BNL Home
July 2016
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. Teacher Training

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

2

  1. No events scheduled

3

  1. No events scheduled

4

  1. No events scheduled

5

  1. Weight Watchers

    12 pm, Bldg. 30 - South Room

6

  1. BSA Noon Recital

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Paul Schenly, director of Pianofest in the Hamptons, brings a group of young pianist participants in this workshop. Performances may be critiqued on stage. A wide range of compositions is selected, including works for two pianos.

7

  1. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

    Matter constitutes 30% of the energy content of the Universe. The remaining 70% is what is called dark energy, which exhibits unusual repulsive gravitational interactions. On the matter sheet, only 5% is of known nature, i.e. matter such as found in atoms, in stars, in planets etc. From observations on all astrophysical and cosmological scales we know that most of it, i.e. 25%, is dark matter (DM) of unknown nature. The nature of DM is one of the most important open problems in science. The ongoing hunt for DM is multi-pronged and interdisciplinary involving cosmology and astrophysics, particle and nuclear physics as well as detector technology. In this talk we will focus on the direct detection of the dark matter constituents, the so called weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), in underground labs. The detection consists of measuring the energy deposited in the detector by the recoiling nucleus, after its elastic collision with a WIMP (spin independent or spin induced). In obtaining the event rates one needs models about the WIMP interaction and density in our vicinity as well as its velocity distribution. No events have so far been observed, only exclusion plots on the nucleon cross sections have been obtained, which will be discussed. Since the expected rates are very small and the usual experimental signature is not different from that of the backgrounds, we will discuss some special signatures that might aid in the analysis of the experiments such as the time dependence of the signal (modulation effect) and the option of inelastic scattering, possible in some special targets, by detecting γ-rays following the de-excitation of the nucleus.

8

  1. NSLS-II Friday Lunchtime Seminar Series

    12 pm, NSLS-II Bldg 744 (LOB 4), room 156

    Hosted by: 'L. Carr, S. Chodankar and B. Ocko'

  2. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Matthew Sievert'

    Fluctuations of conserved charges are important observables that offer insight into the phase structure of strongly interacting matter. Around critical points, such as the chiral critical endpoint of QCD, higher order cumulants of the relevant quantities show universal behavior. The universal behavior of baryon number cumulants can be studied in effective models that lie in the same universality class as QCD. Such a model is for example the Quark Meson model. In my talk I discuss what one can learn from effective field theory studies of fluctuations and present my results obtained using the Functional Renormalization Group method in the Quark Meson model.

  3. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    I will introduce my work on astronomical telescopes, especially on the Observatory and Control Imaging system. From 1998, we began work on LAMOST, including its Observatory Control System (OCS), Survey Strategy System (SSS), and its Instrument Control System (ICS). Based on this work, we developed generic models and a framework for control Systems of Large Astronomy Telescopes, including a basic hierarchical structure, workflow model, and telescope control models based on object-oriented analysis, the main data flow model of a general purpose telescope. A layered and orthogonal architecture which will have a wide range of adaptability and a concrete architecture based on the message bus will be designed and applied to LAMOST and FAST. For the requirement of autonomous control and observation for astronomical telescopes in Antarctic, we also developed a framework based on RTS2 and EPICS. In the telescope, the imaging system, especially the detector system, is the key component. By adapting it to the requirements of low temperature and stability of operation in the Antarctic, we are developing a camera for CSTAR including vacuum chamber and CCD controller. Now in China, a 2.5-meter optic/infrared telescope, the Kunlun Dark Universe Survey Telescope is planned with a large focal plane similar with LSST but more challenges for us.

9

  1. No events scheduled

10

  1. Summer Sunday

    10 am, Lobby in Berkner

    A fabulous day of hands-on family fun with the Science Learning Center and Environmental Extravaganza, both ready for you to explore.

11

  1. No events scheduled

12

  1. Computational Science Initiative Event

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: 'Kerstin Kleese van Dam'

    I will discuss a new structured mesh PDE programming library, Grid, developed with QCD and as an Intel Parallel Computing Centre. This library uses advanced C++11 template mechanisms to obtain faster than Fortran performance on typical operations, delivering as much as 65% of peak performance on modern Intel cores from high level C++ code. Performance and experience from Intel's Knights Landing processor will be presented. The prospects of applying similar technique to unstructure FEM codes is discussed, and an example of CFD given. Finally I discuss some of the Intel - Alan Turing Institute project codesign goals.

