BNL Home
September 2017
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Christoph Lehner''

2

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3

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4

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5

  1. Sustainable Energy Technologies Department Seminar

    11:30 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: ''''Esther Takeuchi''''

    To meet the high-energy requirement that can enable the 40-miles electric drive Plug in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (P-HEVs), long range electric vehicle (EV) and smart grid, it is necessary to develop very high energy and high power cathodes and anodes that when combined in a battery system must offer 5,000 charge-depleting cycles, 15years calendar life as well as excellent abuse tolerance. These challenging requirements make it difficult for conventional battery systems to be adopted in P-HEVs and EVs. In this talk, we will first introduce the different energy storage programs funded by the US Department of Energy including the large DOE investment in Argonne National Laboratory to lead the battery program in the USA. We will then focus on next generation lithium ion battery that include Ni rich full gradient cathode, a high voltage and nonflammable electrolyte and Silicon composite anode including a novel pre-lithiation technology to overcome the irreversible loss of this anode in the first cycle. We will then finish by describing a novel lithium superoxide based close battery system that offer at least 3 times the energy density of the state of the Art lithium ion battery.

  2. Simons Center for Geometry and Physics Public Lecture

    5:30 pm, Simons Center at Stony Brook University, Della Pie

    In the past few decades we have learned a great deal about the basic laws of Physics in the infinitely small – and the infinitely large – and how the two are intimately connected. New windows have expanded our understanding, and many unexpected questions have emerged. This is an exhilarating time in history. New tools, both theoretical and observational, may lead in the next decade to major advances in our understanding of the universe. As in the past, when major discoveries are made about the fundamental laws of Nature, not only is our view of the world enriched, but also our life is transformed. A good place to explore the discoveries from the past decades is in the description of symmetry, symmetry breaking and the Higgs boson in High Energy Physics: why, how and where to…. in a nutshell. These talks will present what we know and what we seek in the fundamental laws of Nature; how we go about answering basic questions in high energy experiments, how much we have learned, and how the technical developments needed to make discoveries have changed society. They will also delineate the boundaries of our knowledge and the known unknowns in fundamental high energy physics and cosmology.

6

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7

  1. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: '''Xin Qian'''

    Radiation hardness of a 50µm thin YAG:Ce scintillator in a form of dependence of a signal efficiency on 3.1MeV proton ?uence was measured and analyzed using X-ray beam. The signal efficiency is a ratio of signals given by a CCD chip after and before radiation damage. The CCD chip was placed outside the primary beam because of its protection from damage which could be caused by radiation. Using simplified assumptions, the 3.1MeV proton fluencies were recalculated to: • 150 MeV proton fluencies with intention to estimate radiation damage of this sample under conditions at proton therapy centers during medical treatment, • 150 MeV proton doses with intention to give a chance to compare radiation hardness of the studied sample with radiation hardness of other detectors used in medical physics, • 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluencies with intention to compare radiation hardness of the studied sample with properties of position sensitive silicon and diamond detectors used in nuclear and particle physics. The following results of our research were obtained. The signal efficiency of the studied sample varies slightly (±3%) up to 3.1MeV proton ?uence of c. (4 − 8) × 1014 cm−2. This limit is equivalent to 150MeV proton ?uence of (5 − 9) × 1016 cm−2, 150MeV proton dose of (350 − 600) kGy and 1MeV neutron ?uence of (1 − 2) × 1016 cm−2. Beyond the limit, the signal efficiency goes gradually down. Fifty percent decrease in the signal efficiency is reached around 3.1MeV ?uence of (1 − 2) × 1016 cm−2 which is equivalent to 150 MeV proton ?uence of around 2 × 1018 cm−2, 150MeV proton dose of around 15 MGy and 1 MeV neutron equivalent ?uence of (4 − 8) × 1017 cm−2. In contrast with position sensitive silicon and diamond radiation detectors, the studied sample has at least two order of magnitude greater radiation resistance. Therefore, YAG:Ce sci

  2. NSLS-II Colloquium Series

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''''''''''John Hill''''''''

    Progress on particle beam physics research have provided marked improvements in beam intensity, brightness, and stability advancing frontier research in applied and fundamental science. This talk will review some beam measurements and manipulation studies being undertaken to improve beam performance in storage rings. Hopefully, these studies will be relevant to the operation and improvement of National Accelerator User Facilities.

  3. CFN Colloquium

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room 2nd Floor

    Hosted by: ''Deyu Lu''

    First-principles studies often rely on the assumption of equilibrium, which can be a poor approximation, e.g., for epitaxial growth. Here, we propose a general effective chemical potential (μ ¯) approach for non-equilibrium systems. It incorporates growth kinetics into the chemical potential, while maintaining its correct equilibrium limits. In studying molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), we divide the process into three stages: pre-nucleation, nucleation, island growth, and focus our efforts on the first two. For the pre-nucleation stage, we solve the rate equations for small clusters on the surface, which serve as the feedstock for the growth, and find that μ ¯ is determined by the most probable, rather than by the lowest-energy, clusters. While this finding contradicts the equilibrium theory (which is in favor of the lowest-energy state), it reinforces the fundamental principle of statistic mechanics. In the case of Bi2Se3, μ ¯ is found to be highly supersaturated. As μ ¯ determines the nucleation barrier for the nucleation stage, this supersaturation leads to a high nucleus concentration and small-sized islands, in qualitative agreement with experiment.

