Winter Car Safety

By Denise Monteleone

When winter storms strike, avoid driving unless necessary

  • If you must travel, make sure you car is stocked with survival gear like blankets, a shovel, flashlight and extra batteries, extra warm clothing, set of tire chains, battery booster cables, quick energy foods and brightly-colored cloth to use as a distress flag.
  • Keep your gas tank full to prevent gasoline freeze-up.
  • If you have a cell phone or two-way radio available for your use, keep the battery charged and keep it with you whenever traveling.
  • If you should become stranded, you will be able to call for help, advising rescuers of your location.
  • Make sure someone knows your travel plans.

Winterize Your Vehicle

Preparing your vehicle for the winter season now will help ensure your vehicle is in good working order when you need it most.

    1) Have a mechanic check the following items on your vehicle:

    • Battery
    • Wipers and windshield washer fluid
    • Antifreeze
    • Ignition system
    • Thermostat
    • Lights
    • Exhaust system
    • Flashing hazard lights
    • Heater
    • Brakes
    • Defroster
    • Oil level

    2) Install good winter tires. Make sure the tires have adequate tread. All-weather radials are usually adequate for most winter conditions. You may also want to carry a set of tire chains in your vehicle for heavy snow conditions.

    3) Keep a windshield scraper and small broom for ice and snow removal and maintain at least a half tank of gas throughout the winter season.

    4) Finally, plan long trips carefully. Listen to the local media report or call law enforcement agencies for the latest road conditions.

Drive Safely

 

The leading cause of death and injuries during winter storms is transportation accidents.


  • Before getting behind the wheel this winter season, every driver could learn a lesson from our school bus drivers. It is elementary, but we have to keep our vehicles clear of ice and snow. Good vision is a key to good driving.
  • Plan your stops and keep more distance between cars. Be extra alert. Remember, snowdrifts can hide smaller children. Moreover, always match your speed to the road and weather conditions.

Trapped in a Car

What would you do if a blizzard trapped you on the road?
Here are some tips to follow:

  • Stay in your car and wait for help to find you.
  • Run your engine for short periods of time to stay warm. Keep your down-wind window open and make sure your exhaust pipe is clear of snow.
  • Turn on the dome light at night when you are running the engine to signal rescuers.
  • Hang a brightly colored piece of cloth or piece of clothing from your car.
  • Exercise from time to time by vigorously moving arms, legs, fingers and toes to keep blood circulating and to keep warm.

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Last Modified: January 14, 2010
Please forward all questions about this site to: Kathy Folkers

 


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