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HET Events

HET/Riken Lunch Seminar Talks and Other Information

May 2019
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. HET Seminar

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

2

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Yuta Kikuchi

    The quantum chiral anomaly enables a nearly dissipationless current in the presence of chirality imbalance and magnetic field – this is the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME), observed recently in Dirac and Weyl semimetals. We propose to utilize the CME for the design of qubits potentially capable of operating at THz frequency, room temperature, and the coherence time to gate time ratio of about 10^4 . The proposed "Chiral Qubit" is a micron-scale ring made of a Weyl or Dirac semimetal, with the |0> and |1> quantum states corresponding to the symmetric and antisymmetric superpositions of quantum states describing chiral fermions circulating along the ring clockwise and counter-clockwise. A fractional magnetic flux through the ring induces a quantum superposition of the |0> and |1> quantum states. The entanglement of qubits can be implemented through the near-field THz frequency electromagnetic fields.

3

  1. HET Lunch Discussion

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Aaron Meyer

  2. NT/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Niklas Mueller

    We present a general systematic formalism for describing dynamics of fluctuations in an arbitrary relativistic hydrodynamic flow, including their feedback (known as long-time hydrodynamic tails) in a deterministic way. The fluctuations are described by two-point equal-time correlation functions. We introduce a definition of equal time in a situation where the local rest frame is determined by the local flow velocity, and a method of taking derivatives and Wigner transforms of such equal-time correlation functions, which we call confluent. The Wigner functions satisfy evolution equations that describes the relaxation of the out-of-equilibrium modes. We find that the equations for confluent Wigner functions nontrivially match with the kinetic equation for phonons propagating on an arbitrary background, including relativistic inertial and Coriolis forces due to acceleration and vorticity of the flow. We also describe the procedure of renormalization of short-distance singularities which eliminates cutoff dependence, allowing efficient numerical implementation of these equations.

4

  1. No events scheduled

5

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6

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7

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8

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9

  1. Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Hosted by: Angie Burnett

    Improved photosynthetic rates have been shown to increase crop biomass, making improved photosynthesis a focus for driving future grain yield increases. Improving the photosynthetic pathway offers opportunity to meet food demand, but requires high throughput measurement techniques to detect photosynthetic variation in natural accessions and transgenically improved plants. Gas exchange measurements are the most widely used method of measuring photosynthesis in field trials but this process is laborious and slow, and requires further modeling to estimate meaningful parameters and to upscale to the plot or canopy level. In field trials of tobacco with modifications made to the photosynthetic pathway, we infer key photosynthetic parameters from imaging spectroscopy using a partial least squares regression technique. We used two hyperspectral cameras with resolution 2.1nm in the visible range and 4.9nm in the NIR. Ground-truth measurements from leaf-level photosynthetic gas exchange, full-range (400-2500nm) hyperspectral reflectance and extracted pigments support the model. The results from a range of wild-type cultivars and from genetically modified germplasm offer a high-throughput screening tool for crop trials aimed at identifying increased photosynthetic capacity.

  2. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Yuta Kikuchi

    The search for an understanding of fundamental particle physics that goes beyond the Standard Model (SM) has grown into a worldwide titanic effort. Low-energy precision experiments are complementary to collider searches and, in certain cases, can even probe higher energy scales directly. However, the interpretation of a potential signal, or lack thereof, is complicated because of the non-perturbative nature of low-energy QCD. I will use the search for electric dipole moments (EDMs), which aims to discover beyond-the-SM CP violation, as an example to illustrate these difficulties and how they can be overcome by combining (chiral) effective field theory and lattice QCD. I discuss how EDM experiments involving complex systems like nucleons, nuclei, atoms, and molecules constrain possible CP-violating interactions involving the Higgs boson, how these constraints match up to direct LHC searches, and the relevance of and strategies for the improvement of the hadronic and nuclear theory.

10

  1. HET Seminar - CANCELLED

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Gopolang Mohlabeng

  2. NT/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Building 510, CFNS Seminar Room 2-38

    Hosted by: Niklas Mueller

11

  1. No events scheduled

12

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13

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14

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15

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16

  1. No events scheduled

17

  1. HET Lunch Discussion

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Peter Denton

18

  1. No events scheduled

19

  1. No events scheduled

20

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21

  1. No events scheduled

22

  1. No events scheduled

23

  1. MAY

    23

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, May 23, 2019, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Yuta Kikuchi

24

  1. MAY

    24

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussion

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, May 24, 2019, 12:15 pm

  2. MAY

    24

    Friday

    NT/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Building 510, CFNS Seminar Room 2-38

    Friday, May 24, 2019, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Niklas Mueller

    The advent of quantum computing for scientific research presents the possibility of calculating time-dependent observables like viscosity and parton distributions from QCD. In order to utilize this new tool, a number of theoretical and practical issues must be addressed related to efficiently digitize, initialize, propagate, and evaluate quantum field theory. In this talk, I will discuss a number of projects being undertaken by the NuQS collaboration to realize calculations on NISQ era and beyond quantum computers.

25

  1. No events scheduled

26

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27

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28

  1. No events scheduled

29

  1. No events scheduled

30

  1. MAY

    30

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, May 30, 2019, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Yuta Kikuchi

31

  1. No events scheduled

  1. MAY

    24

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussion

    "Partial Neutrino Decay Resolves IceCube's Track and Cascade Tension"

    Presented by Peter Denton, BNL

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, May 24, 2019, 12:15 pm

  2. JUN

    19

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Asher Berlin, SLAC

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, June 19, 2019, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Gopolang Mohlabeng

  1. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Update on Double Higgs Production"

    Presented by Sally Dawson, BNL

    Friday, May 17, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Peter Denton

  2. HET Seminar - CANCELLED

    Presented by Nirmal Raj, Triumf

    Friday, May 10, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Gopolang Mohlabeng

  3. Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "High-throughput field phenotyping of photosynthetic capacity using hyperspectral imaging"

    Presented by Katherine Meacham, Univ. of Illinois

    Thursday, May 9, 2019, 11 am
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Hosted by: Angie Burnett

    Improved photosynthetic rates have been shown to increase crop biomass, making improved photosynthesis a focus for driving future grain yield increases. Improving the photosynthetic pathway offers opportunity to meet food demand, but requires high throughput measurement techniques to detect photosynthetic variation in natural accessions and transgenically improved plants. Gas exchange measurements are the most widely used method of measuring photosynthesis in field trials but this process is laborious and slow, and requires further modeling to estimate meaningful parameters and to upscale to the plot or canopy level. In field trials of tobacco with modifications made to the photosynthetic pathway, we infer key photosynthetic parameters from imaging spectroscopy using a partial least squares regression technique. We used two hyperspectral cameras with resolution 2.1nm in the visible range and 4.9nm in the NIR. Ground-truth measurements from leaf-level photosynthetic gas exchange, full-range (400-2500nm) hyperspectral reflectance and extracted pigments support the model. The results from a range of wild-type cultivars and from genetically modified germplasm offer a high-throughput screening tool for crop trials aimed at identifying increased photosynthetic capacity.

  4. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Ultra-Light Boson Dark Matter and Event Horizon Telescope Observations of M87"

    Presented by Hooman Davoudiasl

    Friday, May 3, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Aaron Meyer

  5. HET Seminar

    "Unification and Precision Measurements"

    Presented by James Wells, University of Michigan

    Wednesday, May 1, 2019, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  6. HET Seminar

    "Cores in Dwarf Galaxies from Fermi Repulsion"

    Presented by James Unwin, University of Illinois, Chicago

    Wednesday, April 17, 2019, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  7. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Highlights from EW Moriond 2019"

    Presented by Amarjit Soni, BNL

    Friday, April 12, 2019, 12 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Aaron Meyer

  8. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Quantum Simulation of Gauge Theories"

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, BNL HET

    Friday, April 5, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Aaron Meyer

  9. HET Seminar

    "Lattice QCD Inputs For Neutrino-Nucleon Scattering"

    Presented by Raza Sufian, Jefferson Lab

    Wednesday, April 3, 2019, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Aaron Meyer

    We present lattice QCD calculation of nucleon axial and electromagnetic (up, down, strange and charm) form factors and discuss their impact on the understanding of neutrino-nucleon scattering. In a phenomenological study, using a combination of lattice QCD calculation of the strange-quark form factors, and MiniBooNE experimental neutrino scattering differential cross-section data in a limited kinematic regime, we obtain a precise determination of the weak axial form factor and of the corresponding neutral current weak-axial charge. We further show how a direct lattice QCD determination of neutral current weak-axial charge enable us to predict the BNL E734 data for the neutrino neutral current scattering differential cross section to high precision. We discuss how a direct lattice QCD calculation of neutrino-nucleon scattering cross sections can help to isolate nuclear effects in the neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  10. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Discussion on arXiv 1307.5458: Implication of neutrino backgrounds on the reach of next generation dark matter direct detection experiments"

    Presented by Dr Gopolang Mohlabeng, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, March 29, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Peter Denton

  11. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Quantum-assisted optical interferometry"

    Presented by Paul Stankus, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Friday, March 22, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

  12. HET Seminar

    "Probing the Higgs Yukawa coupling to the top quark at the LHC via single top+Higgs production"

    Presented by Ya-Juan Zheng, University of Kansas

    Wednesday, March 20, 2019, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Gopolang Mohlabeng

  13. HET Lunch Discussion

    "TBA"

    Presented by William Marciano, BNL

    Friday, March 15, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

  14. HET Lunch Discussions@BNL

    "B->D* Semileptonic Decays Form Factors and CKM Matrix Element Vcb"

    Presented by Yong-Chull Jang, BNL

    Friday, March 8, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Peter Denton

  15. HET Seminar

    "Breaking Mirror Hypercharge in Twin Higgs Models"

    Presented by Brian Batell

    Wednesday, March 6, 2019, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  16. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Dark matter beams at neutrino facilities"

    Presented by Claudia Frugiuele, CERN

    Friday, March 1, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Peter Denton

  17. HET Seminar

    "Probing New Physics with Neutrino Scattering"

    Presented by Ian Shoemaker, Virginia Tech

    Wednesday, February 27, 2019, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Gopolang Mohlabeng

    Current experimental sensitivities allow for neutrino scattering to be probed over a range of energy scales. In this talk, I'll discuss phenomenological probes of new physics using neutrino scattering at zero, GeV, and EeV momentum transfer. At zero momentum transfer, the forward coherent scattering of neutrinos on background particles provides novel sensitivity to Dark Matter. At MeV-GeV energies, the solar/atmospheric fluxes allow for the production of heavy sterile neutrinos at IceCube and direct detection experiments, resulting in distinctive signatures. Lastly, I'll discuss sterile neutrino scattering in the Earth as a possible explanation of the anomalous EeV events reported by ANITA.

  18. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Opportunities in Reactor Neutrino Physics"

    Presented by Chao Zhang, BNL

    Friday, February 15, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

  19. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Precision Electroweak Measurements at the LHC"

    Presented by Sally Dawson

    Friday, February 8, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Peter Denton

  20. HET Seminar

    "Searching for flavour symmetries: old data new tricks"

    Presented by Jessica Turner, Fermilab

    Wednesday, February 6, 2019, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Gopolang Mohlabeng

    The observed pattern of mixing in the neutrino sector may be explained by the presence of a non-Abelian, discrete flavour symmetry broken into residual subgroups at low energies. These flavour models require the presence of Standard Model singlet scalars, namely flavons, which decay to charged leptons in a flavour-conserving or violating manner. In this talk, I will present the constraints on the model parameters of an A4 leptonic flavour model using a synergy of g-2, charged lepton flavour conversion and collider data. The most powerful constraints derive from the MEG collaboration's result and the reinterpretation of an 8 TeV ATLAS search for anomalous productions of multi-leptonic final states.

  21. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Multiparticle States in Lattice QCD and Prospects for Neutrino Physics"

    Presented by Aaron Meyer, BNL

    Friday, February 1, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Peter Denton

  22. HET Seminar

    "Matrix Elements for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay from Lattice QCD"

    Presented by David Murphy, MIT

    Wednesday, January 30, 2019, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Aaron Meyer

    While neutrino oscillation experiments have demonstrated that neutrinos have small, nonzero masses, much remains unknown about their properties and decay modes. One potential decay mode —- neutrinoless double beta decay ($0 \nu \beta \beta$) —- is a particularly interesting target of experimental searches, since its observation would imply both the violation of lepton number conservation in nature as well as the existence of at least one Majorana neutrino, in addition to giving further constraints on the neutrino masses and mixing angles. Relating experimental constraints on $0 \nu \beta \beta$ decay rates to the neutrino masses, however, requires theoretical input in the form of non-perturbative nuclear matrix elements which remain difficult to calculate reliably. In this talk we will discuss progress towards first-principles calculations of relevant nuclear matrix elements using lattice QCD and effective field theory techniques, assuming neutrinoless double beta decay mediated by a light Majorana neutrino.

  23. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Hubble Parameter Tension"

    Presented by Anze Slosar, BNL

    Friday, January 25, 2019, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Peter Denton

  24. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Review of the Physics of the Near Detector at DUNE Workshop"

    Presented by Peter Denton, BNL

    Friday, December 14, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  25. HET Lunch Discussion

    "The Neutron Lifetime Puzzle Solution"

    Presented by Bill Marciano, BNL

    Friday, December 7, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  26. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Galactic Dark Matter as the Source for Neutrino Masses"

    Presented by Dr. Gopolang Mohlabeng, BNL

    Friday, November 30, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  27. HET Seminar

    "FASER: ForwArd Search ExpeRiment at the LHC"

    Presented by Felix Kling, Arizona State University

    Wednesday, November 28, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    New physics has traditionally been expected in the high-pT region at high-energy collider experiments. If new particles are light and weakly-coupled, however, this focus may be completely misguided: light particles are typically highly concentrated within a few mrad of the beam line, allowing sensitive searches with small detectors, and even extremely weakly-coupled particles may be produced in large numbers there. We have propose a new experiment, ForwArd Search ExpeRiment, or FASER, which will be placed downstream of the ATLAS interaction point in the unused service tunnel TI12 and operated concurrently there. FASER will complement the LHC's existing physics program and extend its discovery potential to a host of new particles, such as dark photons and axion-like particles. In this talk, I will describe FASER's location and discovery potential, the detector's layout and components, as well as the experiment's timeline.

  28. HET Lunch Discussion

    "Lattice and new physics"

    Presented by Amarjit Soni, BNL

    Friday, November 16, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  29. HET Seminar

    "Parton Distribution Functions in Lattice QCD"

    Presented by Konstantinos Orginos, College of William and Mary

    Wednesday, November 14, 2018, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Aaron Meyer

    Computing the x-dependence of parton distribution functions (PDFs) from first principles had been a challenge for many years. Recent theoretical developments have paved the way to perform this computations for the first time using lattice QCD. In this talk I am reviewing these developments. In particular, I will introduce the concepts of quasi-PDFs and pseudo PDFs and discuss their properties. Finally, I will present results from recent calculations and discuss the prospects for the future.

  30. Joint YITP/HET Theory Seminar

    "Jet Substructure and Monte Carlo Simulations with Neural Networks"

    Presented by Maxim Perelstein, Cornell

    Wednesday, November 7, 2018, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  31. HET Lunch Discussion

    "A Tale of Two Anomalies"

    Presented by Hooman Davoudiasl, BNL

    Friday, November 2, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  32. HET Seminar

    "Unveiling New Physics Through Angular Distributions at the LHC"

    Presented by Rodolfo Capdevilla, Notre Dame

    Wednesday, October 31, 2018, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Gopolang Mohlabeng

    Angular distributions are commonly used in high precision measurements at colliders. In this talk, we will use the Collins-Soper angular distribution with two goals; to identify the quantum numbers of the mediators in a simplified dark matter model, and to enhance the signal to background ratio of resonance searches in W gamma production at the LHC with the use of the so called Radiation Amplitude Zero.

  33. HET Seminar

    "Flavor Physics in Lattice QCD as a Window into BSM Physics: |Vcb| and the B -> D* l nu Semileptonic Decay"

    Presented by Alejandro Vaquero, University of Utah

    Wednesday, October 17, 2018, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Aaron Meyer

    Flavor physics provides a rich variety of phenomena that can be used to probe the SM without requiring the high energies present only in the largest particle accelerators. Among the quantities that could be employed to perform precision test of the SM, the CKM matrix elements takes up a prominent place. This lecture deals with the |V_{cb}| CKM matrix element, whose determinations through inclusive and exclusive decays currently display a 2\sigma discrepancy, and show how lattice QCD methods can reduce the uncertainty in the theoretical estimates and rule out (or not) the existence of unknown physics at play.

  34. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "A Universally Enhanced Light-quarks Yukawa Couplings Paradigm"

    Presented by Shaouly Bar-Shalom, Technion

    Wednesday, October 10, 2018, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  35. HET Seminar

    "Loop-Induced Single Top Partner Production and Decay at the HL-LHC"

    Presented by Jeong Han Kim, Kansas University

    Wednesday, September 26, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  36. HET Lunch Discussions

    "GeV-Scale Messengers of Planck-Scale Dark Matter"

    Presented by Gopolang Mohlabeng, BNL

    Friday, September 21, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  37. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Isospin-breaking corrections to decay amplitudes in lattice QCD"

    Presented by Davide Giusti, Roma 3, INFN

    Friday, September 14, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Mattia Bruno

  38. Joint BNL/RIKEN HET Seminar

    "Higgs pair production via gluon fusion at NLO QCD"

    Presented by Julien Baglio, Tuebingen U.

    Wednesday, September 12, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

    Since the discovery of a Higgs boson in 2012 at CERN, accessing its properties is one of the main goals of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experimental collaborations. The triple Higgs coupling in particular is a primary target as it would be a direct probe of the shape of the scalar potential at the origin of the electroweak-symmetry-breaking mechanism, and is directly accessed via the production of a pair of Higgs bosons. In this view, it is of utmost importance to reach high precision in the theoretical prediction of Higgs boson pair production cross section at the LHC. I will present in this talk the calculation of the 2-loop QCD corrections to the Higgs-pair-production cross section via gluon fusion, that is the main production mechanism, including the top-quark mass effects in the loops. It will be shown that they can be significant in the Higgs-pair-mass differential distributions.

  39. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Lattice QCD and precision physics from long to short distances: an overview of my 3 years at BNL"

    Presented by Mattia Bruno, BNL

    Friday, August 31, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  40. Special HET Seminar

    "The Higgs Potential: A Path Toward Discovery"

    Presented by Pier Paolo Giardino, BNL

    Tuesday, August 21, 2018, 1:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  41. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Lattice QCD Study of Exclusive Channels in the Muon HVP"

    Presented by Aaron Meyer, BNL

    Friday, August 17, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

    The hadronic vacuum polarization is a dominant contribution to the theoretical uncertainty of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Both the R-ratio and Lattice QCD may be used to compute the HVP contribution from theory, and the theoretical uncertainties for both methods are statistically precise in regions that are complimentary to each other. For lattice QCD, the long-distance region dominates the statistical uncertainty. By explicitly studying exclusive channels of the HVP diagram with lattice QCD, it is possible to reconstruct the long-distance behavior of the correlation function. This has the effect of replacing the statistical uncertainty with a significantly smaller systematic uncertainty. With this long-distance reconstruction, it will be possible to achieve a precision with a lattice-only calculation similar to that of the R-ratio method.