8

  1. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

  2. NSLS-II Seminar

    3 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Ron Pindak''

    In search for new and improved materials, composites and super-alloys capable of withstanding the anticipated extreme states associated fusion reactors; high temperature fast reactors and multi-MW particle accelerators, novel reactor steels, super-alloys and composites are continuously being explored to help meet both the challenge of the higher demand environments and the intended application. Higher fluxes and fluences of irradiating species (neutrons and/or protons), extreme temperatures and aggressively corrosive environments make up the new cocktail of operating conditions of the new array of material structures. One of the challenges in characterizing the effects that high radiation fluxes of neutrons and protons induce on these novel material structures in conjunction with high temperatures is the link between lattice induced damage and phase transformation and macroscopic physical properties which ultimately determine performance in the real environment. High energy X-rays at the BNL synchrotrons have offered a path in establishing this important connection between micro-scale effects and physical properties of novel material structures exposed to high radiation fluxes. Specifically, by integrating the unique capabilities of the BNL accelerator complex that includes, in addition to the NSLS and NSLS II, the proton accelerator and Tandem as well as those of CFN, the evolution and/or damage of materials ranging from classical structures such as graphite, beryllium and steels to novel super-alloys, such as those of Invar and "Gum" metal, and new composites have been characterized both at the two length scales. The pivotal role of high energy X-rays from NSLS to NSLS II in making the connection will be presented demonstrating the enormous potential of the NSLS II in answering fundamental questions in our path towards the next generation nuclear materials. Furthermore, first glimpses of the correlation of lattice effects or damage induced by differ

9

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11

  1. Chemistry Department Colloquium

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: '''Javier Concepcion'''

    Our group is interested in the mechanisms of the catalytic reactions in both natural and inorganic systems. Using various X-ray techniques as tools, we are studying how the catalysts modulate and control multielectron reactions by following the reaction under functional conditions. We have developed spectroscopy and diffraction techniques necessary to fully utilize the capability of the XFELs for a wide variety of metalloenzymes, and to study their chemistry under functional conditions. One of such methods is simultaneous data collection for X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy, to determine the overall structural changes of proteins and the chemical changes at metal catalytic sites. In parallel to the detection techniques, we have developed an efficient sample delivery method that involves deposition of droplets on a conveyor belt. This 'Droplet on Tape' (DOT) method, delivers a single drop of the crystal suspension or solution sample onto a tape, which then can be transported to the X ray intersection point with a variable delay in time. In the process, the sample is photochemically or chemically activated at various time delays to capture reaction intermediates with crystallography and spectroscopy. In the field of inorganic catalysts, improved catalysts for electroreduction of carbon dioxide are highly important for promoting the generation of carbon-based reduction products. To gain a fundamental understanding needed to tailor novel catalysts, in particular for the selectivity of the products, the information of the early steps of the electroreduction process on catalyst surfaces is important. We have optimized and utilized surface-sensitive soft and hard X-ray techniques, including grazing incident X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and ambient pressure X-ray photoemission spectroscopy to investigate the interaction of metal catalytic surfaces with electrolytes and/or gases (CO2 and/or H2O) under in situ/operando conditions.

12

  1. NSLS-II Engineering Seminar Series

    2 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: ''Sushil Sharma and Mary Carlucci-Dayton''

    Mechanical design constraints in many cases can present difficult and unintended motion control challenges in many instruments such as frontend slits, insertion devices, mirrors and monochromators. Design decisions for meeting science requirements often times introduce control stability issues that seldom arise in non-scientific equipment. The Delta Tau motion system is an extremely versatile platform for this control, but also presents a severe learning curve as a result of the versatility. This presentation will demonstrate how subtle geometry effects can create large control problems, and how to look for those subtle "opportunities."

  2. Physics Colloquium and Leona Woods Lecture

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Peter Petreczky'

    Transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) distributions describe the configuration of quarks and gluons inside protons and nuclei in three-dimensional momentum space. Observables in scattering experiments can be calculated with the help of TMD factorization formulas, where the target and projectile are represented with non-perturbative TMD distributions, which are separated from the short-distance perturbative part of the collision. A complementary approach to study the momentum structure of protons and nuclei at high energy is the Color Glass Condensate which is an effective theory for the high-gluon-density region of ultra-relativistic particles. We introduce both theories and we discuss connections between them. We present phenomenological results derived from these connections.

13

  1. Computational Science Initiative Event

    11 am, Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: ''Kerstin Kleese van Dam''

    Matrix and tensor factorization techniques are important data analysis tools with numerous applications in recommender systems, text processing, data mining, and image processing. Matrix factorization is a dimension reduction method that extracts features and provides low-rank matrix approximation; while tensor factorization extends these properties to multidimensional arrays. In this talk, we will discuss the following three topics: 1) An efficient algorithm that improves time efficiency and scalability of tensor factorization. We will present a technique to speed up alternating least squares and gradient descent - two commonly used strategies for tensor factorization. By using the properties of Khatri-Rao product, we show how to efficiently address a computationally challenging sub-step of both algorithms, and how to implement the algorithm on parallel machines. 2) Application of matrix factorization for hand pose estimation. We will discuss how a joint matrix factorization and completion algorithm can be used to estimate the unknown joint angle parameters in hand pose estimation. We will conclude the talk by discussing future work on matrix factorization in streaming mode with limited memory. 3) Asynchronous matrix factorization. We will discuss how the distributed matrix factorization avoids bulk synchronization after every iteration.

  2. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    HI intensity mapping is emerging as a new and promising cosmological probe for both the large-scale structure and the early Universe. In preparation for the many large radio projects that are coming online, we launched the Bleien Galactic Survey project as an exercise to test new (and fun) techniques that could develop into useful tools in future surveys. I will first introduce the background science and basic setup of the experiment, and then touch upon two particularly interesting ideas — calibrating the telescope beam using drones, and RFI mitigation with state-of-the-art deep learning algorithms. Dr. Chang will also give a particle physics seminar entitled "Mapping the Cosmos with the Dark Energy Survey" on Sept. 14 at 3:00 p.m. in the Bldg. 510 Small Seminar Room.

