BNL Home
January 2017
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. No events scheduled

2

3

  1. No events scheduled

4

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

5

  1. No events scheduled

6

  1. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    The discoveries of the extraterrestrial neutrino flux by IceCube renewed interest in the precise evaluation of the background neutrinos which are produced in the atmosphere due the cosmic ray interactions. One of the most relevant processes at high energies is the charm and beauty production in proton-nucleus collisions which needs to be evaluated at very high energies where small x effects may become important. I will discuss a recent calculation of the forward charm production in pp and pA, and compare results from different models which include small x effects due to resummation and saturation. Comparison with the LHC data will be presented and nuclear effects on light nuclei will also be discussed. Finally, I will show the resulting prompt neutrino flux and its uncertainties and discuss the potential improvements.

7

  1. No events scheduled

8

  1. No events scheduled

9

  1. Office of Educational Programs Event

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Hosted by: ''''Noel Blackburn''''

  2. Office of Educational Programs Event

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

10

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Oleg Eyser''

    We overview physics of nucleon phase space distributions and diverse high energy processes where they are accessible with current and future machines.

  2. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012, the ATLAS experiment at the LHC has been searching for signs of new physics related to the Higgs boson. One promising area is the seach for new, heavy Higgs-like scalars decaying to a pair of vector gauge bosons. This talk will summarize recent ATLAS searches for a heavy scalar decaying to two Z bosons, using the sqrt(s)=13 TeV data from Run 2

11

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, CFN, Bldg. 735, First floor conference room - A

    Hosted by: 'Deyu Lu'

    Abstract: Near-edge x-ray spectroscopies such as x-ray absorption spectra (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) are commonly used to elucidate the local electronic and atomic structure of materials. X-rays provide a bulk-sensitive, element-specific probe that is responsive to bonding, coordination, and charge states. The OCEAN code is a tool for calculating near-edge x-ray spectra (absorption, emission, RIXS, and NRIXS). Building upon a density functional theory foundation, OCEAN solves the Bethe-Salpeter equation to describe the electron-hole pair created by x-ray absorption or scattering. This allows us to predict spectra for a wide range of condensed matter systems wherein the molecular structure is the only free parameter. Today's talk will introduce some of the capabilities of the OCEAN code and walk through the steps necessary to create and run your own calculations. As an example we will look at some recent results of absorption and resonant emission at the nitrogen K edge in ammonium nitrate which highlight both vibrational disorder and many-body self-energy effects.

  2. HET Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Amarjit Soni''

12

  1. Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11:45 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Hosted by: 'Jian Wang'

    Motor vehicles emit gas- and particle-phase air pollutants, including organic and inorganic gasses, black carbon (BC), organic aerosols (OA) and other species, which are linked with adverse human health effects, visibility reductions, and climate effects. There are steep gradients in concentrations of these species within 10s to 100s of meters from the roadway. The mechanistic evolution of vehicle emissions downwind of a roadway involves complex physicochemical processes and varies spatially and temporally. Exposure concentrations of different pollutants in a near-road environments are influenced by the complex dispersion process, built environments and meteorological factors which lead to physicochemical transformations of primary reactive species. For a better understanding of exposure and evolution of near-road air pollutants, we conducted a comprehensive field study at a site near Interstate 40, near Durham, North Carolina. The specific aims of this study were: 1) characterizing the spatio-temporal and seasonal trends of multiple air pollutant concentrations in a near highway setting, 2) characterizing near-road submicron aerosol volatility and mixing state, and 3) determining the extent to which motor vehicles contribute to ambient secondary OA production. Results from this study show strong seasonal and diurnal differences in downwind concentration gradients with a less-sharp near-road gradients in winter in many species, decreasing of the semi-volatile fraction in ultrafine particle with downwind distance, and a substantial seasonal differences in secondary OA (SOA) formation due to oxidation of near-highway air in an oxidation flow reactor. Details observations from this field study will be discussed. This talk may also briefly address two other projects those are part of my Ph.D. work, (i) improve quantification of gas-particle partitioning parameter values of organic aerosol using a dual-thermodenuder system, and (ii) laboratory aging of wood smoke from d

