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Contacts: Jane Koropsak, (631) 344-4909 or Peter Genzer, (631) 344-3174printer iconPrint

Russian Pianist to perform virtuoso piano works at Brookhaven Lab, Oct. 1

Photo of Lovchinsky

Click on the image to download a high-resolution version. Igor Lovchinsky

UPTON, NY -- Igor Lovchinsky, grand-Prize winner of the Eastman International Piano Competition and the National Chopin Competition of the Kosciuszko Foundation, will perform transcriptions of seven Gershwin songs composed by virtuoso performer Earl Wild at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory on October 1, at noon, in Berkner Hall. Sponsored by Brookhaven Science Associates, the company that manages Brookhaven Lab, the concert is free and open to the public. All visitors to the Laboratory age 16 and over must bring a photo ID.

Lovchinsky worked with Wild, now in his 90s, to produce his recent CD containing these pieces together with Chopin master works. Lovchinsky's Brookhaven performance will also include a Rachmaninoff work transcribed by Earl Wild and a Shostakovich sonata.

Hailed by the press as an artist with “extraordinary mastery” and “phenomenal talent,” Lovchinsky has toured extensively throughout the United States and abroad. His unconventional interpretive style and innovative approach to concert programming have been received with critical acclaim in both national and international concert circuits.

Born in Kazan, Russia, in 1984, Lovchinsky began his studies at the Kazan Special Music School for Gifted Children and after immigrating to the United States in 1994, studied with Nina Polonsky and Steven Glaser. In 2003, he entered the Juilliard School on a full scholarship and studied with renowned pianist Jerome Lowenthal.

For more information call 631 344-2345. The Laboratory is located on William Floyd Parkway, one-and-a-half miles north of Exit 68 of the Long Island Expressway.

2008-826  |  Media & Communications Office

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