14

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Hiromichi Nishimura''

    Multi-particle correlations measured in heavy-ion collision experiments carry info on fluctuations present in the entire evolutionary history of the system. Initial states include geometric and quantum fluctuations and are important contributors. The thermal fluctuations during the course of QGP evolution is another conceptually important source of these fluctuations and should be studied in detail. We begin by treating thermal fluctuations as a linearized perturbation on hydrodynamic background. We present a full calculation of hadronic and photonic observables including these fluctuations. Recently we have included fluctuations in our simulations in a non-perturbative manner. Progress based on this approach will be discussed.

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: '''Erin Sheldon'''

    The first year data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES Y1) provides the most powerful optical survey dataset to date. In this talk I will first give an overall summary of the cosmology results from the DES Y1 dataset combining galaxy clustering and weak gravitational lensing. Next, I will describe our work in generating and testing the wide-field weak lensing mass maps from the galaxy shape measurements and some exciting applications for the maps. I will end with thoughts on how weak lensing could also inform us on various topics of galaxy formation, which is essential for completing the story behind the Universe we see today.

  3. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

15

  1. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

  2. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    Starting from the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) cross section for dijet production in proton-nucleus collisions we derive a transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) factorization formula for small transverse-momentum imbalance of the jets and for finite number of colors. For the eight TMD distributions appearing in the cross section we determine their operator definitions at small-x as CGC correlators of Wilson lines and we study their JIMWLK evolution. We find that at large transverse momentum the universality of TMDs gets restored. We also discuss an extension of the approach to generalized TMDs (GTMDs) that can give an insight into the angular correlations between impact parameter and dipole size in the CGC framework.

16

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17

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18

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19

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20

  1. Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Hosted by: 'Mike Jensen'

    Deep moist convection plays a pivotal role ranging from daily weather impacts to long-term climatic feedbacks. The height and depth of deep convection are particularly important parameters for studies focusing on convective mass transport. Deep convection has the potential to rapidly transport mass and chemical constituents from the boundary layer into the upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric layer. Depending on whether convection is able to reach and penetrate the tropopause has significant implications on whether mass is rapidly transported into the troposphere or the stratosphere, where long residence times can alter the chemical budget and have important effects on climate. Nevertheless, accurately identifying the dynamic convective detrainment height is not easily achieved and commonly used methods contain considerable limitations or assumptions. Observations, such as taken by satellite or aircraft, are typical limited temporally and/or spatially. To account for limited observations, focus is either directed on the use of parcel theory or chemical modeling; however, assumptions in parcel theory are often invalid in observed convection and limited knowledge is available on the accuracy of simulated storm depths and heights. To enhance our understanding and enable more common retrievals of convective detrainment heights, a methodology utilizing the reflectivity field from ground-based radars is used to locate the detrainment envelope and level of maximum detrainment (LMD). A new radar classification algorithm that uses three-dimensional radar observations to stratify radar echo is used to identify suitable regions of convectively-generated anvil, which are used as a proxy for dynamic detrainment. The methodology is validated against dual-Doppler observations and preliminary results of applying the methodology to several months of volumetric radar composites are presented. Additionally, four months of convective forecasts are evaluated to determine the ac

  2. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    ALICE is preparing a major upgrade for 2021. All subdetectors upgrading their counting room DAQ electronics will use a common hardware to receive physics data: the Common Readout Unit (CRU). The CRU is a PC based readout card featuring an Intel Arria 10 FPGA, up to 48 full duplex optical links with a maximum line rate of 10 Gbit/s, and a Gen3 x16 PCIe interface for host connectivity. The same CRU will also distribute the LHC clock and trigger synchronously to most of the upgrading subdetectors (to ~7800 front end cards). Details of the CRU readout card, its usage in ALICE, and the current status and future plans for hardware production, FPGA firmware, and readout software will be presented.

21

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: ''Robert Konik''

    I will discuss two very recent results relating to the properties of electrons in two spatial dimensions (2D), subject to the effects of quenched disorder (impurities) and quantum interference [Anderson (de)localization]. In both cases, the key physics is tied to classical geometric critical phenomena in 2D. I will first present numerical evidence that strongly suggests the equivalence of disordered surface states of topological superconductors and geometric percolation. Percolation is known to play a role in quantum Hall systems with magnetic fields. Our unexpected result implies that percolation applies to topological superconductor surface states in the absence of time-reversal symmetry breaking. Moreover, the usual "even-odd" effect that occurs in such a system (as identified by Pruisken in the integer quantum Hall effect and by Haldane for spin chains) is found to be absent. Second, I will discuss a "toy model" for the ergodic to many-body localized phase transition in 2D, and relate it to an effective self-interacting walk. I will present analytical results of a controlled expansion which suggest that the transition can be viewed as a "dephasing catastrophe."

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    4 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Alessandro Tricoli'

    Most Higgs bosons are expected to decay to a pair of b-quarks, with the Standard Model predicting a branching fraction of about 58%. Probing this decay is important to furthering our understanding of the Higgs sector, but its observation at hadron colliders is complicated by overwhelming Standard Model backgrounds. In this seminar, the search for the Higgs to bb decay, looking at the associated production of the Higgs boson with a W or Z boson, is presented, based on 36 fb-1 of 13 TeV LHC Run 2 data.

