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  1. MAY

    29

    Tuesday

    Computational Science Initiative Event

    "CSI Seminar: Rule Enhanced Penalized Regression"

    Presented by Ai Kagawa, Rutgers University

    1 am, Training Room, Building 725

    Tuesday, May 29, 2018, 1:00 am

    Hosted by: Kerstin Kleese van Dam

    We describe a procedure enhancing L1-penalized regression by adding dynamically generated rules describing multidimensional "box" sets. In contrast to prior approaches to this class of problems, we draw heavily on standard mathematical programming techniques, enhanced by parallel computing. Our rule-adding procedure is based on the classical column generation method for high-dimensional linear programming. The pricing problem for our column generation procedure reduces to the NP-hard rectangular maximum agreement (RMA) problem of finding a box that best discriminates between two weighted datasets. We solve this problem exactly using a parallel branch-and-bound procedure or approximately by a greedy heuristic. The resulting rule-enhanced regression method is computation-intensive, but our computational tests suggest that outperforms prior methods at making accurate and stable predictions.

  2. MAY

    30

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Play Group ++ Goin' Quackers w/ Cornell!

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 30, 2018, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: QOL/BERA/Recreation

    Special guests from Cornell Cooperative Extension: GOIN' QUACKERS! Come to Hospitality Coffee & Play Group. Adults socialize, and if you have children, they play.

  3. MAY

    30

    Wednesday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Deep convective outflow, level of neutral buoyancy, entrainment rate and convective core: new insights from space-borne cloud radar observations"

    Presented by Zhengzhao (Johnny) Luo, CUNY

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Wednesday, May 30, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike Jensen

    Level of neutral buoyancy (LNB) is an important parameter for understanding convection because it sets the potential vertical extent for convective development. It can be estimated from the parcel theory using the ambient sounding without having to observe any actual convective cloud development. In reality, however, convection interacts with the environment in complicated ways; it will eventually find its own effective LNB and manifests it through detraining masses and developing cirrus anvils. In a series of recent papers, we investigated the relationship between the LNB and actual deep convective outflow using 5 years of CloudSat observations. Due to entrainment dilution, the actual outflow level is almost always lower than the LNB. The difference between the two can be interpreted as a proxy for entrainment rate. It was found that the entrainment rate as determined this way is larger over tropical ocean (e.g., TWP warm pool) than tropical land (e.g., Africa and Amazon). Analysis of radar reflectivity profiles further shows that land convection has wider and more intense cores than the oceanic counterpart. These findings lend observational support to a long-standing assumption in convection models concerning the negative relationship between entrainment rate and convective core size. Finally, we examined the environment conditions for the observed convection cases and found that convective outflow tends to occur at a higher level when the mid-troposphere is more humid and when convective system size is smaller. Application of similar analysis to ground-based radar observations (such as those from the DOE ARM program) will be discussed. ?

  4. MAY

    30

    Wednesday

    BERA Summer Recreation Camp Applications are Due

    4 pm, Bldg. 400 QOL/BERA/Recreation Office by Badging

    Wednesday, May 30, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: QOL/BERA/Recreation

    BERA Recreation Program Applications

  5. MAY

    30

    Wednesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Open Space Stewardship Program Celebration"

    6 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, May 30, 2018, 6:00 pm

    Hosted by: Melvyn Morris

  6. JUN

    1

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Liouville action, high multiplicity tail and shape of proton"

    Presented by Vladimir Skokov, BNL

    2 pm, CFNS Seminar Room, 2-38

    Friday, June 1, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chun Shen

    In this talk I violate the common wisdom "one seminar — one message" and discuss two seemingly unrelated results in the framework of the dilute-dense CGC approach: the effect of spatial eccentricity of the projectile (proton) shape on the second harmonic in double-inclusive gluon production and the theoretical description of the high gluon multiplicity tail. I will show that these two superficially unrelated results in combination may lead to unexpected consequences for the phenomenology of p-A collisions.

  7. JUN

    4

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2018 DOE/BNL Summer Internship Orientation"

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Monday, June 4, 2018, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Noel Blackburn

  8. JUN

    5

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "How we got the government we have, and why scientists should engage with it"

    Presented by Benn Tannenbaum, Sandia National Laboratory

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 5, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Andrei Nomerotski

    It seems like a terrible time to be a scientist in the United States. Federal budgets aren't being passed, and when they are, funding for science never seems to increase. The debate over immigration reform—including what to do about visas for high-skilled workers, such as scientists—is stalled. Everyone agrees that cybersecurity is a problem, but no one seems to have a solution. Meanwhile, we have no meaningful debate in Congress or in the administration on climate change or energy policy. This lecture will cover how we got here, why we are stuck, some speculation on how the current administration is impacting research, and how the scientific community can impact policy.

