General Information

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2014 International Workshop on FFAG Accelerators

BNL Tour Information

Participants will tour the following: R&D Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), STAR detector, Superconducting Magnet Division, and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

Tour Date: Wednesday, September 24, 2014

R&D Energy Recovery Linac (ERL)

R&D Energy Recovery Linac (ERL)

The R&D Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in Building 912 is a proof of principle experiment toward eRHIC. It consists of a superconducting RF (SRF) electron gun, designed for up to 0.5 amperes CW at 2 MeV, and 5-cell SRF accelerating cavity designed for 20 MeV energy gain in the ERL. The facility includes a high quantum efficiency photocathode development laboratory.

STAR Detector

STAR Detector

The STAR detector specializes in tracking the thousands of particles produced by each ion collision at RHIC. It is used to search for signatures of the form of matter that RHIC was designed to create: the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Detecting and understanding the QGP allows us to understand better the universe in the moments after the Big Bang, where the symmetries (and lack of symmetries) of our surroundings were put into motion.

Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

Superconducting Magnet Division

The Superconducting Magnet Division designs and builds varied superconducting magnets for use in both particle accelerators and experimental facilities throughout the world. Current projects include the HTS solenoid for BNL's Energy Recovery LINAC, e Lens Solenoid LARP, APUL, correctors for J-PARC, Linear Collider Final Focus and high field magnet research and development.

NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL)

NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL)

The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) uses beams of heavy ions from the accelerators that feed RHIC to simulate space radiation and study its effects on biological specimens—such as cells, tissues, and DNA—and industrial materials. The National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) and the DOE Office of Science partnered to build NSRL to identify materials and methods that reduce the risks astronauts will face on future long-term space missions.

Note: This tour is limited to the first 20 registered participants.

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Last Modified: March 21, 2014