  42. Special HET Seminar

    "New Dark Matter Signals in Neutrino Detectors"

    Presented by Yue Zhang, Northwestern

    Tuesday, August 14, 2018, 1:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  43. Special HET Seminar

    "New Dark Matter Signals in Neutrino Detectors"

    Presented by Yue Zhang, Northwestern

    Monday, August 13, 2018, 1:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  44. Special HET Seminar

    "Searching for physics beyond the Standard Model at the Intensity Frontier"

    Presented by Martin Hoferichter, University of Washington

    Thursday, August 9, 2018, 1:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  45. Special HET Seminar

    "A New Frontier in the Search for Dark Matter"

    Presented by Gordan Krnjaic, FNAL

    Monday, August 6, 2018, 1:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

    The gravitational evidence for the existence of dark matter is overwhelming; observations of galactic rotation curves, the CMB power spectrum, and light element abundances independently suggest that over 80% of all matter is "dark" and beyond the scope of the Standard Model. However, its particle nature is currently unknown, so discovering its potential non-gravitational interactions is a major priority in fundamental physics. In this talk, I will survey the landscape of light dark matter theories and and introduce an emerging field of fixed-target experiments that are poised to cover hitherto unexplored dark matter candidates with MeV-GeV masses. These new techniques involve direct dark matter production with proton, electron, and *muon* beams at various facilities including Fermilab, CERN, SLAC, and JLab. Exploring this mass range is essential for fully testing a broad, predictive class of theories in which dark matter abundance arises from dark-visible interactions in thermal equilibrium in the early universe.

  46. Special HET Seminar

    "New Neutrino Interactions: Breaking Degeneracies and Relaxing Sterile Tensions"

    Presented by Peter Denton, Niels Bohr

    Friday, August 3, 2018, 1:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  47. Chemistry Department Seminar

    "Triggered Reversible Phase Transformation between Layered and Spinel Structure via Intercalated Hetero Species in Sodium Birnessite"

    Presented by Yong-Mook Kang, Department of Energy and Materials Engineering, Dongguk University-Seoul, Seoul, 04620, Republic of Korea., Korea, Republic of (South)

    Monday, July 23, 2018, 11 am
    Room 300, 3rd Flr. Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: Xiao-Qing Yang

    Phase transformation of layered structure into spinel structure has been detrimental for most of layered oxide cathodes. Even if a lot of efforts have been made to relieve this highly irreversible phase transformation, there have been few successful results. However, we firstly observed the possibility to make this irreversible phase transformation extremely reversible by utilizing Na- birnessite (NaxMnO2•yH2O; Na-bir) as a basic structural unit, which has distinctive layered structure containing crystal water. Herein, the crystal water in the structure contributes to generating metastable spinel-like phase, which is the key factor for making this unusual reversibility happen. The reversible structural rearrangement between layered and spinel-like phases during electrochemical reaction could activate new cation sites and enhance ion diffusion with higher structural stability. This unprecedented reversible phase transformation between spinel and layered structure was deeply analyzed via combined ex situ soft and hard X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis with in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). Fundamental mechanism on this reversible phase transformation was theoretically elucidated and confirmed by kinetic investigation using first-principle calculation. These results provide deep insight into novel class of intercalating materials which can deal with highly reversible framework changes, and thus it can pave an innovative way for the development of cathode materials for next- generation rechargeable batteries.

  48. HET Special Seminar

    "The Quest for Dark Sectors"

    Presented by Claudia Frugiuele, Weizmann

    Friday, July 20, 2018, 10 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

    Dark sectors are ubiquitous in physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), and may play a role in explaining many of the long-standing problems of the SM such as the existence of dark matter or the electroweak hierarchy problem. By definition, dark sectors are not charged under any of the known forces. Discovering their possible existence is thus challenging. I will describe how a a broad program combining particle, nuclear and atomic physics experiments can effectively probe a large region of the parameter space. I will show how the unique signatures of such physics can already be searched for with existing/planned experiments, including neutrino-proton fixed-target experiments and precision atomic measurements.

  49. HET Special Seminar

    "Charting the Unknown with Theory and Experiments"

    Presented by Duccio Pappadopulo, NYU

    Tuesday, July 3, 2018, 1:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  50. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Pion-pion scattering with physical quark masses from lattice QCD"

    Presented by Dan Hoying, UConn

    Friday, June 29, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  51. HET Seminar

    "Constraining Effective Field Theories with Machine Learning"

    Presented by Johann Brehmer, New York University

    Wednesday, June 27, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

    An important part of the LHC legacy will be precise limits on indirect effects of new physics, parameterized for instance in an Effective Field Theory (EFT). But measuring these parameters in complex processes is often challenging for established analysis methods. We present powerful new inference techniques based on machine learning. They scale well to complicated problems with many parameters and observables and do not require any approximations on the parton shower or detector effects. In an example analysis of WBF Higgs production we show that they enable us to put stronger bounds on EFT parameters than established methods, demonstrating their potential to improve the new physics reach of the LHC legacy results. We also comment on the application of these new "likelihood-free" or "simulator-based" inference techniques to a broad class of problems outside of particle physics, for instance in cosmology, epidemiology, and genetics.

  52. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Discussion of Mainz workshop of g-2 Theory Initiative"

    Presented by Mattia Bruno and Aaron Meyer, BNL

    Friday, June 15, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  53. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Heterostructures for Nanoelectronics and Photovoltaics"

    Presented by Deep Jariwala, University of Pennsylvania

    Monday, June 11, 2018, 1:30 pm
    CFN, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: Don DiMarzio & Mircea Cotlet

    The isolation of a growing number of two-dimensional (2D) materials has inspired worldwide efforts to integrate distinct 2D materials into van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures. While a tremendous amount of research activity has occurred in assembling disparate 2D materials into "all-2D" van der Waals heterostructures,1, 2 this concept is not limited to 2D materials alone. Given that any passivated, dangling bond-free surface will interact with another via vdW forces, the vdW heterostructure concept can be extended to include the integration of 2D materials with non-2D materials that adhere primarily through noncovalent interactions.3 In the first part of this talk I will present our work on emerging mixed-dimensional (2D + nD, where n is 0, 1 or 3) heterostructure devices performed at Northwestern University. I will present two distinct examples of gate-tunable p-n heterojunctions.4-6 I will show that when a single layer n-type molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) (2D) is combined with p-type semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (1D), the resulting p-n junction is gate-tunable and shows a tunable diode behavior with rectification as a function of gate voltage and a unique anti-ambipolar transfer behavior.4 The same concept when extended to p-type organic small molecule semiconductor (pentacene) (0D) and n-type 2D MoS2 leads to a tunable p-n junction with a photovoltaic effect and an asymmetric anti-ambipolar transfer response.6 I will present the underlying charge transport and photocurrent responses in both the above systems using a variety of scanning probe microscopy techniques as well as computational methods. Finally, I will show that the anti-ambipolar field effect observed in the above systems can be generalized to other semiconducting heterojunction systems and extended over large areas with practical applications in wireless communication circuits.5 The second part of talk will discuss my more recent work performed at Caltech on photovo

  54. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Nucleon Charges and Form Factors from Lattice QCD"

    Presented by Yong-Chull Jang, BNL

    Friday, May 25, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  55. HET Seminar

    "Towards NLO parton showers"

    Presented by Stefan Prestel, Fermilab

    Wednesday, May 23, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

    Parton showers aim to consistently model the evolution of the soft and collinear structure of QCD. As such, they are important pieces of event generator software. Parton shower methods have, since their inception, been limited to lowest order precision. For a consistent NLO event generator framework, and to reduce the uncertainties inherent in a lowest-order approach, it is important to push parton showers beyond lowest order precision. In this talk, I will discuss recent advances within the Dire parton shower (of Pythia and Sherpa) to construct a consistent NLO parton shower.

  56. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Decays of the Higgs into gauge bosons in the SMEFT at the NLO"

    Presented by Pier Paolo Giardino, BNL

    Friday, May 18, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  57. HET Seminar

    "Review of Neutral Kaon Oscillations in and beyond the Standard Model from Lattice QCD"

    Presented by Anastassios Vladikas, INFN Roma Tor Vergata

    Wednesday, May 16, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Mattia Bruno

    The study of the low energy strong interaction effects in neutral K-meson oscillations is based on the lattice regularisation of QCD. Precise and consistent results for the bag parameter BK, in line with expectations from Standard Model flavour phenomenology, have been obtained over the years, from several variants of lattice QCD. More recently, a few groups have also studied BK in extensions of the Standard Model. The discrepancies seen between certain results from different groups are arguably attributed to uncontrolled systematic errors in the non-perturbative renormalisation and running of weak matrix elements. The Schroedinger Functional renormalisation scheme may help resolve these discrepancies.

  58. HET/RIKEN Lunch Discussions

    "Localized 4-Sigma and 5-Sigma Dijet Mass Excesses in ALEPH LEP2 Four-Jet Events"

    Friday, May 11, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Co-hosted by Christoph Lehner and Taku Izubuchi

  59. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Quantum Simulation from Quantum Chemistry to Quantum Chromodynamics"

    Presented by Peter Love, Tufts

    Thursday, May 10, 2018, 12:30 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Mattia Bruno and Enrico Rinaldi

    Quantum simulation proposes to use future quantum computers to calculate properties of quantum systems. In the context of chemistry, the target is the electronic structure problem: determination of the electronic energy given the nuclear coordinates of a molecule. Since 2006 we have been studying quantum approaches to quantum chemical problems, and such approaches must face the challenges of high, but fixed, precision requirements, and fermion antisymmetry. I will describe several algorithmic developments in this area including improvements upon the Jordan Wigner transformation, alternatives to phase estimation, adiabatic quantum computing approaches to the electronic structure problem, methods based on sparse Hamiltonian simulation techniques and the potential for experiments realizing these algorithms in the near future. I will also briefly review work by others on the analog and digital simulation of lattice gauge theories using quantum simulators.

  60. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Variation of alpha from a long range force"

    Presented by Hooman Davoudiasl, BNL

    Friday, May 4, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  61. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Revisiting the Dark Photon Interpretation of the Muon g-2 Anomaly"

    Presented by Gopolang Mohlabeng, BNL

    Friday, April 27, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  62. Joint BNL/SBU HET Seminar

    "Mining the LHC Data for Anomalies"

    Presented by Matthew Buckley, Rutgers University

    Wednesday, April 25, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

  63. Joint BNL/SBU HET seminar

    "Neutron stars chirp about vacuum energy"

    Presented by Csaba Csaki, Cornell University

    Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 2:30 pm
    YITP

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

    While the current vacuum energy of the Universe is very small, in our standard cosmological picture it has been much larger at earlier epochs. We try to address the question of what are possible ways to try to experimentally verify the properties of vacuum energy in phases other than the SM vacuum. One promising direction is to look for systems where vacuum energy constitutes a non-negligible fraction of the total energy, and study the properties of those. Neutron stars could be such systems, and we discuss how to use the recent observation of neutron star mergers to try to learn about the inner core of the neutron star which may be dominated by vacuum energy.

  64. Joint ATLAS/HET lunch discussion

    "Post LHC theory"

    Presented by Eder Izaguirre / Alessandro Tricoli, BNL

    Friday, April 13, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-84

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  65. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Isospin Breaking corrections in tau decays from Lattice QCD"

    Presented by Mattia Bruno, BNL

    Friday, April 6, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  66. HET Seminar

    "Excluding a thin dark matter disk in the Milky Way with Gaia DR1"

    Presented by Katelin Schutz, UC Berkeley

    Thursday, April 5, 2018, 11 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

    If a component of the dark matter has dissipative interactions, it could collapse to form a thin dark disk in our Galaxy coincident with the baryonic disk. It has been suggested that dark disks could explain a variety of observed phenomena, including mass extinction events due to periodic comet impacts. Using the first data release from the Gaia space observatory, I will present the results of a search for a dark disk via its effect on stellar kinematics in the Milky Way. I will discuss our strong new limits that disfavor the presence of a thin dark matter disk and present updated measurements on the total matter density in the solar neighborhood.

  67. HET Seminar has been CANCELLED for today

    "Excluding a thin dark matter disk in the Milky Way with Gaia DR1"

    Presented by Katelin Schutz, UC Berkeley

    Wednesday, April 4, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

    If a component of the dark matter has dissipative interactions, it could collapse to form a thin dark disk in our Galaxy coincident with the baryonic disk. It has been suggested that dark disks could explain a variety of observed phenomena, including mass extinction events due to periodic comet impacts. Using the first data release from the Gaia space observatory, I will present the results of a search for a dark disk via its effect on stellar kinematics in the Milky Way. I will discuss our strong new limits that disfavor the presence of a thin dark matter disk and present updated measurements on the total matter density in the solar neighborhood.

  68. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Lattice QCD Study of Exclusive Channels in the Muon HVP"

    Presented by Aaron Meyer, BNL

    Friday, March 30, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  69. HET Lunch Discussion /Neutrino Discovery Initative

    "Boosted Dark Matter at DUNE"

    Presented by Lina Necib, Caltech

    Friday, March 23, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room - 2-160

  70. HET Seminar

    "Empirical Determination of Dark Matter Velocities"

    Presented by Lina Necib, Caltech

    Friday, March 23, 2018, 10 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

  71. HET Seminar

    "Empirical Determination of Dark Matter Velocities"

    Presented by Lina Necib, Caltech

    Wednesday, March 21, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

  72. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Updated Global SMEFT Fit to Higgs, Diboson and Electroweak Data"

    Presented by Christopher Murphy, BNL

    Friday, March 16, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  73. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Enabling emergent spin-orbit magnetism in iridate-based heterostructures"

    Presented by Jian Liu, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Thursday, March 15, 2018, 11 am
    ISB Bldg. 734 Seminar Room 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: Mark Dean

    5d transition metal oxides have emerged as a novel playground for some of the most outstanding and challenging problems in condensed matter physics, such as metal-insulator transition and quantum magnetism. In particular, layered iridates hosting square lattices of IrO6 octahedra have drawn significant interests due to the electronic and magnetic analogy with high-Tc cuprates. However, materials of this kind are limited to a few Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) compounds. In this talk, I will discuss our recent work on overcoming this bottleneck by constructing such two-dimensional (2D) structures confined in superlattices grown by heteroepitaxy. By leveraging the layering control of epitaxial growth, we are not only able to develop new structural variants of layered iridates, but also unravel and exploit the intriguing spin-orbit-driven 2D magnetism beyond the cuprate physics yet invisible in the RP iridates. The results demonstrate the power of this approach in tailing the exchange interactions, enabling new magnetic controls, and providing unique insights into the emergent phenomena of 5d electrons.

  74. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Metal oxide/semiconductor heterojunctions as carrier-selective contacts for photovoltaic applications"

    Presented by Gabriel Man

    Wednesday, March 14, 2018, 2 am
    CFN, Bldg. 735 - first, floor, conference room A

    Hosted by: Mingzhao Liu

    Solar radiation is a vast, distributed, and renewable energy source which Humanity can utilize via the photovoltaic effect. The goal of photovoltaic technology is to minimize the true costs, while maximizing the power conversion efficiency and lifetime of the cell/module. Interface-related approaches to achieving this goal are explored here, for two technologically-important classes of light absorbers: crystalline-silicon (c-Si) and metal halide perovskite (MHP). The simplest solar cell consists of a light absorber, sandwiched between two metals with dissimilar work functions. Carrier-selective contacts (CSC's), which are ubiquitous in modern solar cells, are added to improve the electrical performance. Solar cells require asymmetric carrier transport within the cell, which can be effected via electrostatic and/or effective fields, and CSC's augment the asymmetry by selectively transporting holes to one contact, and electrons to the other contact. The proper design and implementation of a CSC is crucial, as the performance, lifetime, and/or cost reduction of a solar cell can be hampered by a single interface or layer. A framework, consisting of eight core requirements, was developed from first-principles to evaluate the effectiveness of a given CSC. The framework includes some requirements which are well-recognized, such as the need for appropriate band offsets, and some requirements which are not well-recognized at the moment, such as the need for effective valence/conduction band density of states matching between the absorber and CSC. The application of the framework to multiple silicon-based and MHP-based CSC's revealed the difficulties of effectively designing and implementing a CSC. Three metal oxide/c-Si heterojunctions initially expected to yield comparable electron-selective contacts (ESC's), titanium dioxide/c-Si (TiO2/c-Si), zinc oxide/c-Si (ZnO/c-Si), and tin dioxide/c-Si (SnO2/c-Si), were instead discovered to be widely diff

  75. HET Lunch Discussions

    "An update on the HVP contribution to the muon g-2"

    Presented by Christoph Lehner

    Friday, March 9, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

  76. HET Seminar

    "Dispersion relation for hadronic light-by-light scattering"

    Presented by Peter Stoffer, UC San Diego

    Wednesday, March 7, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

  77. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Semileptonic decays using Oktay-Kronfeld heavy quarks on the HISQ lattice"

    Presented by Yong-Chull Jang, BNL

    Friday, March 2, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  78. Joint BNL/SBU HET Seminar

    "Searching for Light Dark Matter with Dirac Materials"

    Presented by Yonatan Kahn, Princeton University

    Wednesday, February 28, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

    Dark matter with mass below a GeV is invisible to standard WIMP searches. In this talk I will present two recent proposals for direct detection of keV-GeV mass dark matter, both utilizing Dirac materials, where low-energy electronic excitations have linear dispersion relations and obey the Dirac equation. Dark matter with mass in the MeV-GeV range can eject electrons from graphene sheets, which can act as both targets and detectors when employed in a field-effect transistor mode, allowing directional detection. Dark matter as light as a few keV can excite electrons to the conduction band of Dirac semimetals like ZrTe5, where the linear dispersion protects the in-medium mass of the mediator and provides superior reach to a light dark photon mediator compared to superconductors. I will discuss recent progress towards experimental realizations of these proposals.

  79. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Recent indications of LU...... violations: A possible shaking of HEP in the making"

    Presented by Amarjit Soni, BNL

    Friday, February 23, 2018, 12 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  80. HET Seminar

    "Analysis of a Dilaton EFT for Lattice Data"

    Presented by Thomas Appelquist, Yale University

    Wednesday, February 21, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christoph Murphy

  81. Joint Nuclear Theory and HET Seminar

    "TeV Scale Lepton Number Violation: Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay & the LHC"

    Presented by Michael Ramsey-Musolf, U. Mass. Amherst

    Friday, February 9, 2018, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

  82. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Precision physics in the LHC era"

    Presented by Pier Paolo Giardino, BNL

    Friday, January 12, 2018, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  83. HET Seminar

    "Searching for Ultralight Particles with Black Holes and Gravitational Waves"

    Presented by Masha Baryakhtar, Perimeter Inst. Theor. Phys.

    Wednesday, December 13, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

    The LIGO detection of gravitational waves has opened a new window on the universe. I will discuss how the process of superradiance, combined with gravitational wave measurements, makes black holes into nature's laboratories to search for new light bosons, from axions to dark photons. When a bosonic particle's Compton wavelength is comparable to the horizon size of a black hole, superradiance of these bosons into `hydrogenic' bound states extracts energy and angular momentum from the black hole. The occupation number of the levels grows exponentially and the black hole spins down. One candidate for such an ultralight boson is the QCD axion with decay constant above the GUT scale. Current black hole spin measurements disfavor a factor of 30 (400) in axion (vector) mass; future measurements can provide evidence of a new boson. Particles transitioning between levels and annihilating to gravitons may produce thousands of monochromatic gravitational wave signals, and turn LIGO into a particle detector.

  84. Special HET Seminar

    "Effective Theories and Phenomenology of Dark Mesons"

    Presented by Graham Kribs, University of Oregon

    Monday, December 11, 2017, 1:30 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  85. HET Lunch Discussions

    "A precise determination of the QCD coupling by the ALPHA Collaboration"

    Presented by Mattia Bruno, BNL

    Friday, December 8, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  86. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Double Higgs Production in the Complex Singlet Extended Standard Model"

    Presented by Matt Sullivan, University of Kansas

    Friday, December 1, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Orange Room

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  87. HET Seminar

    "Do Electroweak Corrections Violate Factorization?"