  9. JUN

    6

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Play Group

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 6, 2018, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: QOL/BERA/Recreation

    Come to Hospitality Coffee & Play group! Adults socialize, and if you have children, they'll play.

  10. JUN

    6

    Wednesday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Amy M. Heintz, Ph.D., Battelle - Advanced Materials Applications

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Wednesday, June 6, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Matthew Sfeir

  11. JUN

    7

    Thursday

    CFNS Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Markus Diehl, DESY

    4 pm, Building 510, Room 2-38 CFNS Seminar Room

    Thursday, June 7, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Andrey Tarasov

  12. JUN

    11

    Monday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Heterostructures for Nanoelectronics and Photovoltaics"

    Presented by Deep Jariwala, University of Pennsylvania

    1:30 pm, CFN, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Monday, June 11, 2018, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Don DiMarzio & Mircea Cotlet

    The isolation of a growing number of two-dimensional (2D) materials has inspired worldwide efforts to integrate distinct 2D materials into van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures. While a tremendous amount of research activity has occurred in assembling disparate 2D materials into "all-2D" van der Waals heterostructures,1, 2 this concept is not limited to 2D materials alone. Given that any passivated, dangling bond-free surface will interact with another via vdW forces, the vdW heterostructure concept can be extended to include the integration of 2D materials with non-2D materials that adhere primarily through noncovalent interactions.3 In the first part of this talk I will present our work on emerging mixed-dimensional (2D + nD, where n is 0, 1 or 3) heterostructure devices performed at Northwestern University. I will present two distinct examples of gate-tunable p-n heterojunctions.4-6 I will show that when a single layer n-type molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) (2D) is combined with p-type semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (1D), the resulting p-n junction is gate-tunable and shows a tunable diode behavior with rectification as a function of gate voltage and a unique anti-ambipolar transfer behavior.4 The same concept when extended to p-type organic small molecule semiconductor (pentacene) (0D) and n-type 2D MoS2 leads to a tunable p-n junction with a photovoltaic effect and an asymmetric anti-ambipolar transfer response.6 I will present the underlying charge transport and photocurrent responses in both the above systems using a variety of scanning probe microscopy techniques as well as computational methods. Finally, I will show that the anti-ambipolar field effect observed in the above systems can be generalized to other semiconducting heterojunction systems and extended over large areas with practical applications in wireless communication circuits.5 The second part of talk will discuss my more recent work performed at Caltech on photovo

  13. JUN

    12

    Tuesday

    2018 RHIC/AGS Annual Users Meeting

    8:30 am, Bldgs. 510, 555, 488

    Tuesday, June 12, 2018, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: Berndt Mueller

  14. JUN

    13

    Wednesday

    2018 RHIC/AGS Annual Users Meeting

    8:30 am, Bldgs. 510,555,488

    Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: Berndt Mueller

  15. JUN

    13

    Wednesday

    Blood Drive

    9:15 am, Building 30

    Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 9:15 am

    Hosted by: Patricia Edwards

  16. JUN

    13

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Play Group

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 13, 2018, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: QOL/BERA/Recreation

    Come to Hospitality Coffee & Play group! Adults socialize, and if you have children, they'll play.

  17. JUN

    14

    Thursday

    2018 RHIC/AGS Annual Users Meeting

    9 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, June 14, 2018, 9:00 am

  18. JUN

    14

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    9:15 am, Building 30

    Thursday, June 14, 2018, 9:15 am

    Hosted by: Patricia Edwards

  19. JUN

    14

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Doublon-holon origin of the subpeaks at the Hubbard band edges"

    Presented by Seung-Sup Lee, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Germany

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, June 14, 2018, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Andreas Weichselbaum

    Dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) studies frequently observe a fine structure in the local spectral function of the SU(2) Fermi-Hubbard model (i.e., one-band Hubbard model) at half filling: In the metallic phase close to the Mott transition, subpeaks emerge at the inner edges of the Hubbard bands. Here we demonstrate that these subpeaks originate from the low-energy effective interaction of doublon-holon pairs, by investigating how the correlation functions of doublon and holon operators contribute to the subpeaks [1, 2]. We use the numerical renormalization group (NRG) as a DMFT impurity solver to obtain the correlation functions on the real-frequency axis with improved spectral resolution [3]. A mean- field analysis of the low-energy effective Hamiltonian [2] provides results consistent with the numerical result. The subpeaks are associated with a distinctive dispersion that is different from those for quasiparticles and the Hubbard bands. Also, the subpeaks become more pronounced in the SU(N) Hubbard models for larger number N of particle flavors, due to the increased degeneracy of doublon-holon pair excitations. Hence we expect that the sub-peaks can be observed in the photoemission spectroscopy experiments of multi-band materials or in the ultracold atom simulation of the SU(N) Hubbard models. [1] S.-S. B. Lee, J. von Delft, and A. Weichselbaum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 236402 (2017). [2] S.-S. B. Lee, J. von Delft, and A. Weichselbaum, Phys. Rev. B 96, 245106 (2017). [3] S.-S. B. Lee and A. Weichselbaum, Phys. Rev. B 94, 235127 (2016).

  20. JUN

    14

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Jet substructure in ATLAS at the LHC – a tool for discoveries and measurements"

    Presented by Peter Loch, University of Arizona

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, June 14, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) applies jet substructure analysis techniques to extract the internal energy flow in high energy jets produced in the proton-proton collisions in searches for new physics as well as in Standard Model (SM) measurements. In this talk we will introduce the most commonly applied techniques and present an overview of results from the respective performance evaluations. In addition, we will discuss selected configurations of tagging algorithms designed to extract two- or three-prong energy flow patterns inside a jet, as generated by decays of SM particles like the W-boson or the top quark, or possible new heavy particles indicating physics beyond the SM. A brief presentation of recent results from searches and SM measurements, including the recent measurement of the internal structure of light quark and gluon jets, concludes the talk.

  21. JUN

    14

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 14, 2018, 6:30 pm

  22. JUN

    15

    Friday

    2018 RHIC/AGS Annual Users Meeting

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 15, 2018, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Berndt Mueller

  23. JUN

    20

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Play Group

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 20, 2018, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: QOL/BERA/Recreation

    Come to Hospitality Coffee & Play group! Adults socialize, and if you have children, they'll play.

  24. JUN

    21

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Elizabeth Green, Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    9:30 am, ISB Bldg. 734 Seminar Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, June 21, 2018, 9:30 am

    Hosted by: Cedomir Petrovic

    TBA

  25. JUN

    21

    Thursday

    African-American Affinity Group Meeting

    "AAAG General Meeting"

    12:15 pm, TBD

    Thursday, June 21, 2018, 12:15 pm

  26. JUN

    21

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Theories of transport scaling in disordered semimetals and topological spin-nematic excitonic insulators in graphite under high magnetic field"

    Presented by Ryuichi Shindo, Peking University, China

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, June 21, 2018, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Alexei Tsvelik

    In the first part of my talk, I will talk about transport scaling theories in disordered Weyl semimetal [1,2]. In electronic band structure of solid state material, two band touching points with linear dispersion (called as `Weyl node') appear in pair in the momentum space. When they annihilate with each other, the system undergoes a quantum phase transition from Weyl semimetal (WSM) phase to a band insulator (BI) phase. The continuous phase transition is recently discovered in solid state materials [3]. The phase transition is described by a critical theory with a `magnetic dipole' like object in the momentum space. The critical theory hosts a disorder-driven quantum multicritical point, which is encompassed by three quantum phases, WSM phase, BI phase, and diffusive metal (DM) phase. Based on the renormalization group argument, we clarify transport scaling properties around the Weyl node at the quantum multicritical point as well as all phase boundaries among these three phases [1,2]. In the second part of my talk, I will argue that three-dimensional topological excitonic insulator is realized in graphite under high magnetic field [4,5]. Graphite under high magnetic field exhibits consecutive metal-insulator (MI) transitions as well as re-entrant insulator-metal (IM) transition at low temperature. We explain these enigmatic insulator phases as manifestation of excitonic insulator phases with spin nematic orderings ("SNEI" phases). Especially, we explain unusual field-dependences of in-plane resistivity in the graphite experiment by surface transports via 2+1 massless surface Dirac fermion in one of the SNEI phases [4,5]. [1] https://arxiv.org/abs/1803.09051, under review [2] https://arxiv.org/abs/1710.00572, selected as PRB editors' suggestion [3] Tian Liang, et.al., Science Advances, 3, e1602510 (2017) [4] https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.10253, under review [5] in preparation &