  2. NSLS-II Engineering Seminar Series

    2 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: 'Sushil Sharma and Mary Carlucci-Dayton'

    High performance goals of several facilities at BNL (NSLS-II, RHIC, CFN and future eRHIC) require high mechanical stability of their equipment such as magnets, BPMs, mirrors, monochromators, detectors, and microscopes. The mechanical stability of these components can be compromised by site-wide ground vibrations, local vibration sources (pumps, motors, etc.), and fluctuations in air and water temperatures. This presentation highlights the results of several studies that have been conducted at several BNL sites and facilities over the past five years to characterize the mechanical stability issues and to develop mitigation schemes.

13

  1. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

14

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Hiroshi Ohki'

    Anomalous chiral transport processes, with the notable examples of Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) and Chiral Magnetic Wave (CMW), are remarkable phenomena that stem from highly nontrivial interplay of QCD chiral symmetry, axial anomaly, and gluonic topology. The heavy ion collisions, in which topological fluctuations generate chirality imbalance, and very strong magnetic fields $|\vec{\bf B}|\sim m_\pi^2$ are present during the early stage of such collisions, provide a unique environment to study these anomalous chiral transport processes. Significant experimental efforts have been made to look for signals of CME and various other signals of anomalous chiral transport effects in heavy ion collisions. Crucial for such efforts, is the theoretical development of quantitative simulations based on hydrodynamics that incorporates chiral anomaly, implements realistic initial conditions and properly accounts for possible backgrounds. We will introduce our recent progress to understand CME qualitatively, based on a 2+1D viscous hydrodynamics framework

  2. Biology Department Seminar

    3 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: 'Dr. Huilin Li'

    BRCA/FA pathway plays a vital role in ensuring the integrity of mammalian genome. Mutations of genes in this pathway lead to either congenital defects or a variety of diseases including blood related diseases and cancers. In my presentation, I will discuss two discoveries made in my lab: (1) BRCA1 promotes the ubiquitination of PCNA and recruits the translesion DNA polymerases to the stalled DNA replication sites; (2) FANCM, BRCA1 and BLM collaboratively alleviate replication stress at the telomeres. Our discoveries may have important implications in finding better treatment strategies for certain cancers.

  3. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: '''Michael Begel'''

    Tau leptons are notoriously difficult particles to work with in the environment of a hadron collider due to their short lifetime and heavy enough mass for semi-hadronic decay. In this talk I will present the physics motivation for working with taus in spite of the challenges. And I will describe the work my group is involved with, from the first measurement of tau polarization at a hadron collider, to Higgs-tagging and searches for heavy, exotic particles. I will also describe the landscape for physics with taus at ATLAS as we look into Run2 and beyond.

  4. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    4 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    In the intriguing world of subatomic physics, neutrinos form the most bizarre tiny entities known to date. Well, they may be tiny, but the world surrounding them is astonishingly big. Today scientists study these elusive particles to understand the biggest puzzles in the universe, from the structure of the atom to the formation of a star. As the popular saying goes, "Whenever anything cool happens in the universe, neutrinos are usually involved." Although more than a trillion of these little particles pass unnoticed through our bodies every second of the day, neutrinos still remain largely mysterious. These famously shy particles are notoriously difficult to detect given how rarely they interact with normal matter. How rare you ask? Let's say in your entire lifetime, perhaps one neutrino will interact with an atom in your body and seriously, you should feel fortunate that it is that way. Also, the weird fact that these ghostly particles can "morph" into one another makes it even more difficult to detect them. Despite all these challenges, researchers have managed to capture a handful of them by building immense and exquisitely sensitive detectors in some of the most remote places of the planet such as deep in the Antarctic ice, miles under a mine in Canada and deep under a mountain in Japan. Come for an hour to be mesmerized by the scientific adventures in the wonderful world of neutrinos and how they can help us unlock some of the deepest secrets of the universe.