    Presented by Ira Rothstein, Carnegie Mellon U

    Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Eder Izaguirre

  88. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Unified Scenario for Composite Right-Handed Neutrinos and Dark Matter"

    Presented by Pier Paolo Giardino

    Friday, November 17, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  89. HET Seminar

    "Analysis of a Dilaton EFT for Lattice Data"

    Presented by Thomas Appelquist, Yale University

    Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Mattio Bruno

  90. HET Seminar

    "Tomorrow's Colloquium: Joanna Kiryluk: IceCube: Understanding the High Energy Universe with Cosmic Neutrinos"

    Presented by Linda Carpenter, Ohio State University

    Wednesday, November 8, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

    Though the Higgs has a non trivial branching fraction -8 percent, to light jets, this is a very hard channel to directly capture with the LHC. We study the Higgs boson (h ) decay to two light jets at the 14 TeV High-Luminosity-LHC (HL-LHC), where a light jet (j ) represents any nonflavor-tagged jet from the observational point of view. The decay mode Higgs to gluons is chosen as the benchmark since it is the dominant channel in the Standard Model, but the bound obtained is also applicable to the light quarks. We estimate the achievable bounds on the decay branching fractions through the associated production V h (V =W±,Z ). Events of the Higgs boson decaying into heavy (tagged) or light (untagged) jets are correlatively analyzed. We find that with 3000 fb-1 data at the HL-LHC corresponds to a reachable upper bound of a few times the SM prediction. Which can ten be turned into a bound on the Higgs couplings to gluons and light quark flavors. A consistency fit also leads to an upper bound on the Higgs to charm coupling. The estimated bound may be further strengthened by adopting multiple variable analyses or adding other production channels.

  91. Updated HET Seminar

    "Capturing Higgs Boson Decays to Light Jets at LHC"

    Presented by Linda Carpenter, Ohio State University

    Wednesday, November 8, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

    Though the Higgs has a non trivial branching fraction -8 percent, to light jets, this is a very hard channel to directly capture with the LHC. We study the Higgs boson (h ) decay to two light jets at the 14 TeV High-Luminosity-LHC (HL-LHC), where a light jet (j ) represents any nonflavor-tagged jet from the observational point of view. The decay mode Higgs to gluons is chosen as the benchmark since it is the dominant channel in the Standard Model, but the bound obtained is also applicable to the light quarks. We estimate the achievable bounds on the decay branching fractions through the associated production V h (V =W±,Z ). Events of the Higgs boson decaying into heavy (tagged) or light (untagged) jets are correlatively analyzed. We find that with 3000 fb-1 data at the HL-LHC corresponds to a reachable upper bound of a few times the SM prediction. Which can ten be turned into a bound on the Higgs couplings to gluons and light quark flavors. A consistency fit also leads to an upper bound on the Higgs to charm coupling. The estimated bound may be further strengthened by adopting multiple variable analyses or adding other production channels.

  92. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Dark Parity Violation After Qweak and Future Neutrino Physics Discussion"

    Presented by William J. Marciano, BNL

    Friday, November 3, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  93. Updated HET Lunch Discussions

    ""Dark Parity Violation After Qweak and Future Neutrino Physics Discussion" (Neutrino Discovery Initiative)"

    Presented by William J. Marciano, BNL

    Friday, November 3, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

    To participate via BlueJean connection, please click on the following link: https://bluejeans.com/753838707/7269 Meeting ID: 753 838 707 Participate Passcode: 7269

  94. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Calculation of the electric dipole moment with the gradient flow"

    Presented by Andrea Shindler, Michigan State University

    Wednesday, November 1, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  95. HET Lunch Discussions

    "A statistical approach to Higgs couplings in the SMEFT, 1710.02008"

    Presented by Chris Murphy, BNL

    Friday, October 27, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  96. HET Seminar

    "Semileptonic decays of B_(s) mesons to light pseudoscalar mesons with lattice QCD"

    Presented by Zechariah Gelzer, Iowa University

    Wednesday, October 18, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Mattia Bruno

  97. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Repulsion of Dark Matter and Null Direct Signals"

    Presented by Hooman Davoudiasl, BNL

    Friday, October 6, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  98. HET Seminar

    "Flavorful Higgs bosons"

    Presented by Wolfgang Altmannshofer, Cincinnati University

    Wednesday, October 4, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

    Measurements of Higgs production and decays have revealed that most of the mass of the weak gauge bosons is due to the 125 GeV Higgs. Similarly, we know that the Higgs is at least partially responsible for giving mass to the top and bottom quarks and the tau lepton. Much less is known about the origin of mass for the first two generations. In this talk, I will discuss a framework in which the first and second generation masses originate from a second source of electroweak symmetry breaking and outline the phenomenological implications.

  99. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Precision calculation of the g-2 HVP contribution by combining lattice and R-ratio data"

    Presented by Christoph Lehner, BNL

    Friday, September 15, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

  100. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Towards a non-perturbative calculation of Weak Hamiltonian Wilson Coefficients"

    Presented by Mattia Bruno, BNL

    Friday, September 8, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  101. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Finite Volume in QCD+QED & g-2 HLbL"

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, BNL

    Friday, September 1, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  102. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Hierarchion - a unified framework to address the Standard Model's hierarchies"

    Presented by Gilad Perez, Weizmann Institute

    Friday, August 11, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  103. HET Lunch Discussions

    "The Standard Model as a Lamppost"

    Presented by Eder Izaguirre, BNL

    Friday, August 4, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  104. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Possible origin(s) of flavor anomalies"

    Presented by Amarjit Soni, BNL

    Friday, July 28, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  105. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Quasi PDFs"

    Presented by Luchang Jin, BNL

    Friday, July 21, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  106. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Long-lived light scalars and displaced vertices as probe of seesaw"

    Presented by Bhupal Dev, Washington University

    Friday, July 14, 2017, 12 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

    In low-scale seesaw models for neutrino masses with local B −L symmetry breaking, the Higgs field breaking the B −L symmetry can leave a physical real scalar field with mass around GeV scale. In the specific case when the B − L symmetry is embedded into the left-right symmetry, low energy flavor constraints necessarily require such a light scalar to be long lived, with a distinct displaced photon signal at the LHC. We will discuss this previously unexplored region of parameter space, which opens a new window to TeV scale seesaw physics at colliders.

  107. HET Seminar

    "Double Gauge Boson Production in the SM Effective Field Theory"

    Presented by Ian Lewis, University of Kansas

    Wednesday, June 28, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  108. HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "Searching for New Physics with Higgs Decays"

    Presented by Daniel Stolarski, Carleton University

    Wednesday, June 14, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Pier Paolo Giardino

  109. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Cosmology in Mirror Twin Higgs and Neutrinos"

    Presented by Patrick Fox, Fermilab

    Wednesday, May 24, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  110. HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "Collider and Cosmological Signatures of a Strong Electroweak Phase Transition"

    Presented by Jonathan Kozaczuk, UMass Amherst

    Wednesday, May 17, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Pier Paolo Giardino

  111. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Standard Model EFT and Extended Scalar Sectors"

    Presented by Chris Murphy, BNL

    Friday, May 5, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  112. Joint YITP/HET Seminar

    "Evidence for a ~17 MeV Particle in Rare Beryllium-8 Decays?"

    Presented by Tim Tait, UCI

    Wednesday, May 3, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  113. YITP/HET Joint Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by John Donoghue, U. Mass Amherst

    Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 3 pm
    YITP Seminar Room, Stony Brook University

  114. HET Lunch Discussions

    "The proton axial radius problem"

    Presented by Bill Marciano, BNL

    Friday, April 21, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  115. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Electroweak Wilson Coefficients from Lattice QCD"

    Presented by Mattia Bruno, BNL

    Friday, April 14, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  116. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Fuzzy Dark Matter from Infrared Confinement"

    Presented by Hooman Davoudiasl, BNL

    Friday, April 7, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  117. A Special HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "The Road to Nuclear Physics from Standard Model"

    Presented by Zohreh Davoudi, MIT

    Thursday, April 6, 2017, 12:30 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Hiromichi Nishimura

    At the core of nuclear physics is to understand complex phenomena occurring in the hottest and densest known environments in nature, and to unravel the mystery of the dark sector and other new physics possibilities. Nuclear physicists are expected to predict, with certainty, the reaction rates relevant to star evolutions and nuclear energy research, and to obtain the "standard" effects in nuclei to reveal information about the "non-standard" sector. To achieve such certainty, the field has gradually started to eliminate its reliance on the phenomenological models and has entered an era where the underlying interactions are "effectively" based on the Standard Model of particle physics, in particular Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The few-nucleon systems can now emerge directly from the constituent quark and gluon degrees of freedom and with only QCD interactions in play, using the numerical method of lattice QCD. Few-body observable, such as few-nucleon interactions and scattering amplitudes, as well transition amplitudes and reaction rates, have been the focus of this vastly growing field, as once obtained from QCD, and matched to effective field theories, can advance and improve the nuclear many-body calculations of exceedingly complex systems. This talk is a brief introduction to this program and its goals, with a great focus on the progress in few-body observables from QCD.

  118. HET Seminar

    "Hints of New Physics in Semi-leptonic B-meson Decays"

    Presented by Diptimoy Ghosh, Weizman

    Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

    In recent years, a number of interesting signals of potential new physics in semi-leptonic B-meson decays have been reported both by the B-factories as well as the LHCb. In this talk, I will discuss these observations with a particular emphasis on the observable $R_{D^*}$, the ratio of the branching fraction of $\bar{B} \to D^* \tau \bar{\nu}_\tau$ to that of $\bar{B} \to D^* \ell \bar{\nu}_\ell (\ell = \mu, e )$, which shows a 3.3 sigma deviation from the Standard Model prediction. I will present an effective field theory analysis of these potential new physics signals and discuss possible ways to distinguish the various operators.

  119. HET Lunch Discussions

    "A local factorization of the fermion determinant in lattice gauge theories"

    Presented by Leonardo Giusti, CERN

    Friday, March 31, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  120. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Baryogenesis and Dark Matter in the exo-Higgs scenario"

    Presented by Pier Paolo Giardino, BNL

    Friday, March 24, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  121. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Probing top-quark width using b-jet charge identification"

    Presented by Cen Zhang, BNL

    Friday, March 17, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  122. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Hunting for New Leptonic Interactions at Colliders"

    Presented by Brian Shuve, SLAC

    Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Pier Paolo Giardino

  123. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Progress towards sub-percent precision for the muon g-2 HVP contribution from lattice QCD"

    Presented by Christoph Lehner, BNL

    Friday, March 10, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 1-224

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  124. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Lattice Calculation of Nucleon Electric Dipole Moments"

    Presented by Sergey Syritsyn, Stony Brook

    Friday, March 3, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

    Searches for permanent electric dipole moments (EDM) of neutrons, protons, and nuclei are the most sensitive probes for CP violation, which is necessary for baryogenesis. Currently developed experiments will improve bounds on the neutron EDM by 2-3 orders of magnitude. However, to put constraints on CP-violating interactions, nonperturbative QCD calculations of nucleon structure are necessary. I will present some recent developments in lattice calculations of nucleon EDMs induced by quark-gluon CP-odd interaction

  125. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Inclusive tau decays"

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, BNL

    Friday, February 24, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  126. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Few-body systems in QCD"

    Presented by Raul A. Briceno, JLAB

    Wednesday, February 22, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Mattia Bruno

  127. HET Lunch Discussions

    "B-decay Anomalies in a Composite Leptoquark Model"

    Presented by Christopher Murphy, BNL

    Friday, February 17, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

    The collection of a few anomalies in semileptonic $B$-decays, especially in $b \to c \tau \bar{\nu}$ invites us to speculate about the emergence of some striking new phenomena, perhaps interpretable in terms of a weakly broken $U(2)^n$ flavor symmetry and of leptoquark mediators. Here we aim at a partial UV completion of this interpretation by generalizing the minimal composite Higgs model to include a composite vector leptoquark as well. Reference: arXiv:1611.04930 w/ R. Barbieri and F. Senia

  128. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Extracting scattering observables and resonance properties from lattice QCD"

    Presented by Maxwell T. Hansen, Helmholtz Institute Mainz

    Wednesday, February 15, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Mattia Bruno

  129. HET Seminar

    "QCD with Minimally Doubled Fermions"

    Presented by Johannes Weber, TUM

    Tuesday, February 14, 2017, 1 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Mike Creutz

  130. HET Lunch Discussions

    "TBA"

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, BNL

    Friday, February 10, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  131. HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Johannes Weber

    Thursday, February 9, 2017, 3 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Mike Creutz

  132. HET Lunch Discussions

    "The Coming Armageddon - Upcoming Cyber and Other Changes"

    Presented by Thomas Throwe, BNL

    Friday, February 3, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  133. HET Seminar

    "Exploring the Low Mass Frontier in Dark Matter Direct Detection"

    Presented by Tongyan Lin, LBL

    Wednesday, February 1, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  134. HET Lunch Discussions

    "EFTs and the Higgs"

    Presented by Sally Dawson, BNL

    Friday, January 27, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  135. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Anion-based approaches to engineering functionality in perovskite oxide heterostructures"

    Presented by Steve May, Drexel University

    Thursday, January 26, 2017, 1:30 pm
    ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Room 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: Mark Dean

    Scientific interest in ABO3 perovskite oxides remains intense due to the wide range of physical behavior present in these materials. The ability to control the position, occupation, and composition of the anion site has recently emerged as a new route to tune properties in epitaxial perovskites. This talk will focus on recent and ongoing efforts aimed at developing anion-based approaches to tailor electronic, optical and magnetic properties in oxide heterostructures. First, I will discuss how the position of the oxygen anions can be controlled to stabilize non-bulk-like bond angles and lengths, thereby modifying electronic and magnetic behavior in manganite films and superlattices. In the second half of the talk, I will describe efforts focused on controlling the occupation and composition of the anion site, including reversible oxidation/reduction in thin La1/3Sr2/3FeO3-? films and topotactic fluorination reactions to realize oxyfluoride films

  136. Joint YITP/HET Seminar

    "muon colliders"

    Presented by Mario Greco, Frascati

    Wednesday, January 25, 2017, 2:30 pm
    YITP Seminar Room

  137. HET Lunch Discussions

    "epsilin, epsilon'....& the K-UT"

    Presented by Amarjit Soni, BNL

    Friday, January 20, 2017, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  138. HET Seminar

    "Phenomenology of Enhanced Light Quark Yukawa Couplings and the Wh Charge Asymmetry"

    Presented by Felix Yu, Mainz

    Wednesday, January 18, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  139. HET Seminar

    "Search For Dark matter In Terms of Dark Bound States"

    Presented by Yue Zhang, Northwestern

    Wednesday, January 11, 2017, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  140. HET Lunch Discussions

    "The ttbar resonance lineshape using NLO EFT"

    Presented by Cen Zhang, BNL

    Friday, December 16, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  141. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "The Fate of Axion Stars"

    Presented by Hong Zhang, Ohio State University

    Wednesday, December 14, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Pier Paolo Giardino

  142. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Weak decays beyond NLO III"

    Presented by Mattia Bruno, BNL

    Friday, December 9, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  143. Joint: YITP/HET

    "Enhancing searches for beyond the Standard Model physics at the LHC"

    Presented by Michele Papucci, Berkeley

    Wednesday, December 7, 2016, 2:30 pm
    YITP Seminar Room

    In this talk I'll present recent work on improving the capabilities for looking for new physics at the LHC, both for exotics BSM signals (hidden valleys) and for Dark Matter. I will also discuss soon to be publicly available tools for connecting LHC results with theoretical models.

  144. HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "Heavy meson decays to light resonances"

    Presented by Luka Leskovec, University of Arizona

    Wednesday, November 30, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Mattia Bruno

    Lattice QCD calculations of electroweak decays with single, strong-interaction-stable hadrons in the initial and final state have recently reached a high level of precision. Many phenomenologically important decays, however, involve hadronic resonances, and their naive analysis on the lattice leads to uncontrolled systematic errors. Recent theoretical developments in the finite-volume treatment of $1 \to 2$ transition matrix elements now enable us to perform rigorous lattice calculations of electroweak decays to light resonances such as the $\rho$. After presenting the Briceno-Hansen-Walker-Loud formalism, I will discuss our numerical implementation for the $D\to\rho \ell \nu$ and $B\to\rho \ell \nu$ decays, where we aim to quantify the effect of the unstable nature of the $\rho$. Our calculations are performed on a gauge ensemble with 2+1 flavors of clover fermions with a pion mass of ~320 MeV and a lattice size of ~3.6 fm.

  145. HET Lunch Discussions

    "ALPs and the Muon g-2 Discrepancy"

    Presented by William J. Marciano, BNL

    Friday, November 18, 2016, 12:30 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  146. Joint YITP/HET Seminar

    "A Predictive Theory for All Required and Measurable CP Violation"

    Presented by Scott Thomas, Rutgers

    Wednesday, November 16, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  147. HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "When the Higgs meets the Top"

    Presented by Chung Kao, University of Oklahoma

    Wednesday, November 9, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Pier Paolo Giardino

  148. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Perturbative Unitarity at NLO in the 2HDM, and Bottom-Quark Forward-Central Asymmetry at LHCb"

    Presented by Christopher Murphy, BNL

    Friday, November 4, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  149. HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "Neutrinoless double beta decay from lattice QCD"

    Presented by Amy Nicholson, UC Berkeley

    Wednesday, November 2, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Mattia Bruno

  150. HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "Collider signatures of flavorful Higgs bosons"

    Presented by Stefania Gori, University of Cincinnati

    Wednesday, October 26, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Pier Paolo Giardino

  151. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Chiral heavy fermions one more time: pheno & new search strategies"

    Presented by Shaoul Bar-Shalom, Technion

    Friday, October 21, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  152. Joint: YITP/HET

    "A New Angle on Jet Substructure"

    Presented by Jesse Thaler, MIT

    Wednesday, October 19, 2016, 2:30 pm
    YITP Seminar Room

    Jet substructure has emerged as a key tool for new physics searches at the LHC, particularly for signals that involve highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks and electroweak bosons. In this talk, I present a suite of powerful jet substructure observables that were discovered by systematically studying the soft and collinear singularities of QCD. These new observables are based on N-particle energy correlations, using a novel angular weighting function to yield improved performance over previous techniques.

  153. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Constraining the Higgs trilinear coupling"

    Presented by Pier Paolo Giardino, BNL

    Friday, October 14, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  154. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Cannibal Dark Matter"

    Presented by Marco Farina, Rutgers University

    Wednesday, October 12, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Pier Paolo Giardino

  155. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Gravitational Wave Signatures of Sub-Millimeter Primordial Black Holes"

    Presented by Hooman Davoudiasl, BNL

    Friday, September 30, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  156. HET Seminar

    "Lattice QCD for Neutrino Physics"

    Presented by Aaron Meyer, University of Chicago

    Wednesday, September 28, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Mattia Bruno

  157. Physics Colloquium

    "Synthetic gene circuits: New research tools for quantitative biology"

    Presented by Gabor Balazsi, Stony Brook U

    Tuesday, September 27, 2016, 3:30 pm
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    Synthetic biology is a new interdisciplinary field that designs and builds artificial biological systems, using principles from physics, engineering, and mathematics. Recent success stories include the massive, low-cost synthesis of the anti-malaria drug artemisinin, and the construction of genetic switches, oscillators and logic gates. In my laboratory we build synthetic gene circuits and use them as new research tools to precisely perturb cells and watch how they respond. This way, we hope to develop a predictive, quantitative understanding of biological processes such as microbial drug resistance and cancer. We have developed an expanding library of synthetic gene regulatory circuits first in yeast, and then in cancer cells for this purpose. I will illustrate through a few examples how we can gain a deeper, quantitative understanding of microbial drug resistance and cancer using synthetic gene circuits.

