BNL Home
April 2017
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

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  1. Computational Science Initiative Event

    11 am, Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: 'Wei Xu'

    A number of challenges in studying biological systems have arisen over the last decades, related to the complexity of biological data. First, biological systems dynamically change in nature. Second, biological data can feature a broad range of scales. For example, brain activation data may range from the macroscale level to the microscale level. In addition, biological modeling involves multiple models and/or multiple simulation runs. Last but not least, a large number of biological problems contain both spatial and non-spatial features. For example, neuroscientists study brain networks by looking for correlations between brain structures and functional connections. This wealth of data, features, models, and potential hypotheses and experiments exceeds the analytical capabilities of machines. Visualization provides an effective way to help biologists understand, communicate, and gain insight into their biological data through visual analysis and exploration. I have contributed to a survey of visual integration techniques for spatial and non-spatial data in biology, summarized the domain data and tasks in dynamic biological systems analyses, created several innovative visual designs, and developed three visualization applications to those systems, performed in collaboration with domain experts.

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  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Jiangyong Jia'

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions, anomalous chiral effects have been predicted to occur in presence of a strong magnetic field induced by the spectator protons, e.g., the chiral magnetic effect (CME) and chiral magnetic wave (CMW). In the past decade, measurements of CME and CMW have been attempted from RHIC to the LHC energies, where significant signals were found to be in line with expectations of the chiral effects. However, soon after the initial excitement, various sources of background effects were identified and proposed to qualitatively describe the data. The origin of the backgrounds has been extensively studied, but still remains inconclusive to date. Recently, novel collective phenomenon has been found in high-multiplicity pA collisions, similar to those in AA collisions. Due to the weak correlation between the magnetic field direction and the event plane, the high-multiplicity pPb data are expected to have much suppressed CME and CMW signal, comparing to that in PbPb collisions, and thus provide an ideal testing ground to observables related to the anomalous chiral effects. In this talk, I will present new measurements related to the CME and CMW from CMS in pPb and PbPb collisions at the LHC, and discuss their implications to the search for the anomalous chiral effects including an outlook for future studies.

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    12 pm, Physics Bldg 510, Room 2-78

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

5

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. HET Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Amarjit Soni''

    In recent years, a number of interesting signals of potential new physics in semi-leptonic B-meson decays have been reported both by the B-factories as well as the LHCb. In this talk, I will discuss these observations with a particular emphasis on the observable $R_{D^*}$, the ratio of the branching fraction of $\bar{B} \to D^* \tau \bar{\nu}_\tau$ to that of $\bar{B} \to D^* \ell \bar{\nu}_\ell (\ell = \mu, e )$, which shows a 3.3 sigma deviation from the Standard Model prediction. I will present an effective field theory analysis of these potential new physics signals and discuss possible ways to distinguish the various operators.

6

  1. Chemistry Department Seminar

    11 am, Room 300, Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: 'Trevor Sears'

    Carbonyl oxides, known as Criegee intermediates, are reactive radicals formed via alkene ozonolysis that are thought to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry, including reactions that lead to aerosol particle formation. Globally, reaction with water (or water dimer) is thought to be the major sink for formaldehyde oxide (CH2OO), while larger species tend to undergo thermal unimolecular decomposition (Osborn and Taatjes, 2015). However, reactions of CH2OO with trace atmospheric species can be locally competitive under certain conditions. We have applied broadband transient absorption spectroscopy (Foreman et al., 2015) to probe CH2OO via the B-1A′–X-1A′ transition in the near UV to directly measure rate constants for the reactions of CH2OO with inorganic acids and alcohols. Reaction with nitric acid (HNO3) in particular is exceptionally fast, indicating that it may be competitive with water in polluted urban areas, particularly under conditions of lower relative humidity and lower temperature (Foreman et al., 2016). The experimental measurements are supported by complementary ab initio that identify likely products and elucidate mechanistic details.