15

  1. Particle Physics Seminar

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Jyoti Joshi'

    The past few years have brought several remarkable neutrino-related discoveries and experimental anomalies indicating that these elusive particles might hold clues to some of the most profound questions in particle physics such as matter-antimatter asymmetry and the possibility of additional low-mass neutrino states. Further exploration of these clues require technological advances in neutrino detection. Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) are imaging detectors that present neutrino interactions with the detail of bubble chambers, but with an electronic data acquisition and processing. Various efforts are ongoing at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) to develop this intriguing technology. MicroBooNE is a 170 ton LArTPC which recently started collecting data with Fermilab's Booster Neutrino Beam. In addition to addressing the recent low-energy electromagnetic anomaly observed by the MiniBooNE experiment, the exceptional particle identification capability of MicroBooNE will make it possible for the first time to measure low-energy (~1 GeV) neutrino cross-sections in argon with high precision thereby providing invaluable inputs to develop nuclear models needed for future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. MicroBooNE is also leading the way for an extensive short-baseline neutrino physics program at Fermilab and also serves as a R&D project towards a long-baseline multi-kiloton scale LArTPC detector. This talk will start by giving a brief overview of LArTPC efforts at Fermilab, followed by a description of the MicroBooNE experiment, its current status and first physics results along with some future projections.

  2. NSLS-II Friday Lunchtime Seminar Series

    12 pm, NSLS-II Bldg 744 (LOB 4), room 156

    Hosted by: 'L. Carr, S. Chodankar and B. Ocko'

16

  1. No events scheduled

17

  1. Summer Sunday

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Tour the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, where Brookhaven scientists study structures as tiny as a billionth of a meter.

18

  1. No events scheduled

19

  1. No events scheduled

20

  1. No events scheduled

21

  1. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    The IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole has measured the atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum as a function of zenith angle and energy. Using IceCube's full detector configuration we have performed a search for eV-scale sterile neutrinos. Such a sterile neutrino, motivated by the anomalies in short-baseline experiments, is expected to have a significant effect on the $\bar{\nu_\mu}$ survival probability due to matter induced resonant effects for energies of order 1 TeV. This effect makes this search unique and sensitive to small sterile mixings. In this talk, I will present the results of the IceCube sterile neutrino search.

  2. Association of Students and Postdocs (ASAP) Event

    5:30 pm, BNL Gazebo

    All you can eat burgers, hot dogs, snacks, drinks. Beer for those 21+ (bring photo ID). Guests/family welcome. $3 admission, purchase at BERA store in Berkner Hall (open 9am-3pm) by 1pm Thursday; $5 at the 'door'. (Rain date is Friday, July 22) Sponsored by the NSLS-II User Community and hosted by the Association of Students and Postdocs (ASAP)

22

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Matthew Sievert'

    Transport coefficients in two systems are addressed via holographic methods originating from the AdS/CFT. The first system is a neutral conformal fluid. In linearised hydrodynamics, beyond shear viscosity, all order gradient expansion can be efficiently resummed into two momenta-dependent transport coefficient functions. The second system is an e/m current coupled via chiral anomaly to an axial U(1) current. The anomaly-free all order transport coefficients are resummed into three momenta-dependent functions, the diffusion function and two conductivities. Anomaly-induced transport, resummed to all orders, generalises the chiral-magnetic effect (CME) and related phenomena. Novel, anomaly-induced non-linear effects will be presented too.

23

  1. No events scheduled

24

  1. Summer Sunday

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Visit the National Synchrotron Light Source II, where scientists use intense beams of light to see the inner structure of batteries, proteins, space dust, and more.

25

  1. Chemistry Department Seminar

    10 am, Room 300, Chemistry Bldg. 555 - 3rd Floor

    Hosted by: ''Miomir Vukmirovic''

    The synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a non-destructive technique that measures the changes in the x-ray absorption coefficient of a material as the function of energy. The X-rays are highly penetrating and allow studies of gases, solids or liquid at concentrations of as low as a few ppm. As an element-specific technique, XAS can resolve the oxidation state of the element, as well as its coordination environment and subtle changes within. Its unique power is found in application to metal clusters, particularly in nanomaterials. It can resolve the inner structure of a nanoparticle composed of two or more elements, i.e. solid solution, aggregate mixtures, or core-shell particles in which one metal is present mostly in the center of the particle (core), and the other forms a shell around it. The latter nanoparticle systems are of a special interest for electrocatalysts composed of expensive noble metals because minimizing the noble metal content is the goal of the present technology development. The lecture focuses on in-situ characterization of electrochemical systems composed of two or more metal atoms for fuel cell technology. Selected examples show the changes in the inner structure of the catalyst during the oxidation of fuels on anode systems, or oxygen reduction on cathodes, including size, shape and partial oxidation state, and correlate them to the catalyst's activity and stability.

