BNL Home
August 2016
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

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3

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN, Bldg 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: '''''Mircea Cotlet'''''

    Perovskite Photovoltaics: Renewable energies are one of the most important components of the global new energy strategy. Utilizing the power of the sun is one of the most viable ways to solve the foreseeable world's energy crisis. With increasing attention toward carbon-neutral energy production, solar electricity, or photovoltaic (PV) technology, is the object of steadily growing interest. The International Energy Agency's technology roadmap estimates that by 2050, PV will provide ~ 11% of all global electricity production & avoid 2.3 gigatonnes of CO2 emissions per year. A new solar cell material has evolved with transformative potential with laboratory efficiencies of 19.7%. Perovskite absorber materials are very inexpensive to synthesize & simple to manufacture, making them an extremely commercially viable option. Solar cell efficiencies of devices using these materials have increased from 3.8% in 2009 to a certified 20.1% in 2015, making this the fastest-advancing solar cell technology to date. These devices are also known for their high photon absorptivity, ideal direct band gaps with superior carrier charge transports, & cost-effective modes of fabrication scalability. Gama-ray Radiation Detectors: Cadmium zinc telluride (Cd1-xZnxTe or CZT), a ternary semiconductor material is well suited for good charge collection efficiency & high energy resolution room temperature x- & gamma (γ) -ray radiation detectors. In addition, these detectors can be small in size & have fast timing characteristics. Key semiconductor material properties required for high efficiency, & high energy resolution radiation detectors operable at room temperature are a high atomic number, ideal bandgap & low leakage current, high carrier mobility-lifetime (µτ) product to ensure complete charge collection, & high-purity, homogenous, & defect-free. CZT is recognized as one of the leading materials for fabrication.

  2. BSA Noon Recital

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Paul Schenly, Director of Pianofest in the Hamptons, brings a group of young pianist participants in the second session of this workshop. Performances may be critiqued on stage. A wide range of compositions will be selected, including works for two pianos.

  3. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

4

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Hiroshi Oki''

    I will talk about inclusive prompt photon and photon-jet production in p+A collisions at RHIC and the LHC. In particular, I show that photon-jet correlations in the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) picture exhibit long-range azimuthal collimation at near-side for low transverse momenta of the produced photon and jet in high-multiplicity events. These ridge-like features are strikingly similar to the observed ridge effect for di-hadron correlations at RHIC and the LHC. I show that correlations in the relative rapidity and the relative azimuthal angle between pairs of prompt photon and jet strongly depend on the gluon saturation dynamics at small-x kinematics and such measurements can help to understand the true origin of the observed di-hadron ridge in p+A collisions, and address whether the ridge is a universal phenomenon for all two particle correlations at high energy and high multiplicity events.

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    Large liquid-scintillator-based detectors have proven to be exceptionally effective for low energy neutrino measurements due to their good energy resolution and scalability to large volumes. The addition of directional information using Cherenkov light and fast timing would enhance the scientific reach of these detectors, especially for searches for neutrino-less double-beta decay. NuDot is a 1m3 prototype detector that will demonstrate this technique using fast photodetectors and eventually quantum-dot doped liquid scintillator. The ultimate goal is a measurement of two neutrino double-beta decay with direction reconstruction.

5

  1. Particle Physics Seminar

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    A core-collapse supernova explosion would release an enormous amount of neutrinos, the detection of which could yield answers to many questions of supernova dynamics and neutrino physics. The collective neutrinos from all the past supernovae all over the universe (supernova relic neutrinos) are also observable, and their detection would provide us an insight of the stellar evolution and cosmology. In this talk, I will first introduce the supernova burst neutrinos as well as supernova relic neutrinos. Then, i will present the design, characteristics, and sensitivity of an online trigger system of supernova burst neutrinos at Daya Bay. I will also present a search for supernova burst neutrinos at Daya Bay using about 600 days of data. At last, a sensitivity study of the discovery potential for supernova relic neutrinos with a slow liquid scintillator will be presented, which is highly recommended to kilo-ton-scale detectors.

  2. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Matthew Sievert'

    We present calculations of next-to-leading order corrections to the cross section and the single-longitudinal spin asymmetry for W boson production at RHIC. We also discuss decay lepton angular distributions in the Drell-Yan process at hadron colliders and in fixed-target experiments.

