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  1. MAR

    25

    Today

    High Energy / Nuclear Theory / RIKEN Seminars

    "Lattice Workshop for US -Japan Intensity Frontier Incubation (1/1)"

    9 am, TBD

    Monday, March 25, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  2. MAR

    25

    Today

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Advancing Self-Assembly Nanoscience Research and Data Analysis Strategies Using X-ray Scattering Beamlines"

    Presented by Yugang Zhang, Photon Science Division, NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    10 am, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Monday, March 25, 2019, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    Self-assembly has spurred a great research interest across different disciplines due to the new fundamental questions it raises as well as the potential for material fabrication. On nanoscale, DNA is a powerful tool allowing the assembly of nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled interparticle distance and specific structural organizations. Synchrotron-based X-ray scattering techniques offer invaluable information to understand the structure and dynamics in such self-assembly systems. In this talk, I will highlight three of my studies, namely, multi-component assembly, dynamic structure control, and NP orientational ordering, as well as demonstrate how to utilize coherent X-ray scattering to advance self-assembly science. First, I will show how to assemble diverse functional NPs into heterogeneous superlattices and elucidate how compositional order, probed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), can be controlled by the design of DNA shells [1]. Second, I will demonstrate the study of reprogramming DNA interactions to selectively transform the structure of NP superlattices on demand. I will detail how the phase transition pathway is disclosed by pair distribution function (PDF) and different types of SAXS correlation techniques based on real-time in-situ measurements [2]. The third topic is focused on developing SAXS modelling and structural visualization, which helps reveal a remarkable parking with a break of orientational symmetry in nanocube superlattices [3]. Additionally, while working at world-leading coherent hard X-ray scattering (CHX) beamline, I have developed advanced and nearly real-time temporal/spatial-correlation techniques [4], which not only highly benefit the user research programs by also open tremendous new research opportunities (grain boundary dynamics, defects/NP diffusion, strain mapping, crack progradation, etc.) in self-assembly science for the future. The developed techniques could also facilitate the in-situ operando explo

  3. MAR

    25

    Today

    Computational Science Initiative Event

    "Quantum Walk Search for the Near Term"

    Presented by Chen-Fu Chiang, SUNY Polytechnic Institute

    10 am, Bldg 725 Training Room

    Monday, March 25, 2019, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike McGuigan

    Grover search is a special kind of quantum walk, not directly applicable to searching a physical database. It has been shown that a database of N items laid out in d-spatial dimensions can be searched in time of order sqrt(N) for d > 2. It has likewise been shown that quantum walk search performs optimally on 3+D dimension search with the quadratic speedup preserved while its performance does not preserve the quadratic speedup in the 1D and 2D grid. This talk will focus on spatial search via quantum walk and will cover (1) recent advances in 2D and 1D search using Lackadaisical quantum walks, (2) a quantum circuit that utilizes the quantum approximate optimization algorithm (QAOA), related to quantum walk, to perform Grover search by replacing the diffusion operator with transverse (local) operators and, (3) possible approaches for dealing with classical data using near-term small quantum devices.

  4. MAR

    25

    Today

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Deep learning at the edge of discovery at the LHC"

    Presented by Javier Duarte, FNAL

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, March 25, 2019, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

    The discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012 opened a new sector for exploration in the standard model of particle physics. Recent developments, including the use of deep learning to identify a complex but common decay of the Higgs boson to bottom quarks, have expanded our ability to study the production of Higgs bosons with very large momenta. By studying these Higgs bosons and measuring their momentum spectrum, we may be able to discover new physics at very high energy scales inaccessible directly at the LHC. I will explain these searches and the direction that deep learning is taking in particle physics, especially how it's changing the way we think about the trigger, event reconstruction, and our computing paradigm.

