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Synchrotron Radiation in Art and Archaeology

Introduction

The Metropolitan Museum of Art of New York, the Conservation Center at the Institute of Fine Arts of New York University, the Winterthur Museum, Cornell University and Brookhaven National Laboratory are organizing the Fifth International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation in Art and Archaeology (SR2A 2012) in New York City.

The three-day conference will consist of three full days of oral presentations and poster sessions at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. A welcome reception will be held at The Institute of Fine Arts, New York University.

The conference is open to all interested professionals, including conservators, conservation scientists, scientists with experience utilizing large-scale research facilities and other analytical techniques, curators, cultural heritage managers, art historians, students, potential users of synchrotrons, etc. The venue is intended to provide an unprecedented opportunity for professionals from America and world-wide to meet and share their expertise and experience.

The conference language is English.

Click here for more information about the publication.

Scope

The central theme of the SR2A series of conferences is the innovative use of methods employing synchrotron radiation (and/or related types of radiation) for the (non-destructive) investigation of artistic and archaeological materials and artifacts.

Since the first edition of the conference (Grenoble, France, 2005), SR2A has become a forum for discussion and presentation of up-to-date activities regarding the use of penetrating forms of radiation for non-invasive inspection and analysis of precious materials from the past.

The emphasis of the fifth edition of SR2A will be placed on the manner in which synchrotron radiation and other types of penetrating radiation (THz, neutrons, ...) can be used together to characterize artists' materials and archaeological artifacts. Contributions will focus on the exploration of new analytical frontiers, and will also address research challenges of curators, conservators and other professionals working in the cultural heritage field.

The goal of the Conference is to highlight the spectrum of synchrotron techniques which can be applied to the study of objects of cultural heritage, demonstrate representative cultural heritage synchrotron studies, and, boost interactions of cultural heritage scientists with the Synchrotron community in the United States and worldwide.

Conference Partners

SR2A Partners

Important Dates
Feb. 6 Abstracts for oral/poster presentations due.
Feb. 27 Authors acceptance notification.
March 15 Preliminary program.
Jan. 9 – March 25 Reserve accommodations at NYU.
April 15 Late abstract submissions for posters are due.
May 6 Early registration deadline.
View Details
June 1 Close of on-line registration.
July 22 Publication submission due.

Conference Flyer
SR2A Flyer
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Previous Publications

SR2A 2010

Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 2011, Volume 6 Issue 5, Special Issue: "Synchrotron Radiation Applied to Art and Archaeology" Page 873 to 1100 (DOI: 10.1039/C1JA90015C)
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SR2A 2008

Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing Volume 99, Number 2 / May 2010 Special Issue: "Synchrotron Radiation Applied to Art and Archaeology" (pp 333-426) Guest Editor: M. Vendrell
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SR2A 2006

Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing Volume 90, Number 1 / January 2008 Special Issue: "Synchrotron Radiation in Art and Archaeology" (pp 1-100) Guest Editors: W. Eberhardt, B. Kanngießer and I. Reiche
document

SR2A 2005

Applied Physics A: Materials Science & Processing Volume 83, Number 2 / May 2006 Special issue "Synchrotron Radiation in Art and Archaeology" Guest Editors: E. Dooryhée, M. Menu and J. Susini
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Last Modified: May 15, 2012