Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

"Reversed Nanoscale Kirkendall Effect in Au-InAs Hybrid Nanoparticles"

Presented by Anatoly I. Frenkel, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University / Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory

Thursday, October 6, 2016, 11:00 am — Bldg 735, Conference Room A

Metal-semiconductor hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) have synergistic properties that have been exploited in photocatalysis, electrical, and optoelectronic applications. Rational design of hybrid NPs requires the knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of diffusion of the metal species through the nanoscale semiconductor lattice. One extensively studied process of diffusion of two materials across the nanoparticle surface is known as the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. There, an atomic species A with the lower diffusion rate enters the nanocrystal slower than the B species diffusing from the nanocrystal outward. As a result, voids are formed in B, providing an interesting avenue for making hollow nanocrystals. We used time-resolved X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy to monitor the diffusion process of Au atoms through InAs nanocrystals in real time. In this system the diffusion rate of the inward diffusing species (Au) is faster than that of the outward diffusion species (InAs), which results in the formation of a crystalline metallic Au core surrounded by an amorphous, oxidized InAs shell with voids in it. These observations indicate that in hybrid Au-InAs NPs the rarely observed "reversed nanoscale Kirkendall effect" is in play. It presents a potentially new way to synthesize unique nanoscale core-shell structures.

Hosted by: Eric Stach

11767  |  INT/EXT  |  Events Calendar