22

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    11 am, Bldg. 480, Conference Room

    Hosted by: '''Yimei Zhu'''

    Ultrafast Transmission Electron Microscopy (U-TEM) has become a very important tool for the study of ultrafast phenomena at (sub-)nm length scales and (sub-)ps time scales. U-TEM is usually based on the creation of ultrashort electron pulses by femtosecond laser photoemission from a flat cathode, with the result that both the beam quality and the average current are significantly less than in state-of-the-art continuous-beam TEMs. At Eindhoven University we have developed U-TEM in which ultrashort electron pulses are produced by using a 3 GHz deflecting microwave cavity in TM110 mode to sweep a high-brightnes continuous beam across a slit [1]. We have demonstrated ultrafast beam chopping with conservation of the beam quality and the sub-eV energy spread of the FEG source of an adapted 200 keV Tecnai TEM, enabling atomic resolution with sub-ps temporal resolution at 3 GHz rep rate [2] In addition we have developed a new method for doing Time-of-Flight Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (ToF-EELS) based on the combined use of two TM110 deflecting cavities and two TM010 (de)compression cavities. The first 'chopping' TM110 cavity produces ultrashort electron pulses which are sent through a sample. Energy loss in the sample translates into reduction of the electron velocity and thus into a later arrival time at the detector, which is measured with a synchronized second TM110 'streak' cavity. In this way an energy resolution of 12 eV at 30 keV has been demonstrated [3]. By adding a TM010 (de)compression cavity after the sample, the longitudinal phase space can be manipulated in such a way that the energy resolution is improved to 2 eV (to be published). By adding a second TM110 cavity before the sample, full control over the longitudinal phase space can be achieved. Detailed charged particle tracking simulations show that an energy resolution of 20 meV combined with a temporal resolution of 2 ps can be achieved; or, alternatively, 2

23

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24

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25

  1. SEP

    25

    Monday

    Chemistry Department Colloquium

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Monday, September 25, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Matt Bird'

    Coherence phenomena arise from interference, or the addition, of wave-like amplitudes in phase. While coherence has been shown to yield transformative new ways for improving function, advances have been limited to pristine matter, as quantum coherence is considered fragile. Recent evidence of coherence in chemical and biological systems, however, concludes that the phenomena is robust and can survive in the face of disorder and noise. I will present the state of recent discoveries. For example, two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy data allow quantitative analysis of vibronic coherence in the photosynthetic light harvesting complexes [1]. I will show how vibronic coherence plays a special role in downhill energy transfer, increasing energy transfer rates remarkably—even when electronic coupling is weak [2]. I will discuss how coherence might be found in electron transfer reactions. I will conclude with a forecast for the role of function as a design element in realizing coherence [3]. [1] Scholes, et al. "Lessons from nature about solar light harvesting" Nature Chem. 3, 763–774 (2011). [2] Dean et al. "Vibronic Enhancement of Algae Light Harvesting" Chem (Cell Press) 1, 858–872 (2016). [3] Scholes, et al. "Optimal Coherence in Chemical and Biophysical Dynamics" Nature 543, 647–656 (2017).

26

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28

  1. SEP

    28

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Hiromichi Nishimura''

    An infinite dimensional symmetry group which governs the infrared sectors of gauge and gravity theories has been recently discovered. This symmetry can be established both from an asymptotic symmetry analysis as well as from the corresponding Ward identities which are quantum field theoretic soft theorems. Moreover, the spontaneous breaking of these symmetries induces vacuum transitions which are detectable by charged particles through the so-called memory effect. In this seminar, I will explain the precise equivalence between asymptotic symmetries, soft theorems and memory effects in the context of tree level Yang-Mills. In particular, in this context the soft gluon theorem is Ward identity of a large gauge symmetry, whose action on the vacuum can be measured from the relative color charge of colored detectors.

  2. SEP

    28

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Weiguo Yin'''

    Layered iridates, Srn+1IrnO3n+1, have drawn great attention since they share remarkable similarities with high-Tc cuprates, including layered crystalline structure, (pseudo) spin ½ states, antiferromagnetic (AFM) Mott insulating ground state, Fermi arcs, and V shape energy gap, etc. Nonetheless, direct evidences of superconductivity such as zero resistivity and Meissner effect are still lacking up to date. The strong spin-orbit coupling and IrO6 octahedral rotations in 5d iridates result in a canted AFM ground state with weak ferromagnetic moments in each IrO2 plane. Here, we propose to suppress the weak ferromagnetism by suppressing the octahedral rotations in iridates, which may facilitate the Cooper pairing. Using a combination of reactive molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), in situ angleresolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and first principle calculations, we investigate the evolution of octahedral rotations, electronic structure and magnetic ordering in ultra-thin SrIrO3 films grown on (001) SrTiO3 substrate. Our experimental results and theoretical calculations show that octahedral rotations and weak ferromagnetic moments are fully suppressed in 1 and 2 unit cell thick SrIrO3 films through interfacial clamping effects. If time allows, I will also present our recent work on the new understanding of RHEED oscillations in the growth of oxides and the chemically specific termination control of oxide interfaces via layerby- layer mean inner potential engineering.

  3. SEP

    28

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Alessandro Tricoli'

    The Standard Model provides a comprehensive explanation for a vast array of data collected at different experiments. Nonetheless fundamental questions remain unanswered and the search for a more complete theory is still a coveted goal of particle physics. Recently, tensions with standard model predictions have been uncovered in several experimental observables in b-hadron decays at LHCb. I will discuss the data, possible implications, and the connection with other experimental programs such as study of kaon rare decays and neutrino mixing and CP violation

29

  1. SEP

    29

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 29, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    Recent developments have shown that QCD-like theories can be engineered to remain in a confined phase when compactified on an arbitrarily small circle, where their features may be studied quantitatively in a controlled fashion. I'll explain how a non-perturbative mass gap and chiral symmetry breaking, which are both historically viewed as prototypical strong coupling effects, appear from systematic weak-coupling calculations. Then I'll describe the rich spectrum of hadronic states, including glueball, meson, and baryon resonances in the calculable small-circle context.