  5. MAR

    26

    Tuesday

    High Energy / Nuclear Theory / RIKEN Seminars

    "Lattice Workshop for US -Japan Intensity Frontier Incubation (1/1)"

    9 am, TBD

    Tuesday, March 26, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  6. MAR

    26

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Quantum Information Science Landscape, Vision, and NIST"

    Presented by Carl Williams, NIST

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 26, 2019, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Andrei Nomerotski

    The first part of the colloquium will provide an overview of United States government's interest in quantum information science from the National Strategic Overview for Quantum Information Science that established the policy objectives for this administration to the National Quantum Initiative Act that formalizes parts of this strategy for key civilian science agencies. This portion of the talk will conclude with placing the United States strategy in the global context and describe how the United States plans to establish the foundation for the quantum 2.0 economy. The second part of the colloquium will begin with a high-level overview of NIST, of NIST's interest in Quantum Information Science, before talking briefly about some interesting highlights from NIST laboratories. Moving from the highlights, the talk will explore ongoing and future metrological applications followed by some hypothetical conjectures of future technological applications with a focus on how quantum information science and its technology may impact fundamental physics from exploring potential time variation of fundamental constants to future probes of dark matter and gravitational waves.

  7. MAR

    27

    Wednesday

    High Energy / Nuclear Theory / RIKEN Seminars

    "Lattice Workshop for US -Japan Intensity Frontier Incubation (1/1)"

    9 am, TBD

    Wednesday, March 27, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  8. MAR

    27

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Play Group

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 27, 2019, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: QOL/BERA/Recreation

    Come to the Rec Hall Bldg. 317 in the apartment area for coffee & pastry and socializing, and if you have children, they'll play!

  9. MAR

    28

    Thursday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Suffolk Science Teachers Association of New York"

    Dr. Cary Sneider, NGSS Engineering Writing Team Leader & Professor at Portland State University

    7:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, March 28, 2019, 7:30 am

    Hosted by: Bernadette Uzzi

    Annual professional development event for K-12 science teachers. 8:30 - 9:40 am - Keynote Address 9:50 - 2:40 pm - Workshops

  10. MAR

    28

    Thursday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Exploring Structure-Property Relationships Using Synchrotron-Based X-ray Techniques: Organic Semiconductor Case Studies"

    Presented by Jacob Thelen, National Institute of Standards & Technology

    10 am, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Thursday, March 28, 2019, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    Organic semiconductors have been studied extensively in recent decades due to their potential to reduce both the material and production costs of electronic devices. Materials developed for applications such as organic photovoltaics (OPVs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and organic field effect transistors (OFETs) often have similar chemical structures and functionality, and thus can be expected to share similar structure-property relationships. In this talk, I highlight a series of studies where I use and develop synchrotron X-ray techniques to elucidate the morphology of organic semiconducting materials in order to advance our understanding of how nanostructure impacts performance. In the first half of my talk, I will show how wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) can be used to monitor the crystal structure of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), in situ, during electrochemical doping. By simultaneously probing crystal structure and electrochemical performance, a clear picture of the electrochemical doping process in P3HT emerges. The results found for this model P3HT system have been shown to be consistent with several other studies of OFET devices, demonstrating the generalized nature of the doping process. The second half of my talk is focused on developing resonant soft X-ray reflectivity (RSoXR) as technique to probe the through-film structure of organic thin films. I begin by demonstrating how resonant-enhanced X-ray contrast can be utilized to detect phase segregation in thin films of small-molecule/polymer semiconductor blends, which enables their remarkable performance in OFET devices. Next, I discuss how polarized soft X-rays can enable the study of molecular orientation in thin films. Finally, using a small-molecule model system, I demonstrate how polarized-RSoXR can be used to depth-profile molecular orientation, even in amorphous single-component films. Although these studies are focused on organic electronic

  11. MAR

    28

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Large-Scale Drivers And Local Processes Impacts On Post-Cold Frontal Cloud Properties Over The East North Atlantic ARM Site"

    Presented by Jimmy Booth, CCNY

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Thursday, March 28, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike Jensen

