BNL Home
October 2017
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

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  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Jiangyong Jia'

    In recent years, there have been rapid progresses in our understanding of the event-by-event flow fluctuation, which provides direct insight into the fluctuations in the initial geometry. I will start my talk by briefly discussing the flow (collectivity) and its fluctuation in small systems pp and p+Pb, using the newly-proposed subevent cumulant method, which is able to suppress the non-flow background effectively. I will show there is significant fluctuation of elliptic flow $v_2$ in pp and non-Gaussian fluctuation of triangular flow $v_3$ in p+Pb. Moving from small to large systems, STAR collaboration recently has shown different behaviors of cumulant $c_2\{4\}$ between Au+Au and U+U in ultra-central collisions, which is believed to support the different geometry fluctuations. By presenting the newest ATLAS flow measurements in ultra-central collisions, together with detailed MC Glauber studies, I will explain why sign change of $c_2\{4\}$ is observed and its implications. In the end, I will go back to small systems and discuss the potential impact of centrality resolution on pp flow measurements.

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    12 pm, Physics Bldg 510, Room 2-78

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

4

  1. QOL/BERA/Recreation Wednesday Hospitality Coffee & Play Group

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'QOL/BERA/Recreation'

    Newcomers & families with or without children are welcome to come to Hospitality Coffee & Play Group each Wed. in the Rec Hall, Bldg. 317, in the Apt. area. We enjoy coffee & pastry and socializing. A great way to meet other BNLers!

  2. HET Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Sally Dawson''

    Measurements of Higgs production and decays have revealed that most of the mass of the weak gauge bosons is due to the 125 GeV Higgs. Similarly, we know that the Higgs is at least partially responsible for giving mass to the top and bottom quarks and the tau lepton. Much less is known about the origin of mass for the first two generations. In this talk, I will discuss a framework in which the first and second generation masses originate from a second source of electroweak symmetry breaking and outline the phenomenological implications.

5

  1. NSLS-II Seminar

    2 pm, Bldg 744 Room 156

    Hosted by: 'Sushil Sharma'

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) Upgrade Project is a major redesign of the current operating machine to a new multi-bend low emittance lattice operating at 6 GeV with 200 mA of stored beam. To fully support the APS Upgrade (APS-U), the front ends and insertion devices (IDs) located inside the storage ring tunnel need to be upgraded. Most of the front ends at the APS were designed more than 20 years ago and have limitations in the power handling capability. As part of APS Upgrade all the ID front ends will be replaced to one of two types – capable of handling the full straight section of IDs or canted with two ID beams. At the current time, the APS has 54 IDs in operation over 33 beamlines. Most of the devices were optimized more than 20 years ago for 7-GeV operation, providing full energy tunability in the hard x-ray range. To maximize the brightness and flux for all the beamlines (also part of the APS-U), most of the IDs will be replaced. This seminar will provide an overview of the plans for the front ends and insertion devices for the APS-U.

  2. CFN Colloquium

    4 pm, Bldg. 735, Seminar Room 2nd Floor

    Hosted by: '''Mircea Cotlet'''

    Small clusters exhibit electronic and chemical properties that can differ significantly from that of the bulk and offer a unique opportunity for preparing novel catalysts whose reactivity can be modified at the atomic level. Here, we use mass-selected cluster deposition to prepare model "inverse" catalysts comprised of small metal oxide (MxOy: M = Ti, Nb, Mo, Ce, W) and sulfide (MxSy: M = Mo, W) clusters deposited on Cu and Au surfaces, respectively, for reactivity studies related to the water-gas-shift reaction (WGSR) and CO/CO2 activation. A key advantage of cluster deposition is that it allows control over cluster stoichiometry which provides a means of introducing oxygen/sulfur "vacancies" and varying the average cation oxidation state. Moreover, the use of well-ordered supports and size-selected clusters is ideally suited for computational modeling of structure and reactions using DFT electronic structure theory. Results will be presented for studies of water dissociation on oxide clusters deposited on Cu surfaces and CO2 binding on K-modified sulfide clusters, as well as very recent measurements using ambient pressure XPS (CSX-2 at NSLS-2) to explore the activity of (TiO2)n/Cu(111) surfaces for the water-gas-shift reaction.

6

  1. NSLS-II Friday Lunchtime Seminar Series

    12 pm, NSLS-II Bldg 743 (LOB 3), room 156

    Hosted by: ''Ben Ocko, Shirish Chodankar, Milinda Abeykoon, Juergen Thieme and Guimei Wang''

  2. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

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11

  1. Particle Physics Seminar

    1:30 pm, Stony Brook

    Hosted by: '''Neelima Sehgal'''

  2. BSA Distinguished Lecture

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: 'Peter Wanderer'

    In 2016, scientists announced the first ever detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes, launching a new era of gravitational wave astrophysics. Since then there have been a couple more detections. Gravitational waves were predicted by Einstein a hundred years earlier. I will describe the science, technology, and human story behind these discoveries that provide a window into some of the most violent and warped events in the Universe.

12

  1. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Chun Shen'

    The Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), nature's first and most perfect liquid, has been successfully reproduced in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and the LHC. The dynamics of the QGP can be well described by relativistic viscous hydrodynamics, allowing for precise comparisons to experimental data in order to extract the properties of the QGP. While a small shear viscosity is well-established, questions still remain regarding the precise initial state, the temperature dependence of viscosity, the smallest system that displays QGP-like properties, and the equation of state at large densities. In this talk, the various flow harmonic observables are analyzed to help answer these remaining questions.