  2. A Special HET/RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Hiromichi Nishimura''

    At the core of nuclear physics is to understand complex phenomena occurring in the hottest and densest known environments in nature, and to unravel the mystery of the dark sector and other new physics possibilities. Nuclear physicists are expected to predict, with certainty, the reaction rates relevant to star evolutions and nuclear energy research, and to obtain the "standard" effects in nuclei to reveal information about the "non-standard" sector. To achieve such certainty, the field has gradually started to eliminate its reliance on the phenomenological models and has entered an era where the underlying interactions are "effectively" based on the Standard Model of particle physics, in particular Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The few-nucleon systems can now emerge directly from the constituent quark and gluon degrees of freedom and with only QCD interactions in play, using the numerical method of lattice QCD. Few-body observable, such as few-nucleon interactions and scattering amplitudes, as well transition amplitudes and reaction rates, have been the focus of this vastly growing field, as once obtained from QCD, and matched to effective field theories, can advance and improve the nuclear many-body calculations of exceedingly complex systems. This talk is a brief introduction to this program and its goals, with a great focus on the progress in few-body observables from QCD.

  3. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    In this presentation, we discuss recent progress in high channel count data acquisition systems for large experiments. In recent years Nalu Scientific has established a new model for integration of readout electronics with detectors for HEP/NP applications. The most recent work has been involvement in the commissioning of the Belle II Time of Propagation Klong and Muon subdetectors at KEK in Japan. These innovations resulted in modern, modular, compact and high performance readout systems. Nalu Scientific, under multiple SBIR awards, has been working to commercialize these technologies to become available as off-the-shelf products for future experiments. We will cover: 1. Summary of Belle II TOP PID and KLM subdetectors 2. High performance, highly integrated, low cost readout 3. Current efforts in high resolution/ high performance timing 4. Specialized compact readout electronics for SiPMs

  4. CFN Colloquium

    3 pm, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Hosted by: '''''Dario Stacchiola'''''

    Energy is vital to our daily lives. It helps us produce food, fuel transport and power communication channels across the world. Over the coming decades, more people will gain access to energy and enjoy higher standards of living. But these developments could place greater pressure on our world's resources, such as energy, fresh water and food. At the same time, climate change remains a serious concern. At Shell, we use human ingenuity, innovation and technology to unlock the energy our customers need to power their lives in the years ahead, while aiming to limit our impact on the environment. In this seminar we will discuss examples in the area of catalysis that are relevant to meet these challenges in energy. C.V: Carl Mesters joined Shell in 1984 and currently works from the Shell Technology Center in Houston. He has been active in catalysis and process R&D across many areas, including selective catalytic reduction of NOx, ethylene oxide, gas-to-liquids, catalytic dewaxing, aromatic hydrogenation, xylene isomerization, etc. resulting in more than 70 patents filed. In 2005 he was appointed Shell's Chief Scientist for Chemistry & Catalysis. Today's main topics are in 'Gas to Chemicals' and 'long range R&D'. Carl has been Chairman of the Catalysis Society of the Royal Dutch Chemical Society. He holds a degree in Physical and Inorganic Chemistry from the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands, where he also completed a research Ph.D.

  5. Book Swap ~ Monthly

    3 pm, 400 Lobby by Starbucks

    Hosted by: ''QOL/BERA/Recreation''

    Meeting on the first Thursday of each month in 400 Lobby! Bring book to swap, share resources, have conversations about great books you've read, have a coffee, meet others!

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  1. Biology Department Seminar

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: 'Dr. John Shanklin'

    During the past thirty years, the perceived role of lipids has shifted from simple structural components of cell membranes to bioactive molecules that regulate critical cellular and pathological processes. The enzymes that generate and breakdown these bioactive lipids have emerged as novel therapeutic targets for treating the leading causes of diseases in the United States, including cancer. This talk will present new insight into how two key enzymes in sphingolipid metabolism work at the molecular and structural level. These include the colon cancer therapeutic target human Neutral Ceramidase, and the membrane-associated enzyme neutral sphingomyelinase 2, which has established roles in neurodegeneration, metastasis, and intracellular communication.