  158. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Playing with Time in the Schwarzschild Metric"

    Presented by Micheal Creutz, BNL

    Friday, September 23, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  159. Joint YITP/HET Seminar

    "Towards precision jet physics at the LHC"

    Presented by Matt Schwartz, Harvard

    Wednesday, September 21, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  160. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Weak decays beyond NLO II"

    Presented by Mattia Bruno, BNL

    Friday, September 16, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  161. HET

    "Multi-Component Dark Matter through a Radiative Higgs Portal"

    Presented by Gopolang Mohlabeng, University of Kansas

    Wednesday, September 14, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  162. HET Lunch Discussions

    "The Beryllium anomaly and a possible particle physics interpretation"

    Presented by Eder Izaguirre, BNL

    Friday, September 9, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  163. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Survey of algorithms for finite lattice"

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, BNL

    Friday, August 26, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  164. HET Lunch Discussions

    "An update on a precise first-principles determination of the muon g-2"

    Presented by Christoph Lehner, BNL

    Friday, August 19, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  165. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Standard Model Vacuum Stability with a 125 GeV Higgs Boson"

    Presented by Stefano Di Vita, DESY

    Friday, August 12, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Pier Paolo Giardino

  166. HET Seminar

    "Lattice Quantum Gravity and Asymptotic Safety"

    Presented by J. Laiho, Syracuse

    Wednesday, June 15, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  167. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Lefschetz-thimble path integral for studying the sign problem and Silver Blaze phenomenon"

    Presented by Yuya Tanizaki, RBRC

    Thursday, May 26, 2016, 12:30 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Hiroshi Ohki

    Recently, Picard-Lefschetz theory gets much attention in the context of the sign problem, because it enables us to study the system with the complex classical action nonperturbatively by employing the semiclassical analysis. In this seminar, after its brief introduction, I will apply it to the one-site Hubbard model. This model has a severe sign problem, which looks quite similar to that of the finite-density QCD at low temperatures. By solving this model using the Lefschetz-thimble path integral, we are trying to understand the structure of the sign problem of finite-density QCD. Especially, I give a qualitative picture (or speculation) about the early-onset problem of the baryon number density, called the baryon Silver Blaze problem. The complex Langevin method will also be discussed if time allows.

  168. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Avoiding the traps of EFT Higgs analyses"

    Presented by Tilman Plehn, Heidelberg

    Friday, May 20, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  169. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Higgs Pair Production in Extensions of the Standard Model"

    Presented by Ramona Groeber, Roma Tre

    Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Pier Paolo Giardino

    Higgs pair production is not only interesting as a probe of the trilinear Higgs self-coupling, but beyond the Standard Model physics can influence the Higgs pair production cross section in many different ways, for example by new couplings, new loop particles or new resonances. In this talk, I will address the question whether we could see for the first time deviations from the Standard Model in Higgs pair production assuming that no deviations were seen before. Furthermore, for certain models I will show how higher order corrections influence the cross section.

  170. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Equilibrium States and Dynamics of Spin Assemblies in Magnetic Thin Films, Heterostructures and Nanostructured Entities"

    Presented by Ramesh B. Budhani, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur

    Tuesday, May 17, 2016, 11 am
    Building 480, Conference Room

    Hosted by: Lijun Wu

    The orientation of spin assemblies in ferromagnetic thin films and nanostructures can take a variety of shapes depending on the relative strength of factors contributing to their magnetic free energy. These factors are derived from the direct quantum mechanical exchange between the electronic spins or those mediated by impurities, and those associated with the size, shape, crystallographic structure, strain, dipolar interactions and external fields. Here we present three cases where the orientational dynamics has been studied as functions of temperature, magnetic field strength and the elapsed time after acquiring a particular configuration. These studies are based on magnetic force microscopy and bulk magnetometry measurements on strain epitaxial films of La0.67Ca0.33MnO3, and lithographically patterned submicron size ring assemblies of permalloy and Co/Pd multilayers, which also form artificial spin ices. Towards the end of this lecture we will discuss interface driven magnetic and electronic phenomena in magnetic thin films.

  171. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Axions and Topology"

    Presented by Simon Mages, Forschungszentrum Juelich

    Wednesday, May 11, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

    This talk will be centered around the calculation of the high temperature topological susceptibility in QCD. It will provide some background on our motivation from cosmology and particle physics, which is the dependence of axion physics on non-perturbative QCD. I will show our recent results on the quenched high temperature topological susceptibility and discuss difficulties with this conventional approach, which render dynamical studies unfeasible. I will also present our new approach based on formulating QCD on a non-orientable manifold, which is a promising candidate to solve issues related to topological freezing and the divergence of autocorrelations when approaching the continuum limit.

  172. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Calculating TMDs and DPDs on the lattice"

    Presented by Andreas Schaefer, University of Regensburg

    Wednesday, May 4, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

  173. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Going with the flow: sign problem, Lefschetz thimbles and beyond"

    Presented by Gokce Basar, University of Maryland

    Friday, April 29, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Monte Carlo method, a robust way of studying field theories and many body systems, suffers from the sign problem when the action is complex. This includes an important set of problems such as most field theories, including QCD, and strong correlated electronic systems at finite density, as well as computation of real time quantities like transport coefficients. I will show that lifting the path integration to a complex manifold provides a way to ameliorate the sign problem, and introduce a new algorithm for carrying on such a computation. I will give some quantum mechanical examples with severe sign problems, including finite density of fermions and real time observables where Monte Carlo simulations can be profitably performed by this method. Finally I will discuss the 3+1d Bose gas with nonzero chemical potential.

  174. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Heavy Higgs Resonance Dip"

    Presented by Sunghoon Jung, SLAC

    Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Cen Zhang

    We discuss overlooked resonance shapes of heavy Higgs bosons that arise from the resonance-continuum interference with a complex phase. They include pure resonance dips and nothingness. We derive conditions under which they are produced and we modify narrow width approximation suitable for them. We then discuss how MSSM heavy Higgs searches at the LHC can be challenged and changed.

  175. Joint BNL/YITP HET Seminar

    "Progress and Results with the GENEVA Monte Carlo"

    Presented by Christian Bauer, LBNL

    Wednesday, April 20, 2016, 2:30 pm
    YITP (SBU)

  176. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Agravity: an adimensional theory of gravity"

    Presented by Pier Paolo Giardino, BNL

    Friday, April 15, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  177. HET/PARTICLE/RBRC Seminar

    ""Recent Highlights from CMS and from the 13 TeV run at the LHC""

    Presented by Albert de Roeck, CERN/University of Antwerp

    Friday, April 8, 2016, 2 pm
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  178. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Musings on a 750GeV diphoton Resonance"

    Presented by William J. Marciano, BNL

    Friday, March 25, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  179. Special RIKEN/HET Seminar

    "Axion Phenomenology from Unquenched Lattice QCD"

    Presented by Guido Martinelli, Rome University

    Thursday, March 24, 2016, 11 am
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hiroshi Oki

    We investigate the topological properties of Nf = 2 + 1 QCD with physical quark masses, both at zero and finite temperature. At zero temperature both finite size and finite cut-off effects have been studied by comparing the continuum extrapolated results for the topological susceptibility χ with the predictions from chiral perturbation theory. At finite temperature, we explore a region going from Tc up to around 4Tc, where continuum extrapolated results for the topological susceptibility and for the fourth moment of the topological charge distribution are obtained. While the fourth moment converges to the dilute instanton gas prediction the topological susceptibility differs strongly both in the size and in the temperature dependence. This results in a shift of the axion dark matter window of almost one order of magnitude with respect to the instanton computation.

  180. YITP/HET Seminar

    "New Signatures of Top Partners"

    Presented by Jiji Fan, Brown University

    Wednesday, March 23, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  181. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Anomalies galore!"

    Presented by Amarjit Soni, BNL

    Friday, March 18, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  182. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    ""Operator Bases and Effective Field Theories""

    Presented by Brian Henning, Yale University

    Wednesday, March 16, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Cen Zhang

  183. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Weak decays beyond NLO"

    Presented by Mattia Bruno, BNL

    Friday, March 4, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  184. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Accurate event simulation for colliders"

    Presented by Stefan Prestel, SLAC

    Wednesday, March 2, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Cen Zhang

  185. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Ideas about SM EFT in the top-quark sector"

    Presented by Cen Zhang, BNL

    Friday, February 26, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  186. HET/YITP Joint Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by David Kaplan, JHU

    Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 2:30 pm
    Stony Brook University

  187. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Uses of Vector-like fermions"

    Presented by Sally Dawson, BNL

    Friday, February 19, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  188. HET Lunch Discussions

    "An exercise in chiral perturbation theory"

    Presented by Micheal Creutz, BNL

    Friday, February 12, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  189. HET Lunch Discussions

    "The (meta-)stability of the electroweak vacuum"

    Presented by Pier Paolo Giardino, BNL

    Friday, January 29, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  190. YITP/HET Seminar

    "Natural Heavy Supersymmetry"

    Presented by Brian Batell, University of Pittsburgh

    Wednesday, January 27, 2016, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  191. HET Lunch Discussions

    "The 750 GeV Diphoton Excess at the LHC"

    Presented by Hooman Davoudiasl, BNL

    Friday, January 22, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  192. HET Lunch Discussions

    "Ab-initio calculation of the hadronic contributions to the muon (g-2)"

    Presented by Christoph Lehner, BNL

    Friday, January 15, 2016, 12:15 pm
    Building 510, Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  193. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Theoretical Issues in Double Higgs Production"

    Presented by Sally Dawson, BNL

    Friday, December 11, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  194. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Developments in Scattering Amplitudes"

    Presented by Ulrich Schubert, MPI, Munich

    Wednesday, December 9, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  195. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Mattia Bruno and Pier Paolo Giardino, BNL

    Friday, December 4, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  196. YITP/BNL HET Seminar

    "Cosmological Probes of Nearly Decoupled Dark Sectors"

    Presented by Josh Berger, Wisconsin

    Wednesday, December 2, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  197. HET Seminar

    "A Nonperturbative Regulator for Chiral Gauge Theories and Fluffy Mirror Fermions"

    Presented by Dorota Grabowska, University of Washington

    Monday, November 30, 2015, 4 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Michael Creutz

    I discuss a new proposal for nonperturbatively defining chiral gauge theories, something that has resisted previous attempts. The proposal is a well defined field theoretic framework that contains mirror fermions with very soft form factors, which allows them to decouple, as well as ordinary fermions with conventional couplings. The construction makes use of an extra dimension, which localizes chiral zeromodes on the boundaries, and a four dimensional gauge field extended into the bulk via classical gradient flow. After explaining how this setup works, I consider open questions concerning the flow of topological gauge configurations, as well as possible exotic phenomenology in the Standard Model lurking at the low energy frontier.

  198. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Collider Phenomenology of the Right Handed Heavy Neutrinos"

    Presented by Arindam Das, University of Alabama

    Friday, November 20, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room-2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

    We study the collider signature of pseudo-Dirac heavy neutrinos in the inverse seesaw scenario, where the heavy neutrinos with mass at the electro-weak scale can have sizable mixings with the Standard Model neutrinos, while providing the tiny light neutrino masses by the inverse seesaw mechanism. Based on a simple, concrete model realizing the inverse seesaw scenario, we fix the model parameters so as to reproduce the neutrino oscillation data and to satisfy other experimental constraints, assuming two typical flavor structures of the model and the different types of hierarchical light neutrino mass spectra. For completeness, we also consider a general parametrization for the model parameters by introducing an arbitrary orthogonal matrix and the nonzero Dirac and Majorana phases. We perform a parameter scan to identify an allowed parameter region which satisfies all experimental constraints. With the fixed parameters, we analyze the heavy neutrino signal at the LHC through trilepton final states with large missing energy and at the ILC through a single lepton plus dijet with large missing energy.

  199. YITP/BNL HET Seminar

    "Natural SUSY Today"

    Presented by David Shih, Rutgers

    Wednesday, November 18, 2015, 2:30 pm
    Stony Brook

  200. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Flavor physics with Lambda_b baryons"

    Presented by Stefan Meinel, RBRC/ARIZONA

    Friday, November 13, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  201. Joint RIKEN Lunch/HET Seminar

    "Gluon-fusion Higgs production: the final frontier"

    Presented by Elisabetta Furlan, ETH, Zurich

    Thursday, November 12, 2015, 12:30 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

    The gluon-fusion Higgs production cross section has been recently computed through the next-to-next-to-next to leading order (N^3LO) in QCD. This unprecedented level of accuracy is crucial to exploit fully the LHC data in the validation of the Standard Model and in the search for potential (small) deviations due to new physics. I will give an overview of the tools that we employed to achieve this result, from the framework of heavy-quark effective theories to the analytical and mathematical machinery that we developed. I will conclude with some results and future prospects.

  202. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Inflatable Dark Matter"

    Presented by Hooman Davoudiasl, BNL

    Friday, November 6, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  203. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Higgs pair production at the LHC: SM and beyond"

    Presented by Eleni Vryonidou, UCL-Belgium

    Friday, October 30, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  204. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "N-jettiness subtraction scheme"

    Presented by Xiaohui Liu, University of Maryland

    Wednesday, October 28, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Cen Zhang

  205. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Lattice QCD applications to inclusive tau decays and related topics"

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, BNL

    Friday, October 23, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  206. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Phenomenology of semileptonic B-meson decays with form factors from lattice QCD"

    Presented by Ran Zhou, Fermilab

    Wednesday, October 21, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

    The exclusive semileptonic $B$-meson decays $B\to K(\pi)\ell^+\ell^-$, $B \to K(\pi)\nu\bar\nu$, and $B\to\pi\tau\nu$ are used to extract the CKM elements and probe new physics beyond Standard Model. The errors of the form factors used to be an important source of the uncertainties in the theoretical predictions. Recent developments in lattice-QCD provide more accurate form factors and enable us to have better theoretical predictions. In this talk, I will present the latest lattice-QCD results of the form factors in the semileptonic $B$-meson decays processes. In addition, I will compare the theoretical predictions and recent experimental results. The tension between the Standard Model and semileptonic $B$-meson decay experimental data will be discussed.

  207. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Towards precision effective field theory: loops and automation"

    Presented by Cen Zhang, HET-BNL

    Friday, October 16, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  208. YITP/BNL HET Seminar

    "NNLO phenomenology with N-jettiness"

    Presented by Frank Petriello, ANL/Northwestern

    Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  209. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Resonant Di-Higgs Production in the Higgs Singlet Model"

    Presented by Ian Lewis, SLAC

    Friday, October 2, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  210. YITP/BNL HET Seminar

    "Cross-Order Relations from Maximal Unitarity"

    Presented by David Kosower, CEA Saclay

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 2:30 pm
    YITP, Stony Brook

    Hosted by: Patrick Meade (SBU)

  211. ATLAS/HET Joint Lunch Seminar

    "Constraints on New Physics via Higgs Boson Couplings and Invisible Decays with the ATLAS Detector"

    Presented by Ketevi Assamagan, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, September 25, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at $\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the $\gamma\gamma$, $ZZ$, $WW$, $Z\gamma$, $bb$, $\tau\tau$, and $\mu\mu$ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplings with mass. Limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the $\gamma\gamma$ and $ZZ$ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of $m_{A}>370$ GeV in the ``hMSSM'' simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with $W/Z$ ($Z\to ll$, $W/Z \to jj$) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. The use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter.

  212. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "The Surprising Emergent Phenomena of Perturbative QCD"

    Presented by Andrew J. Larkoski, MIT

    Wednesday, September 23, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Cen Zhang

  213. HET/RIKEN seminar

    "Effective Field Theory of Heavy WIMP Annihilation"

    Presented by Matthew Baumgart, Rutgers University

    Wednesday, August 26, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  214. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Constraining Extended Higgs Sectors at the LHC and Beyond"

    Presented by Tania Robens, Technical University of Dresden

    Wednesday, August 12, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  215. HET/RIKEN seminar

    "Higgs coupling deviations, vacuum stability and new bosons at the TeV scale"

    Presented by Raffaele D'Agnolo, Institute for Advanced Study

    Wednesday, August 5, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

    Higgs coupling measurements can shed light on the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking. However it is not trivial to go beyond generic intuitions, such as the expectation that natural theories generate large deviations, and make precise statements. In this talk I will show in a model independent way that measuring deviations at the LHC implies the existence of new bosons between a few TeV and a few hundred TeV. This is true in general, including theories where new fermions produce the deviations.

  216. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Probing Charm-Yukawa at LHC, Status and Prospects"

    Presented by Kohsaku Tobioka, Weizmann Institute/Tel Aviv University

    Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  217. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "One-Flavor QCD and the Dirac Spectrum at $\theta=0$"

    Presented by Jacobus Verbaarschot, Stony Brook University

    Thursday, June 25, 2015, 12:30 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    The chiral condensate of one-flavor QCD is continuous when the quark mass crosses zero. In the sector of fixed topological charge though, the chiral condensate becomes discontinuous at zero mass in the the thermodynamical limit. To reconcile these contradictory observations, we have evaluated the spectral density of the Dirac operator in the epsilon domain of one-flavor QCD. In this domain, we have obtained exact analytical expressions which show that the spectral density at $\theta = 0$ becomes a strongly oscillating function for negative quark mass with an amplitude that increases exponentially with the volume. As is the case for QCD at nonzero chemical potential, these strong oscillations invalidate the Banks-Casher formula and result in a chiral condensate that is continuous as a function of the quark mass. An additional subtlety is the effect of the topological zero modes which will be discussed as well.

  218. HET Seminar

    "Inclusive and Exclusive b->sll: Status, Prospects and Lepton Non-universality"

    Presented by Enrico Lunghi, Indiana

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  219. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Light Inflaton â€" hunting for it from CMB through the Dark Matter and down to the colliders"

    Presented by Fedor Bezrukov, RBRC/U Conn

    Friday, June 12, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  220. HET/RIKEN seminar

    "New physics in b—>s transitions after LHC run 1"

    Presented by Wolfgang Altmannshofer, Perimeter Institute

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

    I will discuss interpretations of the recent updated angular analysis of the B->K*mu+mu- decay by the LHCb collaboration. A global fit to all relevant measurements probing the flavor changing neutral current b->s mu mu transition shows tensions with Standard Model expectations. Assuming hadronic uncertainties are estimated in a sufficiently conservative way, I will discuss the implications of the experimental results on new physics, both model independently as well as in the context of models with flavor changing Z' bosons.

  221. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Cascade Decays of a Leptophobic Boson"

    Presented by Bogdan Dobrescu, Fermilab

    Wednesday, June 3, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  222. HET/ATLAS JOINT LUNCH SEMINAR

    "Search for new light gauge bosons in Higgs boson decays to four-lepton final states in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC"

    Presented by Ketevi Assamagan, BNL

    Friday, May 29, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

    "A search for Higgs bosons decays to four leptons via one or two light exotic vector bosons, Zdark, H -> Z Zdark -> 4l and H -> Zdark Zdark -> 4l (l=electron or muon), is presented. The search is performed using proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 20/fb at the center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The observed data are well described by the Standard Model prediction. Upper bounds at 95% confidence level are set on the relative branching ratios BR(H -> ZZdark -> 4l to BR(H -> 4l for the exotic vector boson masses between 15 and 55 GeV, and on BR(H -> Zdark Zdark -> 4l to BR(H -> ZZ^* -> 4l for the exotic vector boson masses between 15 and 60 GeV. The results are interpreted in benchmark models where a dark gauge symmetry is mediated by a dark vector boson."

  223. HET/RIKEN seminar

    "Colorless Top Partners and Naturalness"

    Presented by Gustavo Burdman, IAS/University of São Paulo

    Wednesday, May 13, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: CheinYi Chen

  224. HET / Riken Lunch Seminar

    "Stealth Composite Dark Matter"

    Presented by Ethan Neil, RBRC/Colorado

    Friday, May 8, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  225. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Flavor in the Randall-Sundrum Model: A New Idea"

    Presented by Michael Geller, Technion

    Friday, May 1, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  226. HET/RIKEN seminar

    "Higgs as a Lamp Post of New Physics"

    Presented by JiJi Fan, Syracuse

    Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  227. HET/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    "Natural Standard Model Alignment in the Two Higgs Doublet Model"

    Presented by Bhupal Dev, Manchester

    Friday, April 24, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

    The current LHC Higgs data provide strong constraints on possible deviations of the couplings of the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson from the Standard Model (SM) expectations. Therefore, it now becomes compelling that any extended Higgs sector should comply with the so-called SM alignment limit. In the context of the Two Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM), this alignment is often associated with either decoupling of the heavy Higgs sector or accidental cancellations in the 2HDM potential. Here we present a new solution realizing natural alignment based on symmetries, without decoupling or fine-tuning. In particular, we show that in 2HDMs where both Higgs doublets acquire vacuum expectation values, there exist only three different symmetry realizations leading to natural alignment. We also discuss some interesting LHC phenomenology of the heavy Higgs sector in the alignment limit.

