General Information

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September 2015
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. No events scheduled

2

  1. No events scheduled

3

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    A general method for exactly computing the nonlinear collision term of the Boltzmann equation for a massless relativistic gas in a homogeneous and isotropic spacetime is presented. This approach is used to find an exact analytical solution of the nonlinear relativistic Boltzmann equation in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. This solution can be used to investigate analytically the interplay between global expansion and local thermalization in rapidly evolving systems.

4

  1. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Asymptotic freedom of gluons is defined in terms of scale-dependent renormalized QCD Hamiltonian operators that act in the Fock space. These operators are calculable in a new way [1,2], by solving a double-commutator differential equation [3], where the derivative is with respect to a scale parameter defined within the renormalization group procedure for effective particles (RGPEP). The RGPEP equation and its solutions are invariant with respect to boosts and may serve as a tool in attempts to dynamically explain the parton and constituent models of hadrons in QCD. The third-order QCD solution of the RGPEP equation to be discussed [2], provides an explicit example of how asymptotic freedom of gluons is exhibited in the scale-dependence of Hamiltonians as operators in the Fock space. This example also prepares ground for the fourth-order calculations of effective strong interactions using the same RGPEP equation [3], to facilitate Hamiltonian studies of many strong-interaction processes, e.g., those that involve heavy quarkonia in relativistic motion. Applications to other sectors of the Standard Model than the strong interactions await development, while only preliminary results are currently available in the domain of precise calculations in QED[4]. [1] Dynamics of effective gluons, S. D. Glazek, Phys. Rev. D63, 116006, 29p (2001). [2] Asymptotic freedom in the front-form Hamiltonian for gluons, M. Gomez-Rocha, S. D. Glazek, arXiv:1505.06688 [hep-ph], to appear in Phys. Rev. D. [3] Perturbative formulae for relativistic interactions of effective particles, S. D. Glazek, Acta Phys. Pol. B43, 1843, 20p (2012). [4] Calculation of size for bound-state constituent

5

  1. No events scheduled

6

  1. No events scheduled

7

  1. No events scheduled

8

  1. SEP

    8

    Tuesday

    Chemistry Department Seminar

    10 am, Room 300, 3rd Floor, Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, September 8, 2015, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Alex Harris

    In the last decade, complexity of catalytic nanoparticles attracted much attention as a major factor in catalytic processes. Atomic and electronic structure and dynamics of particles, as well as their interactions with support and adsorbates, are important descriptors of their catalytic activity. The main challenge is how to investigate these factors in a working catalyst, at high temperature and pressure, and how to do so without breaking the correlations between components of this complex system. I will give a brief overview of new methods developed recently to enable such combined studies under realistic reaction conditions. Our approach is to single out electronic charge of metal atoms in a cluster as an "observable" quantity and develop methods to "observe" it experimentally under realistic reaction conditions, and model theoretically. In this framework, complex interactions between metal and adsorbates, metal and support, and support and adsorbates can be all accounted for in terms of their effects on the cluster charge. I will review recent results utilizing this approach for a prototypical catalyst, 1nm Pt nanoparticles supported on silica. Using high energy resolution methods of X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies (HERFD and RIXS), as well as in situ IR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and electron microscopy, aided with first-principles (DFT) modeling, we deduced that the structure of atoms and charges in the catalyst is strongly heterogeneous and that it changes dynamically with the change in temperature and pressure of adsorbates (H2 or CO).

  2. SEP

    8

    Tuesday

    Joint Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, September 8, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    Neutrinos provide a critical portal to physics beyond the Standard Model, yet the nature of neutrinos is largely unknown, including the neutrino mass hierarcy and if neutrinos are Majorana particles. Majorana particles are fermions that are their own antiparticles. Neutrinos being Majorana particles would explicitly violate lepton number conservation, and would pave the way to understand the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. Neutrinoless double-beta (0 ) decay is a hypothesized process where two neutrons decay into two protons and two electrons simultaneously without emitting neutrinos. It is possible only if neutrinos are Majorana particles, and it is the only feasible way to experimentally establish the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos. The observation of 0 decay would also provide complementary information related to neutrino masses. After decades of experimental e orts, the next generation 0 decay experiments will have a signi cant discovery potential to observe 0 decay, if neutrinos are indeed Majorana particles. In this talk, we will discuss the physics of neutrinoless double beta decay and review the experiments searching for it. We will focus on the Majorana Demonstrator, a 40-kg modular Germanium detector array, which searches for 0 decay in 76Ge and aims at demonstrating a path forward to next generation 0 decay experiments.