  2. NSLS-II Colloquium Series

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: '''''John Hill'''''

    What is the smallest possible size of a magnet? How fast can we switch the magnetization of a thin film? The answer to these simple questions reveals a fascinating world of interactions, which are largely dominated by interface effects. Understanding and controlling such interactions opens new perspectives for classical and quantum data processing technologies at the microscopic scale. Synchrotron radiation measurements exploiting x-ray dichroism at the L- and M-edges of the transition metal and lanthanide elements, respectively, provide a unique spectroscopic and microscopic tool to link the nanoscale properties of matter to the magnetic behavior of different classes of materials. In this talk, I will describe our studies of the evolution of magnetism from single atoms to nanoparticles and molecular magnets [1-4], focusing on the conditions required to achieve magnetic bistability in small systems [5,6]. I will further report on recent efforts to induce magnetization switching using electrical currents in materials characterized by strong spin-orbit interactions [7,8]. Current pump/x-ray probe experiments reveal the mechanism and time scale of magnetization reversal induced by the spin–orbit torques and spin Hall effect in thin film heterostructures, which has applications in ultrafast magnetic random access memories with high endurance [9,10]. [1] P. Gambardella et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 047202 (2002). [2] P. Gambardella et al., Science 300, 1130 (2003). [3] P. Gambardella et al., Nature Mater. 8, 189 (2009). [4] S. Stepanow et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 5451 (2014). [5] I. G. Rau et al., Science 344, 988 (2014). [6] F. Donati et al., Science 352, 318 (2016). [7] I. M. Miron et al., Nature 476, 189 (2011). [8] K. Garello et al., Nature Nanotech. 8, 587 (2013). [9] M. Baumgartner et al., Nature Nanotech., in press (2017). [10] G. Prenat et al., IEEE Transactions on Multi-Scale Computing 2, 149 (2016).

  3. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

13

  1. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    A large Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device for tracking and charged particle identification in the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. After the second long shutdown in 2019/20, the LHC will deliver Pb beams colliding at an interaction rate of about 50 kHz, which is about a factor of 50 above the present read-out rate of the TPC. This will result in a significant improvement on the sensitivity of rare probes that are considered key observables to characterize the QCD matter created in such collisions. In order to make full use of this luminosity, a major upgrade of the TPC is required. Since the TPC drift time of 100 μs is 5 times longer than the average time between interactions, the presently employed gating of the TPC wire chambers must be abandoned and continuously operated readout detectors using GEMs will be implemented. To fulfill the challenging requirements of the upcoming upgrade, a novel configuration of GEM detectors has been developed. It allows to maintain excellent particle identification and efficient ion trapping by stacking four GEM foils operated under specific field configuration. Results of an extensive R&D program concerning ion backflow suppression, dE/dx resolution and stability against discharges will be presented. The status of the upgrade of the online calibration and data reduction system, as well as the development of a new readout electronics will be reported. We will also discuss the ongoing detector production.

14

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16

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 480, Conference Room

    Hosted by: ''Myung-Geun Han''

    Topological structures in functional materials, such as domain walls and skyrmions, see increased attention due to their properties that can be completely different from that of the parent bulk material [1]. I will discuss recent results on multiferroic phase boundaries, domain walls in BiFeO3 [2, 3, 4, 5, 6] using SPM, TEM and ab-initio theory, and discuss future prospects [7]. References [1] J. Seidel (ed.), Topological structures in ferroic materials: domain walls, skyrmions and vortices, ISBN: 978-3-319-25299-5, Springer, Berlin (2016) [2] P. Sharma, et al., Scientific Reports 6, 32347 (2016) [3] P. Sharma, et al., Advanced Electronic Materials 2, 1600283 (2016) [3] J. Seidel, et al., Advanced Materials 26, 4376 (2014) [4] Y. Heo, et al., Advanced Materials 26, 7568 (2014) [5] Y. Heo et al., ACS Nano, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.6b07869 (2017) [6] P. Sharma, et al., Advanced Materials Interfaces 3, 1600033 (2016) [7] J. Seidel, Nature Nanotechnology 10, 190 (2015)

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Researchers at IHEP, Beijing have conceived a new concept of MCP-PMT several years ago. The small MCP (Microchannel Plate) units replace the bulky Dynode chain in the tranditional large PMTs for better photoelectron detection. After three years R&D, a number of 8 inch prototypes were produced and their performance was carefully tested at IHEP in 2013 by using the MCP-PMT evaluation system built at IHEP. The 20 inch prototypes were followed in 2014, and its' performance were improving a lot in 2015. Compensating the PMT performances with fiducially volume convert all specifications to cost, radioactivity, dark noise, TTS, the JUNO ordered 15000 pic 20-inch MCP-PMT from the NNVT in Dec.2015. In 2016, the MCP-PMT collaboration group finished to build the mass production line in Nanjing at the end of 2016, and finished the batch test system in the same place within 100 days at the beginning of 2017. From 2017 to 2019, all the 20-inch MCP-PMT will be produced and tested one by one in NNVT for JUNO. This presentation will talk about the R&D process and mass production, batch test result of the first 2K pieces of MCP-PMT prototypes for JUNO.

17

  1. Sustainable Energy Technologies Department

    11 am, 2nd Floor Seminar Room 201

    Hosted by: 'Feng Wang'

    Insight into relationship between Crystal/Interface structure and properties of capacity, stability and rate capability are important for developing advanced Li-ion batteries. Using theoretical calculations combined with experimental in-situ tests, we did extensive studies on the kinetic of Li-ion diffusion for two representative cathode materials: layered Li(NixMnyCoz)O2 (NMC) (x + y + z = 1) and LiFePO4. We not only focus on the bulk kinetics, but also the kinetics across electrode/electrolyte solid-liquid interface and in the electrolytes. For example, we first proposed that "Janus" solid-liquid interface would facilitate the Li-ion transport in battery and introducing some disordering in non-active cathode materials would activate them for Li-ion storage. Finally, we also developed some in-situ technologies for battery studies. For example, using electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), we achieve an in situ experimental investigation of the LiFePO4 (LFP) and NaFePO4 (NFP)/electrolyte interfacial kinetics for Li(Na)-batteries. (Ref. 1) For high energy and power density applications (e.g., EVs), the safety becomes especially important. Using ab initio calculations combined with experiments, we clarified how the thermal stability of NMC materials can be tuned by the most unstable oxygen, which is determined by the local coordination structure unit (LCSU) of oxygen (TM(Ni, Mn, Co)3-O-Li3-x'): each O atom bonds with three of transition metal (TM) from the TM-layer and three to zero of Li from fully discharged to charged states from the Li-layer. Under this model, how the lithium content, valence states of Ni, contents of Ni, Mn, and Co, and Ni/Li disorder to tune the thermal stability of NMC materials by affecting the sites, content, and the release temperature of the most unstable oxygen is proposed. (Ref. 2) Ref. 1. (a)F. Pan el al., "Kinetics Tuning of Li-ion Diffusion in Layered Li(NixMnyCoz)O2", J. Am. Chem. Soc., 201

18

  1. HET Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: '''Mattia Bruno'''

  2. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Radiation detection systems based on semiconductor detectors play an important role in experimental and applied physics. Common detectors used in physics are strip and pixel detectors, while strip detectors provide a simpler and cheaper solution with a comparable accuracy. A system using ASICs (NCIASIC3) provided by BNL has been designed for silicon strip detectors to investigate their scope and dynamic properties when employed as spectroscopes. Potential applications include single event effect, tracking, dosimetry, and X-ray imaging, among others. The design of the system, as well as results from preliminary tests and measurements will be presented.