  2. SEP

    29

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 29, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    One of the most promising investigations of beyond-the-Standard-Model physics has been the study of neutrino oscillation, that is, the conversion of neutrinos from one flavor to another as they propagate. While neutrino oscillation is studied in a wide variety of experiments, accelerator based experiments, such as T2K, use a muon neutrino or antineutrino beam as a source to look for electron (anti)neutrino appearance, muon neutrino disappearance. The source also is used to make measurements of neutrino interactions and search for exotic physics. This talk will describe a recent analysis of both neutrino and antineutrino beam data from T2K. Comparisons between neutrino and antineutrino event rates provide a tantalizing window on possible CP violation in the neutrino sector. The talk will also highlight the increasingly important role of systematic uncertainty assessment for T2K and other future measurements of CP violation with accelerator beams.

30

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  1. SEP

    25

    Monday

    Chemistry Department Colloquium

    "Can Coherence Enhance Function in Chemical and Biophysical Systems?"

    Presented by Professor Gregory D. Scholes, Dept. of Chemistry, Princeton University

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Monday, September 25, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Matt Bird'

    Coherence phenomena arise from interference, or the addition, of wave-like amplitudes in phase. While coherence has been shown to yield transformative new ways for improving function, advances have been limited to pristine matter, as quantum coherence is considered fragile. Recent evidence of coherence in chemical and biological systems, however, concludes that the phenomena is robust and can survive in the face of disorder and noise. I will present the state of recent discoveries. For example, two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy data allow quantitative analysis of vibronic coherence in the photosynthetic light harvesting complexes [1]. I will show how vibronic coherence plays a special role in downhill energy transfer, increasing energy transfer rates remarkably—even when electronic coupling is weak [2]. I will discuss how coherence might be found in electron transfer reactions. I will conclude with a forecast for the role of function as a design element in realizing coherence [3]. [1] Scholes, et al. "Lessons from nature about solar light harvesting" Nature Chem. 3, 763–774 (2011). [2] Dean et al. "Vibronic Enhancement of Algae Light Harvesting" Chem (Cell Press) 1, 858–872 (2016). [3] Scholes, et al. "Optimal Coherence in Chemical and Biophysical Dynamics" Nature 543, 647–656 (2017).

  2. SEP

    28

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Color Memory, Large Gauge Transformations, and Soft Theorems in Yang-Mills Theory"

    Presented by Monica Pate, Harvard University

    12:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Hiromichi Nishimura''

    An infinite dimensional symmetry group which governs the infrared sectors of gauge and gravity theories has been recently discovered. This symmetry can be established both from an asymptotic symmetry analysis as well as from the corresponding Ward identities which are quantum field theoretic soft theorems. Moreover, the spontaneous breaking of these symmetries induces vacuum transitions which are detectable by charged particles through the so-called memory effect. In this seminar, I will explain the precise equivalence between asymptotic symmetries, soft theorems and memory effects in the context of tree level Yang-Mills. In particular, in this context the soft gluon theorem is Ward identity of a large gauge symmetry, whose action on the vacuum can be measured from the relative color charge of colored detectors.

  3. SEP

    28

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Suppression of weak ferromagnetism in ultrathin iridates by interfacial engineering of octahedral rotations"

    Presented by Yuefeng Nie, Nanjing University, China

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Weiguo Yin'''

    Layered iridates, Srn+1IrnO3n+1, have drawn great attention since they share remarkable similarities with high-Tc cuprates, including layered crystalline structure, (pseudo) spin ½ states, antiferromagnetic (AFM) Mott insulating ground state, Fermi arcs, and V shape energy gap, etc. Nonetheless, direct evidences of superconductivity such as zero resistivity and Meissner effect are still lacking up to date. The strong spin-orbit coupling and IrO6 octahedral rotations in 5d iridates result in a canted AFM ground state with weak ferromagnetic moments in each IrO2 plane. Here, we propose to suppress the weak ferromagnetism by suppressing the octahedral rotations in iridates, which may facilitate the Cooper pairing. Using a combination of reactive molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), in situ angleresolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and first principle calculations, we investigate the evolution of octahedral rotations, electronic structure and magnetic ordering in ultra-thin SrIrO3 films grown on (001) SrTiO3 substrate. Our experimental results and theoretical calculations show that octahedral rotations and weak ferromagnetic moments are fully suppressed in 1 and 2 unit cell thick SrIrO3 films through interfacial clamping effects. If time allows, I will also present our recent work on the new understanding of RHEED oscillations in the growth of oxides and the chemically specific termination control of oxide interfaces via layerby- layer mean inner potential engineering.

  4. SEP

    28

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Beauty and charm decays and physics beyond the Standard Model: an experimentalist perspective"

    Presented by Marina Artuso, Syracuse University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Alessandro Tricoli'

    The Standard Model provides a comprehensive explanation for a vast array of data collected at different experiments. Nonetheless fundamental questions remain unanswered and the search for a more complete theory is still a coveted goal of particle physics. Recently, tensions with standard model predictions have been uncovered in several experimental observables in b-hadron decays at LHCb. I will discuss the data, possible implications, and the connection with other experimental programs such as study of kaon rare decays and neutrino mixing and CP violation

  5. SEP

    29

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "QCD on a small circle"

    Presented by Aleksey Cherman, University of Washington

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 29, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    Recent developments have shown that QCD-like theories can be engineered to remain in a confined phase when compactified on an arbitrarily small circle, where their features may be studied quantitatively in a controlled fashion. I'll explain how a non-perturbative mass gap and chiral symmetry breaking, which are both historically viewed as prototypical strong coupling effects, appear from systematic weak-coupling calculations. Then I'll describe the rich spectrum of hadronic states, including glueball, meson, and baryon resonances in the calculable small-circle context.

