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  1. MAY

    21

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Future opportunities for a small-system scan at RHIC"

    Presented by Jiangyong Jia

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 21, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Rongrong Ma

    The observation of multi-particle azimuthal correlations in high-energy small-system collisions has led to intense debate on its physical origin between two competing theoretical scenarios: one based on initial-state intrinsic momentum anisotropy (ISM), the other based on final-state collective response to the collision geometry (FSM). To complement the previous scan of asymmetric collision systems (p+Au, d+Au and He+Au), we propose a scan of small symmetric collision systems at RHIC, such as C+C, O+O, Al+Al and Ar+Ar at sqrt{s_NN} = 0.2 TeV, to further disentangle contributions from these two scenarios. These symmetric small systems have the advantage of providing access to geometries driven by the average shape of the nuclear overlap, compared to fluctuation-dominant geometries in asymmetric systems. A transport model is employed to investigate the expected geometry response in the FSM scenario. Different trends of elliptic flow with increasing charge particle multiplicity are observed between symmetric and asymmetric systems, while triangular flow appears to show a similar behavior. Furthermore, a comparison of O+O collisions at sqrt{s_NN} = 0.2 TeV and at sqrt{s_NN} =2.76−7 TeV, as proposed at the LHC, provides a unique opportunity to disentangle the collision geometry effects at nucleon level from those arising from subnucleon fluctuations.

  2. MAY

    22

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 22, 2019, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: QOL/BERA/Recreation

    Come by for coffee & pastry, socialize, and if you have children, they'll play!

  3. MAY

    22

    Wednesday

    C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    "High-Level Software Development for the CLARA FEL Test Facility"

    Presented by Dr. James Jones, Daresbury Laboratory

    3 pm, Bldg. 911B, Second Floor, Large Conf. Rm., Rm. A2

    Wednesday, May 22, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Steve Peggs

    CLARA is a low-energy test facility for advanced FEL physics and beam-driven novel acceleration techniques. As part of the facility we have planned for an advanced integrated system for high-level software development and online-model based on C++ and python interfaces. An overview of the CLARA facility and recent experimental results will be presented along with a description and current status of the HLS middle-layer and online-model. Future plans for CLARA will also be presented.

  4. MAY

    23

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Radar Observations and Simulations of the Level of Maximum Detrainment"

    Presented by Gretchen Mullendore, Univ. North Dakota

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, May 23, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike Jensen

    Parcel theory is the basis for many of convective indices (e.g., CAPE, LNB) that are used extensively throughout the community. While it is widely known that parcel theory is only an approximation, and therefore the indices that derive from parcel theory are also just approximations, much more research is needed so that we can better link our theory to observations. One example is the relationship between the level of neutral buoyancy (LNB) and the level of maximum detrainment (LMD). Both models and observations show departures from LNB depend on storm morphology, season and geographical region.

  5. MAY

    23

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Semeon Valgushev, BNL

    12 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, May 23, 2019, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Yuta Kikuchi

  6. MAY

    23

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "In situ imaging of gold nanocrystals during the CO oxidation reaction studied by Bragg Coherent Diffraction Imaging"

    Presented by Ana Flavia Suzana, Brazilian Association of Synchrotron Light Technology-ABTLUS, Brazil

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, May 23, 2019, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Ian Robinson

    The fundamental aim of heterogeneous catalysis research is to understand mechanisms at the nanoparticle level, and then to design and synthesize catalysts with desired active sites. In this regard, the in situ/operando characterization of defects is crucial as they are preferential catalytic sites for the reaction occurrence. In this seminar I will talk about the main part of the work developed during my PhD: the investigation of the morphology and structure evolution of gold nano-catalysts supported on titanium dioxide. Those catalytic materials were evaluated for the model CO oxidation reaction, chosen for its environmental relevance and "simplicity" to be reproducible within our X-ray imaging study. We used the Bragg Coherent Diffraction Imaging technique to follow in situ the 3D morphology changes under catalytic reaction conditions. We correlated the 3D displacement field and strain distribution of the gold nanoparticles to the catalytic properties of the material. In particular, for a 120 nm gold nanoparticle, we quantified under working conditions the adsorbate-induced surface stress on the gold nanocrystal, which leads to restructuration and defects identified as a nanotwin network.