19

  1. Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Hosted by: 'Steve Schwartz'

    Airborne particles are ubiquitous components of our atmosphere, originating from a variety of natural and anthropogenic sources, exhibiting a wide range of physical properties, and contributing in multiple ways to regional air quality as well as regional-to-global-scale climate. Most remain in the atmosphere for a week or less, but can traverse oceans or continents in that time, carrying nutrients or disease vectors in some cases. Bright aerosols reflect sunlight, and can cool the surface; light-absorbing particles can heat the atmosphere, suppressing cloud formation or mediating larger-scale circulations. In most cases, particles are required to collect water vapor as the initial step in cloud formation, so their presence (or absence) and their hygroscopic or hydrophilic properties can affect cloud occurrence, structure, and ability to precipitate. Grasping the scope and nature of aerosol environmental impacts requires understanding microphysical-to-global scale processes, operating on timescales from minutes to days or longer. Satellites are the primary source of observations on kilometer-to-global scales. Spacecraft observations are complemented by suborbital platforms: aircraft in situ measurements and surface-based instrument networks that operate on smaller spatial scales, some on shorter timescales. Numerical models play a third key role in this work — providing a synthesis of current physical understanding with the aggregate of measurements, and allowing for some predictive capability. This presentation will focus on what we can say about aerosol amount and type from space. Constraining particle "type" is at present the leading challenge for satellite aerosol remote sensing. We will review recent advances and future prospects, including the strengths and limitations of available approaches, and current work toward better integrating measurements with models to create a clearer picture of aerosol environmental impacts, globally.

  2. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Enrico Rinaldi'

    The nucleon axial form factor is a dominant contribution to systematic uncertainties in neutrino oscillation studies. The most commonly used model parametrization of the axial form factor has uncontrolled and underestimated systematic errors. First-principles computations from lattice QCD have the potential to control theory errors by disentangling the effects of nuclear corrections from the nucleon amplitudes. In this talk, I discuss fits to the axial form factor with deuterium bubble chamber data using the model-independent $z$ expansion parameterization. I then present preliminary results for a blinded lattice QCD calculation of the nucleon axial charge $g_A$ with physical light quark masses. This calculation is being done with the Highly Improved Staggered Quark (HISQ) action and 2+1+1 flavors of sea quarks.

  3. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Alessandro Tricoli'

    Recent measurements of the Higgs boson properties in the four lepton channel for 36.1 fb-1 of proton—proton collisions at 13 TeV using the ATLAS detector will be presented. The measurements include the Higgs boson mass as well as inclusive, fiducial and differential cross sections and, constraints on Higgs boson production couplings. The results are interpreted within the Standard Model and various extensions.

20

  1. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Chun Shen''

    In the so-called isobar parametrization the three-particle states are populated via an interacting two-particle system (resonant or non-resonant), and a spectator. Using this parametrization, we derive the isobar-spectator interaction such that the three-body Unitarity is ensured exactly. In the first part of my talk I will show the major steps of this derivation. (arXiv:1706.06118) The second part of the talk will be dedicated to the finite-volume implementation of the framework (arXiv:1709.08222). Imaginary parts in the infinite volume, dictated by Unitarity, determine the dominant power-law finite volume effects to ensure the correct 3-body quantization condition. Furthermore, various building blocks of the 3->3 amplitude in the finite volume can become singular. However, when all contributions are summed-up, only genuine 3-body singularities remain. I will demonstrate the corresponding cancellation mechanisms explicitly for the simplified case of only one S-wave isobar.

  2. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    3 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: '''Igor Zaliznyak'''

    Orbital and spin degrees of freedom in heavy transition metal compounds can be locked into each other due to strong spin-orbit coupling. The magnetism in this case is described by an effective total angular momentum jeff=1/2 rather than usual spin angular momentum. Furthermore, these jeff=1/2 moments residing on a honeycomb lattice can be coupled through bond-dependent Kitaev interactions. Magnetic properties of some honeycomb lattice iridates, such as Na2IrO3 and Li2IrO3 have been extensively investigated to examine whether Kitaev quantum spin liquid is realized in these compounds. However, the applicability of the jeff=1/2 local moment model in real materials have not been critically scrutinized experimentally. A combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering experiments on a honeycomb lattice Li2IrO3 reveals that the jeff=1/2 picture breaks down under high pressure, and electrons take on more itinerant character under this condition.

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  1. OCT

    24

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Bjoern Schenke'

    The observation of charge separation induced by the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME), could provide crucial insights on anomalous transport and the interplay of chiral symmetry restoration, axial anomaly, and gluonic topology in the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) produced in heavy ion collisions. I will discuss recent differential charge separation measurements,for p(d)+Au, Au(Cu)+Au and U+U, with a correlator specifically designed to give discernible responses to CME-driven charge separation and non-CME backgrounds. Measurements which span the beam energy range Root_s = 19.5 - 200 GeV will be presented. The d(p)+Au results are observed to be consistent with the reduced magnetic field strength and the essentially random B-field orientations expected in these collisions. In contrast, the Au(Cu)+Au and U+U measurements validate the presence of CME-driven charge separation quantified by the Fourier dipole coefficient a1. Ongoing attempts for CME-signal quantification, as well as implications for the upcoming RHIC isobar run, will be discussed as well.

  2. OCT

    24

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Peter Petreczky'

    On August 17, 2017 the merger of two neutron stars was detected in the form of gravitational-waves by LIGO/Virgo. As a result of over a decade long preparation for multimessenger observations the event was also seen electromagnetically across the full spectrum. The history and future of the multimessenger effort using gravitational-waves will be discussed from an instrumentalist viewpoint.

25

  1. OCT

    25

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Play Group

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'QOL/BERA/Recreation'

    Newcomers, individuals, and families are welcome to come to Hospitality Coffee & Play Group each Wednesday at the Rec Hall, Bldg. 317, in the apartment area. If you have children, they will play while the adults socialize.