    Using observations collected at the ARM Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) site, we examine the relationship between the large-scale environment and the properties of low-level clouds that occur in conditions of subsidence. The cloud boundary cloud properties correlate well with the difference in potential temperature between the 800 hPa level and the surface, a measure of the degree of boundary layer instability. Moreover, consistent relationships are found between near-surface stability, surface energy fluxes, and cloud fraction, optical thickness, and top temperature in various regions of strong post-cold frontal activity. To help understand these mechanisms, we use the Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model to explore post-cold frontal clouds with a case study. The modeled cloud properties are sensitive to the interactions between the shallow convection and the boundary layer parameterizations. We will report how this sensitivity is related to boundary layer decoupling, vertical shear in the horizontal winds at cloud top, and drizzle. We also test the robustness of these conclusions by analyzing a perturbed initial conditions ensemble using WRF. A comparison of the perturbed physics and the perturbed initial condition ensembles explores the relative impact of circulation changes and physical processes on low-level cloud in the model.

  12. MAR

    29

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussion

    "TBA"

    Presented by Dr Gopolang Mohlabeng, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, March 29, 2019, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Denton

  13. MAR

    29

    Friday

    NT/RIKEN Seminar

    "Toward a unified description of both low and high ptparticle production in high energy collisions"

    Presented by Jamal Jalilian-Marian, Baruch College, City University of New York

    2 pm, Building 510, CFNS Seminar Room 2-38

    Friday, March 29, 2019, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Niklas Mueller

    Inclusive particle production at high p_t is successfully described by perturbative QCD using collinear factorization formalism with DGLAP evolution of the parton distribution functions. This formalism breaks down at small Bjorken x (high energy) due to high gluon density (gluon saturation) effects. The Color Glass Condensate (CGC) formalism is an effective action approach to particle production at small Bjorken x (low p_t) which includes gluon saturation. The CGC formalism nevertheless breaks down at intermediate/large Bjorken x, corresponding to the high p_t kinematic region in high energy collisions. Here we describe the first steps taken towards the derivation of a new formalism, with the ultimate goal of having a unified formalism for particle production at both low and high p_t in high energy hadronic/heavy ion collisions.

  14. APR

    3

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Raza Sufian, Jefferson Lab

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 3, 2019, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Aaron Meyer

  15. APR

    3

    Wednesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Prospects on nucleon tomography"

    Presented by Herve Moutard, Université Paris-Saclay

    3 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 3, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Salvatore Fazio

    Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the three-dimensional quark and gluon structure of the nucleon. In particular the concept of Generalized Parton Distributions promises an understanding of the generation of the charge, spin, and energy-momentum structure of the nucleon by its fundamental constituents. Forthcoming measurements with unprecedented accuracy at Jefferson Lab and at a future electron-ion collider will presumably challenge our quantitative description of the three-dimensional structure of hadrons. To fully exploit these future experimental data, new tools and models are currently being developed. After a brief reminder of what make Generalized Parton Distributions a unique tool to understand the nucleon structure, we will discuss the constraints provided by the existing measurements and review recent theoretical developments. We will explain why these developments naturally fit in a versatile software framework, named PARTONS, dedicated to the phenomenology and theory of GPDs.

  16. APR

    4

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "How Long Does Anthropogenic CO2 Stay in the Atmosphere?"

    Presented by Stephen Schwartz, Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Thursday, April 4, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike Jensen

