BNL Home
February 2016
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

2

  1. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

    "We talk about a phase shift that has taken place over the past few decades at US national labs, in which large-scale materials science accelerators rather than high-energy physics accelerators became marquee projects at most major basic research laboratories in the post-Cold War era, accompanied by important changes in the character and culture of the research ecosystem at these laboratories. We consider some features, periodization, funding, and challenges of this phase shift, known as the "New Big Science."

3

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in.

4

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Hiroshi Ohki

    Hydrodynamics is an effective theory of systems close to equilibrium. It has been applied to description of fireballs created in the heavy-ion collisions. With growing interests in fluctuation of observables, theoretical identification of its origin is crucial. One of such origins is thermal fluctuation required by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. In this talk, I will present a new insight into the thermal fluctuation of hydrodynamics by separating the hard and soft scales in a given background. As an illustration, we adopt the Bjorken expansion as a background. The kinetic description of hard modes allows us simple interpretation of renormalization, long-time tails, and fractional powers of derivative expansion.

5

  1. High Energy Theory

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  2. NSLS-II Friday Lunchtime Seminar Series

    12 pm, NSLS-II 744 (LOB4) rm 156

6

  1. No events scheduled

7

  1. No events scheduled

8

  1. No events scheduled

9

  1. No events scheduled

10

  1. Computational Science Intiative Event

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Kerstin Kleese van Dam

    In this presentation we will describe accurate tools of co-design for Exascale systems and application, centered around modeling of performance and power. Methodologies to be considered, developed in our Performance and Architecture Lab (PAL), are practical, accurate, and allow for the possibility of addressing the problem for full systems and applications. A particular emphasis will be placed on applying models to a variety of design and optimization uses for computing at extreme-scale.

  2. High Energy Theory

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  3. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    We present the first solid state avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) radiation detector optimized for medical imaging applications. Low dose medical x-ray imaging is currently limited by the electronic noise and the limited size of detectors. Our design utilizes a layer of avalanche amorphous selenium called High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) to amplify photogenerated charges prior to electronic readout. A-Se allows for large area, uniform deposition compared to crystalline photoconductors. Additionally, it is the only amorphous material capable of avalanche multiplication (at electric fields > 70 V/um). We have previously developed the first solid state HARP multi layer structure. Our current detector is an indirect sensor referred to as Scintillating HARP Active Matrix Flat Panel Imager (SHARP-AMFPI), which multiplies photogenerated holes produced by the optical photons from a high-resolution x-ray scintillator. A structured 150 um CsI:Ti scintillator coupled to a fiber optic face plate was used to convert x-rays to optical photons. The optical photons are absorbed into the 15 um HARP layer capable of producing reliable and uniform avalanche gain of 75 over the 24 cm x 30 cm active area. The AMFPI consists of a commercial TFT array with an 85 um pixel pitch. For this work we used a 30 kVp Mo/Mo spectrum which is similar to that used for mammography. Images at low exposure levels without avalanche gain are dominated by the electronic noise of the TFT array. Quantum noise limited images are obtained as the electric field is increased above the avalanche threshold.

  4. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

11

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: Cedomir Petrovic

    In two-dimensional superconductors, the transition to the metallic state takes place via thermal unbinding of vortex-antivortex pairs, as described by the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) theory. The occurrence of the BKT transition in bulk underdoped samples of cuprate superconductors, which are highly anisotropic, layered materials, has been controversial. Therefore, the nature of the superconducting transition in highly underdoped thick films of La2-xSrxCuO4 has been investigated using the in-plane transport measurements. Both the temperature dependence of the paraconductivity above the transition and the nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics across it exhibit the main signatures of the BKT transition. Moreover, the quantitative comparison of the superfluid stiffness, extracted from the I-V data, with the renormalization-group results for the BKT theory, reveals a large value of the vortex-core energy, strongly suggesting that the relevant length scale controlling the BKT-like transition in this layered material involves a few coupled layers. Finally, measurements of the fluctuations of the resistance with time (i.e. noise) provide evidence for the critical slowing down of the dynamics and the onset of correlated behavior. The details of the observed dynamical critical behavior of the BKT transition and the role of disorder will be discussed.