  228. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Light mediator to dark matter: models and signatures"

    Presented by Yue Zhang, Caltech

    Friday, April 17, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  229. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Improving the Extraction of CKM \gamma from B\to DK"

    Presented by Michael Savastio, Cornell

    Friday, April 10, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  230. HET/RIKEN seminar

    "Radiation from the Dark Sector"

    Presented by Tongyan Lin, University of Chicago

    Wednesday, April 8, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  231. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "A Global Approach to Top-quark FCNCs"

    Presented by Gauthier Durieux, Cornell University

    Wednesday, April 1, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  232. HET/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    "Progress towards the first principles lattice calculation of epsilon-prime"

    Presented by Chris Kelly, RBRC

    Friday, March 27, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  233. HET/RIKEN seminar

    "Flavored Dark Matter with Weak Scale Mediators"

    Presented by Can Kilic, The University of Texas, Austin

    Wednesday, March 25, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

    All matter in the Standard Model appears in three generations, with an intricate flavor structure the origin of which is not well understood. This motivates the question whether distinct phenomenological features arise if dark matter (DM) also has a non-trivial flavor structure. In this talk I will review the experimental signatures of this scenario. In the case of lepton-flavored DM, I will argue that the generation of a lepton asymmetry at a high energy scale can also produce a DM asymmetry, which can strongly affect the sensitivity of direct detection experiments, and I will present novel signatures that can appear at colliders and in indirect detection experiments. I will also review the case of top quark-flavored DM with a distinct collider phenomenology including final states of top pairs and missing energy as well the possibility of displaced decays.

  234. HET/RIKEN seminar

    "Spontaneous CP violation and the strong CP problem"

    Presented by Luca Vecchi, University of Maryland

    Wednesday, March 18, 2015, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  235. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "The Galactic Center Gamma-ray Excess: Have We Started to See Dark Matter"

    Presented by Samuel McDermott, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, March 4, 2015, 2 pm
    Building 510 SSR

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  236. HET/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    "Primordial non-Gaussianity is a crucial probe of inflationary physics"

    Presented by Anze Slosar, BNL

    Friday, February 27, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  237. HET/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    "Custodial SUSY Triplets"

    Presented by Tien-Tien Yu, YITP

    Friday, February 20, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  238. HET/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    "SM EFT at NLO accuracy automated"

    Presented by Cen Zhang, BNL

    Friday, February 13, 2015, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  239. Biosciences Department Seminar

    "Synthetic Approaches to Gene Expression Control: From Yeast to Cancer"

    Presented by Gabor Balazsi, Laufer Center for Physical & Quantitative Biology, Stony Brook University

    Friday, June 20, 2014, 11 am
    John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: John Shanklin

    Genes are templates for protein synthesis. Proteins determine how cells behave. Therefore, to control cells, we should alter protein levels. This is possible by utilizing small artificial regulatory networks called gene expression systems, which consist of a transcription factor gene that alters the protein-producing capacity of other genes. Gene expression systems have been used widely, but without considering the stochasticity of reactions involving gene products. Stochasticity can cause drastic protein level differences from cell to cell, implying that individual cells may not uniformly obey control signals. To address this problem, we have modified existing gene expression systems to control not only the average, but also the variability of protein levels in yeast cells. Further, we have identified a series of steps to move gene expression systems into mammalian cells. Such engineered gene circuits can improve protein level tuning, enhancing our understanding of protein function and enabling future practical applications.

  240. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Synthetic Diamond Radiation Detectors"

    Presented by Merlin Fisher-Levine

    Wednesday, June 4, 2014, 2:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Diamond is a material of many superlatives: it is both the hardest and most thermally conductive known material, as well as being the most intrinsically radiation hard. Diamond also exhibits some of the most extreme semiconductor properties found in any material, and the combination of many of these properties makes it uniquely well suited for radiation detection applications. The success of diamond has, however, been hindered by the difficulty of synthesising large, good quality crystals. In this talk I will present an introduction to the use of diamond for radiation detection, followed by work performed on the characterisation of the quality of modern CVD grown diamond, and on the development of a fast, low noise, charge sensitive amplifier designed and built to exploit diamond's properties for high rate spectroscopic applications.

  241. BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "Life Redesigned: The Emergence of Synthetic Biology"

    Presented by Professor James Collins, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston University, Harvard University

    Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 4 pm
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

    From cheaper drugs and rapid diagnostic tests to targeted therapies that attack antibiotic-resistant "superbugs," synthetic biology will change lives in years to come. Engineers, physicists, and biologists in this growing field are making such advancements possible using proteins, genes, and other bits of DNA to rewire and reprogram organisms with biological circuits similar to electronic networks. During his talk, Collins will highlight recent efforts to create synthetic gene networks and programmable cells. He will also discuss a variety of synthetic biology applications for computing, technology, and medicine.

  242. HET Lunch Seminar

    "TOP PARTNERS, FERMION MASS MATRICES AND HIGGS BOSON PRODUCTION"

    Presented by Elisabetta Furlan, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, April 27, 2012, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  243. HET Lunch Seminar

    "The four dimensional helicity scheme beyond one loop"

    Presented by Bill Kilgore, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, April 20, 2012, 12:45 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  244. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "A novel phase in SU(3) gauge theory with many light fermions"

    Presented by Anna Hasenfratz, University of Colorado at Boulder

    Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

    In this talk I will discuss the results of our recent study of the phase structure of SU(3) lattice gauge theory with $N_f = 12$ and 8 staggered fermions in the fundamental representation. For small fermion masses we found two bulk phase transitions at strong gauge couplings. The phase between the two transitions appears to be a novel phase that breaks the single site shift symmetry of staggered fermions. The eigenvalue spectrum of the Dirac operator, the static potential and the meson spectrum collectively establish that this novel phase is confining but chirally symmetric. The phase is bordered by first-order phase transitions, and since we find the same phase structure with $N_f = 8$ fermions, it is most likely that this novel phase is a strong-coupling lattice artifact, the existence of which does not imply IR conformality. (ArXiv:1111:2317)

  245. Chemistry Department Seminar

    "Comparing the Primary Electron Transfer Process in Photosynthetic Reaction"

    Presented by Garry Rumbles, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, Colorado,

    Friday, April 6, 2012, 11 am
    Room 300, Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: John Miller

    This presentation will focus on some of the fundamental science associated with the rapidly emerging field of organic photovoltaics (OPV). It will include a discussion of how the OPV field is evolving, examine some of the fundamental scientific issues that underpin the subject, and will discuss how spectroscopy can help to understand these issues. The goal is to enable both a better understanding of how these systems function and consequently help to advance solar energy conversion efficiencies of future OPV devices. So-called organic photovoltaic devices have seen certified power conversion efficiencies increase from 2.5% in 2001 to ~9% in 2011. Close inspection of the strategies employed to realize this impressive improvement in performance reveal a common approach of synthesizing new donor polymers, fullerene acceptors and, in some cases, new device architectures. It is questionable as to whether this approach will result in a similar four-fold level of improvement over the next ten years. And it is the answer to this question that motivates the work that will be described. At the heart of all OPV devices is the donor-acceptor interface, where photogenerated excitons are dissociated into separated charge carriers. Using flash photolysis, timeresolved microwave conductivity (fp-TRMC) as a tool for detecting mobile carriers, a number of recently-studied systems will be described. This particular presentation will focus on systems that contain new conjugated polymers and novel derivatives of fullerenes. These studies will serve to highlight a fundamental issue that we have yet to fully understand: how are these carriers created with such efficiency and yield, and in a system that does not immediately suggest that this is possible? The talk will include a speculative discussion about how we might better understand this process by looking at the function of Nature’s photosynthetic reaction centers.

  246. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Application of lattice QCD+QED simulations and error reduction techniques"

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, March 30, 2012, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  247. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Direct Detection of Sub-GeV Dark Matter"

    Presented by Rouven Essig, Stony Brook University

    Friday, March 9, 2012, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  248. Joint HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Lattice vs. Technicolor"

    Presented by Tom DeGrand, University of Colorado at Boulder

    Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  249. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Nucleon strange content from Lattice QCD"

    Presented by Chulwoo Jung, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, February 17, 2012, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: A. Soni

  250. HET Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by David Curtin, YITP of Stony Brook

    Friday, January 27, 2012, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  251. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "More on lattice chiral symmetry and minimal doubling"

    Presented by Mike Creutz, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, January 20, 2012, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  252. Joint HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Nonperturbative QCD vacuum polarization corrections"

    Presented by Dru Renner, Jefferson Laboratory

    Wednesday, January 18, 2012, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  253. Biology Department Seminar

    "Synthetic Biology: Putting Synthesis into Biology"

    Presented by Huimin Zhao, Departments of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Institute for Genomic Biology, and Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

    Friday, January 13, 2012, 10:30 am
    John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Reinhold Mann/John Shanklin

    Synthetic biology is the deliberate design of novel biological systems and organisms that draws on principles elucidated by biologists, chemists, physicists, and engineers. It is a rapidly growing area with broad applications in medical, chemical, food, and agricultural industries. In this talk, I will discuss our recent work on the development and application of new synthetic biology tools. Specifically, I will discuss a new tool for rapid construction of large DNA molecules such as pathways and plasmids and its application in (1) discovery, characterization, and engineering of novel natural product biosynthetic pathways for drug discovery and development and (2) engineering of recombinant yeast strains that can efficiently utilize lignocellulose raw materials to produce biofuels and chemicals. In addition, I will discuss a new bioprocess for synthesis of xylitol, one of DOE’s top 12 platform chemicals for biorefinery. http://www.chemistry.illinois.edu/faculty/Huimin_Zhao.html

  254. HET Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Bill Marciano, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, December 9, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  255. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Hybrid Monte Carlo simulation of graphene"

    Presented by Claudio Rebbi, Boston University

    Wednesday, December 7, 2011, 2 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-84

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

    I will briefly review the Hamiltonian of the graphene system and show how the partition function and Green's functions for the quadratic Hamiltonian can be expressed in path integral form by using fermion coherent states. I will then show how one can incorporate the Coulomb interaction into the path integral and how this can be simulated with the hybrid Monte Carlo technique. I will present then early results for the Green's functions obtained with this method. (Based on research done in collaboration with Richard Brower and David Schaich.)

  256. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Imaging and Electric Control of Boundary Magnetization in Chromia and Chromia-based Exchange Bias Heterostructures"

    Presented by Xi He, University of Nebraska

    Tuesday, December 6, 2011, 11 am
    Bldg. 480 conference room

    Hosted by: Ivan Bozovic

    Controlling magnetism and information encoded in magnetic bits has been playing a vital role in information technology. Controlling magnetism via voltage other than current is the key to reduce power consumption while enhancing processing speed, integration density and functionality in comparison with present-day complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor electronics technology. Promising spintronic device concepts utilize the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. Symmetry arguments require the magnetoelectric antiferromagnet Cr2O3 (0001) has a surface magnetization which is coupled with the bulk antiferromagnetic order parameter. Macroscopic evidences from integral methods include magneto optical Kerr and superconducting quantum device magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, and first-principles calculations [1]. Moreover, microscopic spatial resolved evidences of electrically controlled magnetization domains are observed by magnetic force microscopy and photoemission electron microscopy combined with X-ray magnetic circular dichroism contrast [2]. This unique surface magnetization is coupled to the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state. Therefor reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field switches the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state thus reverses the surface magnetization coupled to it. Using a perpendicular ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr2O3 single crystal to form a Cr2O3 based exchange bias heterostructure, this unique electrically controlled surface magnetization functions as the pinning layer. By electrically controlling the pinning layer, we achieve reversible, isothermal electrically switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values at room temperature [1]. This approach offers a promising new route to voltage-controlled spintronic devices, such as non-volatile magnetoelectric memory, which may be viewed as an alternative to other a

  257. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Improving Collider Searches with Effective Field Theory"

    Presented by Nicholas Dunn, UC Berkeley

    Friday, December 2, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

    Recent results from the LHC suggest that new physics will not be found in obvious search channels. One possibility is that any new physics will be found beneath a large QCD background. In this talk, I will discuss how effective field theory methods, specifically SCET, can be used to improve our understanding of backgrounds at the LHC. I will present new methods for both event generation using Monte Carlo and analytical techniques.

  258. Joint HET/ATLAS Lunch Seminar

    "Combined ATLAS+CMS Standard Model Higgs boson searches with up to 2.3 fb-1 of pp collision data at 7 TeV at the LHC"

    Presented by Ketevi Assamagan, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, November 18, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  259. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Conformal Fixed Point of SU(3) Gauge Theory with 12 Fundamental Fermions in the Twisted Polyakov Loop Scheme"

    Presented by Eigo Shintani, RBRC

    Friday, November 4, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  260. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Fermion masses and Higgs cross sections"

    Presented by Sally Dawson, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, October 28, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  261. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Can We Apply the Notions of Band-offset, Potential Well and Barrier to Nanoscale Heterostructures?"

    Presented by Christoph Delerue, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Lille, France

    Thursday, October 13, 2011, 11 am
    Bldg. 735 - Conf Rm B

    Hosted by: Mark Hybertsen

    Epitaxially-grown semiconductor heterostructures give the possibility to tailor the potential landscape for the carriers in a very controlled way. In planar lattice-matched heterostructures, the potential has indeed a very simple and easily predictable behavior: it is constant everywhere except at the interfaces where there is a step (discontinuity) which only depends on the composition of the semiconductors in contact. In this presentation, we show that this universally accepted picture can be invalid in nanoscale heterostructures (e.g., quantum dots, rods, nanowires) which can be presently fabricated in a large variety of forms. Self-consistent tight-binding calculations applied to systems containing up to 75000 atoms indeed demonstrate that the potential may have a more complex behavior in axial hetero-nanostructures: The band edges can show significant variations far from the interfaces if the nanostructures are not capped with a homogeneous shell. These results suggest new strategies to engineer the electronic properties of nanoscale objects, e.g. for sensors and photovoltaics. Y.M. Niquet and C. Delerue, Phys. Rev. B 84, 075478 (2011).

  262. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Variations on Some Familiar Themes Regarding EWSB"

    Presented by Hooman Davoudiasl, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, October 7, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  263. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Searching for (Nearly) Conformal Dynamics on the Lattice"

    Presented by Ethan T. Neil, Fermilab

    Wednesday, October 5, 2011, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  264. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Strong Yukawa models on the lattice"

    Presented by David Lin, NCTS, Taiwan

    Friday, September 30, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  265. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Symmetry breaking and high-mobility transport in graphene-based heterostructures"

    Presented by Cory Dean, Columbia University

    Tuesday, September 27, 2011, 11 am
    Bldg. 480 conference room

    Hosted by: Ivan Bozovic

    A continuing challenge in the study of graphene remains fabrication of ultra-high mobility devices so that electronic behaviour in this novel material can be studied in the clean limit. In my talk I will discuss our recent experimental advancement in fabricating very-high quality graphene devices on boron nitride. Magnetoresistance measurements under large applied fields will be presented including our observation of the fractional quantum Hall effect in multi-terminal devices over a broad range of carrier densities. Symmetry breaking and evidence for spontaneous quantum Hall ferromagnetism in the degenerate integer quantum Hall states, in both single and bilayer graphene, will be presented. Finally, I will review our ongoing effort to study correlated electron behaviour in multi-layered graphene/BN heterostructures.

  266. Joint HET/ATLAS Lunch Seminar

    "Is SUSY dead?"

    Presented by George Redlinger, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, September 23, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  267. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "High Resolution Soft X-Ray RIXS in Quasi One-Dimensional Cuprates and Oxide Heterostructures"

    Presented by Thorsten Schmitt, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland

    Wednesday, August 10, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) is a powerful bulk-sensitive photon-in/photon-out spectroscopic probe of the electronic structure with atomic and orbital sensitivity. It is an ideal method for studying excitations from the electronic ground state in correlated transition metal oxides, being directly sensitive to charge-, orbital- and spin-degrees of freedom. Ultra-high resolution instrumentation for RIXS is available at the ADvanced RESonant Spectroscopies (ADRESS) beamline of the Swiss Light Source at the Paul Scherrer Institut, being optimized for soft X-rays with variable polarization between 0.4 and 1.8 keV [1]. The SAXES (Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrograph) RIXS spectrometer of the ADRESS beamline has a resolving power of ca. 12000 for 1 keV. It allows varying the scattering geometry between incident and inelastically scattered X-rays in order to study low-energy excitations as a function of momentum transfer. In this talk I will give an overview on high-resolution and momentum dependent RIXS studies of magnetic and electronic excitations in quasi one-dimensional cuprate and oxide hetersotructure systems Sr2CuO3 is a quasi one-dimensional corner-sharing single-chain compound possessing the nearly ideal properties of the one-dimensional antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin-1/2 model. The momentum transfer dispersion of the Cu L3-RIXS signal in Sr2CuO3 along the chain direction reveals that the main spectral weight follows the lower onset of the two-spinon (and higher order) continuum and probes the dynamical spin structure factor. Numerical calculations within the Bethe Ansatz allow a detailed line shape analysis of the RIXS response. The modes within the orbital excitation energy range show that the dd excitations in Sr2CuO3 are momentum dispersive and can be associated with orbitons, i.e. dispersive excitations mediated by the superexchange interactions. A spin-orbital superexchange model reproduces this orbiton dispersion and explains the lar

  268. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Detecting Fourth Generation Heavy Quarks at the LHC"

    Presented by David Atwood, Iowa State University

    Friday, August 5, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  269. HET Lunch Seminar

    "SUSY QCD Corrections to Higgs-b Production"

    Presented by Prerit Jaiswal, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, July 29, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  270. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    ""Chiral Polarization Properties of QCD Dirac Eigenmodes""

    Presented by Ivan Horvath, Kentucky

    Friday, July 8, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-95

    Hosted by: A. Soni

  271. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Eigo Shintani, RBRC

    Friday, July 1, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  272. HET/ATLAS Joint Lunch Seminar

    "Searches for new physics using leptons and jets at the Tevatron and LHC"

    Presented by Thomas Gadfort, BNL

    Friday, May 13, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  273. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Four Generations, Higgs Physics and the MSSM"

    Presented by Prerit Jaiswal, BNL/YITP

    Friday, April 22, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  274. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Generic dark matter signature for gamma-ray telescopes"

    Presented by Wai-Yee Keung, University of Illinois, Chicago

    Friday, March 25, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 / Room 2-160

    Hosted by: A. Soni

    We describe a characteristic signature of dark matter (DM) annihilation or decay into gamma-rays. We show that if the total angular momentum of the initial DM particle(s) vanishes, and helicity suppression operates to prevent annihilation/decay into light fermion pairs, then the amplitude for the dominant 3-body final state e+e- gamma has a unique form dictated by gauge invariance. This amplitude and the corresponding energy spectra hold for annihilation of DM Majorana fermions or self-conjugate scalars, and for decay of DM scalars, thus encompassing a variety of possibilities. Within this scenario, we analyze Fermi LAT, PAMELA and HESS data, and predict a hint in future Fermi gamma-ray data that portends a striking signal at atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (ACTs).