    Knowledge of the adjustment time of anthropogenic CO2, the e-folding time by which excess CO2 (above preindustrial) would decrease in the absence of anthropogenic emissions, is central to understanding the influence of anthropogenic CO2 on climate change and to prospective control of CO2 emissions to reach desired targets. Estimates of this adjustment time from current carbon-cycle models range from about 100 years to over 700 years. This talk examines the CO2 budget by a top-down, observationally based approach. Major stocks and fluxes are quantified. The net flux from the atmosphere and the ocean mixed layer, which are in near equilibrium, to the deep ocean and terrestrial biosphere is found to be proportional to the excess CO2 in these compartments throughout the Anthropocene. These observations, together with knowledge of the underlying physical and chemical processes, are used to develop a simple, transparent model that describes the transport of CO2 between major compartments — the atmosphere, the mixed-layer ocean, the deep ocean, and the terrestrial biosphere. This model compares well with observed atmospheric CO2 from 1750 to the present. The adjustment time of excess CO2, evaluated by multiple measures including the 1/e decay time and the negative inverse of the fractional annual transfer rate of excess CO2 into the terrestrial biosphere and the deep ocean, is found to be 54 ± 10 years. Such a short adjustment time, if correct, would mean that the atmospheric amount of CO2 would respond quickly and strongly to emission changes. For example, atmospheric CO2 could be immediately stabilized at its present value by decreasing anthropogenic emissions by about 50%.

  17. APR

    4

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Markus Holzmann, Laboratoire de Physique et Modélisation des Milieux Condensés

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, April 4, 2019, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Konik

    TBD

  18. APR

    5

    Friday

    NT / RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Paolo Bedaque, U Maryland

    2 pm, Buidling 510, CFNS Seminar Room 2-38

    Friday, April 5, 2019, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Niklas Mueller

  19. APR

    7

    Sunday

    Easter Bunny & Egg Hunt Party w/ the Easter Bunny!

    9:30 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Sunday, April 7, 2019, 9:30 am

    Hosted by: QOL/BERA/Recreation

    Join QOL/BERA/Recreation on April 7, 2019 from 9:30am-12:00pm @ The Rec. Hall - Bldg. 317. Egg hunt begins at 11:15am. Special appearance by THE EASTER BUNNY. Bagels and beverages included. Please bring a breakfast treat to share. Sign up with the BERA store is preferred. ex. 3347.

  20. APR

    9

    Tuesday

    High Energy Theory Seminar

    "Dark matter - or what?"

    Presented by Sabine Hossenfelder, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Germany

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 9, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Berndt Mueller

    In this talk I will explain (a) what observations speak for the hypothesis of dark matter, (b) what observations speak for the hypothesis of modified gravity, and (c) why it is a mistake to insist that either hypothesis on its own must explain all the available data. The right explanation, I will argue, is instead a suitable combination of dark matter and modified gravity, which can be realized by the idea that dark matter has a super fluid phase.

  21. APR

    9

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Why Women Get Fewer Citations"

    Presented by Sabine Hossenfelder, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Germany

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 9, 2019, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Berndt Mueller

    I will talk about the results of a citation analysis on publication data from the arXiv and inspire in which we explored gender differences. I will further explain how we can use bibliometric analysis to improve the efficiency of knowledge discovery.

  22. APR

    9

    Tuesday

    BWIS Sponsored Event

    "How Beauty leads Physics Astray"

    Presented by Sabine Hossenfelder, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Germany

    5 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 9, 2019, 5:00 pm

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    To develop fundamentally new laws of nature, theoretical physicists often rely on arguments from beauty. Simplicity and naturalness in particular have been strongly influential guides in the foundations of physics ever since the development of the standard model of particle physics. In this lecture I argue that arguments from beauty have led the field into a dead end and discuss what can be done about it.

  23. APR

    10

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "The Search for the dark vector boson"

    Presented by Diallo Boye, BNL

    4 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 10, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricolli

    Hidden sector or dark sector states appear in many extensions to the Standard Model, to provide a particle candidate for dark matter in universe or to explain astrophysical observations such the as positron excess observed in the cosmic radiation flux. A hidden or dark sector can be introduced with an additional U(1)d dark gauge symmetry. The discovery of the Higgs boson during Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider opens a new and rich experimental program based on the Higgs Portal. This discovery route uses couplings to the dark sector at the Higgs level, which were not experimentally accessible before. These searches use the possible exotic decays: H -> Z Zd -> 4l and H -> Zd Zd -> 4l. Here Zd is a dark vector boson. We have experience of this search from the Run 1 period of the LHC using the ATLAS detector at CERN. These results showed (tantalizingly) two signal events where none were expected, so that in the strict criteria of High Energy Physics, the result was not yet statistically significant. The Run 1 analysis for 8 TeV collision energy is further developed in Run 2 with 13 TeV collision energy, to expand the search area, take advantage of higher statistics, a higher Higgs production cross section, and substantially better performance of the ATLAS detector. The analysis is extended to search for heavier scalars decaying to dark vector bosons.

  24. APR

    11

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Xiahong Liu, Univ. Wyoming

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, April 11, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Damao Zhang

  25. APR

    11

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Tailoring electronic and thermal properties of bulk Cu26T2(Ge,Sn)6S32 colusite through defects engineering and functionalization of the conductive network"

    Presented by Emmanuel Guilmeau, CRISMAT Laboratory, Caen, France

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, April 11, 2019, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Qiang Li

    A complete study of the structure and thermoelectric properties of colusite Cu26T2(Ge,Sn)6S32 (T = V, Cr, Mo, W) is presented. A brief introduction provides a state-of-theart/survey of thermoelectric sulfides, with a special focus on the structural features and transport properties relationship in Cu-based sulfides. In the first part of this presentation, we highlight the key role of the densification process on the formation of short-to-medium range structural defects in Cu26V2Sn6S32 [1]. A simple and powerful way to adjust carrier concentration combined with enhanced phonon scattering through point defects and disordered regions is described. By combining experiments with band structure and phonons calculations, we elucidate, for the first time, the underlying mechanisms at the origin of the intrinsically low thermal conductivity in colusite samples as well as the effect of S vacancies and antisite defects on the carrier concentration. In the second part, we demonstrate the spectacular role of the substitution of V5+ by hexavalent T6+ cations (Cr, Mo and W) on the electronic properties, leading to high power factors [2]. In particular, Cu26Cr2Ge6S32 shows a value of 1.53 mW m-1 K-2 at RT that reaches a maximum value of 1.94 mW m-1 K-2 at 700 K. The rationale is based on the concept of conductive "Cu-S" network, which in colusites corresponds to the more symmetric parent sphalerite structure. The interactions within the mixed octahedral-tetrahedral [TS4]Cu6 complexes are shown to be responsible for the outstanding electronic transport properties. [1] C. Bourgès et al., J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 140 (2018) 2186 [2] V. Pavan Kumar et al., Adv. Energy Mater. 9 (2019) 1803249

  26. APR

    11

    Thursday

    NSLS-II Colloquium

    "NASA's Mars 2020 Mission – First Steps Towards Mars Sample Return"

    Presented by Kenneth Farley, Caltech

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 11, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: John Hill

    Scientists have advocated for the return of samples from Mars for decades. The quest has finally begun in earnest: the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is in the final stages of construction of the Mars 2020 mission. Mars 2020 builds on the highly successful design of the Mars Science Laboratory (Curiosity Rover) and is updated with new landing capabilities, scientific instruments, and a very sophisticated rock sample collection system. Mars 2020's chief goals are to unravel the geology of its landing site, seek evidence of potential Martian biosignatures, and prepare a cache of several dozen samples for possible return to Earth by a future element of a notional Mars Sample Return campaign. NASA recently selected the mission's destination: Jezero Crater. This crater once held a very deep lake comparable in size to Lake Tahoe. Key geologic targets at the site include ancient Martian bedrock, lake sediments and especially a remarkably preserved river delta, and unusual carbonate-bearing rocks possibly precipitated from lake-water. Mars 2020 will launch in the summer of 2020, land on February 18, 2021, and rove the surface for at least two years. I am Project Scientist for Mars 2020 and will describe the goals and development of this mission, and of Mars sample return.