  2. High Energy Theory/Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  3. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

12

  1. NSLS-II Friday Lunchtime Seminar Series

    12 pm, NSLS-II 744 (LOB4) rm 156

  2. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  3. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Almost all of the visible matter in the universe is built from hadrons, which are composed of quarks and gluons. One of the main challenges in nuclear physics is to understand this complex internal structure. In this talk, I will discuss how hard-scattering processes that involve the spin of hadrons give us insight into aspects of their inner-workings that otherwise would be inaccessible. I will focus on phenomena that arise when hadrons carry spin transverse to their direction of motion, which allow us to examine them in 3D and analyze correlations between their quarks and gluons. I will also consider a new attempt to resolve the so-called "spin crisis" of how the proton gets its spin by looking at how much spin can be carried by small-x quarks and gluons.

13

  1. No events scheduled

14

  1. No events scheduled

15

  1. No events scheduled

16

  1. FEB

    16

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Oleg Eyser

    Jets produced in the high energy collision of quarks and gluons at colliders are bunches of collimated particles traveling along the same direction. Jet productions are extensively studied in various colliders in search for new physics beyond the standard model and as a probe of new state of matter like QGP. In this talk, I will discuss jet study at a high precision as a new tool to probe strong dynamics in electron-proton collider. As an example, I will show the new tool can be used to determine the strong coupling constant and to improve our understanding of nuclear structure such as a parton distribution function of proton. With new level of precision not previously available for jets, the jet physics will provide one of milestones at the early stage of future Electron-Ion collider.

  2. FEB

    16

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson, there has been a lot discussion about the next step in high energy physics. Among different options, a couple of newly proposed next generation circular colliders, including FCC at CERN and CEPC/SPPC in China, have attracted a lot of attention. Through preliminary studies in the past couple of years, an exciting picture of their physics capabilities has emerged. In this talk, I will give an overview on this topic, focusing on some of the most important questions in high energy physics they can help addressing

17

  1. FEB

    17

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, February 17, 2016, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in.

18

  1. FEB

    18

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    11 am, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, February 18, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Dmytro Nykypanchuk

    The fabrication of nanofibers (diameter from 1- 100 nm) can be accomplished by using a variety of methods, including electro-spinning and a combination of chemical/mechanical processes, especially for cellulose, as a form of green sustainable resource material. Non-woven nanofiber mats have unique properties, such as interconnected pores, a very large surface-to-volume ratio, and a high capacity for surface modifications, making such scaffolds useful for fabrication of high throughput separation membranes. Directed water channels in the barrier layer are formed through the formation of interface between the cross-linked nanofibers and the polymer matrix, while the gap thickness (less than 1 nm) may be regulated by physical interactions or chemical bonding. In the present context, advances in electro-spinning and fundamental studies on cellulose microfibrils (or nanocelluloses) by means of synchrotron x-ray scattering have provided us with new insight to use the fibrous format with varying pore sizes for applications from micro-filtration via ultra-filtration to nano-filtration and reverse osmosis. We have taken advantage of unique breakthroughs in chemical modifications and physical scale-up transformations to drastically improve filtration membrane development with predesigned properties. This technology has led to a revolutionary design of highly permeable filtration membranes with significantly higher flux (or lower energy) than commercial membranes. Biography: Prof. Hsiao served as Chair of the Chemistry Department and held Vice President for Research and Chief Research Officer positions at Stony Brook. His research is focused on the development of new nanostructured polymers for energy, environmental and health applications. Recently, Hsiao and his research team have demonstrated a breakthrough technology using nanofibrous materials, such as natural cellulose nanofibers, for water purification. This technology has led to a

  2. FEB

    18

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, February 18, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Erin Sheldon