  7. MAY

    24

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussion

    "Partial Neutrino Decay Resolves IceCube's Track and Cascade Tension"

    Presented by Peter Denton, BNL

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, May 24, 2019, 12:15 pm

  8. MAY

    24

    Friday

    NT/RIKEN Seminar

    "Pieces of the Puzzle: Reaching QCD on Quantum Computers"

    Presented by Henry Lamm, UMD

    2 pm, Building 510, CFNS Seminar Room 2-38

    Friday, May 24, 2019, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Niklas Mueller

    The advent of quantum computing for scientific research presents the possibility of calculating time-dependent observables like viscosity and parton distributions from QCD. In order to utilize this new tool, a number of theoretical and practical issues must be addressed related to efficiently digitize, initialize, propagate, and evaluate quantum field theory. In this talk, I will discuss a number of projects being undertaken by the NuQS collaboration to realize calculations on NISQ era and beyond quantum computers.

  9. MAY

    25

    Saturday

    Asian Pacific American Heritage Month event

    "11th Annual Asian American & Pacific Islander Celebration"

    4:30 pm, Thai Cultural Center, 110 Rustic Rd, Centereach, N

    Saturday, May 25, 2019, 4:30 pm

    Hosted by: Asian Pacific American Association

    Raju Venugopalan, a senior physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, will be recognized as a "highly accomplished Asian American professional" at the Suffolk County eleventh annual Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month Celebration. The event will take place Saturday, May 25, at the Thai Cultural Center in Centereach.

  10. MAY

    28

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Examining hydrodynamical modelling of the QGP through dilepton radiation"

    Presented by Gojko Vujanovic, Wayne State University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 28, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Rongrong Ma

    Recent viscous hydrodynamical studies at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), show that bulk viscosity plays an important role in their phenomenological description. A temperature-dependent bulk viscosity in the hydrodynamical evolution of the medium can modify the development of the hydrodynamic momentum anisotropy differently in the high- and low-temperature regions. Thus, anisotropic flow coefficients of various particle species are affected differently depending where their surface of last scattering lies. For the case of hadronic observables, they are predominantly sensitive to low temperature regions, while electromagnetic radiation is emitted at all temperatures. Therefore, bulk viscosity should affect electromagnetic radiation differently than hadron emission. The effects of bulk viscosity on one of the electromagnetic probes, namely photons, has already been investigated. The same statement holds true for hadrons. The goal of this presentation is to study how dilepton production, the other source of electromagnetic radiation, gets modified owing to the presence of bulk viscosity at RHIC and LHC energies. With calculations at different collision energies, comparisons in the dilepton signal can be made and more robust conclusions regarding the role of bulk viscosity in high energy heavy-ion collisions can be drawn. Dilepton radiation from the dilute hadronic sector of the medium, which are radiated in addition to dileptons emitted during the hydrodynamical evolution, will also be included to ascertain whether interesting dynamics induced by bulk viscosity may have observable consequences. To complete that investigation, particular attention will be given to how the $\rho(770)$ meson, and its subsequent dilepton decay, is calculated at the end of the hydrodynamical simulation.

  11. MAY

    29

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 29, 2019, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: QOL/BERA/Recreation

    Come by for coffee & pastry, socialize, and if you have children, they'll play!

  12. MAY

    30

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "The Influence of Aerosol Chemical Composition, Morphology, and Phase State on Water and Ice Cloud Particle Formation"

    Presented by Yue Zhang, North Carolina State, MIT, and Aerodyne

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, May 30, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

    Aerosols and clouds effect Earth's radiative balance, and aerosol-cloud interactions are major sources of uncertainties in predicting future climate. The climate effects of water and ice cloud particles formed from atmospheric particulate matter are not well understood due to the complex physical and chemical properties of these aerosols. Measurements from fixed sites and field campaigns have shown that organic aerosols (OA) dominate the non-refractory aerosols in the free troposphere where clouds typically form, and cloud water and ice cloud residue both show the presence of organic materials. Despite the abundance of OA, their effects on both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nucleation (IN) are not fully understood and even controversial. To probe into these issues, the CCN and IN properties of complex inorganic-organic aerosol mixtures that simulate ambient conditions were measured with a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC, DMT, Inc.) and a spectrometer for ice nucleation (SPIN, DMT, Inc.) at a variety of laboratory conditions. Our studies suggest that the composition of the organic-containing aerosols, as well as their morphology and phase state, jointly impact their cloud forming potential. The results highlight the importance of combining aerosol physical and chemical properties to accurately understand cloud particle formation processes and their implications on the climate.