  2. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    In this talk I discuss the determination of plasmon mass in classical real-time Yang-Mills theory on a lattice in 3 spatial dimensions. I compare 3 different methods to determine the plasmon mass : a hard thermal loop expression in terms of the particle distribution, an effective dispersion relation constructed from fields and their time derivatives, and by measuring oscillations between electric and magnetic field modes after artificially introducing a homogeneous color electric field. Due to plasma instabilities, small quantum fluctuations on top of the classical background may significantly affect the dynamics of the system. I argue for the need for a numerical calculation of a system of classical gauge fields and small linearized fluctuations in a way that keeps the separation between the two manifest. I derive and test an explicit algorithm to solve these equations on the lattice, maintaining gauge invariance and Gauss's law.

  3. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    Current and planned neutrino experiments address fundamental questions in the neutrino, astrophysical, nuclear, and new physics sectors with ambitious, large-scale facilities and detectors. Maximizing the sensitivity and physics reach of these experiments is the guiding principle for the design of the apparatus as well as the analysis techniques applied to infer results from the data. These experiments, however, pose challenges in this process: the data frequently have ambiguities and some quantities are not measurable, such as the momenta of outgoing neutrinos or recoiling nuclei. Detectors with high density and spatial granularity provide a large number of measured values for each event that must be sifted through to obtain even basic reconstructed quantities. The impact of the values of model parameters on the predicted event rates is not linear but is frequently oscillatory. Systematic uncertainties must be highly constrained in order to tease out small effects. To address these challenges, a variety of sophisticated techniques have been adapted from earlier experiments, such as well-established statistical methods and analysis techniques. New, innovative tools developed in other fields, such as deep-learning methods, are being applied to neutrino experiments. I will give a survey of some of the interesting developments being applied and planned for the future.

  4. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Colloquium

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Hosted by: ''Matt Sfeir''

    The exceptional electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them promising candidates for integration into a variety of future technologies. The key technical bottlenecks to progress on this front are mainly materials and chemistry related. How do we get the exact type of CNTs we want? How do we quantify the purity of these materials? How do we organize and place them on substrates? The solutions to these problems can enable a wide range of applications in the electronics industry. In this talk, I will present recent progress in trying to solve these problems. I will also discuss how these results have enabled the fabrication of transparent conducting electrodes (along with their integration in photovoltaic cells and OLEDs), high performance thin-film transistors on both rigid and flexible substrates and progress towards a CNT-based logic technology.

  5. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

13

  1. Particle Physics Seminar

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    There exists a long-standing, intriguing, discrepancy between the BNL E821 measurement and the Standard Model (SM) prediction for the muon anomalous magnetic moment, $a_{\mu} \equiv (g-2)/2$, at the level of about three standard deviations ($3\sigma$). To test this discrepancy, a new muon $(g-2)$ experiment E989 at Fermilab will improve the experimental uncertainty by a factor of four. Providing that the central value remains unchanged, the new measurement would result into more than $5\sigma$ ``discovery-level'' deviation from the SM. The experiment at Fermilab will employ the original BNL storage ring with an intense new muon source and state-of-the-art detector systems. I will review the current status of the design of new components and upgrades that are required to achieve the challenging precision goal of the experiment.

  2. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Seminar Room 2nd Floor Bldg 734

    Hosted by: 'Robert Konik'

    The development of pump-probe spectroscopies with femtosecond time resolution, which allows to track the dynamics of electronic degrees of freedom in solids under optical excitations, opens up a new window to understand strongly correlated materials and offers the intriguing possibility of controlling their properties with light, on ultra-fast time scales. Triggered by these advances, the interest around time dependent phenomena in quantum many body systems has recently substantially grown. In this talk will review recent progress in understanding transient dynamics of electrons in correlated metals, Mott Insulators and superconductors. I will show that quite generically these systems display very sharp dynamical transitions as a function of the external perturbation, in correspondence of which the lattice response and the sensitivity to density inhomogeneities can be greatly enhanced.