  2. OCT

    25

    Wednesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Cedomir Petrovic'''

    Progress in the widespread adoption of all solid heat-to-electricity technologies has largely been hindered by the absence of suitable thermoelectric materials. In pursuit for new thermoelectrics recent advances in large-scale deployment of first principles calculations could be useful in identifying new promising material systems. However, the need to predict electron and phonon transport properties with sufficient accuracy renders direct assessment of the thermoelectric figure of merit (zT) for large numbers of systems unfeasible. This is true even in the case of relatively simple semiconductor materials, which could be described by the computationally inexpensive single particle theories such as density functional theory (DFT). While the state-of-the-art DFT based approaches to charge carrier and heat transport of semiconductors can deliver desired accuracy, they are currently limited to relatively simple chemistries and/or case-by-case studies. In this talk I will discuss integrated theory-computation-experiment efforts in developing a robust set of material descriptors that: (1) are rooted in the Boltzmann transport theory, but do not rely on classic and largely inapplicable constant relaxation time or constant mean free path approximations, (2) are computationally tractable allowing material searches across large chemical spaces, and (3) are sufficiently accurate to provide reliable predictions. Our approach is demonstrated to correctly identify known thermoelectric materials1 and reliably suggest new and promising candidate semiconductors.2 At the end, I will review successes and failures in our quest for new thermoelectrics, and discuss dopability of semiconductors as the critical outstanding challenge in achieving high zT materials. 1. Yan, P. Gorai, B. Ortiz, S. Miller, S. A. Barnett, T. Mason, V. Stevanovic, and E. S. Toberer, "Material descriptors for thermoelectric performance", Energy Environ. Sci. 2. P. Gorai, V. Stevanovic, and E. Tobe

  3. OCT

    25

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 2:30 pm

    A variety of cryogenic sensor arrays can be read out by coupling each detector element to a microwave resonator whose resonant frequency changes in response to the physics signal. The use of microfabrication techniques and high Q superconducting resonators allows thousands of sensor elements to be multiplexed in this way, and then simultaneously read out through a single RF cable. The SMuRF electronics provide high dynamic range readout along with flux-ramp drive to reduce 1/f noise, and firmware controlled RF line tracking to reduce system nonlinearities. The hardware design supports up to 4000 sensors operating in a 4-8GHz frequency range in a single ATCA card, allowing compact high density systems. The initial target applications are RF SQUID multiplexed CMB telescopes and energy-resolving X-ray detectors; however the hardware will also support MKID and other cryogenic sensors for cryogenic particle detectors and other applications.

26

  1. OCT

    26

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Hiromichi Nishimura''

    Quarkonium can be used as a probe of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in heavy ion collisions. The production process is complicated by several factors: plasma screening effect, in-medium dissociation and recombination, cold nuclear matter effect and feed-down contributions. In this talk, I will present a set of Boltzmann transport equations that govern the in-medium evolution of the heavy quark and quarkonium system. The dissociation and recombination rates are calculated from potential non-relativistic QCD at leading order. I will explain how the system reaches equilibrium in a QGP box and show how the system evolves under a boost invariant longitudinal expansion. I will argue that the angular distribution of quarkonium probes the stages at which recombination occurs. The presented framework will be extended in future work to include other factors influencing quarkonium production.

  2. OCT

    26

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) is a process in which a neutrino scatters off an entire nucleus at low momentum transfer, and for which the observable signature is a low-energy nuclear recoil. It represents a background for direct dark matter detection experiments, as well as a possible signal for astrophysical neutrinos. Furthermore, because the process is cleanly predicted in the Standard Model, a measurement is sensitive to beyond-the-Standard-Model physics, such as non-standard interactions of neutrinos. The process was first predicted in 1973. It was measured for the first time by the COHERENT collaboration using the high-quality source of pion-decay-at-rest neutrinos from the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and a CsI[Na] scintillator detector. This talk will describe COHERENT's recent 6.7-sigma measurement of CEvNS, the status and plans of COHERENT's suite of detectors at the SNS, and future physics reach.

  3. OCT

    26

    Thursday

    BWIS Speaker Event: Amazing Women and How They Got the Vote

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Celebrate the centennial of women's suffrage in New York State. This presentation will include vintage photographs and discussions of various aspects of the movement, focusing on the involvement of Long Island women. Presented by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) Islip Area Branch, the talk features stories of courageous and militant suffragists and their political activism, as well as the activities of the anti-suffragists.

27

  1. OCT

    27

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, October 27, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Alessandro Tricoli''

    There is an extensive, on-going dark matter search program at the LHC that explores several different types of possible interactions between WIMP-like dark matter and standard model particles. The dark matter searches at the LHC are complementary, and in case of certain models, significantly more sensitive than the direct and indirect dark matter searches. In this talk I will discuss several key dark matter searches being pursued by the CMS collaboration. These cover a wide variety of final states in which dark matter particles are produced in association with one or more energetic, visible objects in the detector resulting in 'MET+X' signatures. Furthermore, I will also discuss the constraints set on dark matter interactions by certain resonance searches.

28

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29

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30

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31

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  1. OCT

    24

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "To CME or not to CME? Implications of recent charge separation measurements in p(d)+Au, Au(Cu)+Au and U+U collisions for the chiral magnetic effect in heavy ion collisions"

    Presented by Roy Lacey, Stony Brook University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Bjoern Schenke'

    The observation of charge separation induced by the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME), could provide crucial insights on anomalous transport and the interplay of chiral symmetry restoration, axial anomaly, and gluonic topology in the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) produced in heavy ion collisions. I will discuss recent differential charge separation measurements,for p(d)+Au, Au(Cu)+Au and U+U, with a correlator specifically designed to give discernible responses to CME-driven charge separation and non-CME backgrounds. Measurements which span the beam energy range Root_s = 19.5 - 200 GeV will be presented. The d(p)+Au results are observed to be consistent with the reduced magnetic field strength and the essentially random B-field orientations expected in these collisions. In contrast, the Au(Cu)+Au and U+U measurements validate the presence of CME-driven charge separation quantified by the Fourier dipole coefficient a1. Ongoing attempts for CME-signal quantification, as well as implications for the upcoming RHIC isobar run, will be discussed as well.