  6. SEP

    29

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Latest Results from the T2K Experiment"

    Presented by Kendall Mahn, Michigan State University

    3:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 29, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    One of the most promising investigations of beyond-the-Standard-Model physics has been the study of neutrino oscillation, that is, the conversion of neutrinos from one flavor to another as they propagate. While neutrino oscillation is studied in a wide variety of experiments, accelerator based experiments, such as T2K, use a muon neutrino or antineutrino beam as a source to look for electron (anti)neutrino appearance, muon neutrino disappearance. The source also is used to make measurements of neutrino interactions and search for exotic physics. This talk will describe a recent analysis of both neutrino and antineutrino beam data from T2K. Comparisons between neutrino and antineutrino event rates provide a tantalizing window on possible CP violation in the neutrino sector. The talk will also highlight the increasingly important role of systematic uncertainty assessment for T2K and other future measurements of CP violation with accelerator beams.

  7. OCT

    4

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Wolfgang Altmannshofer, Cincinnati University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 4, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  8. OCT

    5

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Michael White, BNL/Stony Brook U Chemistry

    2:45 pm, Bldg. 735, Seminar Room 2nd Floor

    Thursday, October 5, 2017, 2:45 pm

    Hosted by: 'Mircea Cotlet'

  9. OCT

    11

    Wednesday

    BWIS Sponsored Event

    "BWIS general meeting"

    12 pm, RSB Conf. Rm. 1 & 2 (Bldg. 400)

    Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 12:00 pm

    Come meet the FY2018 BWIS Executive Board to voice your concerns, learn about our future events and volunteer opportunities. We hope to see you there and bring a friend! Brookhaven Women in Science is a diverse and inclusive community that promotes equal opportunity and advancement for all women in support of world-class science. BWIS is a volunteer-run 501(c)(3) non-profit funded by BSA and membership dues. If you have any questions, please email wenhu@bnl.gov.

  10. OCT

    11

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar (at Stony Brook)"

    Presented by Chang Feng, UC Irvine

    1:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Neelima Sehgal'

  11. OCT

    11

    Wednesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "The Warped Universe - The One Hundred Year Quest to discover Einstein's gravitational waves"

    Presented by Dr. Nergis Mavalvala, Marble Prof. of Astrophysics, MIT

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Peter Wanderer''

    In 2016, scientists announced the first ever detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes, launching a new era of gravitational wave astrophysics. Since then there have been a couple more detections. Gravitational waves were predicted by Einstein a hundred years earlier. I will describe the science, technology, and human story behind these discoveries that provide a window into some of the most violent and warped events in the Universe.

  12. OCT

    12

    Thursday

    NSLS-II Colloquium Series

    "From single atom magnets to ultrafast switching: Insights from x-ray absorption spectroscopy and microscopy"

    Presented by Pietro Gambardella, Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Switzerland

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 12, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''''John Hill'''''

    What is the smallest possible size of a magnet? How fast can we switch the magnetization of a thin film? The answer to these simple questions reveals a fascinating world of interactions, which are largely dominated by interface effects. Understanding and controlling such interactions opens new perspectives for classical and quantum data processing technologies at the microscopic scale. Synchrotron radiation measurements exploiting x-ray dichroism at the L- and M-edges of the transition metal and lanthanide elements, respectively, provide a unique spectroscopic and microscopic tool to link the nanoscale properties of matter to the magnetic behavior of different classes of materials. In this talk, I will describe our studies of the evolution of magnetism from single atoms to nanoparticles and molecular magnets [1-4], focusing on the conditions required to achieve magnetic bistability in small systems [5,6]. I will further report on recent efforts to induce magnetization switching using electrical currents in materials characterized by strong spin-orbit interactions [7,8]. Current pump/x-ray probe experiments reveal the mechanism and time scale of magnetization reversal induced by the spin–orbit torques and spin Hall effect in thin film heterostructures, which has applications in ultrafast magnetic random access memories with high endurance [9,10]. [1] P. Gambardella et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 047202 (2002). [2] P. Gambardella et al., Science 300, 1130 (2003). [3] P. Gambardella et al., Nature Mater. 8, 189 (2009). [4] S. Stepanow et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 5451 (2014). [5] I. G. Rau et al., Science 344, 988 (2014). [6] F. Donati et al., Science 352, 318 (2016). [7] I. M. Miron et al., Nature 476, 189 (2011). [8] K. Garello et al., Nature Nanotech. 8, 587 (2013). [9] M. Baumgartner et al., Nature Nanotech., in press (2017). [10] G. Prenat et al., IEEE Transactions on Multi-Scale Computing 2, 149 (2016).