    The gas mass fractions and the distribution in mass and redshift of the galaxy cluster population provide powerful probes of cosmology, constraining the cosmic matter density, the amplitude of the matter power spectrum, properties of dark energy, and the mass of neutrinos, among other parameters. Historically, these tests have been limited by the absolute accuracy of cluster mass determinations. Here, mass measurements from weak lensing have an advantage over estimates based on observations of the intracluster medium (ICM), because the former are nearly unbiased and can be straightforwardly tested against simulations. I will describe recent cosmological constraints obtained from an analysis of X-ray selected cluster samples, incorporating extensive gravitational lensing data from the Weighing the Giants project — the first cluster cosmology study to consistently integrate a lensing mass calibration, including a rigorous quantification of all systematic uncertainties. The results highlight the power and potential of galaxy clusters, which constrain both the expansion of the Universe and the growth of cosmic structure, and their complementarity with other probes such as type Ia supernovae, large-scale galaxy surveys, and the cosmic microwave background.

19

  1. FEB

    19

    Friday

    Nuclear/Riken Theory Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 19, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Perturbative QCD based on the Parton Model of the nucleon is a very successful theoretical approach to describe high-energy processes at particle accelerators and colliders. In particular, parton distribution functions are key ingredients of this approach and give information on the partonic substructure of the nucleon. As such they deliver a one-dimensional picture of how the parton momenta are distributed in the nucleon. In this talk extensions of the parton model are presented which provide access to more detailed information on the dynamics of partons in the nucleon. In particular observables involving transversely polarized nucleons are discussed. They can be described in terms of dynamical quark-gluon correlations which in turn can be studied at an Electron-Ion Collider. Another extension of the parton model takes into account the intrinsic transverse motion of the partons. In this approach - called Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) factorization - one can study three-dimensional distributions of the parton momenta. In addition, implications of the transverse motion of gluons in the nucleon will be discussed for LHC physics.

  2. FEB

    19

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, February 19, 2016, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  3. FEB

    19

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 19, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    An ongoing program of evaluating transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) within lattice QCD is reviewed, summarizing recent progress with respect to several challenges faced by such calculations. These lattice calculations are based on a definition of TMDs through hadronic matrix elements of quark bilocal operators containing staple-shaped gauge connections. A parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes serves to cast them in the Lorentz frame preferred for a lattice calculation. Results presented include data on the naively T-odd Sivers and Boer-Mulders effects, as well as the transversity and a worm-gear distribution. Correlating quark transverse momentum with impact parameter, one can extract quark orbital angular momentum directly,including both the Ji as well as the Jaffe-Manohar definitions.

20

  1. No events scheduled

21

  1. No events scheduled

22

  1. No events scheduled

23

  1. No events scheduled

24

  1. FEB

    24

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in.

  2. FEB

    24

    Wednesday

    HET/YITP Joint Seminar

    2:30 pm, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 2:30 pm

  3. FEB

    24

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 4:00 pm

25

  1. FEB

    25

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, February 25, 2016, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Hiroshi Oki

  2. FEB

    25

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, February 25, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Xin Qian

    Many of particle physics' most interesting observables (neutrinos, dark matter, proton decay) require detectors installed underground. In many cases, the constraints associated with mines—-limited roof spans, limited sites, safety, and excavation costs—- are beginning to limit the scope of our experiments. The energy and chemical industries have 100 years of experience with a different type of underground space: solution-mined salt caverns. These are obtained by drilling into large salt formations and dissolving the salt with water. The caverns obtained can be enormous, deep, stable and above all inexpensive—-but of course they have their own access and pressure constraints. In this talk, I will argue that a wide range of desirable detector technologies, including giant gas TPCs, might be deployed with these caverns. In particular, I will talk about an (untested) TPC gas mixture I devised with these caverns in mind, but which may prove useful in conventional labs too.

