BNL Home
March 2017
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  1. Biology Department Seminar

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: 'Dr. Ian Blaby'

    The rapidly increasing quantity of biological data offers novel and diverse resources to study biological functions at the system level. Integrating and mining these various large-scale datasets is both a central priority and a great challenge for the field of systems biology and necessitates the development of specialized computational approaches. In this talk, I will present several novel computational systems approaches in a multi-scale modeling framework to study gene expression and regulation: 1) an algorithm to simultaneously cluster multi-layer networks such as gene co-expression networks across multiple species, which discovered novel human developmental genomic functions and behaviors; 2) a logic-circuit based method to identify the genome-wide cooperative logics among gene regulatory factors and pathways for the first time in cancers such as acute myeloid leukemia, which provided unprecedented insights into the gene regulatory logics in complex biological systems; 3) an integrated method using the state-space model and dimensionality reduction to identify principal temporal expression patterns driven by internal and external gene regulatory networks, which established an entirely new analytical platform to identify systematic and robust dynamic patterns from high dimensional, complex and noisy biomedical data. In addition, I will introduce some ongoing research projects and discuss the future directions where multi-scale approaches can make a significant impact in systems biology.

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  1. MAR

    30

    Thursday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    4:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 30, 2017, 4:30 pm

    Used in inkjet printheads the precise control and manipulation of fluids that are constrained in small volumes emerged in the 1980s. Used in DNA chips, micro-propulsion and microfluidic designs are being applied in the understanding of biological systems. Dr. Perry's research focuses on the use of graphene to develop high throughput technologies to understand the dynamics of biological and biomimetic materials. She is actively engaged in teaching and inspires students to work at the intersection of chemistry, biology, and engineering. Coffee and cookies at 4:00 p.m.

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  1. MAR

    30

    Thursday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    "Using Graphene to Understand Biology"

    Presented by Sarah Perry, University of Massachusetts Amherst

    4:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 30, 2017, 4:30 pm

    Used in inkjet printheads the precise control and manipulation of fluids that are constrained in small volumes emerged in the 1980s. Used in DNA chips, micro-propulsion and microfluidic designs are being applied in the understanding of biological systems. Dr. Perry's research focuses on the use of graphene to develop high throughput technologies to understand the dynamics of biological and biomimetic materials. She is actively engaged in teaching and inspires students to work at the intersection of chemistry, biology, and engineering. Coffee and cookies at 4:00 p.m.

  2. APR

    7

    Friday

    Biology Department Seminar

    "Structure-Function Studies of Lipid Metabolizing Enzymes Involved in Cancer Development and Therapy"

    Presented by Michael V. Airola, Ph.D., Stony Brook University, Department of Biochemistry & Cell Biology

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Friday, April 7, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Dr. John Shanklin'

    During the past thirty years, the perceived role of lipids has shifted from simple structural components of cell membranes to bioactive molecules that regulate critical cellular and pathological processes. The enzymes that generate and breakdown these bioactive lipids have emerged as novel therapeutic targets for treating the leading causes of diseases in the United States, including cancer. This talk will present new insight into how two key enzymes in sphingolipid metabolism work at the molecular and structural level. These include the colon cancer therapeutic target human Neutral Ceramidase, and the membrane-associated enzyme neutral sphingomyelinase 2, which has established roles in neurodegeneration, metastasis, and intracellular communication.