  13. OCT

    12

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, October 12, 2017, 6:30 pm

  14. OCT

    13

    Friday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Continuously operated Time Projection Chamber with GEM readout – an upgrade of the ALICE TPC"

    Presented by Piotr Gasik, CERN

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Friday, October 13, 2017, 2:30 pm

    A large Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device for tracking and charged particle identification in the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. After the second long shutdown in 2019/20, the LHC will deliver Pb beams colliding at an interaction rate of about 50 kHz, which is about a factor of 50 above the present read-out rate of the TPC. This will result in a significant improvement on the sensitivity of rare probes that are considered key observables to characterize the QCD matter created in such collisions. In order to make full use of this luminosity, a major upgrade of the TPC is required. Since the TPC drift time of 100 μs is 5 times longer than the average time between interactions, the presently employed gating of the TPC wire chambers must be abandoned and continuously operated readout detectors using GEMs will be implemented. To fulfill the challenging requirements of the upcoming upgrade, a novel configuration of GEM detectors has been developed. It allows to maintain excellent particle identification and efficient ion trapping by stacking four GEM foils operated under specific field configuration. Results of an extensive R&D program concerning ion backflow suppression, dE/dx resolution and stability against discharges will be presented. The status of the upgrade of the online calibration and data reduction system, as well as the development of a new readout electronics will be reported. We will also discuss the ongoing detector production.

  15. OCT

    16

    Monday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Domain walls and phase boundaries - new nanoscale functional elements in complex oxides"

    Presented by Jan Seidel, UNSW Sydney

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 480, Conference Room

    Monday, October 16, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Yimei Zhu''

    Topological structures in functional materials, such as domain walls and skyrmions, see increased attention due to their properties that can be completely different from that of the parent bulk material [1]. I will discuss recent results on multiferroic phase boundaries, domain walls in BiFeO3 [2, 3, 4, 5, 6] using SPM, TEM and ab-initio theory, and discuss future prospects [7]. References [1] J. Seidel (ed.), Topological structures in ferroic materials: domain walls, skyrmions and vortices, ISBN: 978-3-319-25299-5, Springer, Berlin (2016) [2] P. Sharma, et al., Scientific Reports 6, 32347 (2016) [3] P. Sharma, et al., Advanced Electronic Materials 2, 1600283 (2016) [3] J. Seidel, et al., Advanced Materials 26, 4376 (2014) [4] Y. Heo, et al., Advanced Materials 26, 7568 (2014) [5] Y. Heo et al., ACS Nano, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.6b07869 (2017) [6] P. Sharma, et al., Advanced Materials Interfaces 3, 1600033 (2016) [7] J. Seidel, Nature Nanotechnology 10, 190 (2015)

  16. OCT

    16

    Monday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "The R&D and Mass Production of 20"MCP-PMT for Neutrino Detection"

    Presented by Dr. Sen Qian, IHEP China

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, October 16, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Researchers at IHEP, Beijing have conceived a new concept of MCP-PMT several years ago. The small MCP (Microchannel Plate) units replace the bulky Dynode chain in the tranditional large PMTs for better photoelectron detection. After three years R&D, a number of 8 inch prototypes were produced and their performance was carefully tested at IHEP in 2013 by using the MCP-PMT evaluation system built at IHEP. The 20 inch prototypes were followed in 2014, and its' performance were improving a lot in 2015. Compensating the PMT performances with fiducially volume convert all specifications to cost, radioactivity, dark noise, TTS, the JUNO ordered 15000 pic 20-inch MCP-PMT from the NNVT in Dec.2015. In 2016, the MCP-PMT collaboration group finished to build the mass production line in Nanjing at the end of 2016, and finished the batch test system in the same place within 100 days at the beginning of 2017. From 2017 to 2019, all the 20-inch MCP-PMT will be produced and tested one by one in NNVT for JUNO. This presentation will talk about the R&D process and mass production, batch test result of the first 2K pieces of MCP-PMT prototypes for JUNO.

  17. OCT

    17

    Tuesday

    A Celebration of the Career and Accomplishments of Satoshi Ozaki

    "A Celebration of the Career and Accomplishments of Satoshi Ozaki"

    Various, Various

    9:15 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, October 17, 2017, 9:15 am

    Hosted by: ''Doon Gibbs''

    Reception and Dinner following symposium (fee required)

  18. OCT

    18

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "Semileptonic decays of B_(s) mesons to light pseudoscalar mesons with lattice QCD"

    Presented by Zechariah Gelzer, Iowa University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 18, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Mattia Bruno'''

  19. OCT

    18

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Pair creation energy and Fano factor of silicon measured at 185 K using 55Fe X-rays"

    Presented by Ivan Kotov, BNL

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, October 18, 2017, 2:30 pm

    The pair creation energy, w, and Fano factor of silicon were measured using CCD250 and 55Fe X-rays. The measurements were performed at the sensor temperature of 185K. The measured pair creation energy is w = 3.65 +/- 0.009 eV at Mn K_alpha and the Fano factor at this energy is F=0.129 +/- 0.001. We will show that our measurements agree with theory and will be described in detail. The system gain was obtained from flat field exposures using properties of Poisson distribution. The details of our measurement procedure will be presented.

  20. OCT

    26

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Observation of Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering by COHERENT"

    Presented by Kate Scholberg, Duke University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) is a process in which a neutrino scatters off an entire nucleus at low momentum transfer, and for which the observable signature is a low-energy nuclear recoil. It represents a background for direct dark matter detection experiments, as well as a possible signal for astrophysical neutrinos. Furthermore, because the process is cleanly predicted in the Standard Model, a measurement is sensitive to beyond-the-Standard-Model physics, such as non-standard interactions of neutrinos. The process was first predicted in 1973. It was measured for the first time by the COHERENT collaboration using the high-quality source of pion-decay-at-rest neutrinos from the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and a CsI[Na] scintillator detector. This talk will describe COHERENT's recent 6.7-sigma measurement of CEvNS, the status and plans of COHERENT's suite of detectors at the SNS, and future physics reach.