  275. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "String Theory and the Real World"

    Presented by Herman Verlinde, Princeton University

    Wednesday, March 9, 2011, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  276. Biology Department Seminar

    "Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases: Possible Origins and Molecular Mechanisms Leading to the Evolution of Enhanced Catalytic Activity, Specificity, and Allostery"

    Presented by Charles Carter, Jr., Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    Monday, March 7, 2011, 11 am
    John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Bob Sweet

    The genetic code is translated by two distinct families of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS), whose role is to accelerate two different chemical reactions: activation of the amino acid carboxyl group at the expense of ATP and transfer of the activated acyl group to the 3’ terminus of the cognate tRNA. Although interest in the synthetase field centers mainly on the second of these reactions, we are preoccupied by the first, because in the absence of catalysts the uncatalyzed rate of amino acid activation is 4-5 orders of magnitude slower than that of acyl transfer. Amino acid activation is therefore the defining kinetic barrier in protein synthesis. We propose that by providing this catalytic activity, primordial aaRS could have launched ribosomal protein synthesis and hence natural selection (1,2). We are developing new methods in order to identify and manipulate models for the ancestral synthetases from both classes (2-4). We have observed that conserved sequences previously thought essential for catalytic activity can be deleted without abolishing activity. In this lecture, I’ll describe an extensive series of active fragments containing the active sites of both tryptophanyl- (Class I) and histidyl- (Class II) tRNA synthetases (2,5), among which the smallest contain only 46 residues. These results enable us to examine possible evolutionary pathways leading to enhanced catalytic activity (3), specificity (2), and allosteric function (6,7). References: 1. Carter, C. W., Jr., and Duax, W. L. (2002) Molec. Cell 10, 705-8. 2. Pham, Y., et al. (2007) Molec. Cell 25, 851-62. 3. Pham, Y., et al. (2010) J. Biol. Chem. 285. 4. Li, L., et al. (2011) J. Biol. Chem., Published online. 5. Rodin, A., et al. (2009) J. Molec. Evolution 69, 555-67. 6. Weinreb, V., et al. (2009) Structure 17, 952-64. 7. Cammer, S., and Carter, C. W., Jr. (2010) Bioinformatics 26, 709-14.

  277. Chemistry Department Seminar

    "Combining reaction kinetics, spectroscopy and DFT calculations for mechanistic studies in heterogeneous catalysis"

    Presented by Prof. Simon Podkolzin, Dept. of Chemistry Engineering & Materials Science, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ

    Wednesday, February 16, 2011, 11 am
    Room 300 - Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: Dario Stacchiola

  278. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Patrick Meade, YITP

    Friday, January 28, 2011, 12 pm
    Building 510 Room 2-160

    TBA

  279. Joint HET/BNL- ATLAS Seminar

    "SUSY as a model independent search tool for experimentalists"

    Presented by Patrick Meade, Stony Brook

    Thursday, January 13, 2011, 11 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  280. Joint HET/BNL- ATLAS Seminar

    "The case for new physics: A BSM overview for LHC experimentalists"

    Presented by Patrick Meade, Stony Brook

    Tuesday, January 11, 2011, 11 am
    Building 510A Room 2-160

  281. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Lattice QCD inputs to the CKM unitarity triangle analysis."

    Presented by Ruth van der Water, BNL

    Friday, December 17, 2010, 12 pm
    Bldg 510, Room 2-160

  282. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Bill Kilgore, BNL

    Friday, December 10, 2010, 12 pm
    Room 2-95

    Hosted by: A. Soni

  283. Biology Department Seminar

    "Copying and Reprogramming of Heterochromatin with RNA Interference"

    Presented by Rob Martienssen, Watson School of Biological Sciences, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY

    Friday, December 10, 2010, 11 am
    John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: John Shanklin

    Heterochromatin is composed of transposable elements (TE) and related repeats which silence genes located nearby, and play a major role in epigenetic regulation of the genome. Far from being inert, heterochromatin is transcribed and small interfering RNA corresponding to heterochromatic sequences can be detected in plants, animals and fission yeast. Recently, we have proposed a role for heterochromatin in reprogramming events that occur in plant reproductive cells, as well as in the embryo and endosperm after fertilization. 21nt epigenetically activated small interfering RNA (easiRNA) from transposable elements accumulate in cultured cells and in pollen, and are translocated from the surrounding pollen grain into the sperm, while in the maturing seed 24nt siRNA are primarily maternal in origin. Thus maternal and paternal genomes likely contribute differing small RNA to the zygote and to the endosperm. If transposable elements in the seed are not targeted by small RNA from the pollen, or vice versa, this could lead to hybrid seed failure, in a mechanism reminiscent of hybrid dysgenesis. Unexpectedly, mutants in the easiRNA pathway lead to specification of diploid functional megaspores from somatic cells in the ovule, reminiscent of apospory in other species. Thus heterochromatin reprogramming may play a role in apomixis, and may utilize a similar mechanism. In fission yeast and in Arabidopsis, centromeric repeats are transcribed, but the transcripts are rapidly turned over by RNA interference, through the combined action of DNA dependent RNA polymerase, Argonaute and RNA dependent RNA polymerase, each of which is associated with heterochromatin. Histone H3 lysine-9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) depends on RNAi, mediated by the Rik1-Clr4 complex. We have found that heterochromatin is lost transiently during chromosomal replication, allowing heterochromatic transcripts to accumulate. Rapid processing of these transcripts into small RNA during S phase promotes restoration of

  284. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Ga-assisted MBE grown GaAs nanowires and related quantum heterostructures for solar applications"

    Presented by Anna Fontcuberta-Morral, Laboratoire des Matériaux Semiconducteurs, Institute of Materials, Ecole Polytechnique, Switzerland

    Friday, December 3, 2010, 11 am
    Bldg 735, CFN Conference Room B

    Hosted by: Peter and Eli Sutter

    Nanowires represent model systems for studying a variety of low dimensional phenomena as well as building blocks for the future generation of nanoscale devices. The most exploited nanowire growth technique is the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) method, which very often employs gold as a seed for the growth. We present the method for growing GaAs nanowires by MBE without using gold as a catalyst. Along these lines, we will show how Molecular beam epitaxy offers a unique possibility for obtaining high purity and high quality materials. Additionally, it gives a great flexibility for the fabrication of many types of nanowire heterostructures. We will present here how radial and axial heterostructures can be obtained and how this combination can be beneficial for application in third generation solar cell designs. The optical and transport properties will be elucidated by means of luminescence, Raman spectroscopy and microscopy experiments realized on the same single nanowire. Finally, the results are then applied to the realization of nanowire-based solar cells. The future of this research area will be briefly discussed.

  285. HET Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Oliver Witzel, BNL

    Friday, November 19, 2010, 12 pm
    Building 510A Room 2-160

  286. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    ": Electronic Compressibility and Magnetization of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Heterostructure Interface"

    Presented by Lu Li, MIT

    Monday, November 15, 2010, 1 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Ivan Bozovic

    The LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructure is a potential candidate for a high mobility two-dimensional electron system with novel electronic and magnetic properties. Though LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 are both large-gap band insulators, the interface is conductive, and even superconducting below 200 mK. In this talk, we describe surprising results from two thermodynamic measurements of this electronic system - the electronic compressibility and the magnetization. First, the electronic compressibility is measured with capacitance spectroscopy. For some devices, we observed a greater than 40% enhancement of the gate capacitance at low carrier densities. At the same densities, electric field penetration measurements show that the oxide interface significantly overscreens applied electric fields. Both measurements imply a negative electronic compressibility of the oxide interface system. Second, the magnetic moment of the interface system is detected directly using torque magnetometry. Control experiments with samples without LaAlO3 display a background signal two orders of magnitude smaller, which verifies the observed magnetic moment arising from the deposition of LaAlO3. The measured equilibrium M-H curve resembles that of a soft ferromagnet. The observed spontaneous magnetic moment is in-plane, and exists even in the superconducting state. Finally, the observation of the negative compressibility supports the two-dimensionality of the electronic system, whereas the measured M-H behavior implies a magnetic ordering at the interface. These two thermodynamic measurements suggest the existence of a two-dimensional magnetic state.

  287. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Higgs Physics in Warped Extra Dimensions"

    Presented by Florian Goertz, University of Mainz, Germany

    Friday, November 12, 2010, 12 pm
    Room 2-95 Building 510A

  288. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Electronic reconstructions in hybrid C/BN heterostructures"

    Presented by Jose Miguel Pruneda, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Spain

    Tuesday, November 9, 2010, 1:30 pm
    Bldg. 735 - Conf Rm A

    Hosted by: Qin Wu

    Studies of hybrid C/BN heterostructures have experienced a considerable thrust after the spectacular rise of graphene and its applications, and the recent fabrication of BN monolayers(1). Synthesis of C/BN nanotubes(2) and nanosheets(3) have already been reported. These hybrid nanostructures offer a unique route for material engineering, by combination of the exciting properties of graphene with those of insulating polar BN. Here, I will present first principles (DFT) calculations of the zigzag-terminated interfaces between C and BN nanodomains, proving that unconventional physical effects similar to those observed at insulating oxide interfaces(4), can also exist in lower dimensions, opening alternative routes for tuning electronic properties at nanointerfaces. It will be shown that the magnetic character of the edge states in zigzag shaped graphene nanoribbons, and the polar BN edge, team up to give a spin asymmetric screening that induces half-semimetallicity at the interface, with a gap of a few tenths of eV for one spin orientation, and a tiny gap of hundredths of eV for the other(5). This effect is also observed in tubular geometries, as long as the interface is zigzag-edged. References: (1) Pacile et. al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2008, 92, 133107; Jin et. al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2009, 102, 195505. (2) Suenaga et. al. Science 1997, 278, 5338; Enouz et. al. Nano Lett. 2007, 7, 1856. (3) Ci et. al. Nat. Materials 2010, 9, 430. (4) Ohtomo & Hwang Nature 2004, 427, 423; Brinkman et. al. Nat. Mater. 2007, 6, 493; Reyren et. al. Science 2007, 317, 5842. (5) Pruneda Phys. Rev. B 2010, 81, 161409(R)

  289. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Walter Goldberger, Yale

    Wednesday, October 20, 2010, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    TBA

  290. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Improving and Expanding Searches for TeV-Scale Z' Bosons Decaying to WW and Zh"

    Presented by Brock Tweedie, Boston University

    Thursday, October 14, 2010, 12:30 pm
    Bldg. 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Anthony Baltz

  291. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "BSM theory review of solutions to the Top quark forward-backward asymmetry anomaly at Tevatron"

    Presented by Kai Wang, IPMU, The University of Tokyo

    Wednesday, September 22, 2010, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    TBA

  292. Joint HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Nucleon physics on the lattice"

    Presented by Meifeng Lin Lin, Yale University

    Thursday, August 19, 2010, 12:30 pm
    Building 510A Room 2-160

  293. Atmospheric Sciences Division Seminar

    "The Role of Organics in Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation: Anthropogenic, HULIS, Biomass Burning, and Marine Biological Particles"

    Presented by Daniel A. Knopf, SUNY Stony Brook

    Friday, July 23, 2010, 11 am
    Bldg 815E

    Hosted by: Arthur Sedlacek

    Aerosols can affect the radiative properties of clouds by acting as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei (IN). Ice particles impact the global radiative budget and atmospheric water vapor distribution, both representing large uncertainties in predicting climate. In the atmosphere, the formation of ice can proceed via homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation. Various organic compounds constitute a significant fraction of aerosol mass and thus affect the ability of particles to serve as IN. Here we report on homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation via deposition, immersion, and condensation modes of organic and organics containing particles in the temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) range typical for cirrus and mixed phase clouds. Ice nucleation as a function of T and RH and corresponding ice nucleation rates for estimation of ice particle production rates are presented. Laboratory generated particles serving as surrogates of atmospheric organics containing particles and field collected aerosol are employed in the studies. Homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation via the immersion mode are studied from pure and multi-component (inorganic/organic) aqueous particles composed of major species typical of marine and biomass burning aerosol including levoglucosan, (NH4)2SO4, NaCl containing solid humic and fulvic acids, and surface-active organic monolayers. Of particular interest is how the organic material affects particle water activity in the supercooled temperature range. Measured freezing temperatures and nucleation rates are discussed with respect to the water-activity based nucleation theory. Anthropogenic particles dominated by organic material collected in and around Mexico City and impacted by photochemical aging nucleate ice heterogeneously at T and RH for cirrus onset conditions typical for the northern hemisphere. Particle analyses conducted using CCSEM/EDX and STXM/NEXAFS. These results are in stark contrast to previous measurements employin

  294. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Mid-infrared High Performance Quantum Cascade Lasers and PbS/InP Heterojunction Photovoltaic Detectors"

    Presented by Zhijun Liu, Brown University

    Monday, June 28, 2010, 1 pm
    Bldg. 735 - Conf Rm B

    Hosted by: Chuck Black

    Mid-infrared spectral region (wavelengths ~ 3-30µm) is of particular interest due to the presence of strong fingerprint absorption of numerous species, which enables various applications in chemical sensing, spectroscopy, medical diagnosis, and countermeasure, among others. Compared to optical technologies in visible or near-infrared regions, mid-infrared photonics is considered as "underdeveloped" due to the lack of suitable optical components and/or their limited performance. With development in synthesis of atomic layer thick heterostructure superlattice and in understanding of light interaction with these nanostructures, breakthroughs have been made in the past decade, especially on the high performance quantum cascade (QC) lasers, which are revolutionizing both fundamental research and practical applications in the mid-infrared. In order to turn the potential applications into real-world uses, optical components with new level of performance and functionalities are in urgent need for different application purposes. In this seminar, I will first describe high performance mid-infrared QC lasers at different wavelengths within the first and second atmospheric windows, which include the performance optimization for high power, room temperature, continuous-wave operation, temperature-dependent optical gain and loss measurements, and new design concepts of deep-well QC lasers and quantum-box emitters. Following the discussion on intersubband QC lasers, I will talk about my recent efforts on realizing subwavelength interband microdisk lasers at telecom wavelength, and a near-infrared and short-wave infrared dual-band photovoltaic detector using PbS nanocrystals on InP substrate. Finally I will conclude with a brief discussion on future research directions.

  295. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Unraveling mechanistic insights of heterogeneous catalytic reactions over model surfaces"

    Presented by Sanjaya Senanayake, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Thursday, April 29, 2010, 10 am
    CFN, Bldg 735, Conference Room A

    Hosted by: Peter Sutter

    Catalysis is at the forefront of global research initiatives aimed at targeting critical environmental problems and addressing ever increasing energy demands. The "surface science" approach has been successful with the use of well defined model surfaces to explain critical aspects of complex real world catalysis but challenges still remain in finding suitable answers to key questions including: identification of active sites, role of interfaces, and correlation of structure to selectivity/activity. This talk will present recent studies of cerium oxide based model catalysts that have become very important as an industrially critical catalyst material due to unique oxygen storage properties. The talk will encompass the following: 1. Probing the redox surface chemistry of oxides with organic molecules 2. Modeling automotive catalysis (CO+NO) using metal nanoparticles supported on oxides (M/Ox) and 3. Understanding the remarkable reactivity observed from oxide nanoparticles in the production of H2 (WGS) in inverse (Ox/M) and mixed oxide (Ox1/Ox2) catalysts.

  296. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Quantum Criticality and the Cuprate Superconductors"

    Presented by Subir Sachdev, Harvard University

    Wednesday, April 28, 2010, 2 pm
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

    I will begin with a simple introduction to the theory of quantum criticality, as applied to experiments on certain insulating antiferromagnets. I will then survey the phenomenology of the cuprate high temperature superconductors, and show how ideas from quantum criticality have helped explain or predict the results of a number of recent experiments. The applications to the cuprates focus attention on key problems associated with the criticality of Fermi surfaces in two dimensions which remain unresolved. I will describe how these open problems are being addressed by the AdS/CFT correspondence discovered in string theory.

  297. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Goldstinos"

    Presented by Jesse Thaler, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, March 24, 2010, 2:30 pm
    SUNY Stony Brook

  298. Particle Physics Seminar

    "The Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment and the Search for Theta13"

    Presented by Daniel Dwyer, California Institute of Technology

    Thursday, March 4, 2010, 3 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: David Jaffe

    The Daya Bay neutrino oscillation experiment has the greatest sensitivity to the neutrino mixing angle $\sin^2 2\theta_{13}$ of all experiments currently under construction. Our goal is to either determine the size of this mixing angle, or to establish a limit of $\sin^2 2\theta_{13}<0.01$. Eight 'identical' detectors, a newly constructed undergound facility, and multiple nuclear power reactors will be used to reach this goal. The progress of construction and recent results from detector testing will be discussed.

  299. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Top-Quark Pair Production Beyond Next-To-Leading Order"

    Presented by Andrea Ferroglia, Mainz University

    Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  300. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "NLO QCD Predictions for Vector Bosons Plus Jets at the LHC"

    Presented by Lance Dixon, SLAC

    Wednesday, February 10, 2010, 2:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  301. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Non-Destructive 3-D Structural Imaging and Characterization of Heterogeneous Functional Materials (HeteroFoaMs) for Energy Systems"

    Presented by Wilson Chiu, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut

    Monday, February 8, 2010, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Jun Wang

    Fuel cells, batteries, capacitators, electrolyzers, solar cells, combustion devices, fuel processing devices, and membranes and coatings all consist of heterogeneous functional materials (HeteroFoaMs) that exhibit functional behavior in a manner that controls their collective performance as an energy system. There is a critical need to understand the role of a HeteroFoaM’s structure, morphology, and composition on system performance. This seminar presents a non-destructive approach to image and characterize HeteroFoaMs using a transmission x-ray microscope at the Advanced Photon Source 32-ID-C. Three-dimensional structures within the sample volume are tomographically reconstructed at 38 nm spatial resolution. Multi-component lattice Boltzmann methods are used to analyze mass transfer, heat transfer, ionic/electronic charge transfer, and chemical/electrochemical reaction rates in the HeteroFoaM. To demonstrate this technique, chemical elements, chemical bonding, and phase- and pore-network structures in a solid oxide fuel cell are examined to provide fundamental insight into the origins of transport-related losses during operation. This work is supported by an Energy Frontier Research Center on Science Based Nano-Structure Design and Synthesis of Heterogeneous Functional Materials for Energy Systems (HeteroFoaM Center) funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (Award DE-SC000106).

  302. Particle Physics Seminar

    "Neutrino mixing: What MINOS can say about theta13, the neutrino mass hierarchy, and CP violation in the lepton sector"

    Presented by Gregory Pawloski, Stanford University

    Thursday, February 4, 2010, 3 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Serban Protopopescu

    ABSTRACT: MINOS is an accelerator neutrino oscillation experiment designed to make precise measurements of the neutrino mixing parameters associated precise measurements of the neutrino mixing parameters associated with the atmospheric mass-squared splitting. By studying oscillations along a 735 km baseline, there is potential to produce measurements that are sensitive to the neutrino mass hierarchy and the values of the CP-violating phase and theta13. The results from the MINOS electron neutrino appearance analysis will be presented, and its implications on the above parameters will be discussed.

  303. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "N=4 SYM and the Grassmannian"

    Presented by N. Arkani-Hamed, Institute for Advanced Study

    Wednesday, January 27, 2010, 2:30 pm
    YITP, Stony Brook

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  304. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Leo Almeida, SBU/BNL

    Friday, January 22, 2010, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  305. RIKEN Lunch/HET/NT

    "EDM's & Bayrogenesis"

    Presented by Ying-chuan Li, University of Wisconsin, China

    Thursday, January 21, 2010, 12:30 pm
    Physics Dept., Bldg. 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Anthony Baltz

  306. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Hai-Yang Cheng, Academia Sinica, Taiwan / BNL

    Friday, January 8, 2010, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  307. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Cai-Dian Lu, IHEP, Bejing

    Friday, December 11, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

  308. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Michael Creutz, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, December 4, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  309. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Amarjit Soni, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, November 20, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  310. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Non-Minimal Dark Matter--Nucleon Scattering"

    Presented by Aaron Pierce, University of Michigan

    Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 2:30 pm
    YITP, SUNY Stony Brook (Room Math 6-125)

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  311. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Aleksandr Azatov, University of Maryland

    Friday, November 13, 2009, 12 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  312. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Hooman Davoudiasl, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, November 6, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  313. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Sally Dawson, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, October 30, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  314. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Comments About Goldstinos"

    Presented by Nathan Seiberg, IAS, Princeton, New Jersey

    Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 2 pm
    YITP, SUNY Stony Brook (Room Math 6-125)

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  315. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Jennifer Kile, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, October 9, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  316. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Relating High-Scale Non-Universality in SUGRA scenario to the Low-Scale Observables at the LHC"

    Presented by Subhaditya Bhattacharya, HRI, India

    Friday, September 25, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

    Apart from the most popular framework in gravity-mediated SUSY breaking scheme, called minimal Supergravity (mSUGRA) where all the SUSY breaking scalar and gaugino masses are assumed to be unified at the high-scale, there exist models with non-universal gaugino and scalar masses which are strongly motivated from GUT theory as well as from the low-energy constraints. In this talk, I will discuss a few such models with non-universal gaugino and scalar masses, indicate the low-energy phenomenology as well as their distinguishability from the mSUGRA scenario, particularly in context of the signatures at the upcoming Large Hadron Collider Experiment.