6

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7

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9

  1. Special Nuclear Theory Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Rob Pisarski'

    Unlike the light pseudoscalar mesons, understanding the properties of light scalar mesons (particularly, their quark substructure) is known to be quite nontrivial. Scalar mesons are important from the theoretical point of view because they are effectively the Higgs bosons of QCD and induce chiral symmetry breaking, and therefore, are probes of the QCD vacuum. Scalars are also important from a phenomenological point of view, as they are crucial intermediate states in Goldstone boson interactions away from threshold; in a range of energy that is too high for a chiral perturbation theory framework, and too low in the context of the perturbative QCD. The physics of scalar mesons has a great impact on our understanding of important issues in strong interactions such as the diquarks, glueballs, hybrids, violation of isospin, low energy hadron phenomenology, instantons, and final-state interaction of pseudoscalar mesons. Moreover, physics of scalar mesons can provide significant insights outside its immediate focus of low-energy QCD such as, for example, in studies of decay Ds to f0(980) e+ ve or decay Bs to J/psi f0(980) measured by LHCb. In this talk, the status of the scalar mesons will be briefly reviewed and the generalized linear sigma model of low-energy QCD for understanding their properties will be presented. Specifically, the underlying symmetries (and their breakdown) for designing the generalized linear sigma model, as well as various contacts with experiment for fixing the free paremeters of the model will be discussed in some details. Several predictions for various low-energy processes as well as the application of this model to studies of heavier meson decays will be given, and directions for further extensions of the model will be discussed.

10

  1. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room D

    Come meet the board, find out about our upcoming events and volunteer opportunities. All are welcome!

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

11

  1. No events scheduled

12

  1. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Pier Paolo Giardino''

13

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14

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15

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16

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17

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18

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Bldg., Conf Room 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: 'Mark Dean'

    New materials are needed to advance electronic, optical and energy materials beyond current technology trends. Perovskite oxides can potentially meet these needs due to their flexibility and unique functional properties. In bulk materials, these properties are accessed through modifications of physical and electronic structure through cation substitution in the perovskite lattice. An even larger phase space of properties and functionalities is possible when these materials are combined in thin film heterostructure form using molecular beam epitaxy. The sensitivity of the resulting properties on interface structure often dominates device function. Uncovering a microscopic understanding of emergent properties at such interfaces is challenging due to the small volume of material present. In this talk, we show how a combination of first principles theory and experiment can be used to develop a non-volatile, three terminal switch. The device is implemented by using the perovskite LaNiO3 as a conducting channel and a ferroelectric gate. The approach to developing this switch involves synchrotron x-ray characterization of picoscale structural distortions for LaNiO3 heterostructures, including LaNiO3-vacuum, LaNiO3-band insulator, and LaNiO3-ferroelectric. The consequences of the picoscale distortions are strong modulations of the measured electronic transport as a function of interface and ferroelectric polarization direction. Quantitative comparisons of the structure with first principles theory show excellent agreement. Theory provides an understanding of how the picoscale distortions at the interface result in changes in orbital occupation and band properties of both the nickelate and ferroelectric. These insights inspire new principles for designing ferroelectric heterostructures that show record non-volatile resistance modulations.

19

  1. Chemistry Department Colloquium

    10 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: 'Dmitry Polyansky'

    Abstract The replacement of fossil fuels by a clean and renewable energy source is one of the most urgent and challenging issues our society is facing today, which is why intense research is devoted to this topic today. Nature has been using sunlight as the primary energy input to oxidize water and generate carbohydrates (a solar fuel) for over a billion years. Inspired, but not constrained, by nature, artificial systems[1] can be designed to carry out redox catalysis induced by light for instance to oxidize water and reduce protons or other organic compounds to generate useful chemical fuels. In this context this contribution will present a variety of molecular water oxidation and proton reduction catalysts[2] based on first row and second row transition metal complexes. Their capacity to carry out these reactions induced by light will be analyzed and discussed.[3] References [1] Berardi, S.; Drouet, S.; Francàs, L.; Gimbert-Suriñach, C.; Guttentag, M.; Richmond, C.; Stoll, T.; Llobet, A. Chem. Soc. Rev., 2014, 43, 7501-7519. [2] (a) Neudeck, S.; Maji, S.; López, I.; Meyer, S.; Meyer, F.; Llobet, A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 24-27. (b) López, I.; Ertem, M. Z.; Maji, S.; Benet-Buchholz, J.; Keidel, A.; Kuhlmann, U.; Hildebrandt, P.; Cramer, C. J.; Batista, V. S.; Llobet, A. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 205-210. (c) Garrido-Barros, P.; Funes-Ardoiz, I.; Drouet, S.; Benet-Buchholz, J.; Maseras, F.; Llobet, A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 6758-6761. (d) Matheu, R.; Ertem, M.Z.; Benet-Buchholz, J.; Coronado, E.; Batista, V. S.; Sala, X.; Llobet, A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 10786-10795. [3] (a) Farras, P.; Di Giovanni, C.; Clifford, J. N.; Garrido-Barros, P.; Palomares, E.; Llobet, A. Green Chem., 2016, 18, 255-260. b) Moonshiram, D.; Gimbert-Suriñach, C.; Guda, A.; Picon, A.; Lehmann, C. S.; Zhang, X.; Doumy, G.; March, A. M.; Benet-Buchholz, J.; Soldatov, A.; Llobet, A.; Southworth, S. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138