  2. Chemistry Department Colloquium

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: ''Alex Harris''

    Although organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices have increased in solar harvesting efficiency, there remains much debate surrounding the mechanism by which the active medium absorbs solar radiation and creates high yields of free, mobile carriers that do not immediately recombine. The uncertainty arises from the low dielectric constant of the active material, normally a conjugated polymer and a fullerene, which lack the ability to screen the coulombic interaction between charges. This presentation will discuss the role of charge delocalization on producing a charge-separated state, where the electron and hole are created at a larger distance than that found in a charge- transfer state. It will examine the important role of the solid-state microstructure of the polymer and its impact on delocalizing the hole, and also on the aggregation properties of the electron acceptor and its role on delocalizing the electrons. In addition, the role that time-resolved microwave conductivity (fp-TRMC) plays in helping to unravel this story will be explained.

  3. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Christoph Lehner''

  4. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    In collisions of heavy ions at ultrarelativistic energies, a system of hot and dense strongly interacting matter is created. This matter exhibits a surprisingly strong degree of collectivity, implying a short mean free path of its constituents and, consequently, a small shear viscosity-to-entropy density ratio. This allows to describe the evolution of the system using relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics. Dissipative fluid dynamics can be understood as an expansion around local thermodynamical equilibrium, corresponding to the ideal-fluid limit where dissipative corrections are absent. A short mean free path means that this expansion is well defined and converges sufficiently rapidly. Nevertheless, in the initial stage of a heavy-ion collision, space-time gradients of the fluid-dynamical fields (energy-momentum and net-charge densities) are so large that dissipative corrections to the ideal-fluid limit can become sizable. In this situation, novel approaches to relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics are called for. One such approach is anisotropic dissipative fluid dynamics, which is based on an expansion around an anisotropic non-equilibrium state (instead of local thermodynamical equilibrium, as in conventional dissipative fluid dynamics). In this talk, I present a derivation of the equations of motion of anisotropic dissipative fluid dynamics from the Boltzmann equation, using the method of moments. I also discuss how to resolve an ambiguity to close the system of equations of motion in the case when there are no corrections to the anisotropic state which constitutes the basis of the moment expansion.

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11

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Jin Huang'

    The observation of long range correlations in highly asymmetric systems as in p+Pb and d+Au collisions suggests the creation of a medium with collective behavior. Single particle production has proven to be a valuable tool to probe the quark-gluon plasma formed in heavy ion collisions as it is sensitive to energy loss, modifications of the nuclear wavefunction. It is an open question whether the apparent medium in small-on-large collisions and the QGP in large-on-large collisions is indeed the same, as is the role of the dynamics of the projectile (nucleon) wavefunction. In order to address these questions with a systematic study of highly asymmetric collisions, the RHIC collider provided beams for p+Al, p+Au, d+Au and 3He+Au collisions. The hadron production as a function of transverse momentum (pT) and rapidity can provide us very useful information about the evolution of the initial state and medium formation with system size. We will present the neutral pion and charged hadron measurements at forward, mid- and backward rapidities and discuss the implications of the results.

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    12 pm, Physics Bldg 510, Room 2-78

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

12

  1. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room D

    Come meet the FY2017 BWIS Executive Board to voice your concerns, learn about our future events and volunteer opportunities. We hope to see you there and bring a friend! Brookhaven Women in Science is a diverse community that promotes equal opportunity and advancement for all women in support of world-class science. BWIS is a volunteer-run non-profit funded by BSA and membership fees. If you have any questions, please email agoldberg@bnl.gov.

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  1. RBRC Lunch Seminar

    12 pm, Building 510, Room 1-224

    Hosted by: '''''Robert Pisarski'''''

    We study the behavior of excited charmed and beauty baryonic states within a unitarized coupled-channel theory in matter that fulfills heavy-quark spin symmetry constraints. We analyze the implications for the formation of charmed mesic nuclei and the propagation of charmed and beauty hadrons in heavy-ion collisions from RHIC to FAIR energies.