  27. JUN

    22

    Friday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Imaging of Local Structure and Dynamics in Hard and Soft Condensed Matter Systems"

    Presented by Dmitry Karpov, New Mexico State University

    11 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Friday, June 22, 2018, 11:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ian Robinson

    With advancement of coherent probes there is a shift from integral studies to highly localized studies in either spatial or temporal domains. Nanostructures and low dimensional phenomena, correlated fluctuations and associated transitions directly benefit from new instrumental capabilities. Studies of ferroelectric and magnetic materials and of their local behavior allow both to test fundamental physics concepts and provide access to technologies with direct practical applications. Topological phase transitions and topological defects are among the topics that are actively pursued in modern materials science. In recent study [1] conducted by our group we were able to visualize three-dimensional topological vortex structure in a volume of individual ferroelectric nanoparticle of barium titanate under external electric field using Bragg coherent diffractive imaging technique. Among other things we observed: (i) electric field induced structural transition from mixture of tetragonal and monoclinic phases to dominant monoclinic phase; (ii) controllable switching of vortex chirality; (iii) vortex mediated behavior of the nano-domains in the particle; (iv) and that the core of the vortex in the volume behaves as a nanorod of zero ferroelectric polarization which can be rotated by external electric field and can serve as a conducting channel for charge carriers. These findings can be used in the design of novel nanoelectronics devices and for creating artificial states of matter. Better understanding of the materials behavior at the nanoscale requires ways of probing anisotropies of the refractive index. Using polarized laser light, we've developed a method [2] termed birefringent coherent diffractive imaging that allows to extract projections of dielectric permittivity tensor in nematic liquid crystal. Further expanding this tool into full-vectorial mode shows that the method can be applied for imaging of magnetic domains, cellular structures, and ot

  28. JUN

    25

    Monday

    Mindfulness Meditation ~ QOL/BERA/Recreation

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Monday, June 25, 2018, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: QOL/BERA/Recreation

    MINDFULNESS & MEDITATION: Berkner Room B at Noon on Monday 5/31 & 6/25. All are invited to workshops to help clear and calm your mind, reduce stress, and enliven your spirit. "Coach" Steve Interrante will teach mindfulness meditation techniques that focus on awareness, intention, breathing, acceptance, and being in the moment to help calm the mind and nervous and circulatory systems. Mark your calendar, as these workshops are being held on Monday's May 31 and June 25 at 488 Berkner Room B.

  29. JUN

    25

    Monday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Fast waveform digitizing for the search of the mu+ -> e+ gamma decay"

    Presented by Stefan Ritt, Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Monday, June 25, 2018, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Martin Purschke

    The search for the lepton-flavor violating decay mu+ -> e+ gamma is both attractive and very challenging. It is complementary to direct searches for New Physics at high energy colliders and has a reach up to several 100 TeV, well beyond any current and future accelerator. The challenge in this search at a level down to 10^-14 with the MEG experiment is the huge background coming from normal muon decays, which requires cutting-edge detector technology and electronics. For this purpose, the Switched Capacitor Array (SCA) chip DRS4 has been developed at PSI, Switzerland. With a sampling rate of 5 GSPS at 12 bits of resolution at a power consumption of 15 mW per channel, this technology allows excellent energy and time resolutions down to a few picoseconds for systems with more than 10,000 channels. I will show results from the MEG experiment and the ongoing work for the MEG II upgrade, which seeks to improve the current limit by one more order of magnitude. It covers the theory behind SCA chips and explains its advantages and limitations. I will show the integration of 9000 channels in the new WaveDAQ system, which is a new crate standard combining the best techniques from VME and xTCA, at a much lower complexity and cost. This includes precision clock distribution down to a few pico seconds, crate management, SiPM bias voltage generation, integrated triggering and data collection.

  30. JUN

    27

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Play Group~Final Before Summer Break for July & Aug.