  3. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    We discuss a new approach to solve the sign problem arising in the Monte Carlo evaluation of path integrals. It is based on deforming the contour of integration into complex space. We will argue that for conceptual and numeric reasons it may be advantageous not to use the steepest descent manifolds (thimbles). We will discuss a variety of algorithms and their application to field theories with a fermionic sign problem and to quantum mechanical models, including real time dynamics.

14

  1. No events scheduled

15

  1. No events scheduled

16

17

  1. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Wenhu Xu''

    Band theory and the BCS theory of superconductivity are two pillars of the quantum theory of solids. High-temperature superconductors belong to a family of materials where both of these, band theory and BCS, fail. Layered organic materials of the BEDT family are another example of materials that are hard to understand within conventional approaches. The root cause of these failures can be traced to strong electronic repulsion. I will start from the simplest model that takes into account the competition between kinetic and potential energy, the Hubbard model. I will show how cluster generalizations of dynamical mean-field theory for this model shed light on these problems. The interaction-induced metal-insulator transition (Mott transition) can serve as an organizing principle for the phase diagrams.

18

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. Particle Physics Seminar - SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar

    1:30 pm, Stony Brook University

    With the next generation of wide field galaxy surveys, both spectroscopic and photometric, we expect to achieve unprecedented constraints on the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure. Maximizing the flow of information from these rich datasets to constraints on our physical models requires accurate characterization of systematic uncertainties. First, we present a method for estimation of covariance matrices of galaxy clustering measurements with spectroscopic surveys. We show that our method enables us to generate accurate galaxy mocks needed for BAO and RSD analyses on nonlinear scales. Then, we present the main challenges in extracting cosmological information from lensing measurements of deep imaging surveys. We show that employing novel techniques in estimation of the point spread function can keep this major systematic under control. Finally, we discuss various approaches for improvement of the photometric redshifts for the imaging surveys. We demonstrate how the precision and accuracy of photometric redshifts can be greatly enhanced if we take advantage of combining different datasets.

  3. HET Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Amarjit Soni''

19

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, CFN, Building 735, 1st floor conference room

    Hosted by: 'Mark Hybertsen'

    First-principles quantum mechanical methods, e.g. density functional theory (DFT) and correlated wavefunction theories, have made possible accurate theoretical description of chemical processes such as chemical bond-breaking and forming, and charge transfer. To be able to describe surface processes on metal and metal oxides at the atomic level is of fundamental and practical interest because such processes give rise to or may affect macroscopic properties such as catalytic activity, chemical adsorption and absorption efficiency, and charge carrier conductivity, to name a few. The thermodynamics and kinetics of surface reconstruction in photocatalytic perovskite oxides, SrTiO3 and BaTiO3, are explored through DFT, and their implications for catalysis will be discussed. Secondly, the feasibility of light-driven catalysis on plasmonic metal nanoparticles (e.g., Au and Cu) will be presented. We studied the excited-state energetics of select heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions via the embedded correlated wavefunction method (e.g., multiconfigurational second order perturbation theory embedded in a density-functional-derived embedding potential). We evaluate if these excited-state reaction pathways are accessible via plasmon resonance and decay. N2 dissociation on Fe-doped Au(111) surface and CH4 activation on Ru-doped Cu(111) will be presented as examples.

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Alessandro Tricoli'

    In this seminar I will first review the physics case for a hermetic timing detector for charge particles to be installed in CMS in the years 2024-25 in preparation of the High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC accelerator (HL-LHC). Then I will present the possible technologies currently under studies for the timing detector and then I will concentrate on explaining the basics principles of Ultra-fast Silicon Detectors and their performances. I will conclude with a brief outline of the future R&D steps for the construction of the timing detector.