26

  1. FEB

    26

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 26, 2016, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Xin Qian

    Beta decay kinematics are, in principle, sensitive to the absolute values of the neutrino masses. Many decades of work with tritium decay have shown m_nu to be in the range 0—2.0 eV; require improvement in spectrometer resolution, statistics, and systematics. The KATRIN experiment will push the limits of classical techniques to reach 0.2 eV sensitivity. The Project 8 is developing what we hope is the next step in beta electron spectroscopy; we can now perform precise electron energy measurements, in-situ in a low-pressure gaseous source, by cyclotron radiation energy spectroscopy (CRES). I will show recent results from the Project 8 prototype, including the first CRES measurements in krypton, and our path to first molecular tritum measurements and to a future large atomic tritium experiment.

  2. FEB

    26

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, February 26, 2016, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  3. FEB

    26

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 26, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    I review the basic ideas of real time formulation of thermal field theory. Then I like to consider the following topics in this formulation: 1) thermal propagator for a scalar field 2) spectral representation of two-point functions for arbitrary fields 3) perturbation expansion 4) one-loop self -energy 5) dilepton production

27

  1. No events scheduled

28

  1. No events scheduled

29

  1. FEB

    29

    Monday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, February 29, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Erin Sheldon

  1. FEB

    16

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Precision Jet Physics to Probe Strong Dynamics"

    Presented by Dr. Daekyoung Kang, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Oleg Eyser

    Jets produced in the high energy collision of quarks and gluons at colliders are bunches of collimated particles traveling along the same direction. Jet productions are extensively studied in various colliders in search for new physics beyond the standard model and as a probe of new state of matter like QGP. In this talk, I will discuss jet study at a high precision as a new tool to probe strong dynamics in electron-proton collider. As an example, I will show the new tool can be used to determine the strong coupling constant and to improve our understanding of nuclear structure such as a parton distribution function of proton. With new level of precision not previously available for jets, the jet physics will provide one of milestones at the early stage of future Electron-Ion collider.

  2. FEB

    16

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Physics opportunities at future circular colliders"

    Presented by LianTao Wang, University of Chicago

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson, there has been a lot discussion about the next step in high energy physics. Among different options, a couple of newly proposed next generation circular colliders, including FCC at CERN and CEPC/SPPC in China, have attracted a lot of attention. Through preliminary studies in the past couple of years, an exciting picture of their physics capabilities has emerged. In this talk, I will give an overview on this topic, focusing on some of the most important questions in high energy physics they can help addressing

  3. FEB

    17

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, February 17, 2016, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in.

  4. FEB

    18

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Breakthrough water filtration membrane technology based on nanofibers"

    Presented by Ben Hsiao, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, Co-founding Director, Innovative Global Energy Solutions Center, Director, Center for Advanced Technology in Integrated Electric Energy Systems, Stony Brook University

    11 am, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, February 18, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Dmytro Nykypanchuk

    The fabrication of nanofibers (diameter from 1- 100 nm) can be accomplished by using a variety of methods, including electro-spinning and a combination of chemical/mechanical processes, especially for cellulose, as a form of green sustainable resource material. Non-woven nanofiber mats have unique properties, such as interconnected pores, a very large surface-to-volume ratio, and a high capacity for surface modifications, making such scaffolds useful for fabrication of high throughput separation membranes. Directed water channels in the barrier layer are formed through the formation of interface between the cross-linked nanofibers and the polymer matrix, while the gap thickness (less than 1 nm) may be regulated by physical interactions or chemical bonding. In the present context, advances in electro-spinning and fundamental studies on cellulose microfibrils (or nanocelluloses) by means of synchrotron x-ray scattering have provided us with new insight to use the fibrous format with varying pore sizes for applications from micro-filtration via ultra-filtration to nano-filtration and reverse osmosis. We have taken advantage of unique breakthroughs in chemical modifications and physical scale-up transformations to drastically improve filtration membrane development with predesigned properties. This technology has led to a revolutionary design of highly permeable filtration membranes with significantly higher flux (or lower energy) than commercial membranes. Biography: Prof. Hsiao served as Chair of the Chemistry Department and held Vice President for Research and Chief Research Officer positions at Stony Brook. His research is focused on the development of new nanostructured polymers for energy, environmental and health applications. Recently, Hsiao and his research team have demonstrated a breakthrough technology using nanofibrous materials, such as natural cellulose nanofibers, for water purification. This technology has led to a