  27. APR

    11

    Thursday

    CAC Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, April 11, 2019, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: Nora Sundin

  28. APR

    12

    Friday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 12, 2019, 3:30 pm

  29. APR

    17

    Wednesday

    CFNS Workshop on Lattice Parton Distribution Functions

    8 am, Building 510, Room 2-38 CFNS Seminar Room

    Wednesday, April 17, 2019, 8:00 am

  30. APR

    18

    Thursday

    CFNS Workshop on Lattice Parton Distribution Functions

    8 am, Building 510, Room 2-38 CFNS Seminar Room

    Thursday, April 18, 2019, 8:00 am

  31. APR

    18

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Greg Elsasser, NASA GISS

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, April 18, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike Jensen

  32. APR

    19

    Friday

    CFNS Workshop on Lattice Parton Distribution Functions

    8 am, Building 510, Room 2-38 CFNS Seminar Room

    Friday, April 19, 2019, 8:00 am

  33. APR

    19

    Friday

    NT/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Anatoly Radyushkin, ODU/JLab

    2 pm, Building 510, CFNS Room 2-38

    Friday, April 19, 2019, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Niklas Mueller

  34. APR

    24

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Zhen Liu, University of Maryland

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 24, 2019, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Gopolang Mohlabeng

  35. APR

    25

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, April 25, 2019, 11:00 am

  36. APR

    25

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Keh-Fei Liu, University of Kentucky

    12 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, April 25, 2019, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Yuta Kikuchi

  37. APR

    25

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Searching for Higgs Pair Production at the LHC"

    Presented by Elizabeth Brost, Northern Illinois University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 25, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

    Since the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012, the particle physics community at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been hard at work studying its properties, and comparing them to the predictions of the Standard Model (SM), including the couplings of the Higgs boson to itself and to other particles. The Higgs self-coupling can be measured directly in the Higgs pair production process, and will provide insight into the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking. In the SM, the di-Higgs cross section in proton-proton collisions is very small. However, a wide range of beyond-the-SM models predict enhancements to the di-Higgs production rate, which motivates searching for di-Higgs production even now, when the SM cross section is too small to measure in the current LHC dataset. Looking forward, the LHC Run 3 and HL-LHC will bring a new set of challenges, including more proton-proton collisions per bunch crossing. Extracting rare physics signatures from this busier environment will be difficult for the current ATLAS trigger system. In this talk, I will present current and future ATLAS searches for hh production using a variety of final states, and discuss the use of future track triggers in upgrades to the ATLAS trigger system.

  38. APR

    26

    Friday

    CFN Special Colloquium

    "Magnet-free non-reciprocal and topological metamaterials"

    Presented by Andrea Alù, Photonics Initiative, Advanced Science Research Center, City University of New York

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Friday, April 26, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Donald DiMarzio

    In this talk, I discuss our recent research activity in electromagnetics, nano-optics, quantum optics, acoustics and mechanics, showing how suitably tailored meta-atoms and suitable arrangements of them open exciting venues to realize non-reciprocal devices for light, radio-waves and sound, largely breaking Lorentz reciprocity and realize isolation without the need of magnetic bias. Our approaches are based on using suitably tailored mechanical motion, spatio-temporal modulation, and large nonlinearities in coupled resonator systems, and have enabled magnetic-free circulators and isolators for sound, microwaves, THz and optical frequencies, non-reciprocal antennas, emitters and absorbers breaking Kirchhoff's law, self-induced isolation for high-intensities triggered by nonlinearities, and a new generation of topological insulators for light, sound, and static systems in mechanics. In the talk, I will also discuss the impact of these concepts from basic science to practical technology from classical light to quantum optics and computing. Andrea Alù is the Founding Director and Einstein Professor at the Photonics Initiative, CUNY Advanced Science Research Center. He received his Laurea (2001) and PhD (2007) from the University of Roma Tre, Italy, and, after a postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania, he joined the faculty of the University of Texas at Austin in 2009, where he was the Temple Foundation Endowed Professor until Jan. 2018. Dr. Alù is a Fellow of IEEE, OSA, SPIE and APS, and has received several scientific awards, including the ICO Prize in Optics (2016), the NSF Alan T. Waterman award (2015), the OSA Adolph Lomb Medal (2013), and the URSI Issac Koga Gold Medal (2011).