  3. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Hiromichi Nishimura'

    Vector mesons play a prominent role for the detection of chiral symmetry restoration in the quark-gluon plasma since their in-medium modifications are directly observable in dilepton spectra. However, a direct connection between their in-medium modifications and chiral symmetry restoration remains elusive. To shed some light on this, I will first address the question how chiral symmetry breaking and the light (vector) mesons emerge from the underlying quark-gluon dynamics. Then, I will present preliminary results on the in-medium spectral functions of the rho and a1 mesons obtained from analytic continuation of Euclidean two-point functions.

  4. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    2 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: ''Oleg Gang''

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used to inhibit or modulate the peptide fibrillation as a potential therapeutic strategy and to understand the molecular mechanisms of amyloid diseases. Particularly, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been widely used to study peptide/inorganic NP interactions due to the tunable size, surface and plamonic properties. In this talk, I will present the study of interaction of AuNPs with islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), which features in type 2 diabetes pathogenesis by self-assembly into fibrils and peptide-induced disruption of cell membranes. Amyloid fibrils share a distinct β-sheet structure, with the structural diversity controlled by the amino acid sequence. To elucidate the key mechanisms of amyloid self-assembly and provide unique viewpoints on the interactions with NPs, polymorphic fibril structures will firstly be discussed using amyloidogenic peptides that are designed based on the IAPP sequence. The observed amyloid fibrillation and hydrogelation controlled by the peptide structure also led to a proposed relationship between amyloid structure and self-assembly behaviour. Next, I will present the systematic study of IAPP/AuNP interactions, in which the strong binding is initiated by the metal-binding sequence in the hydrophilic peptide domain. Structural transition accelerated in a NP size-dependent manner also implies a facet-dependent IAPP/AuNP interaction. Based on these findings, liquid cell transmission electron microscopy was used for direct visualisation of the dynamic growth of AuNPs in presence of IAPP fibrils. The results show growth of branch(star)-shaped AuNPs in the presence of IAPP fibrils, suggesting a preferred nucleation site for Au binding and subsequent growth on the amyloid template.

20

  1. Computational Science Center Seminar

    11 am, Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: 'Kerstin Kleese van Dam'

    The current analysis pipeline for Nano-DESI Mass Spectral Imaging involves analyzing the data coming off the instrument using an in-house tool called MSI QuickView and saving the results onto a storage drive before moving on to the next experiment. While this works well for single datasets, there is a demand for more scalable, flexible workflows that are re-executable across datasets, support extensive querying and ease collaboration. His talk will focus on a workflow that moves data analysis from a mere desktop application for single experiments to a more general capability that can be possibly extended to perform multi-modal analysis across datasets. The core components of the workflow include (1) MSI QuickView, a desktop application for the near-real time visualization and analysis of mass spectrometry data; (2) Provenance Environment (ProvEn), a provenance production and collection framework that provides components supporting the production and collection of provenance information for distributed application environments; (3) Elasticsearch, a readily-scalable, broadly-distributable, enterprise-grade search engine that is accessible through an elaborate and extensive API to power extremely fast indexing and searches that support your data discovery applications; (4) Logstash, processing of log files; and (5) Kibana, a platform to visualize, analyze and explore data from multiple sources including Elasticsearch and Logstash.

  2. NSLS-II Friday Lunchtime Seminar Series

    12 pm, NSLS-II Bldg 743 (LOB 3), room 156

    Hosted by: 'Ben Ocko and Shirish Chodankar'

  3. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Christoph Lehner''

  4. Nuclear Theory Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    We construct small-x evolution equations which can be used to calculate quark and anti-quark helicity TMDs and PDFs, along with the g_1 structure function. These evolution equations resum powers of alpha_s ln^2 (1/x) in the polarization-dependent evolution along with the powers of alpha_s ln (1/x) in the unpolarized evolution which includes saturation effects. The equations are written in an operator form in terms of polarization-dependent Wilson line-like operators. While the equations do not close in general, they become closed and self-contained systems of non-linear equations in the large-N_c and large-N_c & N_f limits. After solving the large-N_c equations numerically we obtain the following small-x asymptotics for the flavor-singlet g_1 structure function along with quarks helicity PDFs and TMDs (in absence of saturation effects): g_1^S (x, Q^2) ~ \Delta q^S (x, Q^2) ~ g_{1L}^S (x, k_T^2) ~ ( 1/x )^{alpha_h} \approx t( 1/x )^{2.31 \sqrt{\alpha_s N_c/(2pi}} This result is valid for all flavors. We also give an estimate of how much of the proton's spin may reside at small x and what impact this has on the so-called ``spin crisis.'' This work would help one better understand longitudinal polarization data to be obtained at the proposed Electron-Ion Collider (EIC).