  5. FEB

    18

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Weighing the Giants: Anchoring Cluster Cosmology"

    Presented by Adam Mantz, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, February 18, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Erin Sheldon

    The gas mass fractions and the distribution in mass and redshift of the galaxy cluster population provide powerful probes of cosmology, constraining the cosmic matter density, the amplitude of the matter power spectrum, properties of dark energy, and the mass of neutrinos, among other parameters. Historically, these tests have been limited by the absolute accuracy of cluster mass determinations. Here, mass measurements from weak lensing have an advantage over estimates based on observations of the intracluster medium (ICM), because the former are nearly unbiased and can be straightforwardly tested against simulations. I will describe recent cosmological constraints obtained from an analysis of X-ray selected cluster samples, incorporating extensive gravitational lensing data from the Weighing the Giants project — the first cluster cosmology study to consistently integrate a lensing mass calibration, including a rigorous quantification of all systematic uncertainties. The results highlight the power and potential of galaxy clusters, which constrain both the expansion of the Universe and the growth of cosmic structure, and their complementarity with other probes such as type Ia supernovae, large-scale galaxy surveys, and the cosmic microwave background.

  6. FEB

    19

    Friday

    Nuclear/Riken Theory Seminar

    "The Transverse Structure of the Nucleon"

    Presented by Marc Schlegel, University of Tuebingen

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 19, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Perturbative QCD based on the Parton Model of the nucleon is a very successful theoretical approach to describe high-energy processes at particle accelerators and colliders. In particular, parton distribution functions are key ingredients of this approach and give information on the partonic substructure of the nucleon. As such they deliver a one-dimensional picture of how the parton momenta are distributed in the nucleon. In this talk extensions of the parton model are presented which provide access to more detailed information on the dynamics of partons in the nucleon. In particular observables involving transversely polarized nucleons are discussed. They can be described in terms of dynamical quark-gluon correlations which in turn can be studied at an Electron-Ion Collider. Another extension of the parton model takes into account the intrinsic transverse motion of the partons. In this approach - called Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) factorization - one can study three-dimensional distributions of the parton momenta. In addition, implications of the transverse motion of gluons in the nucleon will be discussed for LHC physics.

  7. FEB

    19

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    "Uses of Vector-like fermions"

    Presented by Sally Dawson, BNL

    12:15 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, February 19, 2016, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  8. FEB

    19

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Lattice QCD investigations of quark transverse momentum in hadrons"

    Presented by Michael Engelhardt, New Mexico State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 19, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    An ongoing program of evaluating transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) within lattice QCD is reviewed, summarizing recent progress with respect to several challenges faced by such calculations. These lattice calculations are based on a definition of TMDs through hadronic matrix elements of quark bilocal operators containing staple-shaped gauge connections. A parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes serves to cast them in the Lorentz frame preferred for a lattice calculation. Results presented include data on the naively T-odd Sivers and Boer-Mulders effects, as well as the transversity and a worm-gear distribution. Correlating quark transverse momentum with impact parameter, one can extract quark orbital angular momentum directly,including both the Ji as well as the Jaffe-Manohar definitions.

  9. FEB

    24

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in.