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group~Final Before Summer Break for July & Aug"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 27, 2018, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: QOL/BERA/Recreation

    Hospitality Coffee & Play Group~Final Before Summer Break July & Aug

  31. JUN

    27

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Johann Brehmer, New York University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, June 27, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy

  32. JUL

    5

    Thursday

    CFNS Seminar

    "Gluon Tomography at Small-x"

    Presented by Feng Yuan, LBNL

    4 pm, Building 510, CFNS Seminar Room, 2-38

    Thursday, July 5, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Andrey Tarasov

  33. JUL

    9

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "High School Research Program Begins"

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Monday, July 9, 2018, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Aleida Perez

  34. JUL

    15

    Sunday

    Summer Sundays

    "Family Fun - Science Learning Center"

    10 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Sunday, July 15, 2018, 10:00 am

    Gates open at 10:00 AM. Last Facility visit begins at 3:00 PM; all activities finish at 4:00 PM All Day:Hands-on family fun at the Science Learning Center where you can use interactive exhibits that demonstrate basic scientific principles. Meet part of the team that helps the Laboratory go and grow safely and see our fire trucks up close at the BNL Fire House! Enjoy a family friendly science talk by Dr. Stephen Schwartz "Energy, CO2, Climate, and You!" at 11 AM, 12:30 PM or 2:00 PM See "The Magic of Energy" Science Show at 12 Noon, 1:30 PM or 3:00 PM

  35. JUL

    19

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Mechanism of strange metal and strange metal state near a heavy fermion quantum critical point"

    Presented by Chung-Hou Chung, Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao-Tung University, Taiwan

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, July 19, 2018, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Alexei Tsvelik

    Strange metal (SM) behaviors with non-Fermi liquid (NFL) properties, generic features of heavy fermion systems near quantum phase transitions, are yet to be understood microscopically. A paradigmatic example is the magnetic field-tuned quantum critical heavy fermion metal YbRh2Si2 (YRS), revealing a possible SM state over a finite range of fields at low temperatures when substituted with Ge. Above a critical field, the SM state gives way to a heavy Fermi liquid with Kondo correlation. The NFL behavior shows most notably a linear-in-temperature electrical resistivity and a logarithmic-in-temperature followed by a power-law-in-temperature in the specific heat coefficient at low temperatures [1]. We propose a mechanism to explain it: a quasi-2d fluctuating anti-ferromagnetic short-range resonating-valence-bond (RVB) spin-liquid competing with the Kondo correlation (Fig. 1) [2]. Applying renormalization group analysis on an effective field theory beyond a large-N approach to an antiferromagnetic Kondo-Heisenberg model, we identify the critical point, and explain remarkably well the SM behavior. Our theory goes beyond the well-established framework of quantum phase transitions and serves as a new basis to address open issues of the non-Fermi liquid behavior in quantum critical heavy-fermion compounds, such as: the strange superconductivity observed in the "115" family CeMIn5 (M=Co, Rh)[3]. References: [1] J. Custers et al., Nature 424, 524 (2003); J. Custers et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 186402 (2010). [2] Yung-Yeh Chang, Silke Paschen, and Chung-Hou Chung, Phys. Rev. B 97, 035156 (2018). [3] Y. Y. Chang,, F. Hsu, S. Kirchner, C. Y. Mou, T. K. Lee and C. H. Chung (un-published).

  36. JUL

    22

    Sunday

    Summer Sundays

    "Exploring the Ultra Small - Center for Functional Nanomaterials"

    10 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Sunday, July 22, 2018, 10:00 am

  37. JUL

    29

    Sunday

    Summer Sundays

    "Brilliant Light, Dazzling Discoveries - National Synchrotron Light Source II"

    10 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Sunday, July 29, 2018, 10:00 am

  38. AUG

    5

    Sunday

    Summer Sundays

    "Atom Smashing Fun with the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider"

    10 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Sunday, August 5, 2018, 10:00 am

  39. AUG

    8

    Wednesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2018 DOE/BNL Summer Internship Poster Session"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, August 8, 2018, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: Noel Blackburn

  40. AUG

    20

    Monday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "Biodesign Under Pressure: 10 Molecules. 90 days. Go."

    Presented by Dr. Benjamin Gordon, Director, MIT-Broad Foundry

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Monday, August 20, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

  41. SEP

    13

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Higgs couplings"

    Presented by Konstantinos Nikolopoulos

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 13, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

  42. SEP

    26

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "Loop-Induced Single Top Partner Production and Decay at the HL-LHC"

    Presented by Jeong Han Kim, Kansas University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, September 26, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Christopher Murphy