  2. OCT

    24

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Path Forward in Gravitational-wave astronomy"

    Presented by Zsuzsa Marka, Columbia University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Peter Petreczky'

    On August 17, 2017 the merger of two neutron stars was detected in the form of gravitational-waves by LIGO/Virgo. As a result of over a decade long preparation for multimessenger observations the event was also seen electromagnetically across the full spectrum. The history and future of the multimessenger effort using gravitational-waves will be discussed from an instrumentalist viewpoint.

  3. OCT

    25

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Play Group

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'QOL/BERA/Recreation'

    Newcomers, individuals, and families are welcome to come to Hospitality Coffee & Play Group each Wednesday at the Rec Hall, Bldg. 317, in the apartment area. If you have children, they will play while the adults socialize.

  4. OCT

    25

    Wednesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Theory and Computation Guided Discovery of New Thermoelectric Materials"

    Presented by Vladan Stevanovic, Colorado School of Mines & National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Cedomir Petrovic'''

    Progress in the widespread adoption of all solid heat-to-electricity technologies has largely been hindered by the absence of suitable thermoelectric materials. In pursuit for new thermoelectrics recent advances in large-scale deployment of first principles calculations could be useful in identifying new promising material systems. However, the need to predict electron and phonon transport properties with sufficient accuracy renders direct assessment of the thermoelectric figure of merit (zT) for large numbers of systems unfeasible. This is true even in the case of relatively simple semiconductor materials, which could be described by the computationally inexpensive single particle theories such as density functional theory (DFT). While the state-of-the-art DFT based approaches to charge carrier and heat transport of semiconductors can deliver desired accuracy, they are currently limited to relatively simple chemistries and/or case-by-case studies. In this talk I will discuss integrated theory-computation-experiment efforts in developing a robust set of material descriptors that: (1) are rooted in the Boltzmann transport theory, but do not rely on classic and largely inapplicable constant relaxation time or constant mean free path approximations, (2) are computationally tractable allowing material searches across large chemical spaces, and (3) are sufficiently accurate to provide reliable predictions. Our approach is demonstrated to correctly identify known thermoelectric materials1 and reliably suggest new and promising candidate semiconductors.2 At the end, I will review successes and failures in our quest for new thermoelectrics, and discuss dopability of semiconductors as the critical outstanding challenge in achieving high zT materials. 1. Yan, P. Gorai, B. Ortiz, S. Miller, S. A. Barnett, T. Mason, V. Stevanovic, and E. S. Toberer, "Material descriptors for thermoelectric performance", Energy Environ. Sci. 2. P. Gorai, V. Stevanovic, and E. Tobe

  5. OCT

    25

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "The SLAC Micro-resonator RF electronics for cryogenic sensors arrays"

    Presented by Josef Frisch, SLAC

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, October 25, 2017, 2:30 pm

    A variety of cryogenic sensor arrays can be read out by coupling each detector element to a microwave resonator whose resonant frequency changes in response to the physics signal. The use of microfabrication techniques and high Q superconducting resonators allows thousands of sensor elements to be multiplexed in this way, and then simultaneously read out through a single RF cable. The SMuRF electronics provide high dynamic range readout along with flux-ramp drive to reduce 1/f noise, and firmware controlled RF line tracking to reduce system nonlinearities. The hardware design supports up to 4000 sensors operating in a 4-8GHz frequency range in a single ATCA card, allowing compact high density systems. The initial target applications are RF SQUID multiplexed CMB telescopes and energy-resolving X-ray detectors; however the hardware will also support MKID and other cryogenic sensors for cryogenic particle detectors and other applications.

  6. OCT

    26

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Approach to equilibrium of quarkonium in quark-gluon plasma"

    Presented by Xiaojun Yao, BNL

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Hiromichi Nishimura''

    Quarkonium can be used as a probe of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in heavy ion collisions. The production process is complicated by several factors: plasma screening effect, in-medium dissociation and recombination, cold nuclear matter effect and feed-down contributions. In this talk, I will present a set of Boltzmann transport equations that govern the in-medium evolution of the heavy quark and quarkonium system. The dissociation and recombination rates are calculated from potential non-relativistic QCD at leading order. I will explain how the system reaches equilibrium in a QGP box and show how the system evolves under a boost invariant longitudinal expansion. I will argue that the angular distribution of quarkonium probes the stages at which recombination occurs. The presented framework will be extended in future work to include other factors influencing quarkonium production.

  7. OCT

    26

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Observation of Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering by COHERENT"

    Presented by Kate Scholberg, Duke University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) is a process in which a neutrino scatters off an entire nucleus at low momentum transfer, and for which the observable signature is a low-energy nuclear recoil. It represents a background for direct dark matter detection experiments, as well as a possible signal for astrophysical neutrinos. Furthermore, because the process is cleanly predicted in the Standard Model, a measurement is sensitive to beyond-the-Standard-Model physics, such as non-standard interactions of neutrinos. The process was first predicted in 1973. It was measured for the first time by the COHERENT collaboration using the high-quality source of pion-decay-at-rest neutrinos from the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and a CsI[Na] scintillator detector. This talk will describe COHERENT's recent 6.7-sigma measurement of CEvNS, the status and plans of COHERENT's suite of detectors at the SNS, and future physics reach.

  8. OCT

    26

    Thursday

    BWIS Speaker Event: Amazing Women and How They Got the Vote

    "BWIS Lecture"

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Celebrate the centennial of women's suffrage in New York State. This presentation will include vintage photographs and discussions of various aspects of the movement, focusing on the involvement of Long Island women. Presented by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) Islip Area Branch, the talk features stories of courageous and militant suffragists and their political activism, as well as the activities of the anti-suffragists.

  9. OCT

    27

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search for dark matter at the CMS experiment"

    Presented by Adish Vartak, University of California San Diego

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, October 27, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Alessandro Tricoli''

    There is an extensive, on-going dark matter search program at the LHC that explores several different types of possible interactions between WIMP-like dark matter and standard model particles. The dark matter searches at the LHC are complementary, and in case of certain models, significantly more sensitive than the direct and indirect dark matter searches. In this talk I will discuss several key dark matter searches being pursued by the CMS collaboration. These cover a wide variety of final states in which dark matter particles are produced in association with one or more energetic, visible objects in the detector resulting in 'MET+X' signatures. Furthermore, I will also discuss the constraints set on dark matter interactions by certain resonance searches.