  2. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: '''Neil Robinson'''

    Advances in light sources and time resolved spectroscopy have made it possible to excite specific atomic vibrations in solids and to observe the resulting changes in electronic properties but the mechanism by which phonon excitation causes qualitative changes in electronic properties has remained unclear. Here we show that the dominant symmetry-allowed coupling between electron density and dipole active modes implies an electron density-dependent squeezing of the phonon state which provides an attractive contribution to the electron-electron interaction, independent of the sign of the bare electron-phonon coupling and with a magnitude proportional to the degree of laser-induced phonon excitation. Reasonable excitation amplitudes lead to non-negligible attractive interactions that may cause significant transient changes in electronic properties including superconductivity. The mechanism is generically applicable to a wide range of systems, offering a promising route to manipulating and controlling electronic phase behavior in novel materials.

  3. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Christoph Lehner''

    I will show how a natural seesaw model for SM neutrino mass arises within the general framework of a warped extra dimension (dual to composite Higgs in 4D). It starts out as an attempt at implementing the high-scale seesaw mechanism. I will first carefully determine what the underlying dynamical picture really is. Motivated by this physical understanding, LHC signals of TeV-mass SM singlet neutrinos within a specific model for the electroweak gauge sector will be discussed. Some of these channels are similar to those studied in 4D left-right (LR) symmetric models, but nonetheless the two can be distinguished. While other signals are more characteristic of the 5D/composite framework, i.e., are absent in 4D LR models.

  4. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

14

  1. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Christoph Lehner''

  2. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    Very strong magnetic fields can arise in non-central heavy-ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies, which may not decay quickly in a conducting plasma. We carry out magnetohydrodynamics simulations to study the effects of this magnetic field on the evolution of the plasma and on resulting flow fluctuations. Our results show that magnetic field leads to enhancement in elliptic flow, while flow fluctuations lead to reorganization of magnetic flux resulting in a transient increase in the local magnetic field. We also show generation of vorticity arising from nontrivial dependence of magnetosonic waves on pressure gradients and magnetic field direction. Magnetic field from collision of deformed nuclei shows very nontrivial features and can lead to qualitatively new effects on plasma evolutions. We discuss possibility of dynamo effect in the presence of vortices if any exotic high baryon density QCD phases are achieved in heavy-ion collisions.

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17

  1. Chemistry Department Seminar

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: ''Sanjaya Senanayake''

    The availability of whole-genome sequences has ushered in a new era of biological research. While these resources are invaluable, the data serve to underscore the extent of biological complexity, and have provided the framework by which our lack of knowledge and progress can be measured. For instance, even in very well studied model organisms, over 40% of genes are of unknown function. In less characterized complex organisms, such as bioenergy crops, up to 80% of all genes in a given genome are of unknown or very limited function. Indeed, a complete functional understanding (i.e. combined knowledge of biochemical activity, biological role and compartmentalization) is missing for ~95% of plant genes. This fundamental knowledge gap undermines the ability of systems scientists to realize the potential of genomic science and impedes our ability to leverage photosynthetic organisms to meet national energy needs. To remove this obstacle, we are addressing the function of plant proteins at the cellular and subcellular levels by integrating multi-dimensional dataypes: in vivo analyses employing single-celled plants and photosynthetic bacteria, high-throughput automation, in vitro protein characterization and structure, and computation. Modern sequencing, functional genomics and genome-editing technologies coupled with high-throughput approaches accelerate the gathering of informative data; our group specializes in utilizing multi-sourced data types in combination with targeted molecular approaches to reduce the knowledge gap in foundational plant research.

18

  1. Office of Educational Programs Event

    9:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: 'Kenneth White'

    Please join us to celebrate our 5th year and learn about the exciting things that have been happening in STEM on Long Island! Opening Address: Kathleen Hochul, NYS Lieutenant Governor Keynote Speaker: Mark Alessi, Executive Director, Business Incubator Association of NYS 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. - Student and Industry Showcases 11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. - Annual Meeting • Network with the LI STEM Hub's Business and Academic Partners from across Long Island • Interact with some of LI's top students & learn about their STEM research and projects • Learn from Industry Leaders about future trends and skills needed in their fields • Hear from Innovators about their path to success • Learn about the LI STEM Hub's progress to date and plans going forward Registration link: www.listemhub.org/li-stem-hub-annual-celebration All visitors to the Laboratory age 16 and over MUST BRING a photo ID. This event is free and open to the public. Event photos will be taken.