  2. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

  3. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Matthew Sievert'

    The general features of the event-by-event fluctuations of the multiplicity of gluons produced in the scattering of a dilute "hadron" off a large nucleus are discussed. Analytic calculations are possible in "semi-realistic" circumstances.

20

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21

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22

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    1:30 pm, CFN, Bldg. 735, 1st floor, conf. rm. A

    Hosted by: 'Alexei Tkachenko'

    Self-assembling materials have been extensively studied in recent years. It is now possible to achieve a considerable degree of complexity using simple building blocks. For example, using computer simulations, we have found that 2D particles with regularly arranged 'patches' spontaneously form dodecagonal quasicrystals in certain conditions. I will show that the quasicrystal phase has the lowest free energy over a range of conditions and is stabilized by its greater configurational entropy over the crystalline phases. The patchy particles of the model can be thought of as a coarse-grained representation of DNA multi-arm 'star' motifs. I will present several possible design strategies to construct soft two-dimensional DNA-based quasicrystals. However, simple building blocks such as these can only go so far and self-assembling truly 'complex' structures requires us to introduce more distinct building blocks into the system, which makes the problem of self-poisoning ever more difficult to counter. In 2012, Ke and co-workers reported that DNA bricks successfully self-assembled into structures containing not just a handful, but hundreds of distinct components [Science 338, 1117 (2012)]. However, it is not immediately obvious why such self-assembly should succeed where colloidal systems have failed. In my talk, I will present our computational and theoretical work explaining how nucleation governs the self-assembly of these many-component systems and the role this plays in the rational design of the target structure.

23

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24

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25

  1. AUG

    25

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    3 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, August 25, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Neil Robinson''

    Strongly correlated materials including transitional metal oxides and heavy fermion materials exhibit novel structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. The first-principles study of these unusual properties requires a theoretical description that goes beyond density functional theory to treat strong correlation effects properly. In this talk, I will show that the density functional theory plus dynamical mean field theory (DFT+DMFT) method enables realistic and quantitative calculations of those properties in good agreement with experimental spectroscopic measurements. First, I will clarify the nature of the insulating phase in bulk rare-earth nickelates using DFT+DMFT and determine the structural and metal-insulator phase diagram. I will also present DFT+DMFT results of structural and electronic properties in artificially structured LaNiO3/LaAlO3 superlattices under strains. Calculation results of layer-resolved orbital polarization will be compared to recent X-ray absorption spectroscopy data and analyzed in terms of structural and quantum confinement effects. Finally, I will show the momentum and frequency dependent magnetic excitation spectra in CePd3 computed using DFT+DMFT and explain that the calculated spectra based on realistic band excitations are in good agreement with the inelastic neutron scattering data measured in this material.

  2. AUG

    25

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, August 25, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''William Marciano''

26

  1. AUG

    26

    Friday

    Chemistry Department Colloquium

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Friday, August 26, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Sanjaya Senanayake'

    CHEMISTRY COLLOQUIUM Friday, August 26th, 2016 11:00am – Hamilton Seminar Room Chemistry Building, 555 Understanding the fundamental relationships between catalyst activity and structure at the nanoscale will enable the improved design of catalysts. In-situ and operando environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) are powerful techniques for the investigation of structure-reactivity relationships in high surface area catalysts under reaction conditions. With new instruments, atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy can be carried out in the presence of gas, liquid, light and thermal stimuli. The combination of mass spectrometry and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) allows catalytic products to be detected and quantified directly in the electron microscope. With aberration corrected TEM, the positions of atomic columns on nanoparticles surfaces can be observed and correlated with changes in conversion. New developments in monochromated EELS allow the electronic and vibrational structure of catalyst surfaces to be probed with focused electron beams. Using the so-called "aloof beam" approach to EELS, radiation damage is minimized potentially allowing electronic surface and defect states to be observed and correlated with catalytic properties. Examples will be shown which illustrate the information that can be obtained with modern electron imaging and spectroscopy. In situ observations of the structural and chemical changes during activation of reforming catalysts consisting of Ni or NiRu nanoparticles on non-reducible (SiO2) and reducible (CeO2 or doped CeO2) supports will be described. The evolution of the metal and bimetallic structures can be correlated with conversion and selectivity to provide an understanding of nanoscale structure-reactivity relations for partial oxidation and steam reforming. Recent advances in the development of operando methods will be illustrated for CO oxidation on Ru where correlating reactio

  2. AUG

    26

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, August 26, 2016, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: ''Christoph Lehner''

27

  1. No events scheduled

28

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29

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30

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31

  1. No events scheduled

  1. AUG

    25

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Testing the Standard Model with the lepton g-2"

    Presented by Massimo Passera, INFN

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, August 25, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''William Marciano''

  2. AUG

    25

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "The first-principles study of structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of strongly correlated materials: DFT+DMFT approach."

    Presented by Hyowon Park, University of Illinois

    3 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, August 25, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Neil Robinson''

    Strongly correlated materials including transitional metal oxides and heavy fermion materials exhibit novel structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. The first-principles study of these unusual properties requires a theoretical description that goes beyond density functional theory to treat strong correlation effects properly. In this talk, I will show that the density functional theory plus dynamical mean field theory (DFT+DMFT) method enables realistic and quantitative calculations of those properties in good agreement with experimental spectroscopic measurements. First, I will clarify the nature of the insulating phase in bulk rare-earth nickelates using DFT+DMFT and determine the structural and metal-insulator phase diagram. I will also present DFT+DMFT results of structural and electronic properties in artificially structured LaNiO3/LaAlO3 superlattices under strains. Calculation results of layer-resolved orbital polarization will be compared to recent X-ray absorption spectroscopy data and analyzed in terms of structural and quantum confinement effects. Finally, I will show the momentum and frequency dependent magnetic excitation spectra in CePd3 computed using DFT+DMFT and explain that the calculated spectra based on realistic band excitations are in good agreement with the inelastic neutron scattering data measured in this material.

  3. AUG

    26

    Friday

    Chemistry Department Colloquium

    "In Situ and Operando Electron Microscopy Imaging and Spectroscopy of Thermal and Light Driven Catalysts"

    Presented by Peter A. Crozier,, School for the Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy,

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Friday, August 26, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Sanjaya Senanayake'

    CHEMISTRY COLLOQUIUM Friday, August 26th, 2016 11:00am – Hamilton Seminar Room Chemistry Building, 555 Understanding the fundamental relationships between catalyst activity and structure at the nanoscale will enable the improved design of catalysts. In-situ and operando environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) are powerful techniques for the investigation of structure-reactivity relationships in high surface area catalysts under reaction conditions. With new instruments, atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy can be carried out in the presence of gas, liquid, light and thermal stimuli. The combination of mass spectrometry and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) allows catalytic products to be detected and quantified directly in the electron microscope. With aberration corrected TEM, the positions of atomic columns on nanoparticles surfaces can be observed and correlated with changes in conversion. New developments in monochromated EELS allow the electronic and vibrational structure of catalyst surfaces to be probed with focused electron beams. Using the so-called "aloof beam" approach to EELS, radiation damage is minimized potentially allowing electronic surface and defect states to be observed and correlated with catalytic properties. Examples will be shown which illustrate the information that can be obtained with modern electron imaging and spectroscopy. In situ observations of the structural and chemical changes during activation of reforming catalysts consisting of Ni or NiRu nanoparticles on non-reducible (SiO2) and reducible (CeO2 or doped CeO2) supports will be described. The evolution of the metal and bimetallic structures can be correlated with conversion and selectivity to provide an understanding of nanoscale structure-reactivity relations for partial oxidation and steam reforming. Recent advances in the development of operando methods will be illustrated for CO oxidation on Ru where correlating reactio

  4. AUG

    26

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    "Survey of algorithms for finite lattice"

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, BNL

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, August 26, 2016, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: ''Christoph Lehner''

  5. SEP

    1

    Thursday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "A readout chip for GEM detectors in the CMS experiment"

