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Matthew Boyer

Aerosol Instrument Mentor

While obtaining his M.Sc, Matt Boyer conducted research that focused on the microphysics of sea spray aerosols and their cloud nucleating properties. In addition to laboratory aerosol research, Matt has a wide range of experiences operating and troubleshooting advanced scientific instrumentation in the field for air quality monitoring and research, including maintenance at an air quality observatory for the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, data collection and processing for the Environmental Quality Programme at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, instrumentation service and repair as an Instrument Technician at Palmer Station, Antarctica, and the deployment of shipboard aerosol instrumentation in the Arctic. Currently, Matt works with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement group at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where he specializes in aerosol concentration measurements.

Education

  • Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, M.S., Physics & Atmospheric Science, 2017.
  • Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania, B.S., Environmental Science, 2013.

Areas of Interest

  • Aerosol and cloud processes
  • Atmospheric instrumentation and measurement techniques
  • Arctic aerosol sources

Experience

  • Aerosol Measurement Engineer, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 2018-present.
  • Instrument Technician, United States Antarctic Program, 2017.
  • Research Technician, Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, 2013-2014.
  • Air Quality Technician, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, 2012-2013.

Publications

Collins, D. B., Burkart, J., Chang, R. Y.-W., Lizotte, M., Boivin-Rioux, A., Blais, M., Mungall, E. L., Boyer, M., Irish, V. E., Massé, G., Kunkel, D., Tremblay, J.-É., Papakyriakou, T., Bertram, A. K., Bozem, H., Gosselin, M., Levasseur, M., and Abbatt, J. P. D.: Frequent Ultrafine Particle Formation and Growth in the Canadian Arctic Marine Environment. Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., in review, doi:10.5194/acp-2017-411 (2017).