BNL Home
January 2019
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  1. JAN

    24

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, January 24, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Yangang Liu

    The WRF-Solar model is an augmentation of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model specifically designed for solar energy applications. The developments have focused on improving the representation of the aerosol-cloud-radiation physics. In this direction, WRF-Solar includes a fast radiative transfer parameterization to provide surface irradiance forecast only limited by the model time step; an improved representation of the aerosol-radiation feedback (aerosol direct effect); incorporation of the cloud-aerosol feedbacks (aerosol indirect effects); and improved cloud-radiation feedbacks. During this seminar I will provide an overview of the WRF-Solar model and present evaluations that illustrate the benefits of the augmentations. Ongoing developments including a better cloud initialization and extending the model to provide probabilistic forecasts will be also discussed.

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  1. JAN

    28

    Monday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Monday, January 28, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike Jensen

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  1. JAN

    31

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, January 31, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Fan Yang

    Inspired by early convection-tank experiments (e.g., Deardorff and Willis) and diffusion-chamber experiments, we have developed a cloud chamber that operates on the principle of isobaric mixing within turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The "Pi cloud chamber" has a height of 1 m and diameter of 2 m. An attractive aspect of this approach is the ability to make direct comparison to large eddy simulation with detailed cloud microphysics, with well characterized boundary conditions, and statistical stationarity of both turbulence and cloud properties. Highlights of what we have learned are: cloud microphysical and optical properties are representative of those observed in stratocumulus; aerosol number concentration plays a critical role in cloud droplet size dispersion, i.e., dispersion indirect effect; aerosol-cloud interactions can lead to a condition conducive to accelerated cloud collapse; realistic and persistent mixed-phase cloud conditions can be sustained; LES is able to capture the essential features of the turbulent convection and warm-phase cloud microphysical conditions. It is worth considering what more could be learned with a larger-scale cloudy-convection chamber. Turbulence Reynolds numbers and Lagrangian-correlation times would be scaled up, therefore allowing more enhanced role of fluctuations in the condensation-growth process. Larger vertical extent (of order 10 m) would approach typical collision mean free paths, thereby allowing for direct observation of the transition from condensation- to coalescence-growth. In combination with cloudy LES, this would be an opportunity for microphysical model validation, and for synergistic learning from model-measurement comparison under controlled experimental conditions.

  1. JAN

    24

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "WRF-Solar: Model overview and ongoing developments"

    Presented by Pedro Jiminez Munoz, NCAR

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, January 24, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Yangang Liu

    The WRF-Solar model is an augmentation of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model specifically designed for solar energy applications. The developments have focused on improving the representation of the aerosol-cloud-radiation physics. In this direction, WRF-Solar includes a fast radiative transfer parameterization to provide surface irradiance forecast only limited by the model time step; an improved representation of the aerosol-radiation feedback (aerosol direct effect); incorporation of the cloud-aerosol feedbacks (aerosol indirect effects); and improved cloud-radiation feedbacks. During this seminar I will provide an overview of the WRF-Solar model and present evaluations that illustrate the benefits of the augmentations. Ongoing developments including a better cloud initialization and extending the model to provide probabilistic forecasts will be also discussed.

  2. JAN

    28

    Monday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Remote Sensing of Clouds and Precipitation and their Application to Model Evaluation"

    Presented by Xiquan Dong, Univ. Arizona

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Monday, January 28, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike Jensen

  3. JAN

    31

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "What can we learn from cloudy convection in a box? Laboratory meets LES with cloud microphysics"

    Presented by Raymond Shaw, MTU

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, January 31, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Fan Yang

    Inspired by early convection-tank experiments (e.g., Deardorff and Willis) and diffusion-chamber experiments, we have developed a cloud chamber that operates on the principle of isobaric mixing within turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The "Pi cloud chamber" has a height of 1 m and diameter of 2 m. An attractive aspect of this approach is the ability to make direct comparison to large eddy simulation with detailed cloud microphysics, with well characterized boundary conditions, and statistical stationarity of both turbulence and cloud properties. Highlights of what we have learned are: cloud microphysical and optical properties are representative of those observed in stratocumulus; aerosol number concentration plays a critical role in cloud droplet size dispersion, i.e., dispersion indirect effect; aerosol-cloud interactions can lead to a condition conducive to accelerated cloud collapse; realistic and persistent mixed-phase cloud conditions can be sustained; LES is able to capture the essential features of the turbulent convection and warm-phase cloud microphysical conditions. It is worth considering what more could be learned with a larger-scale cloudy-convection chamber. Turbulence Reynolds numbers and Lagrangian-correlation times would be scaled up, therefore allowing more enhanced role of fluctuations in the condensation-growth process. Larger vertical extent (of order 10 m) would approach typical collision mean free paths, thereby allowing for direct observation of the transition from condensation- to coalescence-growth. In combination with cloudy LES, this would be an opportunity for microphysical model validation, and for synergistic learning from model-measurement comparison under controlled experimental conditions.

  4. FEB

    14

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "TRacking Aerosol Convection interactions ExpeRiment (TRACER) - An upcoming ARM field campaign"

    Presented by Michael Jensen, Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, February 14, 2019, 11:00 am

    Despite their climatic importance, multi-scale models continue to have persistent biases produced by insufficient representation of convective clouds. To increase our understanding of convective cloud lifecycles and aerosol-convection interactions, the TRacking Aerosol Convection interactions ExpeRiment (TRACER) will take place in the Houson, TX region from April 2021 through April 2022 with an intensive observation period from June to September 2022. TRACER (currently) includes the deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility, a C-band scanning polarimetric radar, and additional aerosol and atmospheric state measurements within existing surface meteorology, air quality and lightning dection neworks. A unique component of TRACER is that a large number of individual, isolated convective cells will be tracked and measured in high spatial and temporal resolution for the purposes of: (i) Characterizing and linking convective cloud kinematic and microphysical lifecycles, (ii) Quantifying environmental thermodynamic and kinematic controls on convective lifecycle properties, and (iii) Isolating and quantifying the impacts of aerosol properties on convective cloud kinematic and microphysical evolution. The seminar will present the scientific motivation for the TRACER campaign, details on the deployment strategies, and evolving opportunities for participation. The unique combination of cloud, precipitation, lightning, aerosol, and atmospheric state measurements associated with tracked convective cells will ultimately improve our understanding of the convective cloud lifecycle and its interaction with individual environmental factors such that improved, next generation cumulus, microphysics, turbulence, and aerosol parameterizations can be designed.

  5. FEB

    21

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Damao Zhang, Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, February 21, 2019, 11:00 am

  6. MAR

    7

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "The Characteristics of Mesoscale Convective Systems as Revealed by Radar Wind Profilers"

    Presented by Die Wang, Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, March 7, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Scott Giangrande

  7. MAR

    14

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Jan Kazil, NOAA

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, March 14, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike Jensen

  8. MAR

    21

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Yangang Liu, Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, March 21, 2019, 11:00 am

  9. MAR

    28

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Jimmy Booth, CCNY

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, March 28, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike Jensen

  10. APR

    11

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Xiahong Liu, Univ. Wyoming

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, April 11, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Damao Zhang

  11. APR

    18

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Greg Elsasser, NASA GISS

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, April 18, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike Jensen

  12. MAY

    23

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Gretchen Mullendore, Univ. North Dakota

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, May 23, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike Jensen