26

  1. No events scheduled

27

  1. No events scheduled

28

  1. JUL

    28

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, July 28, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Thomas Ullrich''

    The accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program, aimed for the measurement of oscillation parameters and observing the leptonic CP violation, is moving full steam ahead. However, the recent measurements have revealed unexpected and interesting neutrino interaction physics, and exposed the inadequacy of the relativistic Fermi gas (RFG) based Monte-Carlo generators (in describing neutrino-nucleus scatterings) resulting in large systematic uncertainties. A more detailed and careful neutrino-nucleus modeling, covering the whole experimental kinematical space, is inevitable in order to achieve the unprecedented precision goal of the present and future accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation experiments. In this talk, I will present a microscopic Hartree-Fock (HF) and continuum random phase approximation (CRPA) approach to electroweak scattering off nuclei from low energy (threshold) to the intermediate energy region. As a necessary check to test the reliability of this approach, I will first present a electron-nucleus (^12 C, ^16 O, ^40 Ca) cross section comparison (in the kinematics range of interest) with the data to validate the model. Then, I will present flux-folded (anti)neutrino cross section calculations and comparison with the measurements of MiniBooNE and T2K experiments. I will draw special attention to the contribution emerging from the low-energy nuclear excitations, at the most forward scattering bins, in the signal of MiniBooNE and T2K experiments and their impact on the non-trivial differences between muon-neutrino and electron-neutrino cross sections. These effects remain inaccessible in the (current) relativistic Fermi-gas (RFG) based Monte-Carlo generators.

29

  1. JUL

    29

    Friday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, July 29, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Matthew Sievert'

    High Pt Dijet production in ep/eA DIS at small x (high energy) involves the expectation value of a trace of four Wilson lines, i.e. the quadrupole. At leading power the isotropic part can be expressed as the conventional Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution. On the other hand, the distribution of linearly polarized gluons determines the amplitude of the ~ cos(2phi) anisotropy of the transverse momentum imbalance. I shall also discuss the operator that determines the next-to-leading power correction, its expectation value in a Gaussian theory (at large Nc), and the resulting .

30

  1. No events scheduled

31

  1. JUL

    31

    Sunday

    Summer Sunday

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Sunday, July 31, 2016, 10:00 am

    Explore the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, where particles are smashed together at near-light-speed to reveal the secrets of our universe. * Facility tour appropriate for ages 10 and over.

  1. JUL

    28

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Modeling electron- and neutrino-nucleus scattering in kinematics"

    Presented by Vishvas Pandey, Ghent University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, July 28, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Thomas Ullrich''

    The accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program, aimed for the measurement of oscillation parameters and observing the leptonic CP violation, is moving full steam ahead. However, the recent measurements have revealed unexpected and interesting neutrino interaction physics, and exposed the inadequacy of the relativistic Fermi gas (RFG) based Monte-Carlo generators (in describing neutrino-nucleus scatterings) resulting in large systematic uncertainties. A more detailed and careful neutrino-nucleus modeling, covering the whole experimental kinematical space, is inevitable in order to achieve the unprecedented precision goal of the present and future accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation experiments. In this talk, I will present a microscopic Hartree-Fock (HF) and continuum random phase approximation (CRPA) approach to electroweak scattering off nuclei from low energy (threshold) to the intermediate energy region. As a necessary check to test the reliability of this approach, I will first present a electron-nucleus (^12 C, ^16 O, ^40 Ca) cross section comparison (in the kinematics range of interest) with the data to validate the model. Then, I will present flux-folded (anti)neutrino cross section calculations and comparison with the measurements of MiniBooNE and T2K experiments. I will draw special attention to the contribution emerging from the low-energy nuclear excitations, at the most forward scattering bins, in the signal of MiniBooNE and T2K experiments and their impact on the non-trivial differences between muon-neutrino and electron-neutrino cross sections. These effects remain inaccessible in the (current) relativistic Fermi-gas (RFG) based Monte-Carlo generators.