  317. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Fourth Generation and Electroweak Symmetry Breaking"

    Presented by Gustave Burdman, Sao Paulo/FNAL

    Wednesday, September 23, 2009, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  318. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Creating Low-Dimensional Electronic States in Superconducting Oxide Heterostructures"

    Presented by Yusuke Kozuka, Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan

    Monday, September 21, 2009, 11 am
    Bldg. 480 conference room

    Hosted by: Ivan Bozovic

    The role of dimensionality has been one of the central issues in superconductivity, because many promising superconductors have quasi-two-dimensional electronic states such as MgB2 and cuprates. Although the low-dimensional properties of superconductivity have been studied in metal thin films for decades, they essentially form from 3D electronic states because of their large carrier density. Here, we focus on strontium titanate (SrTiO3), which is the first known superconducting semiconductor with extremely low carrier density (n > 1019 cm-3). Using a new growth technique for high-mobility SrTiO3 films, we grew heterostructures of 1 at. % Nb-doped SrTiO3 (Nb:SrTiO3) embedded in insulating SrTiO3 by pulsed laser deposition, which exhibits a superconducting transition around 0.3 K. By decreasing the thickness of Nb:SrTiO3, the low-temperature mobility was enhanced by a factor of ~ 3, exceeding 1,000 cm2 V-1 s-1. In addition, analysis of the superconducting upper critical field indicated a crossover from 2D to 3D superconductivity. Above the upper critical field, we observed Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations which scale with the perpendicular field, indicating a 2D normal state. These results suggest we can access new regimes of 2D superconducting phase transitions in the clean limit. This work was done in collaboration with Minu Kim, Christopher Bell, Bog G. Kim, Yasuyuki Hikita, and Harold Y. Hwang.

  319. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Christian Sturm, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, September 18, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  320. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Insight into heterogeneous geomaterials through XANES Imaging Spectroscopy."

    Presented by Vincent De Andrade, ESRF, X-ray microscopy beamline ID21, 38043 Grenoble

    Wednesday, September 9, 2009, 9 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Juergen Thieme

    Because of their complex genesis, materials are commonly polycrystalline heterogeneous systems, with both chemical and structural heterogeneities at various scale-level. As most of the micro- and nano- analytical techniques relying on scanning instruments with a pencil-beam, XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) technique offers high spatial resolution but suffers from long acquisition times imposing practical limits on the field of view. Now, region of interest in samples are generally several orders of magnitude larger than the beam size. Along this presentation, an overview will be given onto the on-going technical developments of the ESRF ID21-beamline Scanning Microscope, relating to detection (multi-elements detector, in-house developed WDX spectrometer) and optics (Fresnel zone plate, KB mirrors). Then, we will focus on an original setup developed and optimized to perform spectroscopic imaging on geomaterials, with relatively short acquisition time (≈1 h) and large field of view (0.5-2 mm2) while keeping a sub-micron resolution. The setup consists in coupling full-field absorption radiographies with a large parallel beam of hard X-rays, XANES and PIC (Polarization Imaging Contrast) techniques. The potential of this combined approach will be demonstrated on metamorphic rocks. This non-invasive method enables 2D quantitative Fe3+/Fetotal estimates revealing subtle redox variations inside mineralogical phases. Moreover, besides providing crystalline orientations at the pixel scale, the PIC and XANES combination allowed to correct XANES estimates from polarization effects, which is a tricky but important task in polycrystalline materials. Finally, the last application concerns an experimental study of a bentonite analog (clayey material) considered for nuclear wastes and CO2 storage. Mapping of the proportions of finely mixed phases at the µm3 scale were extracted from hyperspectral data acquired on a reference bentonite. The spatial repartition o

  321. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Depth dependent studies of magnetic and superconducting properties of thin films and heterostructures with polarized low energy muons"

    Presented by Elvezio Morenzoni, Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland

    Wednesday, September 2, 2009, 11 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Ivan Bozovic

    Positive polarized muons $\mu^{+}$ act as a non-destructive, non-invasive, and sensitive microscopic probe for local magnetic investigations (muon spin rotation/relaxation, $\mu$SR). Over the years they have provided unique information about magnetic, superconducting and other electronic properties of bulk matter. A novel extension of the $\mu$SR technique is given by the availability of $\mu^{+}$ with 100\% spin polarization and whose energy can be continuously varied from 0.5 to 30 keV. This allows depth dependent $\mu$SR-studies of thin films, near surface regions and multilayered structures in the range from $\sim$ 1 nm to $\sim$ 300 nm. After a brief introduction of the method, I will overview some experiments including investigations of thin films and heterostructures of various superconducting and magnetic materials, ranging from cuprates through spin glasses to structures and compounds relevant for spintronics applications.

  322. HET Lunch Seminar

    "U(1)' instead of R-parity"

    Presented by Hye-Sung Lee, University of California Riverside

    Friday, August 7, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  323. HET Lunch Seminar

    "W/Z+b jets at hadron colliders: a challenging background"

    Presented by Laura Reina, FSU

    Friday, July 24, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  324. HET Lunch Seminar

    "The WIMP Forest"

    Presented by Chris Jackson, Argonne National Laboratory

    Friday, July 10, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  325. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Thomas Rizzo, SLAC

    Friday, June 12, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  326. Special HET Lunch Seminar

    "Flavor and SUSY: between frustration and hope"

    Presented by Antonio Masiero, INFN/PADUA

    Thursday, June 11, 2009, 12:30 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  327. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Yasumichi Aoki, RBRC

    Friday, May 22, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  328. Biology Department Seminar

    "Microbial Genomics to Omics-Based Systems and Synthetic Microbiology"

    Presented by Jihyun Kim, KRIBB, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea

    Friday, May 22, 2009, 11 am
    John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Bill Studier

    With the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies, sequencing has become an effective means of understanding life systems and increasing their utility. There is no doubt that sequence information is not only the final goal of a particular genome/metagenome project but a starting point of so-called ‘-omics’ research, becoming the cornerstone of systems biology and synthetic biology. There have been hundreds of microbial genome projects, including derivatives of Escherichia coli B that have been widely used as a workhorse in the labs and industry. Recently, we determined partly as an international consortium activity the genome sequences of two E. coli strains of the B lineage, REL606 and BL21(DE3). We further integrated and compared the transcriptome, proteome and phenome data of B and K-12, and also applied a computational modeling approach, thus providing a framework to elucidate the phenotypic characteristics of organisms and offering a high-resolution system-wide view of the biological systems.

  329. HET Lunch Seminar

    "'4th Generation' & B-CP anomalies"

    Presented by Amarjit Soni, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, May 8, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  330. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Implications of the Higgs Discovery in MSSM"

    Presented by Ian Low, Argonne National Laboratory/Northwestern University

    Wednesday, May 6, 2009, 2:30 pm
    YITP, SUNY Stony Brook (Room Math 6-125)

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  331. HET/ATLAS Joint Seminar

    Presented by Michael Begel, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, May 1, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  332. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Bill Kilgore, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, April 24, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  333. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Zuowei Liu, YITP-SBU

    Friday, April 17, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  334. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Constraining Interactions in Cosmology's Dark Sector"

    Presented by Mark Trodden, University of Pennsylvania

    Wednesday, April 15, 2009, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  335. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Erin Sheldon, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, April 3, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  336. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Fundamental Physics from the Sky"

    Presented by Stefano Profumo, SCIPP, University of California, Santa Cruz

    Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

    Can we learn about New Physics with astronomical and astro-particle data? Understanding how this is possible is key to unraveling one of the most pressing mysteries at the interface of cosmology and particle physics: the fundamental nature of dark matter. Rapid progress may be within grasp in the context of an approach which combines information from high-energy particle physics with cosmic-ray and traditional astronomical data. I discuss recent puzzling data on cosmic-ray electrons and positrons and their interpretation. I show how the Fermi Space Telescope will soon shed light on those data as well as potentially on several dark matter particle properties. I then introduce a novel approach to particle dark matter searches based on the complementarity of astronomical observations across the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio to X-ray and to gamma-ray frequencies.

  337. HET/ATLAS Joint Seminar

    "Search for MSSM Higgs Boson Production in di-tau Final States at D0"

    Presented by Abid Patwa, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, March 27, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

    Recent results from the D0 Experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented on the search for the production of neutral Higgs bosons decaying into di-tau final states. In particular, searches with integrated luminosities of up to 2.2 fb^-1 of data are described in both the Higgs decaying into tau pairs as well as those produced in association with a b-quark. Since no significant excess is observed over the predicted backgrounds in either decay mode, limits on its production cross section times branching ratio are set for Higgs masses within the range from 90 to 300 GeV. The results are subsequently interpreted in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and regions in the (mA, tan(beta)) parameter space for different MSSM benchmark scenarios are excluded at the 95% C.L. Future prospects for measurements with increased integrated luminosities delivered by the Tevatron are also discussed.

  338. Medical Department Seminar

    "GIN, CIN, and cell promiscuity, or whether viruses cause cancer by fusing cells"

    Presented by Professor Yuri Lazenbik, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    Friday, March 20, 2009, 1:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Hosted by: Helene Benveniste, MD, PhD

  339. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Leandro Almeida, YITP, SBU

    Friday, March 13, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  340. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Bill Marciano, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, March 6, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  341. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Frank Paige, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, February 27, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  342. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Dark Matter Sees the Light"

    Presented by Michele Papucci, IAS, Princeton

    Wednesday, February 25, 2009, 2:30 pm
    YITP, SUNY Stony Brook (Room Math 6-125)

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  343. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Anomalous Dynamics in Colloidal Glasses and Polymers Under Heterogeneous Confinement"

    Presented by Erica Saltzman, Columbia University

    Wednesday, February 18, 2009, 11 am
    Bldg. 735 - Conf Rm B

    Hosted by: Mark Hybertsen

    Complex fluids such as colloidal suspensions and polymer melts exhibit slow dynamics under a variety of conditions. Glasses are self-constraining complex fluids in which each particle is confined by its neighbors, and their dynamics as observed by simulation and experiment include a number of non-Gaussian behaviors. A theory of glassy dynamics in dense colloidal suspensions is presented, which qualitatively predicts the anomalous phenomenology. Another system exhibiting constrained dynamics is a polymer chain under spatial confinement, as in a porous medium. Simplified simulations of polymers under generic heterogeneous confinement are presented, which show that this system exhibits many of the non-Gaussian features of glassy dynamics.

  344. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Oliver Witzel, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, February 13, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  345. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Rachel Rosen, New York University

    Friday, February 6, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  346. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Kristian McDonald, TRIUMF

    Friday, January 30, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  347. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    Presented by Ruth Britto, Saclay, SPhT & Fermilab

    Wednesday, January 28, 2009, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  348. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Michael Creutz, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, January 23, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  349. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Jennifer Kile, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, January 16, 2009, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  350. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Alex Mitov, YITP

    Friday, December 19, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  351. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, HET/RBRC

    Friday, December 12, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  352. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "The Planck Scale from Top Condensation"

    Presented by Eduardo Ponton, Columbia University

    Wednesday, December 10, 2008, 2:30 pm
    YITP, SUNY Stony Brook (Room Math 6-125)

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  353. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "From Vortices in Superconductivity to Quark Confinement"

    Presented by Mikhail Shifman, University of Minnesota

    Wednesday, November 19, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

    Supersymmetry, born in the early 1970s, is a very rich theory which is supposed to describe the widest range of natural phenomena. Although it has not yet been discovered experimentally, it proved to be a powerful tool in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) -- the theory of hadrons -- and strongly coupled gauge theories at large. Efforts aimed at solving various aspects of QCD basing on supersymmetry and string-inspired ideas bring fruits. In a remarkable entanglement, theoretical constructions of the 1970s and 1990s combine with today's ideas to provide new insights and a deeper understanding.

  354. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Ruth Van de Water, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, November 14, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  355. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Tomomi Ishikawa, RBRC

    Friday, October 24, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  356. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Landscape Naturalness"

    Presented by Scott Thomas, Rutgers University

    Wednesday, October 22, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  357. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Sally Dawson, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, October 10, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  358. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Generalized unitarity and one-loop calculations"

    Presented by Kirill Melnikov, Johns Hopkins University

    Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 2:30 pm
    YITP, SUNY Stony Brook (Room Math 6-125)

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  359. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Christian Sturm, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, September 26, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  360. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Shrihari Gopalakrishna, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, September 19, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  361. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Silicon Carbide Nanocones and Heterostructures Induced by Released Iron Catalysis"

    Monday, September 15, 2008, 10 am
    Bldg. 735 - Conf Rm A

    Hosted by: Yimei Zhu

    Nanowires represent an important and broad class of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures at the forefront of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Nanowires are also attractive building blocks for functional nanoscale electronics, optoelectronic, electrochemical, and electromechanical devices. Understanding how to control the morphology, rational design and predictable synthesis of nanowires is vital in order to deterministically integrate such nanostructures into various technologies. A remarkably elegant approach to produce 1-dimensional (1D) nanostructures is by metal-catalyzed nanowire formation via the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Our results demonstrated the successful synthesis of unusual silicon carbide (SiC) nanocones and Y, T branched heterostructures as catalyzed by an iron nanoparticle originally encapsulated within a graphite-like carbon shell. At high temperature, the Fe nanoparticles leave the C-shell, migrate and combine with other Fe to form larger Fe nanoclusters. The increasing cross-sectional diameter of the SiC is due to the increasing diameter of the exposed Fe surface, that catalyzes the SiC growth, which could be caused by the release of the nanocluster from the C-shell and/or the coalescence with later released Fe particles. The released Fe can migrate onto an existing SiC nanowire, which catalyzes the nucleation and growth of a secondary SiC nanowire. Consequently, different Y and T branched structures and more complex hierarchical SiC nanostructures can be realized from this unique catalytic process. The migration of iron nanocrystal from the graphitic carbon shell is visualized by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The resultant SiC nanocones and heterostructures are analyzed systematically by different electron microscopy techniques, including Z-contrast imaging, energy dispersive X-ray emission (EDX) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques, electron diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM).

  362. Joint HET/RIKEN Theory Seminar

    Presented by Kaustubh Agashe, University of Maryland

    Wednesday, August 27, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  363. Joint HET/RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "Maximal Flavor Violation"

    Presented by Shaouly Bar-Shalom, Technion & UCI

    Wednesday, August 13, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  364. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Interaction between the General Anesthetic Halothane and Model Ion Channel Peptides in Langmuir Monolayers: An X-ray Reflectivity Study"

    Presented by Joseph Strzalka, University of Pennsylvania

    Friday, July 18, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  365. Joint HET/RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "Positronium and Polyelectrons"

    Presented by Andrzej Czarnecki, University of Alberta, Canada

    Wednesday, July 16, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  366. Joint HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Deconfining phase of SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics"

    Presented by Ralf Hofmann, University of Karlsruhe

    Wednesday, July 9, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  367. Biology Department Seminar

    "Harnessing Photosynthetic Bacteria for the Heterologous Expression of Membrane Proteins"

    Presented by Deborah Hanson, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL

    Friday, June 20, 2008, 11 am
    John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Carl Anderson

    The functions performed by membrane proteins are essential for all organisms. Despite the fact that they represent approximately 30% of every genome and comprise more than 60% of all drug targets, only about 100 unique, unrelated membrane protein structures have been determined to date, in contrast with unique, unrelated structures representing more than 8100 soluble protein families. This field has suffered because it is difficult to obtain quantities of pure, native membrane proteins that are adequate for structural and functional analyses. To approach this problem, we have employed the Rhodobacter species of photosynthetic bacteria -- which is characterized by an inducible intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) -- for the heterologous expression of membrane proteins. Compartmentalization of an expressed membrane protein to the Rhodobacter ICM suggests strongly that it assumes a structure that directs proper insertion into the lipid bilayer. Activity assays and circular dichroism spectra have been used to demonstrate functional and structural integrity of heterologous proteins following their purification from Rhodobacter membranes. Our results also underscore this organism's utility in the assembly of membrane proteins with complex cofactors. This expression system puts to task, in a novel way, this photosynthetic species and the membranes it produces naturally in order to harness this machinery for the efficient production of foreign membrane proteins for a variety of structural and functional experiments.

  368. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Yasumichi Aoki, Brookhaven National Laboratory - RBRC

    Friday, May 16, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  369. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Dark matter annihilations in the WMAP sky"

    Presented by Dan Hooper, Fermilab

    Wednesday, May 14, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  370. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Amarjit Soni, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, May 9, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  371. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Quantum anomalies and bulk properties of hot QCD matter"

    Presented by Dmitri Kharzeev, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, April 25, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  372. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "The Unparticle Scale"

    Presented by Howard Georgi, Harvard University

    Wednesday, April 23, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  373. HET/ATLAS Joint Seminar

    Presented by David Adams, Brookhaven National Laboratory - ATLAS

    Friday, April 18, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  374. Joint HET/RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "Sflavor at the LHC"

    Presented by Graham Kribs, University of Oregon

    Wednesday, April 16, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  375. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Two topics talk: 1) DDbar mixnig 2) Spin, hadronization and lifetimes"

    Presented by Yuval Grossman, Cornell University

    Wednesday, April 9, 2008, 2:30 pm
    YITP, SUNY Stony Brook (Room Math 6-125 )

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  376. HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Sinya Aoki, University of Tsukaba/RBRC

    Friday, April 4, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  377. Joint HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Mike Creutz, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, March 28, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  378. HET LUNCH SEMINAR

    Presented by Frank Paige, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, March 14, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  379. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    Presented by Gil Paz, IAS, Princeton

    Wednesday, March 12, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  380. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Ingredients for a Precise Top-Quark Mass Measurement from Jets"

    Presented by Iain Stewart, MIT

    Wednesday, March 5, 2008, 2:30 pm
    YITP, SUNY Stony Brook (Room Math 6-125 )

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  381. Medical Department Seminar

    "New Synthetic Routes to Protein-Based Imaging Agents"

    Presented by Matthew B. Francis, PhD, Associate Professor, University of California at Berkeley, Chemistry Department.

    Tuesday, March 4, 2008, 1:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Hosted by: Jacob Hooker, PhD

    A modular synthetic platform has been developed to access targetable delivery vectors for a variety of imaging techniques. Genome-free viral capsids have served as the basic scaffold for these studies, as they provide monodisperse spherical structures that can be tailored to display multiple copies of a desired functional group. The interior surface of each capsid has been modified to house up to 100 gadolinium complexes, yielding MRI contrast enhancement agents with very high relaxivities. Chemical techniques have also been developed for the introduction of F-18 nuclei for PET and cryptophane ligands for the binding of hyperpolarized xenon. Exterior surface modifications have targeted an artificial amino acid that exhibits unique chemical reactivity, allowing the facile attachment of tissue targeting peptides and biocompatible polymers. The cornerstone of these efforts has been the development of reliable synthetic reactions that can modify biomolecules with high site selectivity and yield. This presentation will emphasize the potential of these techniques for the construction of new imaging agents from virtually any protein of interest.