  21. OCT

    27

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search for dark matter at the CMS experiment"

    Presented by Adish Vartak, University of California San Diego

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, October 27, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Alessandro Tricoli''

    There is an extensive, on-going dark matter search program at the LHC that explores several different types of possible interactions between WIMP-like dark matter and standard model particles. The dark matter searches at the LHC are complementary, and in case of certain models, significantly more sensitive than the direct and indirect dark matter searches. In this talk I will discuss several key dark matter searches being pursued by the CMS collaboration. These cover a wide variety of final states in which dark matter particles are produced in association with one or more energetic, visible objects in the detector resulting in 'MET+X' signatures. Furthermore, I will also discuss the constraints set on dark matter interactions by certain resonance searches.

  22. NOV

    1

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 1, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  23. NOV

    2

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "UCNtau: A magneto-gravitational trap measurement of the free neutron lifetime"

    Presented by Robert Pattie, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 2, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    The neutron is the simplest nuclear system that can be used to probe the structure of the weak interaction and search for physics Beyond the Standard Model. Measurements of neutron ?-decay observables are sensitive to scalar and tensor interactions in the weak force which are not present in the Standard Model. The lifetime of the neutron ?n is an important parameter for Big-Bang Nucleo-synthesis models, solar fusion models, and absolute neutrino scattering cross-sections, and can be used to test the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix. Presently, the two typical methods used to measure the neutron lifetime, cold neutron beam measurements and stored ultracold neutron (UCN) measurements, disagree by roughly 4?. This discrepancy motivates the need for new measurements with complementary systematic uncertainties to previous efforts. The UCN? experiment uses an asymmetric magneto-gravitational UCN trap with in situ counting of surviving neutrons to measure the neutron lifetime. Previous bottle experiments confined UCN in a material storage vessel creating a significant correction due to losses resulting from the material UCN interactions. The magnetic and gravitational confinement of the UCN minimizes losses due to material interactions. Additionally, UCN? uses a detection system that is lowered into the storage volume which avoids emptying the surviving UCN into an external detector. This minimizes any possible transport related systematics. This in situ detector also enables counting at various heights in the vessel, which provides information on the trapped UCN energy spectrum, quasi-bound orbits, and possible phase space evolution. I will present the physics motivation for precision neutron physics, a description of the UCN? experiment, the results of data collected during the 2016-2017 accelerator cycle which resulted in a value of τn=877.7±(0.7) stat (+0.3/−0.1) sys in agreement with previous material bottle

  24. NOV

    2

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications of Nanocomposite Coatings with Tunable Properties Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition"

    Presented by Jeffrey Elam, Argonne National Laboratory

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, November 2, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Chang-Yong Nam''

    We have been developing atomic layer deposition (ALD) nanocomposite coatings comprised of conducting, metallic nanoparticles embedded in an amorphous dielectric matrix. These nanocomposite films have proved to be exceptional as resistive coatings in solid-state electron multipliers, as charge drain coatings, and as solar absorbing films in concentrated solar power. All of these applications demand tunable properties so that particular attributes of the film, such as electronic resistivity, can be precisely tailored for maximum efficiency. In our films, the properties are tuned by adjusting the ratio of metallic and dielectric components. For example, nanocomposite films comprised of W:Al2O3 are prepared using alternating exposures to trimethyl aluminum (TMA) and H2O for the Al2O3 ALD and alternating WF6/Si2H6 exposures for the W ALD. By varying the ratio of ALD cycles for the W and the Al2O3 components in the film, we can tune precisely the resistance of these coatings over a very broad range from 1012-105 Ohm-cm. We have used this strategy to synthesize a broad range of ALD nanocomposites combining different metals and dielectrics. These nanocomposite coatings have been utilized to functionalize capillary glass array plates and fabricate large-area microchannel plates suitable for application in large-area photodetectors. In addition, we have applied these films to serve as charge drain coatings in micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) devices for a prototype electron beam lithography tool, and obtained high-resolution electron beam patterns without charging artifacts. We have also used these nanocomposite coatings to infiltrate porous scaffolds resulting in selective solar absorbing coatings with high visible absorption and low IR emittance suitable for power tower receivers in concentrated solar power.

  25. NOV

    8

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Linda Carpenter, Ohio State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 8, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  26. NOV

    9

    Thursday

    Particle Physics - SB/BNL Joint Cosmo seminar (at BNL)

    "Dark Matter Searches with CCDs and the Sensei Experiment"

    Presented by Dr. Javier Tiffenberg, FNAL

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 9, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Erin Sheldon''

  27. NOV

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, November 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

  28. NOV

    14

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Christoph Lehner, BNL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, November 14, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Rob Pisarski''

  29. NOV

    15

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Thomas Appelquist, Yale University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  30. NOV

    29

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  31. DEC

    6

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, December 6, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  32. DEC

    7

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Dmitri Talapin, The University of Chicago, Department of Chemistry and James Franck Institute

    10:30 am, Bldg. 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, December 7, 2017, 10:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Oleg Gang'

  33. DEC

    13

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, December 13, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  34. DEC

    14

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    "Blood Drive"

    9:15 am, The Center Building 30

    Thursday, December 14, 2017, 9:15 am

    Hosted by: 'Long Island Blood Services'

  35. DEC

    14

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, December 14, 2017, 6:30 pm

  36. JAN

    11

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, January 11, 2018, 6:30 pm

  37. FEB

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, February 8, 2018, 6:30 pm

  38. MAR

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, March 8, 2018, 6:30 pm

  39. APR

    12

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, April 12, 2018, 6:30 pm

  40. MAY

    10

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 10, 2018, 6:30 pm

  41. JUN

    14

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 14, 2018, 6:30 pm