  13. MAY

    30

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Dr Akio Tomiya, RBRC

    12 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, May 30, 2019, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Yuta Kikuchi

  14. MAY

    30

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Latest oscillation results from the NOvA experiment"

    Presented by Diana Patricia Mendez, University of Sussex

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 30, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worcester

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment measuring $\nu_{\mu}$ disappearance and $\nu_e$ appearance within the NuMI beam from Fermilab. The experiment uses a Near and a Far Detector placed 810 km away from each other and at 14 milliradians off the beam-axis resulting in an observed energy spectrum that peaks at 2 GeV, close to the oscillation maximum. A combined $\bar{\nu}_{\mu}$ + $\nu_{\mu}$ disappearance, and $\bar{\nu}_{e}$ + $\nu_{e}$ appearance result will be presented including NOvA's first collected anti-neutrino data for a total exposure of $16\times10^{20}$ protons-on-target. In addition to an increased exposure, an upgraded analysis has enable the experiment to set new limits to the allowed regions for $\Delta m^2_{32}$ and sin$^2\theta_{23}$ and make a measurement of $\Delta m^2_{32}$ among the world's best.

  15. MAY

    30

    Thursday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Open Space Stewardship Celebration"

    6 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, May 30, 2019, 6:00 pm

    Hosted by: Dr. Mel Morris

  16. MAY

    31

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Searching for dark matter-The hunt to find it in the laboratory"

    Presented by Ioannis (J.D.) Vergados

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 31, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Milind Diwan

    There is plenty of evidence at all scales (galaxies, cluster of galaxies, cosmological distances) that most of the energy content of the universe is of unknown nature, i.e, 70% is dark energy and 25% dark matter. Only 5% is made up of matter of known nature, in atoms, in stars, in planets etc, constituents predicted by the standard model. Thus unraveling the nature of the dominant components and, in particular, of dark matter is one of the most important open problems in science. This nature can only be understood by the direct detection of its constituents in the laboratory. This can be achieved, if there exists a week interaction, much stronger than gravity, between the dark matter and ordinary matter. The constituents are supposed to have a mass and are called WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particles). We have no idea what this mass is, but from the rotational curves we know that the constituents must be non relativistic, regardless of the size of their mass. The experimental techniques for the direct detection crucially depend on the assumed WIMP mass. Historically the first searches assumed WIMP masses of many GeV and, therefore, heavy nuclear targets were favored. Thus the hunt for DM began and evolved into a multi-pronged and interdisciplinary enterprise, combining cosmology and astrophysics, particle and nuclear physics as well as detector technology, which will be reviewed. Since the WIMP energy is in the keV region, the nucleus cannot be excited and only the nuclear recoil can be measured. As a result, unfortunately, the signal cannot be easily distinguished from backgrounds. After thirty years of intensive work against formidable backgrounds by a lot of large experimental teams, no dark matter has been found. Impressive limits on the nucleon cross section have, however, been obtained. Extension of these searches to GeV or sub-GeV WIMPs is also been considered using light nuclear targets. It may very w

  17. JUN

    3

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2019 DOE/BNL Summer Internship"

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Monday, June 3, 2019, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Noel Blackburn

  18. JUN

    6

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Precision measurements of jet substructure"

    Presented by Jennifer Roloff

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, June 6, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

  19. JUN

    6

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Water technologies by interface engineering"

    Presented by Dr. Seth B. Darling, Argonne National Laboratory

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor, Seminar Room

    Thursday, June 6, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chang-Yong Nam

    Driven by climate change, population growth, development, urbanization, and other factors, water crises represent the greatest global risk in the coming decades. Advances in materials represent a powerful tool to address many of these challenges. Understanding—and ultimately controlling—interfaces between materials and water are pivotal. In this presentation, Dr. Darling will lay out the challenges and present several examples of work in his group based on materials science strategies for addressing applications in water. In each instance, manipulation of interfacial properties provides novel functionality, ranging from selective transport to energy transduction to pollution mitigation. http://www.linkedin.com/in/sethdarling

  20. JUN

    11

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "High energy atmospheric neutrinos: connections between laboratory experiments and cosmic rays"

    Presented by Mary Hall Reno, University of Iowa

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 11, 2019, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Milind Diwan

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory's measurement of a diffuse flux of neutrinos from astrophysical sources has opened a new era in high energy astroparticle physics. Neutrinos produced by cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere are the main background to the astrophysical neutrino flux. At these high energies, data from the Large Hadron Collider experiments on heavy flavor production can be used to narrow the uncertainties in the background predictions at the highest energies. Our evaluation of the atmospheric neutrino flux from charm will be used to illustrate how collider physics results are connected to cosmic ray physics in this context.