  10. FEB

    24

    Wednesday

    HET/YITP Joint Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by David Kaplan, JHU

    2:30 pm, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 2:30 pm

  11. FEB

    24

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "512th Brookhaven Lecture: Swagato Mukherjee"

    Presented by Swagato Mukherjee, Physics Department at Brookhaven Lab

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, February 24, 2016, 4:00 pm

  12. FEB

    25

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Takaya Miyamoto, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, February 25, 2016, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Hiroshi Oki

  13. FEB

    25

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Giant detectors in solution-mined salt caverns"

    Presented by Prof. Ben Monreal, UC Santa Barbara

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, February 25, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Xin Qian

    Many of particle physics' most interesting observables (neutrinos, dark matter, proton decay) require detectors installed underground. In many cases, the constraints associated with mines—-limited roof spans, limited sites, safety, and excavation costs—- are beginning to limit the scope of our experiments. The energy and chemical industries have 100 years of experience with a different type of underground space: solution-mined salt caverns. These are obtained by drilling into large salt formations and dissolving the salt with water. The caverns obtained can be enormous, deep, stable and above all inexpensive—-but of course they have their own access and pressure constraints. In this talk, I will argue that a wide range of desirable detector technologies, including giant gas TPCs, might be deployed with these caverns. In particular, I will talk about an (untested) TPC gas mixture I devised with these caverns in mind, but which may prove useful in conventional labs too.

  14. FEB

    26

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Project 8: tritium decays, neutrino masses, and single-electron spectroscopy"

    Presented by Prof. Ben Monreal, UC Santa Barbara

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 26, 2016, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Xin Qian

    Beta decay kinematics are, in principle, sensitive to the absolute values of the neutrino masses. Many decades of work with tritium decay have shown m_nu to be in the range 0—2.0 eV; require improvement in spectrometer resolution, statistics, and systematics. The KATRIN experiment will push the limits of classical techniques to reach 0.2 eV sensitivity. The Project 8 is developing what we hope is the next step in beta electron spectroscopy; we can now perform precise electron energy measurements, in-situ in a low-pressure gaseous source, by cyclotron radiation energy spectroscopy (CRES). I will show recent results from the Project 8 prototype, including the first CRES measurements in krypton, and our path to first molecular tritum measurements and to a future large atomic tritium experiment.

  15. FEB

    26

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    "Ideas about SM EFT in the top-quark sector"

    Presented by Cen Zhang, BNL

    12:15 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, February 26, 2016, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: Christoph Lehner

  16. FEB

    26

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Real time method of thermal field theory"

    Presented by Samir Mallik, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 26, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    I review the basic ideas of real time formulation of thermal field theory. Then I like to consider the following topics in this formulation: 1) thermal propagator for a scalar field 2) spectral representation of two-point functions for arbitrary fields 3) perturbation expansion 4) one-loop self -energy 5) dilepton production

  17. FEB

    29

    Monday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBD"

    Presented by Sergey Klimenko, University of Florida

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, February 29, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Erin Sheldon

  18. MAR

    1

    Tuesday

    African American Affinity Group meeting (AAAG)

    "African American Affinity Group Meeting"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room D

    Tuesday, March 1, 2016, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: BERA African American Affinity Group

    Monthly AAAG Group Meeting

  19. MAR

    2

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 2, 2016, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in.

  20. MAR

    2

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Stefan Prestel, SLAC

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 2, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Cen Zhang

  21. MAR

    3

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Niklas Mueller, University of Heidelberg

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, March 3, 2016, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

  22. MAR

    5

    Saturday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2016 Middle School Science Bowl"

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Saturday, March 5, 2016, 8:00 am

  23. MAR

    9

    Wednesday

    RBRC Workshop on Lattice Guage Theories 2016

    9 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 9, 2016, 9:00 am

  24. MAR

    9

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 9, 2016, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in.

  25. MAR

    10

    Thursday

    RBRC Workshop on Lattice Gauge Theories 2016

    9 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 10, 2016, 9:00 am

  26. MAR

    10

    Thursday

    Computational Science Intiative Event

    "Exploring the Scientific and Technical Information and Data Needs Of Researchers and DOE"