  382. Joint HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "New Phenomenological Applications of Lattice Field Theories"

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, Kanazawa University / RBRC

    Thursday, February 28, 2008, 12:30 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  383. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Electroweak corrections to hadronic gauge boson production at large transverse momentum"

    Presented by Anna Kulesza, DESY, Germany

    Wednesday, February 27, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  384. HET Lunch Seminar

    "Maximal Flavor Violation"

    Presented by Shaouly Bar-Shalom, Technion -IIT

    Friday, February 22, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  385. HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Hooman Davoudiasl, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, February 15, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  386. Joint HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Flavor physics from the lattice: a model independent determination of |V_cb|."

    Presented by Jack Laiho, Washington University, St. Louis

    Thursday, February 14, 2008, 12:30 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  387. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Tree Amplitudes in Gauge Theory and Gravity"

    Presented by Nima Arkani-Hamed, IAS

    Wednesday, February 13, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  388. HET Lunch Seminar

    "The electric dipole moment of the nucleon from simulations at imaginary \theta"

    Presented by Yoshifumi Nakamura, DESY

    Friday, February 8, 2008, 12 pm
    Room 2-95, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  389. Joint HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Harvey Meyer, MIT

    Thursday, February 7, 2008, 12:30 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  390. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "QCD on the Light-Front"

    Presented by Stanley Brodsky, SLAC

    Wednesday, February 6, 2008, 2:30 pm
    YITP, SUNY Stony Brook (Room Math 6-125 )

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  391. Biology Department Seminar

    "Guiding Improvements of Photosynthesis Using an Integrated Dynamic Model of Photosynthetic Carbon Metabolism"

    Presented by Xinguang Zhu, Department of Plant Biology, School of Integrative Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Friday, January 25, 2008, 11 am
    John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Jorg Schwender

    The distribution of nitrogen between enzymes of photosynthetic carbon metabolism might be assumed to have been optimized by natural selection. However, natural selection for survival and fecundity does not necessarily select for maximal photosynthetic productivity. Further atmospheric CO2 concentration, the key substrate, has changed more over the past 100 years than the past 25M years with the likelihood that natural selection has had inadequate time to re-optimize resource partitioning for this change. Could photosynthetic rate be increased by altered partitioning of resource among the enzymes of carbon metabolism? To address this question, we developed a complete dynamic model of photosynthetic carbon metabolism and used an “evolutionary” algorithm to progressively search for multiple alterations in partitioning that increase photosynthetic rate. Our results suggest that manipulation of partitioning could greatly increase carbon gain without any increase in the total protein-nitrogen investment in the apparatus for photosynthetic carbon metabolism.

  392. Joint HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Kaon physics from mixed action lattice QCD"

    Presented by Ruth Van de Water, Fermilab

    Thursday, January 24, 2008, 12:30 pm
    Room 2-160, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soni Amarjit

  393. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Scattering processes in N=4 SYM at strong coupling via AdS/CFT"

    Presented by Juan Maldacena, IAS

    Wednesday, January 23, 2008, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  394. Joint ATLAS/HET Lunch Seminar

    Presented by Hong Ma, BNL

    Friday, December 14, 2007, 12 pm
    Bldg.510 Rm.2-95

  395. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Antagonistic Orders in Nanoengineered Ferromagnet - Superconductor Heterostructures"

    Presented by Ramesh Budhani, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, India

    Friday, November 30, 2007, 10 am
    Bldg. 480 - conference room

    Hosted by: Yimei Zhu

    The antagonism between superconductivity and ferromagnetism has generated a considerable degree of interest in recent years. Thin film heterostructures of a variety of superconducting (SC) and ferromagnetic (FM) materials permit experimental verification of such diverse phenomena as-phase shift, triplet pairing and enhanced flux pinning by magnetic inhomogeneities. We have been working on FM-SC-FM and SC-FM-SC trilayers of conventional materials such as NbN and CoPt, and the exotic systems comprising of YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) and La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSMO) deposited on lattice matched substrates. Transport measurements on LSMO-YBCO-LSMO system show clear oscillations in critical current (Ic) as the thickness of the LSMO layers is scanned from ~ 50 Å to ~ 1100 Å. In the light of existing theories of FM-SC heterostructures, this observation suggests a long range proximity effect in the manganite, modulated by its weak exchange energy (~2 meV). One interesting issue in FM-SC hybrids that defies the notion of antagonistic orders is the magnetic field induced superconductivity (FIS). We have shown that in systems where the FM domains/islands produce spatial inhomogeneities of the SC order parameter, the FIS can derive significant contribution from different mobilities of the magnetic flux identified by two distinct critical states in the inhomogeneous superconductor. Our experiments on nano-engineered bilayers of ferromagnetic CoPt and superconducting NbN where CoPt/NbN islands are separated by a granular NbN, lend support to this alternative explanation of FIS in certain class of FM-SC hybrids. This research has been supported by grants from the Department of Science and Technology (DST) and the Board for Research on Nuclear Sciences (BRNS), Government of India.

  396. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    Presented by Matthew Schwartz, Johns Hopkins University

    Wednesday, November 28, 2007, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  397. HET LUNCH SEMINAR

    Presented by Frank Paige, BNL

    Friday, November 16, 2007, 12 pm
    Bldg.510 Rm. 2-95

  398. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITPSeminar

    "New ideas for Event Generators"

    Presented by Christian Bauer, LBL

    Wednesday, November 14, 2007, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  399. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Fabrication of heterostructured nanoparticles with high magnetic moment in gas phase"

    Presented by YunHao Xu, University of Minnesota

    Friday, October 5, 2007, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  400. Biology Department Seminar

    "Silent Running: RNA Interference and Heterochromatic Silencing in Plants and Fission Yeast"

    Presented by Robert Martienssen, Watson School of Biological Sciences, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    Friday, June 8, 2007, 11 am
    John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Carl Anderson

    Heterochromatin is composed of transposable elements (TE) and related repeats which silence genes located nearby, and play a major role in epigenetic regulation of the genome. Far from being inert, heterochromatin is transcribed and small interfering RNA corresponding to heterochromatic sequences can be detected in plants, animals and fission yeast. We have used tiling microarrays to examine these transcripts and their regulation in plants and fission yeast. In plants, expression of small interfering RNA (siRNA) corresponding to different classes of TE depends on DNA methyltransferase MET1, the SWI/SNF ATPase, DDM1, or both, but not on the histone deacetylase SIL1. All three genes are required for silencing transposons in the absence of RNAi. In fission yeast and in Arabidopsis, centromeric repeats are continually transcribed on one strand, but the transcripts are rapidly turned over by RNA interference, through the combined action of DNA dependent RNA polymerase, Argonaute and RNA dependent RNA polymerase, each of which is associated with heterochromatin. Histone H3 lysine-9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) depends on RNAi, mediated by the Rik1-Clr4 complex. Rik1 has similarity to both DNA and RNA binding proteins, and may play a role in RNA processing. In pombe, spreading of histone methylation into reporter genes that are silenced by position effect variegation (PEV) depends on co-transcription and slicing by Argonaute, leading to a model for PEV.

  401. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Theoretical Studies in Heterogeneous Catalysis and Electrocatalysis"

    Presented by Ping Liu, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007, 10:30 am
    Chemistry Department, Room 300

    Hosted by: Mark Hybertsen

    Density functional theory has reached a level where it can be used to describe complete catalytic reactions on both surfaces and nanoparticles. This gives a basic insight into these processes, and it allows us to pinpoint the origin of the catalytic activity of the material. The electrocatalytic processes involving in fuel cell and hydrodesulfurization reaction are used to exemplify this approach. It will be shown that by combining density functional calculations with kinetic modeling, we can well predict the catalytic activities of different systems.

  402. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Violation of Rotational Invariance during Inflation"

    Presented by Mark Wise, California Institute of Technology

    Wednesday, May 9, 2007, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  403. National Synchrotron Light Source Symposia

    "Heteroepitaxy Integration and Interface Engineering: The use of MgO as an Epitaxy Template for Complex Oxide Ferromagnetic and Ferroelectric Integration on 6H-SiC through MBE"

    Presented by Katherine S. Ziemer, Northeastern University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Boston, MA

    Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 1 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Dario Arena

    There is a growing interest for the integration of complex magnetic or ferroelectric oxides on wide bandgap semiconductors for robust multifunctional devices. However, difficulties arise at the interface of the complex oxide film and semiconductor substrate due to lattice mismatch, thermal mismatch, and interdiffusion. To address these challenges, it is proposed to use the quasi-hexagonal structure of the alternating layers of magnesium and oxygen in MgO (111) to facilitate, through O-O bonding, the effective integration of more complex oxides with SiC. Epitaxial films of 10 to 300 Å thick MgO (111) were grown under Mg adsorption controlled conditions on 6H-SiC (0001) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was used real time to monitor the growth rate, crystal structure, and crystallographic orientation. In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) provided composition and chemical bonding information. Both 38 nm and 20Å MgO films on 6H-SiC tested for thermal stability at 790oC in vacuum (<10-9 Torr) and in air. Films showed no evidence of instability at the interface, as measured by XPS or x-ray diffraction (XRD). However, the RHEED pattern transitioned from a twinned structure to an improved, ordered structure believed to be a result of atom mobility within the MgO lattice. Complex oxides, including barium titanate (BTO) and barium hexaferrite (BaM) were then deposited on the MgO thin films by means of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and MBE in order to evaluate the potential for crystalline MgO to be used as an epitaxy template. Characterization by both the in-situ techniques and ex-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), XRD, and general area diffraction (GADDS) of the subsequent complex oxide integration revealed a preferred crystal orientation in the (111) direction. This supports the hypothesis that high-quality, single crystalline MgO (111) deposited on 6H-SiC (0001) has

  404. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Split or Splat Supersymmetry at the LHC"

    Presented by James Wells, University of Michigan

    Wednesday, April 11, 2007, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  405. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "CANCELED"

    Presented by Michael Dine, Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP)

    Wednesday, March 28, 2007, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  406. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Thin Films, Heterostructures and Some Applications of High Temperature Superconductors and Other Oxides"

    Presented by Kazuhiro Endo, of Kanazawa Institute of Technology (KIT), Japna

    Friday, March 2, 2007, 2 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: John Hill

    Top quality thin films for different applications are always of interest. However, it is not easy to grow such films and many criteria have to be fulfilled. The degree of complexity enhances significantly for muticomponent materials such as high-Tc superconductors, giant magnetoresistive materials, heterostructures, other. This translates into a lower growth control level. Solution resides in identification of the specific details as well as of the general principles of growth and their personalized application towards preparation of optimized thin films of top quality. This is our approach and goal. Examples in this regard will be introduced. Applications build on our thin films such as junctions will be also briefly presented.

  407. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Topological Interactions of Higgs Bosons"

    Presented by Richard Hill, Fermilab

    Wednesday, February 21, 2007, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  408. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Single-Molecule Confocal Microscopy for Studying Conformational Changes of Light-Harvesting Complex in the Photosynthetic Membrane"

    Presented by Duohai Pan, Beckman Institute at UIUC

    Tuesday, February 20, 2007, 10 am
    Rm. 300, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    Single molecule spectroscopy and confocal optical imaging methods have been rapidly become an important new set of tools for probing the individual nanoscale behavior of molecules in complex local environments. In this talk, I will first present the multi-channel confocal fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging technique which was developed recently. This system allows us to study the fluorescence intensity, lifetime, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) at single molecule level. Second, I will present a study of light-harvesting complexes at room temperature with this system. The fluctuating inter-molecule protein energy transfer in bacterial photosynthetic membranes was observed. The results suggest that there are two states (dynamic coupled and non-coupled states) of the light-harvesting protein assemblies in photosynthetic membranes.

  409. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "On the Interplay of B and Higgs Physics in Minimal Supersymmetric Models"

    Presented by Carlos Wagner, Argonne National Laboratory

    Wednesday, January 31, 2007, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  410. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "The Pentagon Model of TeV Scale Physics"

    Presented by Tom Banks, UC, Santa Cruz and Rutgers University

    Wednesday, December 6, 2006, 1:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  411. Joint HET/RIKEN/YITP Seminar

    "Using Effective Field Theory to determine discretization errors in the spectrum of the lattice Dirac operator"

    Presented by Steve Sharpe, University of Washington

    Wednesday, November 15, 2006, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  412. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Developing Novel Synthetic Biomaterials"

    Presented by Sergey Paramonov, Rice University

    Monday, July 17, 2006, 10 am
    John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

  413. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Correlated Electron Heterostructures"

    Presented by Andrew Millis, Columbia University

    Tuesday, January 10, 2006, 10 am
    Small seminar room, Bldg. 510

  414. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Heterogeneous Catalyst Modeling and Screening from First Principles"

    Presented by Jeff Greeley, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark

    Wednesday, January 4, 2006, 11 am
    Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: Jim Davenport

  415. Particle Physics Seminar

    "Determining the Neutrino Mixing Angle Theta13 with the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plants"

    Presented by Kam-Biu Luk, U.C. - Berkeley

    Friday, November 4, 2005, 9:30 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Laurie Littenberg

    Besides being a fundamental constant of Nature, the unknown neutrino mixing angle theta_13 will determine whether we can explore CP violation in the lepton sector, which holds the promise of explaining the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. The Daya Bay nuclear power plants in China have been identified as an excellent site for mounting an experiment for determining sin^2(2theta_13) with a sensitivity to 0.01, using electron antineutrinos from the reactors. The status of the Daya Bay experiment will be presented.

  416. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "High Statistics Search for Theta^+ in Photon Production Reactions on Deuterium"

    Presented by Tsutomu Mibe, Ohio State University, Japan

    Tuesday, September 6, 2005, 11 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Werner Vogelsang

    A signature indicating the existence of the S=+1 pentaquark state Theta^+ has been reported in more than ten experiments in a variety of reactions. On the other hand, there are a number of reports of non-observations from high statistics experiments. The main criticism for the existence of the Theta^+ is the low statistical significance. None of the positive results show a high significance with sufficient statistics. A new experiment to search for the Theta^+ in the photon-induced production on a deuteron has been pursued using the CLAS detector and the tagged-photon facility at Jefferson Laboratory. The integrated luminosity of the new data is about 10 times greater than the previously published CLAS data on a deuterium target. In this talk, an experimental overview and preliminary results will be presented.

  417. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Experimental Catalysis at the Nanoscale - The Application of Novel Synthetic Strategies for Fundamental Studies of Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts"

    Presented by Peter Faguy, Admamede

    Wednesday, May 4, 2005, 10 am
    Chemistry Bldg., Third Floor Conference Room 300

    Hosted by: Bob Hwang

  418. Medical Department Seminar

    "Imaging d-amphetamine Effects in Healthy Volunteers: Drug Effects on fMRI Brain Responses to a Novel Impulsivity/risk Task (BART) and Emotional Picture Task (IAPS)"

    Presented by Tara L. White, Brown University Providence, RI

    Thursday, April 21, 2005, 1:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Hosted by: Rita Goldstein

    Clinical evidence suggests that impulsivity increases after drug consumption in addicted individuals. This increase in impulsive behavior could facilitate the transition to drug abuse through increased drug exposure in vulnerable individuals. To date, however, brain mechanisms involved in the effects of drugs on impulsive behavior have not been well studied in healthy, nonaddicted subjects. Objective: The present fMRI study was designed to determine the brain regions involved in acute drug effects on impulsive behavior and emotion, as measured during a newly developed computerized measure of risk-taking behavior (Balloon Analogue Risk Task, BART) and emotional pictures from the International Affective Picture Set (IAPS). Method: Participants received d-amphetamine (20 mg oral) or placebo 90 minutes prior to fMRI scanning and performance of the BART impulsivity/risk task and IAPS picture set in a double-blind, within-subjects design. Participants were preselected based on personality traits that have been found to modulate the effects of the drug in other samples, as assessed by a standardized personality inventory with an orthogonal factor structure (Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire, Brief Form). Findings: d-amphetamine significantly altered fMRI activation in the limbic thalamus, anterior cingulate, and nucleus accumbens during high reward blocks compared to low reward blocks of the behavioral impulsivity/ risk task. D-amphetamine also decreased amygdala responses to negatively valenced blocks of the IAPS emotional picture task. These data suggest that d-amphetamine selectively shifts brain processing toward high reward, high risk stimuli and away from low reward, low risk alternatives. Individual differences in fMRI responses to amphetamine were also observed, and were found to relate primarily to the stable personality traits of reward sensitivity, harm avoidance, and stress reactivity. Potential findings with regard to SERT and DRD4 polymorphism

  419. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Homo-and-Hetero-Nuclear Correlation Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy; Applications to Heterogeneous Catalysts and Nanoscale Materials"

    Presented by Marek Pruski, Ames Laboratory

    Friday, April 15, 2005, 10 am
    Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: Bob Hwang

  420. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Applications of Imaging Techniques in Heterogeneous Catalysis - From Non-linear Dynamics of Chemical Reactions to Parallel High-Throughput Studies"

    Presented by Jochen Lauterbach, University of Delaware

    Tuesday, April 5, 2005, 1:30 pm
    Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: Bob Hwang

  421. Particle Physics Seminar

    "Measuring the Neutrino Theta_13 with Double Chooz"

    Presented by John LoSecco, University of Notre Dame

    Thursday, March 24, 2005, 11 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Mary Bishai

    A reactor anti-neutrino disappearance experiment with two or more detectors is one of the most efficient ways to extend our reach for the neutrino mixing angle theta_13 without ambiguities from CP violation and matter effects. Double Chooz is a experiment designed to reach a sensitivity of sin^2(2*theta_13) < 0.03 in a three year run, 2008-2011. This would cover roughly 85% of the remaining allowed region. The costs and time to first results can be minimized since this project takes advantage of an exiting infrastructure.

  422. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Applications of Imaging Techniques in Heterogeneous Catalysis - From Non-Linear Dynamics of Chemical Reactions to Parallel High-Throughput Studies"

    Presented by Jochen Lauterbach, University of Delaware

    Monday, February 28, 2005, 11 am
    Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: Robert Hwang

  423. Chemistry Department Seminar

    "Density functional studies in heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience"

    Presented by Ping Liu, Chemistry Department, BNL

    Wednesday, February 9, 2005, 11 am
    Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: Jon Hanson

    Density functional theory has reached a level where it can be used to describe complete catalytic reactions on both surfaces and nanoparticles. This gives a basic insight into these processes, and it allows us to pinpoint the origin of the catalytic activity of the material. The reactions involving in PEM fuel cell and hydrodesulfurization are used to exemplify the approach. It will be shown that by combining density functional calculations with kinetic modeling we can well predict the catalytic activities of different systems. This provides a strong basis for rational catalyst design.

  424. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "First-Principles Methods in Heterogeneous Catalysis: From Resolving Mechanistic Puzzles to Identifying Promising Catalysts"

    Presented by Manos Mavrikakis, University of Wisconsin

    Thursday, December 9, 2004, 11 am
    John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

  425. Medical Department Seminar

    "Anesthetic Neurotoxicity"

    Presented by Andrew Kofke, Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

    Thursday, February 26, 2004, 1:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

  426. Medical Department Seminar

    "Synthetic Cytokine Analogs: II. Tissue Engineering"

    Presented by Louis Pena, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Medical Department

    Thursday, January 29, 2004, 1:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

  427. Medical Department Seminar

    "Synthetic Cytokine Analogs: I. Radiation Protection"

    Presented by Louis Pena, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Medical Department

    Thursday, January 22, 2004, 1:30 pm
    John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

  428. Materials Science Department Seminar

    "Size Effects in Nanoscale Ferroelectric Heterostructures"

    Presented by Nagarajan Valanoor, Forschungzentrum Juelich, Germany

    Tuesday, November 25, 2003, 11 am
    Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

  429. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Universality in Heterogeneous Catalysis"

    Presented by J.K. Norskov, Center for Atomic-Scale Materials Physics, Technical University of Denmark

    Wednesday, November 5, 2003, 9:30 am
    Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

  430. Medical Department Seminar

    "Pathophysiologic Heterogeneity and Cholinergic Mechanisms in Alzheimers Disease"

    Presented by Isak Prohovnik,, Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine

    Thursday, October 23, 2003, 1:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490