Injection of Electrons and Holes into Nanostructures

This program targets fundamental understanding of nanoscale charge transfer processes. The proposed work draws on the strengths of the Brookhaven Chemistry Department in the areas of electron transfer experiment and theory, and extends the area of inquiry to nanoscale processes. Electron/hole injection into a wire, a nanocrystal, a nanotube or other nanostructure in solution may be brought about by light absorption, by an electron pulse (pulse radiolysis, LEAF), by a chemical reagent, or through an electrode. These processes are being studied by transient methods by following conductivity, current, but most generally, spectroscopic changes in the solutions to determine the dynamics of charge injection. The observed transient spectra can also provide values for electron-transfer coupling elements and energetics. Theoretical/computational studies can help in materials design and in the interpretation of the experimental results. The experimental systems being examined include molecular wires and metal nanoclusters.

Electron/hole injection into a molecular wire

... or a nanotube or other nanostructure in solution brought about by light absorption, by an electron pulse (pulse radiolysis, LEAF), by a chemical reagent, or through an electrode.

The Injection of Electrons and Holes into Nanostructures Program is supported by the Photochemistry and Radiation Research Program of the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Office of Science under contract No. DE-AC02-CH9810886 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

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Last Modified: June 28, 2012