  2. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Jia Jiangyong'

    In this talk I will discuss about the ongoing and future efforts at RHIC towards the search for the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME). I will focus on the recent STAR measurements of the charge separation across the reaction plane, a predicted signal of the Chiral Magnetic Effect. Although charge separation has been observed, it has been argued that the measured separation in A+A collisions can be explained by elliptic flow related backgrounds. I will discuss on the challenges in disentangling such background contributions from the signals of CME. I will also discuss on implications of the recent measurements of charge separation in p+A collisions towards the search for CME.

  3. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: 'Qiang Li'

    Interactions between the Dirac fermions in graphene can lead to new collective behavior described by hydrodynamics. By listening to the Johnson noise of the electrons, we are able to probe simultaneously the thermal and electrical transport of the Dirac fluid and observe how it departs from Fermi liquid physics. At high temperature near the neutrality point, we find a strong enhancement of the thermal conductivity and breakdown of Wiedemann-Franz law in graphene. This is attributed to the non-degenerate electrons and holes forming a strongly coupled Dirac fluid. At lower temperatures beyond the hydrodynamic behavior, the Dirac fermions are in extreme thermal isolation with minute specific heat that can be exploited for ultra-sensitive photon detection. We will present our latest experimental result towards observing single microwave photons and explore its role in scaling up the superconducting qubit systems. Our model suggests the graphene-based Josephson junction single photon detector can have a high-speed, negligible dark count, and high intrinsic quantum efficiency for applications in quantum information science and technologies. Ref: Science 351, 1058 (2016)

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  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. BSA Noon Recital

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: 'Geoffrey Hind'

    The concert will include arias from Rossini's The Barber of Seville, Massenet's Thais, Stravinsky's The Rake's Progress, Puccini's La Bohème, Mozart's Die Zauberflöte, Weber's Der Freischütz, Britten's A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Saint-Saëns' Samson et Dalila. The Stony Brook Opera singers will also perform art songs by Tosti, Richard Strauss, and Reynaldo Hahn, as well as three operatic duets, from Don Giovanni, La Traviata, and Porgy and Bess.

  3. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Radiation sensors detect and convert radiation of interest (e.g. charged particles, neutrino, X- and gamma–rays) into electric charge. Reading out from radiation sensors requires highly specialized electronics. In this talk, the low-noise design techniques and circuits adopted in state-of-the-art CMOS Front-End ASICs for radiation detectors are presented. Design applications include high-energy and particle physics, energy science, space, and medical imaging. Special design challenges on CMOS devices at extreme environment. e.g. cryogenic operation and space radiation, are also discussed.

  4. Particle Physics SB/BNL Joint Cosmo seminar

    3 pm, Stony Brook University

20

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: ''''Igor Zaliznyak''''

    The magnetic properties of superconductors have a rich and interesting history, and we will briefly review some highlights. Early work showed that even tiny concentrations of magnetic impurities destroyed the superconducting pairing through the exchange-driven spin depairing mechanism, prohibiting any possibility of magnetic order coexisting with superconductivity. The first exceptions to this rule were provided by the cubic rare-earth substituted CeRu2 alloys, followed by the ternary Chevrel-phase superconductors (e.g. HoMo6S8) and related compounds, where long range magnetic order coexists or competes with superconductivity. The very low magnetic ordering temperatures (~1 K) suggested that dipolar rather than exchange interactions dominate, thus (it was thought) allowing the coexistence. These materials also provided the first examples of the competition between ferromagnetism and superconductivity. In the newer borocarbide class of magnetic superconductors (e.g. ErNi2B2C), however, it became clear that the magnetic order is in fact exchange driven. The borocarbides also provided the first example of the spontaneous formation of flux quanta (vortices). For the cuprate and iron-based superconductors (formerly known as "high Tc") we now have come full circle, as the spins are not only tolerated but are intimately tied to the superconductivity. The "parent" cuprate systems are Mott-Hubbard antiferromagnetic insulators with very strong magnetic interactions that are two-dimensional in nature. These strong exchange interactions survive into the superconducting state, yielding highly correlated electrons that participate directly in the superconducting pairing. The "parent" materials of the new iron-based high TC superconductors are also antiferromagnets with very energetic spin excitations, and in the superconducting regime they form a "magnetic resonance" that is directly tied to the superconducting order parameter, ju