    9 am, Location to be determined

    Thursday, March 10, 2016, 9:00 am

    Representatives from the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) will visit Brookhaven National Laboratory on March 10th for a 1-day meeting. OSTI's Mission is to make R&D findings available and useful to Department of Energy researchers and the public to advance scientific discovery and its translation into innovative solutions that will impact society. R&D findings are hereby defined as: Scientific and Technical Information incl. publications, software, data, patents and multi-media material (e.g. video's). This meeting will explore how lab-based scientists use scientific and technical information (STI), data, and supplemental material in the workflow of their research efforts. DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) will describe their role and responsibilities in collecting, preserving, and disseminating STI, as well as specific OSTI tools and services. OSTI will seek to gain a better understanding of the STI and data needs of researchers for the purpose of making OSTI tools and services (and their STI content) more useful and integrated to meet those needs, while fulfilling DOE's public access and dissemination mandates. The meeting will include an overview of OSTI services, followed by a number of dedicated breakout sessions to discuss the requirements of specific science domains: • Energy Sciences Department • Nuclear and Particle Physics Department • Environment, Biology, Nuclear Science & Nonproliferation Department • Early Career Researchers Contact Lauri Peragine, peragine@bnl.gov, Ext. 7090 for details.

  27. MAR

    10

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "New SUSY Results from ATLAS"

    Presented by Max Swiatlowski

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 10, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Michael Begel

  28. MAR

    10

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, March 10, 2016, 6:30 pm

  29. MAR

    11

    Friday

    RBRC Workshop on Lattice Gauge Theories 2016

    9 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 11, 2016, 9:00 am

  30. MAR

    11

    Friday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Michael Tsapatsis, University of Minnesota

    11 am, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Friday, March 11, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Anibal Boscoboinik

    TBD

  31. MAR

    16

    Wednesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "MagLev Competition"

    8:30 am, Brookhaven Center

    Wednesday, March 16, 2016, 8:30 am

  32. MAR

    16

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 16, 2016, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in.

  33. MAR

    16

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Brian Henning, Yale University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 16, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Cen Zhang

  34. MAR

    17

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBA"

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 17, 2016, 3:00 pm

  35. MAR

    18

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Duality, Dimensions and Reduction on the Lattice"

    Presented by Joel Giedt, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 18, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Montonen and Olive found evidence that a duality could exist in Yang-Mills with adjoint scalars. In this scheme, the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole forms a gauge triplet with the photon, leading to a theory equivalent to the Georgi-Glashow model but with magnetic charge replacing electric charge. The duality is believed to be realized in N=4 super-Yang-Mills. We are pursuing numerical, nonperturbative evidence for this S-duality using our lattice formulation. Two lines of approach are being taken, which I will discuss. First, we attempt to show that there is a value of the gauge coupling for which the W boson mass is equal to the monopole mass. Second, we are relating the 't Hooft loop to the Wilson loop at this self-dual coupling. On a somewhat unrelated topic, we also discuss the determination of anomalous dimensions on the lattice. In the dual gravitational picture these correspond to masses of fields in the bulk, so that some aspects of the gauge-gravity duality could be tested by such determinations. In particular in N=4 super-Yang-Mills there are predictions for the dimensions of non-protected operators at the self-dual point, based on the superconformal bootstrap.

  36. MAR

    22

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Guido Martinelli, Rome University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 22, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  37. MAR

    23

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 23, 2016, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in.

  38. MAR

    23

    Wednesday

    YITP/HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jiji Fan, Brown University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 23, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  39. MAR

    24

    Thursday

    Joint RIKEN Lunch/HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Guido Martinelli, Rome University

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, March 24, 2016, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Hiroshi Oki

  40. MAR

    24

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Exotic BSM Higgs Decays and proposed LHC Benchmarks"

    Presented by Shufrang Su

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 24, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Bill Marciano

  41. MAR

    29

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Quark-Gluon Plasma: An Old and New Phase of Quantum Matter"

    Presented by Jinfeng Liao, Indiana University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 29, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