21

  1. No events scheduled

22

  1. No events scheduled

23

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    11 am, Building 734, conference room 201

    Hosted by: '''Cedomir Petrovic'''

    Transition Metal Oxides (TMOs) exhibit unique and multifunctional electronic properties (such as high-temperature superconductivity, colossal magnetoresistance, metal-insulator transitions, etc.) directly related to the spin and orbital degrees of freedom of the transition metal d-states. Furthermore, their iso-structural nature permits realization of heterostructures where novel unexpected electronic properties take place. Engineering transition metal oxide surfaces and interfaces carries the potential for achieving new physical properties that radically differ from those of the constituent bulk materials. This is the case of oxide-lowDEGs, which recently showed extraordinary occurrences, including interfacial superconductivity, magnetism, large tuneable spin-orbit coupling and indications of topological states. In my talk, I will present recent spin resolved Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements of the low dimensional electron gas at SrTiO3 [1, 2, 3], TiO2-anatase and Sr1-xBaxTiO3 showing that these materials have capability for the realization of TMO based electronic device. References: [1] N. C. Plumb, M. Salluzzo, E. Razzoli, M. Månsson, M. Falub, J. Krempasky, C. E. Matt, J. Chang, J. Minár, J. Braun, H. Ebert, B. Delley, K.-J. Zhou, C. Monney, T. Schmitt, M. Shi, J. Mesot1, C. Quitmann, L. Patthey, M. Radovic, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 086801 (2014). [2] A. F. Santander-Syro, F. Fortuna, C. Bareille, T. C. Rodel, G. Landolt, N. C. Plumb, J. H. Dil, and M. Radovic, Nature Materials, 13, 1085–1090 doi:10.1038/nmat4107 (2014). [3] Z. Wang, S. McKeown Walker, A. Tamai, Z. Ristic, F.Y. Bruno, A. de la Torre, S. Ricco, N.C. Plumb, M. Shi, P. Hlawenka, J. Sanchez-Barriga, A. Varykhalov, T.K. Kim, M. Hoesch, P.D.C. King, W. Meevasana, U. Diebold, J. Mesot, M. Radovic, and F. Baumberger, Nature Materials 15, 835–839 (2016) doi:10.1038/nmat4623 (2016).

24

  1. JAN

    24

    Today

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    2 pm, Building 480, Conference Room

    Tuesday, January 24, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Yimei Zhu''

25

  1. JAN

    25

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, January 25, 2017, 10:00 am

    To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. JAN

    25

    Wednesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Room 201 (upstairs)

    Wednesday, January 25, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Mark Dean'

    Scientific interest in ABO3 perovskite oxides remains intense due to the wide range of physical behavior present in these materials. The ability to control the position, occupation, and composition of the anion site has recently emerged as a new route to tune properties in epitaxial perovskites. This talk will focus on recent and ongoing efforts aimed at developing anion-based approaches to tailor electronic, optical and magnetic properties in oxide heterostructures. First, I will discuss how the position of the oxygen anions can be controlled to stabilize non-bulk-like bond angles and lengths, thereby modifying electronic and magnetic behavior in manganite films and superlattices. In the second half of the talk, I will describe efforts focused on controlling the occupation and composition of the anion site, including reversible oxidation/reduction in thin La1/3Sr2/3FeO3-? films and topotactic fluorination reactions to realize oxyfluoride films

  3. JAN

    25

    Wednesday

    Joint YITP/HET Seminar

    2:30 pm, YITP Seminar Room

    Wednesday, January 25, 2017, 2:30 pm

26

  1. JAN

    26

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 1-224

    Thursday, January 26, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Hiromichi Nishimura''

  2. JAN

    26

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, January 26, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Hooman Davoudiasl''

    I will describe a new mechanism for creating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe at low temperatures, i.e. below the QCD confinement temperature, involving the CP-violating oscillation of fermions made of strongly interacting particles. I will also make connections to neutron-antineutron oscillations, clearing up issues that exist in the literature. Novel experimental tests will be discussed.