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Erin Sheldon''

    Our Milky Way galaxy is surrounded by a multitude of dwarf satellite galaxies. They are some of the oldest, least luminous, most metal poor, and most dark-matter-dominated objects known. These extreme objects provide a unique opportunity for testing the standard models of cosmology and galaxy formation. In addition, the relative proximity and large dark matter content of dwarf galaxies make them excellent systems for probing the fundamental properties of dark matter. Over the past two years, the unprecedented sensitivity of the Dark Energy Camera has allowed us to nearly double the known population of Milky Way satellites. These discoveries help address the "missing satellites problem" and can be used to test the particle nature of dark matter. However, they also raise new questions concerning the role of the Magellanic Clouds in the formation of the Milky Way's satellite population. I will summarize recent results, outstanding questions, and upcoming advances in the study of the Milky Way's dark companions.

21

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10:30 am, CFN, Bldg 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: 'Kevin Yager and Masa Fukuto'

    The talk gives an overview of some recently developed, theoretical and numerical methods for wave-motion modeling and mathematical optimization, and selected applications. At first, methods to solve eikonal and wave equations on parallel computer architectures are presented. Next, a recently developed hybrid optimization scheme is presented and applied to distributed wave-source optimization. All presented methods are tailored to take advantage of parallel computer architectures, especially multi-GPU computer architectures.

  2. NSLS-II Friday Lunchtime Seminar Series

    12 pm, NSLS-II Bldg 743 (LOB 3), room 156

    Hosted by: 'Ben Ocko and Shirish Chodankar'

  3. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

  4. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    Single inclusive particle production cross sections in high energy hadron collisions at forward rapidity are an important benchmark process for the CGC picture of small x QCD. The process can be calculated in the "hybrid formalism", where a collinear large-x quark or gluon scatters off the dense color field of the target. Recent calculations at next-to-leading order in perturbation theory have not led to a stable physical result for the single inclusive cross section at high transverse momenta. The problem with these NLO calculations lies in the subtraction procedure for the soft "rapidity" divergence which must be absorbed into BK renormalization group evolution of the target. This talk discusses recent work to understand and resolve the problems with the subtraction procedure. In particular, we have recently implemented numerically the quark channel production cross section using a new rapidity factorization procedure proposed by Iancu et al. For a fixed coupling one does indeed obtain a physically meaningful cross section which is positive and reduces in a controlled way to previous leading order calculations. However, it is not yet clear how to generalize this to running coupling in a way that is fully consistent with previous leading order calculations in coordinate space.

22

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25

  1. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

    The observation of neutrinoless double beta decay would establish that neutrinos are Majorana fermions and would represent a discovery of profound importance: that lepton number is not conserved. There is currently a worldwide effort to search for neutrinoless double beta decay, using a variety of candidate isotopes and detector technologies. A subcommittee of the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) recently surveyed the field and the associated research and development needs. Based on the information provided to this subcommittee, I will present an overview of the present activity in this field and the prospects for the future.

  2. Brookhaven Women in Science (BWIS) Lecture

    4 pm, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    The ability to create synthetic materials that mimic the structural and mechanical properties of native tissues, like skin and fibrous tissues, is crucial for many biomaterials applications. Unfortunately, design of such materials remains a significant challenge. Many native tissues and synthetic soft biomaterials are comprised of polymer networks. What are the minimum properties that must be build into a synthetic polymer network in order to reproduce the properties of native tissues? Dr. Bhatia will discuss this issue, while drawing parallels between lessons learned from design of soft materials and challenges faced by women in science and engineering fields.