  10. NOV

    1

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 1, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  11. NOV

    2

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Rotating Dirac fermion in Magnetic field in 1+2 and 1+3 dimensions"

    Presented by Yizhuang Liu, Stony Brook University

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, November 2, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Hiromichi Nishimura'

  12. NOV

    2

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "UCNtau: A magneto-gravitational trap measurement of the free neutron lifetime"

    Presented by Robert Pattie, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 2, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    The neutron is the simplest nuclear system that can be used to probe the structure of the weak interaction and search for physics Beyond the Standard Model. Measurements of neutron ?-decay observables are sensitive to scalar and tensor interactions in the weak force which are not present in the Standard Model. The lifetime of the neutron ?n is an important parameter for Big-Bang Nucleo-synthesis models, solar fusion models, and absolute neutrino scattering cross-sections, and can be used to test the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix. Presently, the two typical methods used to measure the neutron lifetime, cold neutron beam measurements and stored ultracold neutron (UCN) measurements, disagree by roughly 4?. This discrepancy motivates the need for new measurements with complementary systematic uncertainties to previous efforts. The UCN? experiment uses an asymmetric magneto-gravitational UCN trap with in situ counting of surviving neutrons to measure the neutron lifetime. Previous bottle experiments confined UCN in a material storage vessel creating a significant correction due to losses resulting from the material UCN interactions. The magnetic and gravitational confinement of the UCN minimizes losses due to material interactions. Additionally, UCN? uses a detection system that is lowered into the storage volume which avoids emptying the surviving UCN into an external detector. This minimizes any possible transport related systematics. This in situ detector also enables counting at various heights in the vessel, which provides information on the trapped UCN energy spectrum, quasi-bound orbits, and possible phase space evolution. I will present the physics motivation for precision neutron physics, a description of the UCN? experiment, the results of data collected during the 2016-2017 accelerator cycle which resulted in a value of τn=877.7±(0.7) stat (+0.3/−0.1) sys in agreement with previous material bottle

  13. NOV

    2

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications of Nanocomposite Coatings with Tunable Properties Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition"

    Presented by Jeffrey Elam, Argonne National Laboratory

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, November 2, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Chang-Yong Nam''

    We have been developing atomic layer deposition (ALD) nanocomposite coatings comprised of conducting, metallic nanoparticles embedded in an amorphous dielectric matrix. These nanocomposite films have proved to be exceptional as resistive coatings in solid-state electron multipliers, as charge drain coatings, and as solar absorbing films in concentrated solar power. All of these applications demand tunable properties so that particular attributes of the film, such as electronic resistivity, can be precisely tailored for maximum efficiency. In our films, the properties are tuned by adjusting the ratio of metallic and dielectric components. For example, nanocomposite films comprised of W:Al2O3 are prepared using alternating exposures to trimethyl aluminum (TMA) and H2O for the Al2O3 ALD and alternating WF6/Si2H6 exposures for the W ALD. By varying the ratio of ALD cycles for the W and the Al2O3 components in the film, we can tune precisely the resistance of these coatings over a very broad range from 1012-105 Ohm-cm. We have used this strategy to synthesize a broad range of ALD nanocomposites combining different metals and dielectrics. These nanocomposite coatings have been utilized to functionalize capillary glass array plates and fabricate large-area microchannel plates suitable for application in large-area photodetectors. In addition, we have applied these films to serve as charge drain coatings in micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) devices for a prototype electron beam lithography tool, and obtained high-resolution electron beam patterns without charging artifacts. We have also used these nanocomposite coatings to infiltrate porous scaffolds resulting in selective solar absorbing coatings with high visible absorption and low IR emittance suitable for power tower receivers in concentrated solar power.

  14. NOV

    3

    Friday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Wandering amongst the Feynamn diagrams"

    Presented by Nikolay Prokofiev, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

    11 am, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Friday, November 3, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Igor Zaliznyak''

    Feynman diagrams are the most celebrated and powerful tool of theoretical physics usually associated with the analytic approach. I will argue that diagrammatic expansions are also an ideal numerical tool with enormous and yet to be explored potential for solving interacting many-body systems by direct simulation of Feynman diagrams (bare or skeleton) for the proper self-energies and polarization operators up to high order. Though the original series based on are propagators are sign-alternating and often divergent one can determine the answer behind them by using proper series re-summation techniques and working with skeleton diagrams, i.e. by making the entire scheme self-consistent. The bottom line is that the diagrammatic Monte Carlo approach generically solves the computational complexity for interacting fermionic systems. In terms of physical applications, I will disucss results for the Hubbard model, resonant fermi gas at unitarity, and stability of Dirac liquid against strong Coulomb interaction in graphene.

  15. NOV

    3

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Proton radius puzzle"

    Presented by Gerald Miller, University of Washington

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, November 3, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Chun Shen'

  16. NOV

    6

    Monday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Proximity effects in cuprate/manganite multilayers"

    Presented by Christian Bernhard, University of Fribourg, Germany

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Seminar Room 201 (upstairs)

    Monday, November 6, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Chris Homes'''

    Recently we observed an intriguing, magnetic-filed-induced insulator-to-metal transition in YBa2Cu3O7/Pr1-xCaxMnO3 (YBCO/PCMO) multilayers [1]. In the low field regime, the response of these multilayers is highly resistive and resembles the one of granular superconductors or frustrated Josephson-networks. Notably, a coherent superconducting response can be restored with a large magnetic field. The latter also suppresses the charge/orbital order of the PCMO layers towards a ferromagnetic state. This coincidence suggests an intimate relationship between the insulator-to-superconductor transition in the YBCO layer and the suppression of the charge/orbital order in the PCMO. I will discuss the evidence, based on resonant x-ray scattering experiments, that the latter induces (or strongly enhances) a static Cu-CDW order in YBCO that is intertwined with superconductivity. [1] B.P.P. Mallett et al., Phys. Rev. B 94, 180503(R) (2016).