  39. MAY

    1

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by James Wells, University of Michigan

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, May 1, 2019, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  40. MAY

    2

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, May 2, 2019, 11:00 am

  41. MAY

    2

    Thursday

    SB/BNL Joint Cosmo seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Vivian Miranda, University of Arizona

    3 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 2, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chi-Ting Chiang

  42. MAY

    2

    Thursday

    CFNS Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Ulf Meissner, University of Bonn

    4 pm, Building 510, 2-38 CFNS Seminar Room

    Thursday, May 2, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Andrey Tarasov

  43. MAY

    4

    Saturday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Elementary Science Fair Competition"

    9 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Saturday, May 4, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Amanda Horn

  44. MAY

    9

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Katherine Meacham, Univ. of Illinois

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, May 9, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Angie Burnett

    (pending)

  45. MAY

    9

    Thursday

    CAC Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 9, 2019, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: Nora Sundin

  46. MAY

    10

    Friday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Nirmal Raj, Triumf

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, May 10, 2019, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: Gopolang Mohlabeng

  47. MAY

    15

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Junwu Huang, Perimeter Institute

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, May 15, 2019, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Gopolang Mohlabeng

  48. MAY

    16

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Thursday, May 16, 2019, 11:00 am

  49. MAY

    23

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Gretchen Mullendore, Univ. North Dakota

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, May 23, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mike Jensen

  50. MAY

    30

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Date Available"

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Thursday, May 30, 2019, 11:00 am

  51. MAY

    30

    Thursday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Open Space Stewardship Celebration"

    6 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, May 30, 2019, 6:00 pm

    Hosted by: Dr. Mel Morris

  52. JUN

    3

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2019 DOE/BNL Summer Internship"

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Monday, June 3, 2019, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Noel Blackburn

  53. JUN

    6

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Caroline Ross, MIT

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor, Seminar Room

    Thursday, June 6, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chang-Yong Nam

  54. JUN

    12

    Wednesday

    Blood Drive

    9 am, Brookhaven Center

    Wednesday, June 12, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Long Island Blood Services

  55. JUN

    13

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    9 am, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, June 13, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Long Island Blood Services

  56. JUN

    13

    Thursday

    CAC Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 13, 2019, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: Nora Sundin

  57. JUN

    19

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Asher Berlin, SLAC

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, June 19, 2019, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Gopolang Mohlabeng

  58. JUN

    22

    Saturday

    BERA Amateur Radio Club Field Day

    11 am, Gazebo by the ball fields

    Saturday, June 22, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Marc Montemagno

    This event is open to everyone who wishes to experience Ham Radio. We will have at least 3 transceiver stations setup for the purpose of contacting other stations throughout the US and the world.

  59. JUL

    8

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2019 Summer High School Research Program"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Monday, July 8, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Dr. Aleida Perez

  60. JUL

    8

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2019 STEM-Prep Summer Institute"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Monday, July 8, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Dr. Aleida Perez

  61. AUG

    20

    Tuesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    Presented by Professor Sophie Scott, University College London, United Kingdom

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Tuesday, August 20, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  62. AUG

    26

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2019 DOE/BNL Fall Internship"

    8:30 am, The Office of Educational Programs, Bldg. 438

    Monday, August 26, 2019, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: Noel Blackburn

  63. SEP

    5

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    9 am, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, September 5, 2019, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Long Island Blood Services

  64. NOV

    5

    Tuesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Professional Developement Workshops for Teachers - Sci-Ed Day"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Tuesday, November 5, 2019, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: Dr. Aleida Perez