9

  1. SEP

    9

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, September 9, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

10

  1. SEP

    10

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, September 10, 2015, 6:30 pm

11

  1. SEP

    11

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 11, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

12

  1. No events scheduled

13

  1. No events scheduled

14

  1. No events scheduled

15

  1. No events scheduled

16

  1. SEP

    16

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, September 16, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

17

  1. SEP

    17

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 17, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi Assamagan

18

  1. SEP

    18

    Friday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Friday, September 18, 2015, 2:00 pm

    The X-ray detector group at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland, has a long history in hybrid detector developments for use at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) and other synchrotrons worldwide. Initially, the development was based on single photon counting systems, like the world-renowned PILATUS and its successor EIGER. EIGER is characterized by 7575 m2 pixels and a frame rate as high as 23 kHz for a 4 bit counter. The rst detector systems are being integrated into beamline operations. Some experimental results and the challenges for the large area detector operations will be presented. The construction of the Swiss Free Electron Laser (FEL) at PSI and other FELs worldwide has shifted the developments towards charge integrating systems, which are able to sustain a high number of photons in pulses with a O(fs) length. The versatile JUNGFRAU detector has 7575 m2 pixels. It is characterized by single photon resolution and high dynamic range. These characteristics can be simultaneously achieved through a dynamic gain switching mechanism. Details on the detector concept and results on the characterization will be shown. A frame rate as high as 2 kHz prospects the use of the JUNGFRAU detector also at the SLS. The employment of charge integrating systems for synchrotron applications will allow to sustain higher rate capabilities, which are typically the major limitations in the use of single photon counting systems. Finally, the MONCH charge integrating detector, characterized by pixels as small as 25  25 m2, will be shown. These research project is meant to investigate perspectives for hybrid detectors in the soft/tender X-ray regime. Moreover, the small pixels and the possibilityto exploit the charge sharing e ect to achieve sub-pixel resolution, open possibilities for high resolution imaging at synchrotrons and with X-ray tubes.

  2. SEP

    18

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 18, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

19

  1. SEP

    19

    Saturday

    BNL Team at the Port Jeff Dragon Boat Race Festival

    9 am, Port Jefferson Harborfront Park

    Saturday, September 19, 2015, 9:00 am

    The BERA Asian Pacific American Association (APAA) is inviting all members of the Brookhaven Lab community to join them at the the 2015 Port Jefferson Dragon Boat Race Festival on Sept. 19 to cheer the BNL Team. This is the festival's second year, and teams from all over the New York tri-state area will be competing. The BERA/BNL Team is practicing all summer for this race. Come cheer us on! View the event's official web site at http://portjeffdragonracefest.com/

20

  1. No events scheduled

21

  1. No events scheduled

22

  1. No events scheduled

23

  1. SEP

    23

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, September 23, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. SEP

    23

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 23, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

24

  1. No events scheduled

25

  1. SEP

    25

    Friday

    ATLAS/HET Joint Lunch Seminar

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, September 25, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

26

  1. No events scheduled

27

  1. No events scheduled

28

  1. No events scheduled

29

  1. No events scheduled

30

  1. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 12:00 pm

  3. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

    It has been a hundred years since molecules were first visualized directly by using x-ray crystallography. That technique gave us our first look at molecules as simple as common salt to one as complex as the ribosome that has almost a million atoms. In the last few years, electron microscopy has offered an alternative to directly obtaining the structure of very large molecules. I will describe some highlights in this journey with an emphasis on the recent developments in electron microscopy and how it is creating a new range of possibilities for visualizing biological structures.

  4. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    CFN Proposal Deadline

    11:45 pm, CFN

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 11:45 pm

  1. SEP

    8

    Tuesday

    Chemistry Department Seminar

    ""Tracking atoms and charges in metal catalysts under reaction conditions"

    Presented by Anatoly I. Frenkel, Physics Dept, Yeshiva University, NY

    10 am, Room 300, 3rd Floor, Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, September 8, 2015, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Alex Harris

    In the last decade, complexity of catalytic nanoparticles attracted much attention as a major factor in catalytic processes. Atomic and electronic structure and dynamics of particles, as well as their interactions with support and adsorbates, are important descriptors of their catalytic activity. The main challenge is how to investigate these factors in a working catalyst, at high temperature and pressure, and how to do so without breaking the correlations between components of this complex system. I will give a brief overview of new methods developed recently to enable such combined studies under realistic reaction conditions. Our approach is to single out electronic charge of metal atoms in a cluster as an "observable" quantity and develop methods to "observe" it experimentally under realistic reaction conditions, and model theoretically. In this framework, complex interactions between metal and adsorbates, metal and support, and support and adsorbates can be all accounted for in terms of their effects on the cluster charge. I will review recent results utilizing this approach for a prototypical catalyst, 1nm Pt nanoparticles supported on silica. Using high energy resolution methods of X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies (HERFD and RIXS), as well as in situ IR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and electron microscopy, aided with first-principles (DFT) modeling, we deduced that the structure of atoms and charges in the catalyst is strongly heterogeneous and that it changes dynamically with the change in temperature and pressure of adsorbates (H2 or CO).

  2. SEP

    8

    Tuesday

    Joint Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics Seminar

    "Understanding the nature of neutrinos via neutrinoless double-beta decay"

    Presented by Wenqin Xu, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, September 8, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    Neutrinos provide a critical portal to physics beyond the Standard Model, yet the nature of neutrinos is largely unknown, including the neutrino mass hierarcy and if neutrinos are Majorana particles. Majorana particles are fermions that are their own antiparticles. Neutrinos being Majorana particles would explicitly violate lepton number conservation, and would pave the way to understand the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. Neutrinoless double-beta (0 ) decay is a hypothesized process where two neutrons decay into two protons and two electrons simultaneously without emitting neutrinos. It is possible only if neutrinos are Majorana particles, and it is the only feasible way to experimentally establish the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos. The observation of 0 decay would also provide complementary information related to neutrino masses. After decades of experimental e orts, the next generation 0 decay experiments will have a signi cant discovery potential to observe 0 decay, if neutrinos are indeed Majorana particles. In this talk, we will discuss the physics of neutrinoless double beta decay and review the experiments searching for it. We will focus on the Majorana Demonstrator, a 40-kg modular Germanium detector array, which searches for 0 decay in 76Ge and aims at demonstrating a path forward to next generation 0 decay experiments.

  3. SEP

    9

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, September 9, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  4. SEP

    10

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, September 10, 2015, 6:30 pm

  5. SEP

    11

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Michael Strickland, Kent State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 11, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  6. SEP

    16

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, September 16, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  7. SEP

    17

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "CMB Constraints DM Annihilation/Sum of the neutrino masses from CMB observations"

    Presented by Neelima Sehgal, Stony Brook University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 17, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi Assamagan

  8. SEP

    18

    Friday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Hybrid pixel detector developments for Synchrotrons and Free Electron Lasers at the Paul Scherrer Institute"

    Presented by Gemma Tinti, Paul Scherrer Institute, Italy

    2 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Friday, September 18, 2015, 2:00 pm

    The X-ray detector group at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland, has a long history in hybrid detector developments for use at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) and other synchrotrons worldwide. Initially, the development was based on single photon counting systems, like the world-renowned PILATUS and its successor EIGER. EIGER is characterized by 7575 m2 pixels and a frame rate as high as 23 kHz for a 4 bit counter. The rst detector systems are being integrated into beamline operations. Some experimental results and the challenges for the large area detector operations will be presented. The construction of the Swiss Free Electron Laser (FEL) at PSI and other FELs worldwide has shifted the developments towards charge integrating systems, which are able to sustain a high number of photons in pulses with a O(fs) length. The versatile JUNGFRAU detector has 7575 m2 pixels. It is characterized by single photon resolution and high dynamic range. These characteristics can be simultaneously achieved through a dynamic gain switching mechanism. Details on the detector concept and results on the characterization will be shown. A frame rate as high as 2 kHz prospects the use of the JUNGFRAU detector also at the SLS. The employment of charge integrating systems for synchrotron applications will allow to sustain higher rate capabilities, which are typically the major limitations in the use of single photon counting systems. Finally, the MONCH charge integrating detector, characterized by pixels as small as 25  25 m2, will be shown. These research project is meant to investigate perspectives for hybrid detectors in the soft/tender X-ray regime. Moreover, the small pixels and the possibilityto exploit the charge sharing e ect to achieve sub-pixel resolution, open possibilities for high resolution imaging at synchrotrons and with X-ray tubes.