  17. NOV

    7

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Building an entanglement sharing quantum network"

    Presented by Professor Eden Figueroa, Stony Brook University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, November 7, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

    In the first part of our talk we will show how to produce photonic quantum entanglement and how to store it and distribute it by optically manipulating the properties of room temperature atomic clouds. We will discuss our recent experiments in which several quantum devices are already interconnected forming an elementary quantum cryptographic network. We will also discuss our progress regarding the construction of an entanglement sharing link between Stony Brook and BNL. In the second part we will show our progress regarding the construction of an analog quantum computer capable of simulating relativistic dynamics using atoms and quantized light. We will show how our device is already capable of simulating Dirac and Jackiw-Rebbi Hamiltonians as well as the road map towards simulating Quantum Field Theory Hamiltonians.

  18. NOV

    8

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Linda Carpenter, Ohio State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 8, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  19. NOV

    9

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Quasiparticle spectra from stochastic many-body methods"

    Presented by Vojtech Vlcek, University of California, Los Angeles

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, November 9, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Igor Zaliznyak''

    TBD

  20. NOV

    9

    Thursday

    Particle Physics - SB/BNL Joint Cosmo seminar (at BNL)

    "Dark Matter Searches with CCDs and the Sensei Experiment"

    Presented by Dr. Javier Tiffenberg, FNAL

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 9, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Erin Sheldon''

  21. NOV

    9

    Thursday

    NSLS-II Colloquium Series

    "Imaging dynamics of radiation-sensitive molecules."

    Presented by John Spence, Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 9, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'John Hill'

    The possibility of out-running radiation damage by the "diffract-and-destroy method, using femtosecond pulses of either electrons or hard X-rays, opens completely new vistas for imaging molecular dynamics at atom resolution and sub-picosecond speeds (1). First, I'll compare high-energy electron beams for this purpose, and compare them in regard to damage mechanisms and time-scales with XFEL radiation. I'll suggest a fast mode of image formation which provides high resolution despite the use of the large incoherent photocathode. I'll then review our work using the hard X-ray pulsed laser at SLAC within our BioXFEL 6-campus NSF consortium (http://www.bioxfel.org), aimed at the application of X-ray lasers (XFELs) to Structural Biology. I'll show molecular movies from light-sensitive proteins with 150 fs time resolution and near-atomic spatial , using both crystals and solution scattering obtained from the LCLS XFEL at SLAC, and very recent single-particle virus images (one virus per shot) showing dynamics. I'll discuss work in my lab on methods for hydrated sample delivery for an XFEL, and the compact IC XFEL under construction on the ASU campus, which uses a laser as an undulator. Finally, I'll review a recent proposal for the use of intensity interferometry to analyze the angular dependence of inner-shell X-ray fluorescence from a molecule. See Google Scholar for references and the many collaborators whom I thank. 1. J.Spence. XFELS for structure and dynamics in biology. IUCrJ 4, 322 (2017).

  22. NOV

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, November 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

  23. NOV

    13

    Monday

    2017 Urban Dispersion Virtual Workshop

    "Designing the Next Generation Urban Dispersion Field Programs"

    1 pm, Online

    Monday, November 13, 2017, 1:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Tom Watson'''

    Urban dispersion experiments have been extremely useful for development and testing of transport and dispersion models. However, there is an urgent need for improvement of the science of urban transport and validation of the current generation of dispersion models. New, high-resolution data in the multi-scale environment with significant gradients (e.g., land/urban/water) that characterizes major urban areas is necessary to increase accuracy and improve speed of these models as well as to develop model products that specifically meet the needs of the emergency response community. New data are also necessary to design effective real-time meteorological and Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) monitoring networks necessary to support emergency response and to initialize models. It is timely to design and execute the next generation of Urban Dispersion field programs to address these needs

  24. NOV

    14

    Tuesday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Catherine Prigent, CNRS-Institute National des Sciences de'l Univers (INSU), France

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Tuesday, November 14, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: '''Mike Jensen'''

    pending

  25. NOV

    14

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Christoph Lehner, BNL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, November 14, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Rob Pisarski''

  26. NOV

    15

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Thomas Appelquist, Yale University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  27. NOV

    15

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Pair creation energy and Fano factor of silicon measured at 185 K using 55Fe X-rays"

    Presented by Ivan Kotov, BNL

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 2:30 pm

    The pair creation energy, w, and Fano factor of silicon were measured using CCD250 and 55Fe X-rays. The measurements were performed at the sensor temperature of 185K. The measured pair creation energy is w = 3.65 +/- 0.009 eV at Mn K_alpha and the Fano factor at this energy is F=0.129 +/- 0.001. We will show that our measurements agree with theory and will be described in detail. The system gain was obtained from flat field exposures using properties of Poisson distribution. The details of our measurement procedure will be presented.

  28. NOV

    16

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "QCD from gluon, quark, and meson correlators"

    Presented by Mario Mitter, BNL

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, November 16, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Hiromichi Nishimura'''

    We present non-perturbative first-principle results for quark-, gluon- and meson 1PI correlation functions of two-flavour Landau-gauge QCD in the vacuum and Yang-Mills theory at finite temperature. They are obtained by solving their Functional Renormalisation Group equations in a systematic vertex expansion, aiming at apparent convergence within a self-consistent approximation scheme. These correlation functions carry the full information about the theory and their connection to physical observables is discussed. The presented calculations represent a crucial prerequisite for quantitative first-principle studies of QCD and its phase diagram within this framework. In particular, we have computed the ghost, quark and scalar-pseudoscalar meson propagators, as well as gluon, ghost-gluon, quark-gluon, quark, quark-meson, and meson interactions and the magnetic and electric components of the gluon propagator, and the three- and four-gluon vertices. Our results stress the crucial importance of the quantitatively correct running of different vertices in the semi-perturbative regime for describing the phenomena and scales of confinement and spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking without phenomenological input. We confront our results for the correlators with lattice simulations and compare our Debye mass to hard thermal loop perturbation theory. Finally, applications to "QCD-enhanced" low-energy effective models of QCD are discussed.

