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January 2020
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  1. CSI Q Seminar

    3 pm, Training Room, CSI Bldg 725

    Hosted by: Andrei Nomerotski

    Quantum networks provide a platform for astronomical interferometers capable of imaging faint stellar objects. We present a protocol with efficient use of quantum resources and modest quantum memories. In our approach, the quantum state of incoming photons along with an arrival time index is stored in a binary qubit code at each receiver. Nonlocal retrieval of the quantum state via entanglement-assisted parity checks at the expected photon arrival rate allows for direct extraction of phase difference, effectively circumventing transmission losses between nodes. Compared to prior proposals, our scheme (based on efficient quantum data compression) offers an exponential decrease in required entanglement bandwidth. We show that it can be operated as a broadband interferometer and generalized to multiple sites in the array. We also analyze how imaging based on the quantum Fourier transform provides improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to classical processing. Finally, we discuss physical realizations including photon detection-based quantum state transfer. Experimental implementation is then feasible with near-term technology, enabling optical imaging of astronomical objects akin to well-established radio interferometers and pushing resolution beyond what is practically achievable classically. References: Phys. Rev. Lett. 123, 070504, Phys. Rev. A 100, 022316

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  1. CSI Q Seminar

    "Quantum-Assisted Telescope Arrays"

    Presented by Emil Khabiboulline, Harvard University

    Monday, January 13, 2020, 3 pm
    Training Room, CSI Bldg 725

    Hosted by: Andrei Nomerotski

    Quantum networks provide a platform for astronomical interferometers capable of imaging faint stellar objects. We present a protocol with efficient use of quantum resources and modest quantum memories. In our approach, the quantum state of incoming photons along with an arrival time index is stored in a binary qubit code at each receiver. Nonlocal retrieval of the quantum state via entanglement-assisted parity checks at the expected photon arrival rate allows for direct extraction of phase difference, effectively circumventing transmission losses between nodes. Compared to prior proposals, our scheme (based on efficient quantum data compression) offers an exponential decrease in required entanglement bandwidth. We show that it can be operated as a broadband interferometer and generalized to multiple sites in the array. We also analyze how imaging based on the quantum Fourier transform provides improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to classical processing. Finally, we discuss physical realizations including photon detection-based quantum state transfer. Experimental implementation is then feasible with near-term technology, enabling optical imaging of astronomical objects akin to well-established radio interferometers and pushing resolution beyond what is practically achievable classically. References: Phys. Rev. Lett. 123, 070504, Phys. Rev. A 100, 022316

  2. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Experimental Equipment Needs for the Electron-Ion Collider"

    Presented by Elke-Caroline Aschenauer, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Wednesday, October 16, 2019, 12:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Hosted by: Gabriella Carini

    In this talk the experimental equipment needed to fully realize the scientific promise for the electron-ion collider will be discussed in detail, further the challenges and opportunities for new developments in collaboration with the EIC User Community will be outlined.

  3. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "A Roadmap for the Best PMTs and SiPM in Physics Research"

    Presented by Razmik Mirzoyan, Max Planck Institute for Physics, Germany

    Wednesday, January 23, 2019, 2:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Photomultiplier Tubes (PMT) are the most wide spread detectors for measuring fast and faint light signals. In cooperation with the companies Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. (Japan) and Electron Tubes Enterprises Ltd. (England) we pursued an improvement program for the PMTs for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project. CTA is the next major Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) array for ground-based very high energy gamma-ray astrophysics. A total of ∼100 telescopes of sizes of 23m, 12m and 4m in diameter will be built in northern and southern hemispheres. The manufacturers succeeded producing 1.5′ PMTs of enhanced peak quantum efficiency of ∼38-42 % and after pulsing below 0.02% (threshold ≥ 4 photoelectrons). The novel 1.5′ PMTs have the world-wide best parameters. It is interesting to compare the performance of PMTs with the current generation of SiPMs. In the imaging camera of the MAGIC IACT, consisting of 1039 PMTs, since many months we are operating composite clusters of SiPMs from the three well-known manufacturers. A critical comparison of these two types of sensors will be presented. Prospects for further significant improvements of PMTs and SiPMs will be discussed, also in the frame of the supported by the EU SENSE Roadmap for the best fast light sensors.

Currently showing seminars from the past year. See all past seminars »

There are no conferences scheduled at this time.

  1. Belle II Summer School 2019

    July 29 - August 2, 2019

  2. CARE 2015: Career Advancement in a Research Environment

    March 10, 2015

  3. 7th International Meeting on Front-End Electronics

    May 18-21, 2009