    Presented by Mietek Dabrowski, CERN

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Thursday, September 1, 2016, 2:30 pm

    The CMS muon system is planning an upgrade, which is necessary to maintain the high level of performance in the high luminosity phase of the LHC. One of the improvements is the installation of an additional set of muon detectors - Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) - in the first endcap muon station of the CMS. Recently a novel and complex chip - VFAT3 - for the readout of GEM detectors was designed within the CERN Microelectronics section. In this seminar I will present the architecture of the CMS-GEM readout system with a focus on the VFAT3 chip, including the main challenges, which include the low-power and low-noise front-end required to tolerate high range of detector capacitances, a wide dynamic range and reduction of the discriminator time-walk to less than five nanosecond. The digital back end of the chip includes a novel radiation-hard communication port and data formatting techniques resulting in a lossless compression of the data-stream, amongst other functionality. The entire design has been made radiation hard, for both, TID and SEE.

  6. SEP

    8

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Billions and Billions of molecules: Exploring chemical space for functional molecular materials"

    Presented by Alan Aspuru-Guzik, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, September 8, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''''Qin Wu''''

    Many of the challenges of the twenty-first century are related to molecular processes such as the generation and storage of clean energy, water purification and desalination. These transformations require a next generation of more efficient, chemically stable, and non-toxic materials. Chemical space, the space of all possible synthesizable molecules, is practically infinite and promises to have relevant candidate functional molecules to address these challenges. One of the main goals of my research group is to develop understanding and tools for the exploration chemical space in order to accelerate the discovery of organic materials. Our design cycle is sped up by the constant interaction of theoreticians and experimentalists, the use of high-throughput computational techniques, machine learning, and the development of specialized big data tools. We have had recent successes in theoretically predicting and experimentally confirming in record times top performers in the areas of organic electronics, organic flow batteries and organic light-emitting diodes. In this talk, I will discuss what I consider are the key factors related with a successful high-performance screening approach as illustrated by these three different applications. I will end by discussing the future prospects and challenges associated with developing appropriate metrics for the cartography of chemical space.

  7. SEP

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    ""Open to the Public""

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, September 8, 2016, 6:30 pm

  8. SEP

    14

    Wednesday

    HET

    "TBA"

    Presented by Gopolang Mohlabeng, University of Kansas

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, September 14, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  9. SEP

    15

    Thursday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "Solar Driven Water Splitting"

    Presented by Professor Harry Gray, California Institute of Technology

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, September 15, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Peter Wanderer'

  10. SEP

    21

    Wednesday

    Joint YITP/HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Matt Schwartz, Harvard

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, September 21, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Amarjit Soni'

  11. SEP

    22

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar"

    12 pm, Stony Brook

    Thursday, September 22, 2016, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Anze Slosar'

  12. SEP

    29

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar:TBA"

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 29, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Anze Slosar''

  13. OCT

    4

    Tuesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "Dark Matter and Dark Energy"

    Presented by Prof. Hitoshi Murayama, Univ. of California Berkeley and Kavli Institute, Univ. of Tokyo

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Tuesday, October 4, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Peter Wanderer'

  14. OCT

    6

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Dark Interactions: perspective from theory and experiment"

    9 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 6, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

  15. OCT

    12

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Marco Farina, Rutgers University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 12, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Pier Paolo Giardino''

  16. OCT

    13

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, October 13, 2016, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Nora Sundin''

  17. OCT

    26

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "TBA"

    Presented by Stefania Gori, University of Cincinnati

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 26, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

  18. NOV

    9

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jo Bovy

    1:30 pm, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, November 9, 2016, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Neelima Sehgal'

  19. NOV

    10

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar: TBA"

    1:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 10, 2016, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Anze Slosar'

  20. NOV

    10

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, November 10, 2016, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  21. DEC

    1

    Thursday

    PACCD Workshop (Precision Astronomy with Fully Depleted CCDs)

    8 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, December 1, 2016, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  22. DEC

    1

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    9:30 am, Bldg 30 North Room

    Thursday, December 1, 2016, 9:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Long Island Blood Services'

  23. DEC

    2

    Friday

    PACCD Workshop (Precision Astronomy with Fully Depleted CCDs)

    8 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, December 2, 2016, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  24. DEC

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, December 8, 2016, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  25. JAN

    12

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, January 12, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  26. FEB

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, February 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  27. MAR

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  28. APR

    13

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, April 13, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  29. MAY

    11

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 11, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  30. JUN

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 8, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'