    The use of fire was instrumental for human civilization. Early conception of varied phases of matter as well as transitions among them, perhaps developed from e.g. burning wood and heating water. Those ancient pursuits continue into the modern quest for understanding the structure of matter under extreme conditions: what's the phase of matter when heated to unprecedented temperature? The answer to this question relies upon our understanding of the strong nuclear force, which is described by quantum chromodynamics (QCD). First principle calculations of QCD predict that the normal nuclear matter, when heated to be hot enough, will change into a new phase of matter called the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). In fact, the QGP was an old phase of matter that occupied the early universe shortly after the Big Bang. Today, such primordial droplets of QGP can be re-created repeatedly and measured precisely in relativistic heavy ion collisions (often called the Little Bangs). Remarkable discoveries have been made at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that together reveal the QGP as a nearly perfect quantum liquid with superior opaqueness. We will discuss a number of novel properties of QGP. In particular we will highlight the recent progress on how certain unusual transport phenomena stemming from microscopic chiral anomaly, which is intrinsically quantum mechanical, could manifest themselves in the macroscopic QGP fluid. A very brief survey will be given on the theoretical developments, the experimental search in heavy ion collisions, as well as the recent exciting progress of such physics in Dirac and Weyl semimetals.

  42. MAR

    30

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 30, 2016, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in.

  43. MAR

    30

    Wednesday

    High Energy Theory

    "Pseudo-scalar Higgs Form Factors at 3-loops in QCD"

    Presented by Taushif Ahmed, IMSC, Chennai, India

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 30, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  44. MAR

    31

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Mark Mace, Stony Brook University

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, March 31, 2016, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

  45. MAR

    31

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Milicharge: A Proposal"

    Presented by Ben Kaplan

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 31, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Michael Begel

  46. APR

    5

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Xiangdong Ji, University of Maryland

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 5, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  47. APR

    7

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Matthew Sfeir, Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    11 am, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, April 7, 2016, 11:00 am

    TBD

  48. APR

    7

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Dark Matter Search Results from PICO-2L"

    Presented by Chanpreet Amole, Queen's University, SNOLAB

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 7, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Xin Qian

    New data are reported from a second run of the 2-liter PICO-2L C3F8 bubble chamber with a total exposure of 129 kg-days at a thermodynamic threshold energy of 3.3 keV. These data show that measures taken to control particulate con-tamination in the superheated fluid resulted in the absence of the anomalous back-ground events observed in the first run of this bubble chamber. One single nuclear-recoil event was observed in the data, consistent both with the predicted background rate from neutrons and with the observed rate of unambiguous multiple-bubble neutron scattering events. The chamber exhibits the same excellent electron-recoil and alpha decay rejection as was previously reported. These data provide the most stringent direct detection constraints on WIMP- proton spin-dependent scattering to date for WIMP masses < 50 GeV/c2.

  49. APR

    14

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, April 14, 2016, 6:30 pm

  50. APR

    19

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Dam Thanh Son, University of Chicago

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  51. APR

    26

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Marilena Loverde, Stony Brook University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 26, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  52. APR

    27

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Sunghoon Jung, SLAC

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Cen Zhang

  53. MAY

    3

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Thomas Roser, BNL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 3, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  54. MAY

    7

    Saturday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Science Fair"

    9 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Saturday, May 7, 2016, 9:00 am

  55. MAY

    12

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 12, 2016, 6:30 pm

  56. MAY

    24

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Ralph James, BNL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  57. JUN

    2

    Thursday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Open Space Stewardship Celebration"

    6 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, June 2, 2016, 6:00 pm

  58. JUN

    7

    Tuesday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2016 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, June 7, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Kelly Guiffreda

  59. JUN

    8

    Wednesday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2016 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Wednesday, June 8, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Kelly Guiffreda

  60. JUN

    9

    Thursday

    Annual User' Meeting

    "2016 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    9 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, June 9, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Kelly Guiffreda

  61. JUN

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 9, 2016, 6:30 pm

  62. JUN

    10

    Friday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2016 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 10, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Kelly Guiffreda

  63. JUN

    21

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Mikhail Shaposhnikov, EPFL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 21, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  64. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Larry Weinstein, Old Dominion University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski