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  1. JUL

    19

    Today

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Invariant and insensitive: climate model microphysics as a scaling problem"

    Presented by Mikael Witte, National Center for Atmospheric Research

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, July 19, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Yangang Liu

    Clouds are inherently multiscale phenomena: the particles that make up clouds are typically microns to millimeters, while the large-scale circulations that drive cloud systems can be hundreds of kilometers across. Limited computational power and the need to accurately represent the large-scale circulations in numerical simulations of the atmosphere make explicit inclusion of cloud microphysics a practical impossibility. In the last 20 years there has been a shift toward representing microphysics as scale-aware processes. Despite this shift, many unanswered questions remain regarding the scaling characteristics of microphysical fields and how best to incorporate that information into parameterizations. In this talk, I will present results from analysis of high frequency in situ aircraft measurements of marine stratocumulus taken over the southeastern Pacific Ocean aboard the NCAR/NSF C-130 during VOCALS-REx. First, I will show that cloud and rain water have distinct scaling properties, indicating that there is a statistically and potentially physically significant difference in the spatial structure of the two fields. Covariance of cloud and rain is a strong function of length/grid scale and this information can easily be incorporated in large-scale model parameterizations. Next I will show results from multifractal analysis of cloud and rain water to understand the spatial structure of these fields, the results of which provide a framework for development of a scale-insensitive microphysics parameterization. Finally, I compare observed microphysical scaling properties with those inferred from large eddy simulations of drizzling stratocumulus, applying the same analyses as applied to the aircraft observations. We find that simulated cloud water agrees well with the observations but the drizzle field is substantially smoother than observed, which has implications for the ability of limited-area models to adequately reproduce the spatial structure o

  2. JUL

    19

    Today

    Physics Summer School

    "Silicon detectors"

    Presented by Gabriele Giacomini

    12:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, July 19, 2018, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Mary Bishai and Anze Slosar

  3. JUL

    19

    Today

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar/Special Nuclear Theory Seminar

    "Neutrino Scattering on Quantum Computers"

    Presented by Alessandro Roggero, University of Washington

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, July 19, 2018, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

  4. JUL

    19

    Today

    CFNS Seminar

    "Lessons from QCD studies at HERA and the LHC towards the EIC"

    Presented by Christophe Royon, University of Kansas

    4 pm, Building 510, CFNS Seminar Room 2-38

    Thursday, July 19, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Maria Pia Zurita

    We will start by describing the main results from HERA and the LHC concerning the proton structure and study how the EIC could bring new insight into proton and nucleon contents in terms of quarks and gluons. We will also describe the possibility of observing new phenomena at low x at the EIC, such as saturation effects. The structure of diffractive events where hadrons can remain intact in the final state will also be discussed. We will finish by describing briefly timing detectors that will be useful at the EIC.

  5. JUL

    19

    Today

    ASAP/STUDENT BBQ

    5:30 pm, Gazebo- located just past NSLS II

    Thursday, July 19, 2018, 5:30 pm

    Hosted by: ASAP & QOL/BERA/Recreation

    Buy your ticket at the BERA Store in Bldg. 488 for this annual ASAP/Student BBQ! Grilled Burgers, Veg Burgers, Hot Dogs, Salads, Watermelon, Soft Drinks & Beer. $3 in advance, @ BERA Store, $4 at the door. Photo ID required for all in attendance! Rain date is 7/20 Friday.

  6. JUL

    20

    Friday

    HET Special Seminar

    "The Quest for Dark Sectors"

    Presented by Claudia Frugiuele, Weizmann

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, July 20, 2018, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

    Dark sectors are ubiquitous in physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), and may play a role in explaining many of the long-standing problems of the SM such as the existence of dark matter or the electroweak hierarchy problem. By definition, dark sectors are not charged under any of the known forces. Discovering their possible existence is thus challenging. I will describe how a a broad program combining particle, nuclear and atomic physics experiments can effectively probe a large region of the parameter space. I will show how the unique signatures of such physics can already be searched for with existing/planned experiments, including neutrino-proton fixed-target experiments and precision atomic measurements.

  7. JUL

    22

    Sunday

    Summer Sundays

    "Exploring the Ultra Small - Center for Functional Nanomaterials"

    10 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Sunday, July 22, 2018, 10:00 am

  8. JUL

    23

    Monday

    2018 Workshop on Probing Quark-Gluon Matter with Jets

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, July 23, 2018, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Yacine Mehtar-Tani (chair), Megan Connors, Brian Page, Felix Ringer, Konrad Tywoniuk, Marta Verweij

  9. JUL

    24

    Tuesday

    2018 Workshop on Probing Quark-Gluon Matter with Jets

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, July 24, 2018, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Yacine Mehtar-Tani (chair), Megan Connors, Brian Page, Felix Ringer, Konrad Tywoniuk, Marta Verweij

  10. JUL

    24

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Tale of coherent photon products: from UPC to HHIC"

    Presented by Wangmei Zha, University of Science and Technology of China

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, July 24, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Rongrong Ma

  11. JUL

    25

    Wednesday

    2018 Workshop on Probing Quark-Gluon Matter with Jets

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, July 25, 2018, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Yacine Mehtar-Tani (chair), Megan Connors, Brian Page, Felix Ringer, Konrad Tywoniuk, Marta Verweij

  12. JUL

    26

    Thursday

    Physics Summer School

    "Working with High-Performance Astronomical CCD"

    Presented by Andrei Nomerotski, BNL

    12:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, July 26, 2018, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Mary Bishai and Anze Slosar

  13. JUL

    26

    Thursday

    CFNS Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Barbara Pasquini, INFN/University of Pavia

    4 pm, Building 510, CFNS Seminar Room 2-38

    Thursday, July 26, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Andrey Tarasov

  14. JUL

    27

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Zhongbo Kang, UCLA

    2 pm, Building 510, CFNS Seminar Room 2-38

    Friday, July 27, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chun Shen

  15. JUL

    27

    Friday

    Sambamurti Lecture

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jin Huang, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, July 27, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: John Haggerty

  16. JUL

    29

    Sunday

    Summer Sundays

    "Brilliant Light, Dazzling Discoveries - National Synchrotron Light Source II"

    10 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Sunday, July 29, 2018, 10:00 am

  17. JUL

    31

    Tuesday

    Special Particle Physics Seminar

    "Dark Matter Annual Modulation with SABRE"

    Presented by Lindsey Bignell, Australian National University

    1:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, July 31, 2018, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: David Jaffe

    SABRE is a dark matter direct detection experiment with a target of ultra-pure NaI(Tl). Our experiment is motivated by the DAMA result; a long-standing and highly statistically significant modulation of the count rate in their NaI(Tl) detector that is consistent with that expected from the dark matter halo. However, a number of other direct detection experiments, using different target materials, exclude the dark matter parameter space implied by DAMA for the simplest WIMP-nucleus interaction models. SABRE hopes to carry out the first model-independent test of the DAMA claim, with sufficient sensitivity to confirm or refute their result. SABRE will also operate identical detectors in the northern and southern hemisphere, to rule out seasonally-modulated backgrounds. The southern detector will be housed at the first deep underground laboratory in the Southern Hemisphere: the Stawell Underground Physics Laboratory. This talk will give an overview of the SABRE design and its predicted sensitivity, as well as an update on the proof-of-principle detector which will be operating this summer.

  18. JUL

    31

    Tuesday

    Marcum Workplace Challenge @ Jones Beach

    6 pm, Jones Beach- On the Ocean

    Tuesday, July 31, 2018, 6:00 pm

    Hosted by: Dmitry Polyansky

    Register today for the worlds largest office party, run/walk, and BBQ! Free 4pm Bus from BNL @ Bldg. 400, too!

  19. AUG

    1

    Wednesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Imaging Non-equilibrium Dynamics in Two-Dimensional Materials"

    Presented by Kenneth Beyerlein, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Germany

    11 am, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Wednesday, August 1, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Ian Robinson

    The interfaces in thin film heterostructures dictate the performance of an electronic device. Understanding their behavior upon exposure to light is important for advancing photovoltaics and spintronics. However, producing an atomic image of these dynamics is an under-determined problem without a unique solution. In this talk, I will show how a set of ultrafast soft X-ray diffraction rocking curves can be spliced together to add constraints to the phase retrieval problem. In doing so, the anti-ferromagnetic order through a NdNiO3 film after illumination of the substrate with a mid-Infrared laser pulse will be imaged. Notably, a disordered phase front initiated at the substrate interface is shown to evolve at twice the speed of sound. This time-spliced imaging technique opens a new window into the correlated dynamics of two-dimensional materials.

  20. AUG

    2

    Thursday

    HET Special Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Peter Denton, Niels Bohr

    1:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, August 2, 2018, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  21. AUG

    3

    Friday

    NSLS-II Friday Luncheon Seminar

    "Homoepitaxial growth of SrTiO3 by Pulsed Laser Deposition: energetic vs thermal growth"

    Presented by Jeff Ulbrandt, University of Vermont

    12 pm, NSLS-II Bldg. 743 Room 156

    Friday, August 3, 2018, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: M. Abeykoon, S. Chodankar, B. Ocko, T. Tanabe, J. Thieme

  22. AUG

    5

    Sunday

    Summer Sundays

    "Atom Smashing Fun with the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider"

    10 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Sunday, August 5, 2018, 10:00 am

  23. AUG

    6

    Monday

    Chemistry Department Seminar

    "Synthesis of Fuels and Chemicals by Electroreduction over Copper Catalysts"

    Presented by Elizabeth J. Biddinger, The City College of New York, CUNY

    11 am, Room 300 - 3rd Flr. Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Monday, August 6, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Sanjaya Senanayake

    Electrochemical synthesis methods offer opportunities to perform reactions under benign reaction conditions (at or near room temperature and pressure), use less harmful or waste-generating reaction steps, and perform selective reactions. In electroreduction reactions, externally-supplied hydrogen that is generally needed for reduction is not required. Rather, electrons, frequently paired with the electrolyte, are the reducing agents. New opportunities for utilization of electrochemical reactions exist with the emerging renewable electricity generation market. Due to the intermittent supply sources for many renewable electricity systems, excess electricity gets generated when peak generation (sunny or windy periods) does not match with demand. Electrochemical reactions can be performed at relatively low costs with this excess electricity to synthesize fuels for later use or chemicals. The work presented here will illustrate two synthesis systems via electroreduction – carbon dioxide electroreduction to hydrocarbons and furfural (a biomass-derived species) electrochemical hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis (ECH) to fuels and chemicals. Both of these reactions are performed over copper electrodes, serving as the catalysts for the system. Copper is utilized because of its unique balance between being active for the electroreduction and less active for the undesired side reaction hydrogen evolution. In CO2 electroreduction, copper is the only known metal to produce significant quantities of hydrocarbons. By tuning the morphology, the selectivity between ethylene and methane can be tuned. The results of morphological differences and the dynamic nature of copper surfaces will be discussed in terms of electrodeposition and the resulting CO2 electroreduction performance. In furfural ECH, both 2-methyl furan and furfuryl alcohol can be formed, while over many other metals 2-methyl furan is not formed. The reaction conditions for furfural ECH si

  24. AUG

    7

    Tuesday

    Special Particle Physics Seminar

    "Deep Neural Network Techniques R&D for Data Reconstruction of Liquid Argon TPC Detectors"

    Presented by Kazuhiro Terao, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, August 7, 2018, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Chao Zhang