  29. NOV

    16

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Zurab Guguchia, Columbia University

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, November 16, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Emil Bozin''

    TBA

  30. NOV

    20

    Monday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Carbonaceous Gas and Aerosol Measurements to Validate Models and Verify Emissions"

    Presented by Manvendra Dubey, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Monday, November 20, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Steve Schwartz'

    Earth system models rely on accurate representations of processes and emissions that are evaluated using observations. Iterative refinements are crucial for reliable and robust climate assessments, as I will illustrate with following recent case studies: Carbonaceous aerosol (CA) forcing in current models is prescribed as a balance between the warming by black carbon and the cooling by organic aerosol. However, data show that some organic aerosols called brown carbon absorb sunlight. Furthermore, transparent coatings on black carbon amplify their light absorbing potency by lensing. Such coatings could make black carbon more hydrophilic thereby reducing their lifetime and burden. I will use field and laboratory studies to uncover the fundamental chemistry controlling the optical properties and water affinity of CAs as they age to enable prognostic treatments. Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulation is moderated by its uptake by forests and oceans that soak up 25% each of the human emissions. How carbon sinks will respond to future climate change is uncertain. I will present observations of daily and seasonal variations of column CO2 and CO over the Amazon rainforest. I will show that both biomass burning and net ecosystem exchange that are out of phase control the seasonal CO2 cycle and are captured well by models. However, the daily CO2 drop driven by photosynthesis is biased low in models, a problem that needs to be fixed. Atmospheric Methane (CH4) that accounts for 25% of climate forcing is rising after a long hiatus. Potential causes include leaks from shale gas revolution, intensive agriculture, permafrost thaw, expand wetlands or shorter lifetime by higher Hydroxyl. I will review recent findings and focus on our discovery of the methane hot spot over Four Corners, NM attributed to fossil fuel that demonstrated reported emissions were low by a factor of 3. I will close with our development of an automated neural network methane leak detection

  31. NOV

    21

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Numerical Relativity in the Multimessenger Era"

    Presented by Manuela Campanelli, Rochester Institute of Technology

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, November 21, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Peter Petreczky'

    The recent discovery of gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO ushered in a new kind of astronomy, one potentially integrating its findings with those obtained from electromagnetic and/or neutrino observations. Multi-messenger astronomy promises to revolutionize our understanding of the universe by providing dramatically contrasting views of the same objects. To understand this unprecedented wealth of observational evidence, computer intensive theoretical calculations of the Einstein field equations, coupled with the equations of magneto-hydrodynamics, are required in order to link data with underlying physics. In this talk, I will provide a review on the recent progress in this exciting field of computational astrophysics. With Advanced LIGO now fully operational and the detection of additional gravitational wave events imminent, we expect that there will be a surge in the number of researchers interested in performing simulations of compact binary mergers.

  32. NOV

    29

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  33. DEC

    6

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, December 6, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  34. DEC

    6

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Women in Science Annual Wine & Cheese Networking Event

    5 pm, Bldg. 734 (ISB) 2nd Floor Lobby

    Wednesday, December 6, 2017, 5:00 pm

    Please join us for wine, cheese, and conversation with Brookhaven Women in Science (BWIS)—a great opportunity to network, meet new friends, and enjoy the company of friends and colleagues from across the Lab. Discussions will cover the history of BWIS as well as what's to come.

  35. DEC

    7

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Engineering functionality in colloidal semiconductor nanomaterials"

    Presented by Dmitri Talapin, The University of Chicago, Department of Chemistry and James Franck Institute

    4 pm, Bldg. 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, December 7, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Oleg Gang'''

    Development of nanostructured materials has introduced revolutionary approaches for materials processing and electronic structure engineering. These materials can offer the advantages of crystalline inorganic solids combined with inexpensive solution-based device fabrication. I will discuss emerging advances in the surface chemistry of semiconducting nanostructures that are poised to enable advances in additive manufacturing of semiconducting and multifunctional materials. Specifically, I will discuss inorganic linkers that permit electronic coupling between the nanocrystals and new semiconducting "solders" that enable solution processing of high-quality inorganic semiconductors. I will also introduce a general chemical approach for photoresist-free, direct optical lithography of functional inorganic nanomaterials (DOLFIN). Examples of patterned materials include metals, semiconductors, oxides, and magnetic and rare earth compositions. No organic impurities are present in the patterned layers, which helps achieve good electronic and optical properties. The conductivity, carrier mobility, dielectric, and luminescence properties of optically patterned layers are on par with the properties of state-of-the-art solution-processed materials. The ability to directly pattern all-inorganic layers using a light exposure dose comparable to that of organic photoresists opens up a host of new opportunities for thin-film device manufacturing.

  36. DEC

    13

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, December 13, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  37. DEC

    14

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    "Blood Drive"

    9:15 am, The Center Building 30

    Thursday, December 14, 2017, 9:15 am

    Hosted by: 'Long Island Blood Services'

  38. DEC

    14

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, December 14, 2017, 6:30 pm

  39. JAN

    11

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, January 11, 2018, 6:30 pm

  40. FEB

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, February 8, 2018, 6:30 pm

  41. FEB

    13

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Multi-Messenger Picture of a Neutron Star Merger"

    Presented by Brian Metzger, Columbia University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Peter Petreczky'

    On August 17 the LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave observatories detected the first binary neutron star merger event (GW170817), a discovery followed by the most ambitious electromagnetic (EM) follow-up campaign ever conducted. A gamma-ray burst (GRB) of short duration and very low luminosity was discovered by the Fermi and INTEGRAL satellites within 2 seconds of the merger. Within 11 hours, a bright but rapidly-fading thermal optical counterpart was discovered in the galaxy NGC 4993 at a distance of only 40 Mpc. The properties of the optical transient match remarkably well predictions for kilonova emission powered by the radioactive decay of heavy nuclei synthesized in the expanding merger ejecta by the r-process. The rapid spectral evolution of the kilonova emission to near-infrared wavelengths demonstrates that a portion of the ejecta contains heavy lanthanide nuclei. Two weeks after the merger, rising non-thermal X-ray and radio emission were detected from the position of the optical transient, consistent with delayed synchrotron afterglow radiation from an initially off-axis relativistic jet with the properties consistent with those of (on-axis) cosmological short GRB. I will describe a unified scenario for the range of EM counterparts from GW170817 and their implications for the astrophysical origin of the r-process and the properties of neutron stars. I will preview the upcoming era of multi-messenger astronomy, once Advanced LIGO/Virgo reach design sensitivity and a neutron star merger is detected every few weeks.

  42. MAR

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, March 8, 2018, 6:30 pm

  43. APR

    12

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, April 12, 2018, 6:30 pm

  44. MAY

    10

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 10, 2018, 6:30 pm

  45. JUN

    14

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 14, 2018, 6:30 pm