  21. JUN

    12

    Wednesday

    Blood Drive

    9 am, Brookhaven Center

    Wednesday, June 12, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Long Island Blood Services

  22. JUN

    13

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    9 am, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, June 13, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Long Island Blood Services

  23. JUN

    13

    Thursday

    CAC Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 13, 2019, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: Nora Sundin

  24. JUN

    14

    Friday

    Brookhaven Women in Science 40th Anniversary Spring Networking Lunch

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Friday, June 14, 2019, 12:00 pm

  25. JUN

    14

    Friday

    NT/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Hsiang-nan Li, National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Physics Division, Taiwan

    2 pm, Building 510, CFNS Room 2-38

    Friday, June 14, 2019, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Niklas Mueller

  26. JUN

    19

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Asher Berlin, SLAC

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, June 19, 2019, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Gopolang Mohlabeng

  27. JUN

    22

    Saturday

    BERA Amateur Radio Club Field Day

    11 am, Gazebo by the ball fields

    Saturday, June 22, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Marc Montemagno

    This event is open to everyone who wishes to experience Ham Radio. We will have at least 3 transceiver stations setup for the purpose of contacting other stations throughout the US and the world.

  28. JUL

    1

    Monday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Searches of Dark Matter signals with the ATLAS detector at the LHC: Present and future"

    Presented by Dr. Rachid Mazini, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, July 1, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

    In this seminar, I will present an overview of up-to-date results on searches for Dark Matter signals with the ATLAS detector at the LHC using Run 2 data. Comparison with non-accelerator DM results as well as interpretation within some theoretical models will be discussed. In addition, expectation from the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) DM searches program will be briefly presented. Finally, I will talk about the new ATLAS High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD), planned for the phase 2 upgrade program for the HL-LHC run, and it performances for physics studies.

  29. JUL

    8

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2019 Summer High School Research Program"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Monday, July 8, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Dr. Aleida Perez

  30. JUL

    8

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2019 STEM-Prep Summer Institute"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Monday, July 8, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Dr. Aleida Perez

  31. AUG

    20

    Tuesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    Presented by Professor Sophie Scott, University College London, United Kingdom

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Tuesday, August 20, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  32. AUG

    26

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2019 DOE/BNL Fall Internship"

    8:30 am, The Office of Educational Programs, Bldg. 438

    Monday, August 26, 2019, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: Noel Blackburn

  33. SEP

    5

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    9 am, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, September 5, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Long Island Blood Services

  34. SEP

    5

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, September 5, 2019, 11:00 am

  35. SEP

    12

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, September 12, 2019, 11:00 am

  36. SEP

    12

    Thursday

    NSLS-II Colloquium

    "Theoretical Understanding of Photon Spectroscopies in Correlated Materials In and Out of Equilibrium"

    Presented by Thomas Devereaux, SLAC

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 12, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: John Hill

    Pending

  37. SEP

    19

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, September 19, 2019, 11:00 am

  38. SEP

    26

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, September 26, 2019, 11:00 am

  39. OCT

    3

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, October 3, 2019, 11:00 am

  40. OCT

    10

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, October 10, 2019, 11:00 am

  41. OCT

    17

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, October 17, 2019, 11:00 am

  42. OCT

    24

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, October 24, 2019, 11:00 am

  43. OCT

    31

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, October 31, 2019, 11:00 am

  44. NOV

    5

    Tuesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Professional Developement Workshops for Teachers - Sci-Ed Day"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Tuesday, November 5, 2019, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: Dr. Aleida Perez

  45. NOV

    7

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, November 7, 2019, 11:00 am

  46. NOV

    14

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, November 14, 2019, 11:00 am

  47. NOV

    21

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, November 21, 2019, 11:00 am