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) are capable of recording images of charged particle tracks with breathtaking resolution. Such detailed information will allow LArTPCs to perform accurate particle identification and calorimetry, making it the detector of choice for many current and future neutrino experiments. However, analyzing such images can be challenging, requiring the development of many algorithms to identify and assemble features of the events in order to reconstruct neutrino interactions. In the recent years, we have been investigating a new approach using deep neural networks (DNNs), a modern solution to a pattern recognition for image-like data in the field of Computer Vision. A modern DNN can be applied for various types of problems such as data reconstruction tasks including interaction vertex finding, pixel clustering, and particle/topology type identification. We have developed a small inter-experiment collaboration to share generic software tools and algorithms development effort that can be applied to non-LArTPC imaging detectors. In this talk I will discuss the challenges of LArTPC data reconstruction, recent work and future plans for developing a full LArTPC data reconstruction chain using DNNs.

  25. AUG

    8

    Wednesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2018 DOE/BNL Summer Internship Poster Session"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, August 8, 2018, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: Noel Blackburn

  26. AUG

    8

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "The Problems with Photoguns"

    Presented by Matt Poelker, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, August 8, 2018, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: John Smedley

    Although the field has advanced considerably over decades, improving the performance of DC high voltage photoguns can be painfully slow and frustrating, especially when attempting to advance the state of the art. At the Jefferson Accelerator Facility, the gun group has adopted a photogun design with inverted-insulator geometry as a means to reach higher operating voltages while also improving gun vacuum and photocathode lifetime. This talk describes ongoing photogun projects at Jefferson Lab, highlighting some recent successes but also describing efforts that corrected one problem and introduced another.

  27. AUG

    9

    Thursday

    NSLS-II Colloquium Series

    "Mulling over Nanoemulsions: Interfacial Molecular Structure, Stabilization and Assembly"

    Presented by Prof. Geraldine (Geri) Richmond, University of Oregon

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, August 9, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: John Hill

    Nanoemlusions are finding numerous applications in the fields of pharmaceuticals, food production, materials synthesis and cosmetics. With the search for broader and improved usage of these unique droplets comes the need to better understand the molecular interactions at the surface that lead to their stabilization. This presentation will focus on our most recent efforts in measuring the molecular structure of the oil-water interface and the unique environment it provides for adsorption of molecules, surfactants and macromolecules at both planar and nanoemulsion oil/water interfaces. The studies are a combination of spectroscopic and thermodynamic measurements coupled with theoretical simulations.

  28. AUG

    10

    Friday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Advances in high energy electron holography"

    Presented by Toshiaki Tanigaki, Hitachi, Japan

    10:30 am, Conference room in building 480

    Friday, August 10, 2018, 10:30 am

    Hosted by: M.-G. Han

  29. AUG

    16

    Thursday

    African-American Advancement Group Meeting

    "AAAG General Meeting"

    12:15 pm, Berkner Hall, Room D

    Thursday, August 16, 2018, 12:15 pm

  30. AUG

    20

    Monday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "Biodesign Under Pressure: 10 Molecules. 90 days. Go."

    Presented by Dr. Benjamin Gordon, Director, MIT-Broad Foundry

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Monday, August 20, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

  31. AUG

    21

    Tuesday

    Special HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Pier Paolo Giardino, BNL

    1:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, August 21, 2018, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  32. AUG

    30

    Thursday

    Special Nuclear Theory Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Joaquin Drut, University of North Carolina

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, August 30, 2018, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

  33. SEP

    4

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Neutron production and capture in stellar nucleosynthesis:^{22}Ne(\Alpha,n)^{25}Mg reaction and radiative neutron captures of radioactive nuclei"

    Presented by Shuya Ota, Texas A&M University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, September 4, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    Most of elements heavier than Fe in the Universe are produced by a series of neutron capture reaction and ??-decay in stars. The s-process, which occurs under moderate neutron environments (~107-10 neutrons/cm3) such as in He burning of massive stars, is responsible for producing almost half of the heavy elements. Neutrons for the s-process environment is believed to be supplied by two dominant reactions, one of which is 22Ne(?,n)25Mg reaction. This reaction in massive stars is dominated by a few resonance reactions. Nevertheless, there remain large uncertainties about contribution of the reaction to the s-process nucleosynthesis because the reaction cross sections are too small for direct measurements due to Coulomb barrier (E? = 400-900 keV in the lab system). In the first half of this seminar, I will present our experiment to determine these resonance strengths with a cyclotron accelerator at Texas A&M University. The experiment was performed by an indirect approach using 6Li(22Ne,25Mg+n)d ?-transfer reaction, in which resonance properties such as neutron decay branching ratios of produced 26Mg were studied by measuring deuterons, ?-ray, and 26Mg in coincidence using large arrays of Si and Ge, and a magnetic spectrometer. Our results showed neutron production from 22Ne(?,n)25Mg reaction can be about 10 times lower than past measurements. The effect of our measurements on the s-process nucleosynthesis will be discussed. In the second half of this seminar, I will present our experiments to determine neutron capture cross sections of radioactive nuclei using the Surrogate Reaction method [1]. Neutron capture reactions for the s-process involve relatively long-lived nuclei neighboring stability in the nuclear chart. Therefore, the Surrogate Reaction, which creates the same compound nuclei as the neutron capture reaction using a stable beam and target, can be a useful approach. On the other hand, the r- process, which produces the other half

  34. SEP

    6

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    9:15 am, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, September 6, 2018, 9:15 am

    Hosted by: Long Island Blood Services

  35. SEP

    6

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Safe Li-Ion Battery Electrolytes: from Aqueous Electrolytes, Nonflammable Organic Electrolytes, to Solid State Electrolytes"

    Presented by Chunsheng Wang, University of Maryland

    4 pm, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, September 6, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Dong Su

    Li-ion batteries are the critical enabling technology for the portable devices, electric vehicles (EV), and renewable energy. However, the safety of current batteries still needs to be improved to satisfy these requirements. We investigated the electrochemical performances of three nonflammable electrolytes: water-in-salt electrolytes, all fluorinated organic electrolytes, and solid state electrolytes. The electrochemical stability window of these electrolytes, interface/interphase stability with anodes and high-voltage cathodes, and the interface/interphase resistance between electrodes and electrolytes were systematically studied. The critical issues limiting the performance of these safe electrolytes will be discussed.

  36. SEP

    13

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Higgs couplings"

    Presented by Konstantinos Nikolopoulos

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 13, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

  37. SEP

    13

    Thursday

    CFNS Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Long Pang, LBNL

    4 pm, Building 510, CFNS Seminar Room 2-38

    Thursday, September 13, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Andrey Tarasov

  38. SEP

    20

    Thursday

    African-American Advancement Group Meeting

    "AAAG General Meeting"

    12:15 pm, Berkner Hall, Room D

    Thursday, September 20, 2018, 12:15 pm

  39. SEP

    26

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "Loop-Induced Single Top Partner Production and Decay at the HL-LHC"

    Presented by Jeong Han Kim, Kansas University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, September 26, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

  40. OCT

    1

    Monday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Results from NA62 and its future program"

    Presented by Babette Döbrich, CERN

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, October 1, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

    The decay K+→π+νν, with a very precisely predicted branching ratio of less than 10^{-10}, is one of the best candidates to reveal indirect effects of new physics at the highest mass scales. The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS is designed to measure the branching ratio of the K+→π+νν with a decay-in-flight technique, novel for this channel. NA62 took data in 2016, 2017 and another year run is scheduled in 2018. Statistics collected in 2016 allows NA62 to reach the Standard Model sensitivity for K+→π+νν, entering the domain of 10-10 single event sensitivity and showing the proof of principle of the experiment. The analysis data is reviewed and the preliminary result from the 2016 data set presented. In addition, owing to the high beam-energy and a hermetic detector coverage, NA62 also has the opportunity to directly search for a plaethora of long-lived beyond-the Standard Model particles, such as Axion-like Particles and Dark Photons. We will review the status and results of this searches and give prospects for future data taking at NA62.