27

  1. JAN

    27

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, January 27, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    Recent classical-statistical numerical simulations have established the "bottom-up" thermalization scenario of Baier et al. as the correct weak coupling effective theory for thermalization in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. I will talk on a parametric study of photon production in the various stages of this bottom-up framework to ascertain the relative contribution of the off-equilibrium "Glasma" relative to that of a thermalized Quark-Gluon Plasma. Taking into account the constraints imposed by the measured charged hadron multiplicities at RHIC and the LHC, we find that Glasma contributions are important especially for large values of the saturation scale at both energies. Furthermore, I will report on first kinetic simulations of photon production in the expanding Glasma that will quantify our estimates.

28

  1. No events scheduled

29

  1. No events scheduled

30

  1. No events scheduled

31

  1. No events scheduled

  1. JAN

    24

    Today

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Ultrafast Dynamical Phenomena in Nanostructural Materials by 4D Electron Microscopy"

    Presented by Xuewen Fu, California Institute of Technology

    2 pm, Building 480, Conference Room

    Tuesday, January 24, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Yimei Zhu''

  2. JAN

    25

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, January 25, 2017, 10:00 am

    To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  3. JAN

    25

    Wednesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Anion-based approaches to engineering functionality in perovskite oxide heterostructures"

    Presented by Steve May, Drexel University

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Room 201 (upstairs)

    Wednesday, January 25, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Mark Dean'

    Scientific interest in ABO3 perovskite oxides remains intense due to the wide range of physical behavior present in these materials. The ability to control the position, occupation, and composition of the anion site has recently emerged as a new route to tune properties in epitaxial perovskites. This talk will focus on recent and ongoing efforts aimed at developing anion-based approaches to tailor electronic, optical and magnetic properties in oxide heterostructures. First, I will discuss how the position of the oxygen anions can be controlled to stabilize non-bulk-like bond angles and lengths, thereby modifying electronic and magnetic behavior in manganite films and superlattices. In the second half of the talk, I will describe efforts focused on controlling the occupation and composition of the anion site, including reversible oxidation/reduction in thin La1/3Sr2/3FeO3-? films and topotactic fluorination reactions to realize oxyfluoride films

  4. JAN

    25

    Wednesday

    Joint YITP/HET Seminar

    "muon colliders"

    Presented by Mario Greco, Frascati

    2:30 pm, YITP Seminar Room

    Wednesday, January 25, 2017, 2:30 pm

  5. JAN

    26

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "From small to moderate-x: beyond the eikonal approximation"

    Presented by Andrey Tarasov, BNL

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 1-224

    Thursday, January 26, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Hiromichi Nishimura''

  6. JAN

    26

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "New Models of Baryogenesis"

    Presented by Dr. David McKeen, University of Pittsburgh

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, January 26, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Hooman Davoudiasl''

    I will describe a new mechanism for creating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe at low temperatures, i.e. below the QCD confinement temperature, involving the CP-violating oscillation of fermions made of strongly interacting particles. I will also make connections to neutron-antineutron oscillations, clearing up issues that exist in the literature. Novel experimental tests will be discussed.

  7. JAN

    27

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "What shines brighter, Glasma or Quark-Gluon Plasma?"