  9. SEP

    18

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Alex Kovner, University of Connecticut

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 18, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  10. SEP

    19

    Saturday

    BNL Team at the Port Jeff Dragon Boat Race Festival

    "BERA APAA Event"

    9 am, Port Jefferson Harborfront Park

    Saturday, September 19, 2015, 9:00 am

    The BERA Asian Pacific American Association (APAA) is inviting all members of the Brookhaven Lab community to join them at the the 2015 Port Jefferson Dragon Boat Race Festival on Sept. 19 to cheer the BNL Team. This is the festival's second year, and teams from all over the New York tri-state area will be competing. The BERA/BNL Team is practicing all summer for this race. Come cheer us on! View the event's official web site at http://portjeffdragonracefest.com/

  11. SEP

    23

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, September 23, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  12. SEP

    23

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "507th Brookhaven Lecture, Featuring Dong Su"

    Presented by Dong Su, Center for Functional Nanomaterials at Brookhaven Lab

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 23, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

  13. SEP

    25

    Friday

    ATLAS/HET Joint Lunch Seminar

    "Constraints on New Physics via Higgs Boson Couplings and Invisible Decays with the ATLAS Detector"

    Presented by Ketevi Assamagan, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, September 25, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  14. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  15. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Enso String Quartet: Salonen, Sibelius"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 12:00 pm

  16. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "A hundred years of visualizing molecular structure"

    Presented by Professor Venki Ramakrishnan, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, United Kingdom

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

    It has been a hundred years since molecules were first visualized directly by using x-ray crystallography. That technique gave us our first look at molecules as simple as common salt to one as complex as the ribosome that has almost a million atoms. In the last few years, electron microscopy has offered an alternative to directly obtaining the structure of very large molecules. I will describe some highlights in this journey with an emphasis on the recent developments in electron microscopy and how it is creating a new range of possibilities for visualizing biological structures.

  17. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    CFN Proposal Deadline

    "CFN Proposal Deadline for January-April Cycle 2016"

    11:45 pm, CFN

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 11:45 pm

  18. OCT

    1

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Top Quark Precision Physics and the Fate of the Universe"

    Presented by Andreas Jung, Purdue University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 1, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The talk will discuss recent measurements in the top quark sector, the heaviest known elementary particle known so far, performed at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and at the LHC. I will highlight Tevatron results that are competitive to those at the LHC, especially regarding the top quark mass and production asymmetry. The talk will also present CMS results on the top quark mass and Yukawa coupling. I will discuss the implications for the standard model electroweak sector regarding the vacuum stability. I will conclude with an outlook towards the high luminosity phase of the LHC and the CMS silicon detector upgrades required for the high luminosity phase.

  19. OCT

    2

    Friday

    CFN Colloquium

    "In-situ XAS, TXM and RIXS experiments"

    Presented by Frank de Groot, Debye Institute of Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Netherlands

    11 am, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Friday, October 2, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Deyu Lu

    New developments in in-situ x-ray absorption (XAS), transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) will be discussed. A brief introduction is given of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, including the multiplet interpretation of XAS spectral shapes [1,2]. Nanoscale chemical imaging of catalysts under working conditions is possible with transmission x-ray microscopy. We have shown that TXM can image a catalytic system under relevant reaction conditions and provides detailed information on the morphology and composition of the catalyst material in situ [3]. The 20 nanometer resolution combined with powerful chemical speciation by XAS and the ability to image materials under reaction conditions opens up new opportunities to study many chemical processes. I will discuss the present status of in-situ TXM, with an emphasis on the abilities of the 10+ nm resolution TXM technique in comparison with 0.1 nm STEM-EELS [4,5]. Hard X-ray TXM allows the measurement of chemical images and tomographs under more realistic conditions, using a capillary reactor at 10 bar Fischer-Tropsch conditions [6]. The second part of the talk deals with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), In 2p3d RIXS one scans through the 2p XAS edge and measures the optical excitation range. As an example, the RIXS spectra of CoO will be discussed. The experimental resolution of 100 meV at ADRESS allows the detailed observation of the electronic structure. First-principle theoretical modelling was performed for the ground state and multiplet analysis for the RIXS experiments. The implications for measurements on coordination compounds (cobalt carboxylates) and cobalt nanoparticles is discussed, in particular the comparison with optical spectroscopy [7]. Related to the RIXS measurements is the analysis of Fluorescence yield (FY) detected x-ray absorption spectra (XAS), including the intrinsic deviations of the FY-XAS spectral shape from

  20. OCT

    7

    Wednesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "Universe or Multiverse?"