  2. JUL

    29

    Friday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Azimuthal anisotropy and the distribution of linearly polarized gluons in DIS dijet production at high energy"

    Presented by Adrian Dumitru, Baruch College

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, July 29, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Matthew Sievert'

    High Pt Dijet production in ep/eA DIS at small x (high energy) involves the expectation value of a trace of four Wilson lines, i.e. the quadrupole. At leading power the isotropic part can be expressed as the conventional Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution. On the other hand, the distribution of linearly polarized gluons determines the amplitude of the ~ cos(2phi) anisotropy of the transverse momentum imbalance. I shall also discuss the operator that determines the next-to-leading power correction, its expectation value in a Gaussian theory (at large Nc), and the resulting .

  3. JUL

    31

    Sunday

    Summer Sunday

    "Atom-Smashing Fun: Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider"

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Sunday, July 31, 2016, 10:00 am

    Explore the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, where particles are smashed together at near-light-speed to reveal the secrets of our universe. * Facility tour appropriate for ages 10 and over.

  4. AUG

    1

    Monday

    Sambamurti Lecture

    "Electron-Positron Tomography Seeking Symmetry in the Quark-Gluon Plasma"

    Presented by Lijuan Ruan, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, August 1, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''John Haggerty'''

  5. AUG

    3

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Pianofest"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, August 3, 2016, 12:00 pm

    Paul Schenly, Director of Pianofest in the Hamptons, brings a group of young pianist participants in the second session of this workshop. Performances may be critiqued on stage. A wide range of compositions will be selected, including works for two pianos.

  6. AUG

    5

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Study of the detection of supernova neutrinos"

    Presented by Hanyu Wei, Tsinghua University

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, August 5, 2016, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    A core-collapse supernova explosion would release an enormous amount of neutrinos, the detection of which could yield answers to many questions of supernova dynamics and neutrino physics. The collective neutrinos from all the past supernovae all over the universe (supernova relic neutrinos) are also observable, and their detection would provide us an insight of the stellar evolution and cosmology. In this talk, I will first introduce the supernova burst neutrinos as well as supernova relic neutrinos. Then, i will present the design, characteristics, and sensitivity of an online trigger system of supernova burst neutrinos at Daya Bay. I will also present a search for supernova burst neutrinos at Daya Bay using about 600 days of data. At last, a sensitivity study of the discovery potential for supernova relic neutrinos with a slow liquid scintillator will be presented, which is highly recommended to kilo-ton-scale detectors.

  7. AUG

    12

    Friday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Stefano Di Vita, DESY

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, August 12, 2016, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

  8. AUG

    26

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    "TBA"

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, BNL

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, August 26, 2016, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

  9. SEP

    8

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Alan Aspuru-Guzik

    1:30 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, September 8, 2016, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Qin Wu''

  10. SEP

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    ""Open to the Public""

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, September 8, 2016, 6:30 pm

  11. SEP

    14

    Wednesday

    HET

    "TBA"

    Presented by Gopolang Mohlabeng, University of Kansas

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, September 14, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  12. SEP

    15

    Thursday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "Solar Driven Water Splitting"

    Presented by Professor Harry Gray, California Institute of Technology

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, September 15, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Peter Wanderer'

  13. OCT

    5

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Marco Farina, Rutgers University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 5, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

  14. OCT

    6

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Dark Interactions: perspective from theory and experiment"

    9 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 6, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

  15. OCT

    13

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, October 13, 2016, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Nora Sundin''

  16. OCT

    26

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "TBA"

    Presented by Stefania Gori, University of Cincinnati

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 26, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

  17. NOV

    10

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, November 10, 2016, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  18. DEC

    1

    Thursday

    PACCD Workshop (Precision Astronomy with Fully Depleted CCDs)

    8 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, December 1, 2016, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  19. DEC

    2

    Friday

    PACCD Workshop (Precision Astronomy with Fully Depleted CCDs)

    8 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, December 2, 2016, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  20. DEC

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, December 8, 2016, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  21. JAN

    12

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, January 12, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  22. FEB

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, February 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  23. MAR

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  24. APR

    13

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, April 13, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  25. MAY

    11

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 11, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  26. JUN

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 8, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'