    Presented by Naoto Tanji, University of Heidelberg

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, January 27, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    Recent classical-statistical numerical simulations have established the "bottom-up" thermalization scenario of Baier et al. as the correct weak coupling effective theory for thermalization in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. I will talk on a parametric study of photon production in the various stages of this bottom-up framework to ascertain the relative contribution of the off-equilibrium "Glasma" relative to that of a thermalized Quark-Gluon Plasma. Taking into account the constraints imposed by the measured charged hadron multiplicities at RHIC and the LHC, we find that Glasma contributions are important especially for large values of the saturation scale at both energies. Furthermore, I will report on first kinetic simulations of photon production in the expanding Glasma that will quantify our estimates.

  8. FEB

    1

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar - SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Elisabeth Krause, SLAC

    1:30 pm, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, February 1, 2017, 1:30 pm

  9. FEB

    1

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Tongyan Lin, LBL

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, February 1, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Amarjit Soni'

  10. FEB

    2

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "SURF Project: Understanding Urban Convection and Haze"

    Presented by Shiguang Miao, Beijing Institute for Urban Meteorology, China

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, February 2, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: '''Jorge Gonzalez/Alice Cialella'''

    Half the global population will be in cities by 2025, many having more than 10 million people. Urbanization modifies atmospheric energy and moisture balances, forming local climates, e.g. urban heat islands (UHIs) and enhanced precipitation. These produce significant challenges to science and society, e.g. flooding, heat waves strengthened by UHIs, and air pollutant hazes. The Beijing megacity experiences such severe events, e.g., 2012 flooding killed 79 and caused losses of $2B. Despite significant research into urban effects on weather and air quality, important science issues remain, e.g., urban-thermodynamic and aerosol impacts on summer convective precipitation and interactions between urban and regional climate changes. Observations are fundamental for understanding these interactions, improving forecasts, and providing useful information to end-users. Previous large urban field campaigns have not been coordinated by a group such as the Beijing Institute of Urban Meteorology (IUM), with its responsibilities for both boundary layer research and real time urban weather forecasting. The overall science objective of the 2014-8 SURF Project is thus a better understanding of urban, terrain, convection, and aerosol interactions for improved forecast accuracy. Beijing is a test case, but the improved understandings are transferable to many large cities globally. Specific objectives include: Promote cooperative international-research to improve understanding of urban weather-systems via summer thunderstorm-rainfall and winter aerosol field studies; Improve high-resolution (∼1 km grid) urban weather and air quality forecast-models; and, Enhance urban weather forecasts for societal applications, e.g., health, energy, hydrologic, climate change, air quality, urban planning, emergency-response management.

  11. FEB

    2

    Thursday

    NSLS-II Colloquium

    "Operando X-ray Studies of Electrocatalysis for Renewable Energy"

    Presented by Anders Nilsson, Stockholm University, Sweden

    2:30 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, February 2, 2017, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''John Hill'''

    We will demonstrate how electron and x-ray spectroscopy can be used to address fundamental questions regarding the reaction mechanism and active sites of the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR), Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER), Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) and CO2 reduction reaction (CO2RR). We have developed in-situ XPS capabilities using a membrane assembly where either the anode or cathode side is exposed to a differential pumped environments where direct measurements of the changes in the catalyst and various reaction intermediates can be probed during ORR on Pt, OER on IrO2 and HER conditions for MoS2. We have also recently conducted high-energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD) studies of the Fe and Ni K-edges under OES conditions in the highly active Ni-Fi oxyhydroxides to determine the nature of the active sites. In particular we observe that Fe encounter an extremely strained local geometry when Ni undergoes a transformation from the 2+ to 3+ state. We have followed the change of Cu catalyst after oxidative activation and then reduction into the metallic state using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and ambient pressure XPS to elucidate the nature of the enhanced selectivity towards ethylene in CO2RR. At the end I will elucidate the increase in our understanding of chemical reactivity in observing reactions in real time using ultrafast techniques bases on x-ray lasers.