    Presented by Andre Linde, Stanford University

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, October 7, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

    Cosmological observations show that the universe is very uniform on the maximally large scale accessible to our telescopes. The best theoretical explanation of this uniformity is provided by the inflationary theory. Andrei Linde will briefly describe the status of this theory in view of recent observational data. Rather paradoxically, this theory predicts that on an extremely large scales, much greater than what we can see now, the world may look totally different. Instead of being a single spherically symmetric balloon, our universe may look like a "multiverse," a collection of many different exponentially large balloons ("universes") with different laws of low-energy physics operating in each of them. The new cosmological paradigm, supported by developments in string theory, changes the standard views on the origin and the global structure of the universe and on our own place in the world.

  21. OCT

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, October 8, 2015, 6:30 pm

  22. OCT

    12

    Monday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, October 12, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  23. OCT

    13

    Tuesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, October 13, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  24. OCT

    14

    Wednesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  25. OCT

    14

    Wednesday

    S.C. Planning Federation Workshop

    "2015 Autumn Workshop"

    3 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 3:00 pm

  26. OCT

    15

    Thursday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 15, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  27. OCT

    15

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Recent Results from the BaBar Experiment"

    Presented by David Norvil Brown, University of Louisville

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 15, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    TBD

  28. OCT

    16

    Friday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, October 16, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  29. OCT

    16

    Friday

    HET Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Cen Zhang, HET-BNL

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, October 16, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  30. OCT

    20

    Tuesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Sasa Dordevic, University of Akron, Serbia

    1:30 pm, Building 734, Room 201

    Tuesday, October 20, 2015, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Cedomir Petrovic

  31. OCT

    21

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "508th Brookhaven Lecture, Featuring Dennis Perpelitsa"

    Presented by Dennis Perpelitsa, Physics Department at Brookhaven Lab

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, October 21, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

  32. OCT

    28

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Xiaohui Liu, University of Maryland

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 28, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Cen Zhang

  33. OCT

    30

    Friday

    HET Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Eleni Vryonidou, UCL-Belgium

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, October 30, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  34. NOV

    6

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Linearly resummed hydrodynamics from gravity"

    Presented by Yanyan Bu, Ben Gurion University of the Negev

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, November 6, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Using fluid/gravity correspondence, we study all-order resummed hydrodynamics in a weakly curved spacetime. The underlying microscopic theory is a finite temperature \mathcal{N}=4 super-Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling. To linear order in the amplitude of hydrodynamic variables and metric perturbations, the fluid's stress-energy tensor is computed with derivatives of both the fluid velocity and background metric resummed to all orders. In addition to two viscosity functions, we find four curvature induced structures coupled to the fluid via new transport coefficient functions, which were referred to as gravitational susceptibilities of the fluid (GSF). We analytically compute these coefficients in the hydrodynamic limit, and then numerically up to large values of momenta. We extensively discuss the meaning of all order hydrodynamics by expressing it in terms of the memory function formalism, which is also suitable for practical simulations. We also consider Gauss-Bonnet correction in the dual gravity, which is equivalent to some 1/N corrections in the dual CFT. To leading order in the Gauss-Bonnet coupling, we find that the memory function is still vanishing.

  35. NOV

    18

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "509th Brookhaven Lecture, Featuring Wah-Keat Lee"

    Presented by Wah-Keat Lee, National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven Lab

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, November 18, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

  36. DEC

    16

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "510th Brookhaven Lecture, Featuring Yonggang Cui"

    Presented by Yonggang Cui, Nonproliferation & National Security Department at Brookhaven Lab

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, December 16, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

  37. DEC

    17

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search for Higgs Bosons produced in association with top quarks with the ATLAS detector"

    Presented by Professor Vivek Jain, SUNY Albany

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, December 17, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi Assamagan

    Due to the large measured mass of the top quark, the Yukawa coupling of the top quark (yt) is much stronger than that of other quarks. The observation of the t¯tH production mode would allow for a direct measurement of this coupling, to which other Higgs production modes are only sensitive via loop effects. Since yt is expected to be close to unity, it is also argued to be the quantity that might give insight into the scale of new physics. Using various Higgs decay modes, we report on the status of this search using data collected with the ATLAS detector at 7 and 8 TeV collision energies.