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Scientists in Brookhaven's Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science Department study basic, theoretical and applied aspects of materials, their utilization, and their electronic, physical, mechanical, and chemical properties in relation to their structure. 

The field of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science integrates the knowledge and tools of chemistry and physics with the principles of engineering to understand and optimize the behavior of materials, as well as to create new and improved materials to help fulfill the missions of the Department of Energy.

  1. OCT

    20

    Friday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Pressure-driven collapse of Jeff=1/2 electronic state in a honeycomb iridate"

    Presented by Young-June Kim, University of Toronto, Canada

    3 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Friday, October 20, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Igor Zaliznyak'''

    Orbital and spin degrees of freedom in heavy transition metal compounds can be locked into each other due to strong spin-orbit coupling. The magnetism in this case is described by an effective total angular momentum jeff=1/2 rather than usual spin angular momentum. Furthermore, these jeff=1/2 moments residing on a honeycomb lattice can be coupled through bond-dependent Kitaev interactions. Magnetic properties of some honeycomb lattice iridates, such as Na2IrO3 and Li2IrO3 have been extensively investigated to examine whether Kitaev quantum spin liquid is realized in these compounds. However, the applicability of the jeff=1/2 local moment model in real materials have not been critically scrutinized experimentally. A combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering experiments on a honeycomb lattice Li2IrO3 reveals that the jeff=1/2 picture breaks down under high pressure, and electrons take on more itinerant character under this condition.

Electron Spectroscopy

Explores the electronic structure and electrodynamics of topological insulators and strongly correlated electron systems, with particular attention to emergent phenomena, such as superconductivity and magnetism, using angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and optical spectroscopy.

Neutron Scattering

Studies the role of antiferromagnetism in high-temperature superconductors.  The interaction of charge carriers with magnetic moments is of critical importance but remains a challenge to understand. .

X-Ray Scattering

Carries out basic studies of the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of condensed matter systems using synchrotron-based x-ray scattering techniques. .

Condensed Matter Theory

Conducts basic research over a wide swath of theoretical physics, ranging from strongly correlated electrons to first principle electronic structure theory.  

Advanced Energy Materials

Studies both the microscopic and macroscopic properties of complex and nano-structured materials with a view to understanding and developing their application in different energy related technologies

Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy

Addresses key open questions in HTS physics such as the dimensionality of the HTS phenomenon, the spin and charge of free carriers, the nature of the superconducting transition, the role of charge stripes (if any) in the HTS state, the nature of the overdoped metallic state, and more.

Spectroscopic Imaging

Span a wide range of quantum matter systems, including superconductors, superfluids, supersolids, electronic liquid crystals, topological insulators superconductors & superfluids, heavy fermions, and spin liquids. Throughout, the focus is on development of innovative techniques and approaches to each problem.

Electron Microscopy and Nanostructure

Utilizes advanced electron microscopy techniques to study nanoscale structure and defects that determine the utility of functional materials, such as superconductors, multiferroics, and other energy related systems including thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, and batteries.

The Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department is part of Brookhaven National Laboratory's Energy Sciences Directorate.