  12. FEB

    2

    Thursday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Colloquium

    "Structure and reactivity of anatase TiO2 surfaces and interfaces from first principles simulations"

    Presented by Annabella Selloni, Princeton University

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, February 2, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Deyu Lu'

    Anatase is the form of TiO2 that is most widely used in photocatalysis and solar energy conversion. Anatase is also more active than rutile for most photocatalytic reactions, which has been attributed to various reasons such as the longer charge-carrier lifetime, the higher charge-carrier mobility, and the higher production of reactive OH radicals. In this talk I shall present recent applications of first principles electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics simulations to study the structure and chemistry of anatase surfaces, with focus on their interactions with water and molecular oxygen, the influence of charge carriers on the reactivity, and the different behaviors of anatase and rutile.

  13. FEB

    3

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    "The Coming Armageddon - Upcoming Cyber and Other Changes"

    Presented by Thomas Throwe, BNL

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, February 3, 2017, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: '''Christoph Lehner'''

  14. FEB

    8

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar - SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Tim Eifler, JPL/Caltech

    1:30 pm, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, February 8, 2017, 1:30 pm

  15. FEB

    9

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "TBD"

    Presented by Sriram Ganeshan, Stony Brook University

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, February 9, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Robert Konik'

    TBD

  16. FEB

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, February 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  17. FEB

    14

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Aleksi Kurkela, CERN and Univ. of Stavenger

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 14, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Robert Pisarski'

  18. FEB

    15

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar - SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Adrian Liu, Berkeley

    1:30 pm, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, February 15, 2017, 1:30 pm

  19. FEB

    16

    Thursday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Bowen Xiao, CCNU

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, February 16, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

  20. FEB

    28

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Experimental Challenge of 21 cm Cosmology, host A.Nomerotski"

    Presented by Miguel Morales, University of Washington

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 28, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  21. MAR

    1

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Semiar SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Will Farr, Birmingham

    1:30 pm, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, March 1, 2017, 1:30 pm

  22. MAR

    2

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Kevin Yager, CFN / BNL

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, March 2, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Deyu Lu''

    TBD

  23. MAR

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  24. MAR

    14

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Bob McKeown, Jefferson Lab

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  25. MAR

    15

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Brian Shuve, SLAC

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

  26. MAR

    28

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Carl Bender, Washington University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Robert Pisarski'

  27. APR

    6

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by TBD

    4 pm, CFN Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, April 6, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'TBD'

  28. APR

    7

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Dirk Rischke, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitat

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 7, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

  29. APR

    13

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, April 13, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  30. APR

    20

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Magnetic Superconductors"

    Presented by Jeffrey Lynn, NIST Center for Neutron Research

    11 am, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, April 20, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Igor Zaliznyak'

    TBD

  31. MAY

    3

    Wednesday

    Joint YITP/HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Tim Tait, UCI

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, May 3, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Amarjit Soni'

  32. MAY

    4

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by TBD

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, May 4, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'TBD'

  33. MAY

    11

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 11, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  34. MAY

    31

    Wednesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Open Space Stewardship Program Celebration"

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, May 31, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Melvyn Morris'''

  35. JUN

    1

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by TBD

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, June 1, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'TBD'

  36. JUN

    5

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Summer "DOE/BNL" Internship Program Begins"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Monday, June 5, 2017, 8:30 am

  37. JUN

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 8, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  38. JUN

    20

    Tuesday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2017 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    8:30 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, June 20, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: '''Kelly Guiffreda'''

  39. JUN

    21

    Wednesday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2017 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, June 21, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Kelly Guiffreda'

  40. JUN

    22

    Thursday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2017 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, June 22, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Kelly Guiffreda'

  41. JUN

    23

    Friday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2017 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    8:30 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 23, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Kelly Guiffreda'

  42. JUL

    6

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by TBD

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, July 6, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'TBD'

  43. JUL

    10

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "High School Research Program Begins"

    8:30 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Monday, July 10, 2017, 8:30 am

  44. AUG

    10

    Thursday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2017 Summer Poster Symposium"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, August 10, 2017, 8:30 am

  45. AUG

    28

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2017 Fall Internship Begins"

    8:30 am, BLDG. 438

    Monday, August 28, 2017, 8:30 am