26

  1. APR

    26

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. APR

    26

    Wednesday

    Chemistry Department Colloquium

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Alex Harris''

    With the intensifying global need for alternative energy and fuels, there is strong interest in the development of efficient catalysts that can drive the chemical conversion of renewable resources into useful products. This talk will describe the use of an emerging synthetic strategy, atomic layer deposition (ALD), to generate nanoscale catalyst materials with a high level of control over composition, structure, and thickness. Two catalytic applications will be described. The first example is the conversion of synthesis gas (CO + H2) to synthetic liquid fuels and high-value chemicals using supported metal, heterogeneous catalysts. The promotion of rhodium-based catalysts, which have intrinsic selectivity towards desirable higher oxygenate production, is explored using various metal oxides deposited by ALD. The interactions between catalyst and promoter are studied using a variety of experimental techniques complemented by theory and the promoted catalysts are shown to have an increase in activity and higher oxygenate selectivity relative to unpromoted Rh nanoparticles. The second application is electrocatalysis for water splitting to produce hydrogen for fuel. We show that nanometer thick electrocatalyst layers of earth abundant materials deposited by ALD are active for the oxygen evolution reaction, an important reaction in the conversion of sunlight to fuels. We also demonstrate use of this layer-by-layer synthetic strategy to explore other metal oxides for electrocatalysis, to study charge transport limitations in the catalysts, and to achieve compositional control over ternary metal oxide and doped metal oxide thin films. The potential of atomic layer deposition to synthesize nanoscale materials for catalytic applications will be discussed.

  3. APR

    26

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 2:30 pm

    The sPHENIX detector is being proposed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to measure jets and upsilons for advancing our understanding of the quark gluon plasma formed in heavy ion collisions. It is also expected to form the basis of a day-1 detector for a future U.S. Electron Ion Collider. sPHENIX is based on a superconducting solenoidal magnet formerly used by the BaBar experiment, and of charged particle tracking, electromagnetic as well as hadronic calorimetry. It covers a large acceptance, 2 π in azimuth and | η | < 1 in pseudorapidities and allows to acquire data at a rate of up to 15 kHz. A Gas Electron Multiplier based Time Projection Chamber has been proposed for tracking in a high multiplicity environment. In this talk the current TPC design and status of ongoing R&D and simulation studies will be presented.

  4. APR

    26

    Wednesday

    YITP/HET Joint Seminar

    3 pm, YITP Seminar Room, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 3:00 pm

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  1. APR

    27

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 27, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Erin Sheldon'

  2. APR

    27

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    4 pm, CFN Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, April 27, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''''Fang Lu'''''

    Platinum (Pt) nanocrystals are commonly used in chemical reactions because of their unusual catalytic activity, for example, photocatalytic water splitting of water. In a typical design, Pt nanocrystals can accept photo-excited electrons from light absorbers such as semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) to catalyze hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) [1]. Charge transfer from QDs to Pt nanocrystals is very inefficient, and shuttle molecules (e.g., methyl viologen) or other shuttle species are necessary to facilitate the charge transfer [2]. In addition to receiving energetic electrons from semiconductor QDs, Pt nanocrystal can also absorb visible light to generate energetic electrons (or hot electrons), which can directly reduce reactive species or migrate across a metal/semiconductor Schottky barrier to the conduction band of a semiconductor. Different from the widely studied plasmonic metal nanocrystals (e.g., Au, Ag), the efficiency of generating hot electrons in the weakly absorbing Pt nanocrystals is very low. We found that depositing Pt nanocrystals on spherical glass beads (i.e., SiO2 particles) could significantly enhance the visible absorption coefficient of the Pt nanocrystals. For example, in SiO2@Pt nanocrystals@TiO2 core-shell nanostructures, the enhancement in visible absorption enables the efficient generation of energetic electrons in photoexcited Pt nanocrystals, which can easily transfer to the TiO2 surface layer to drive HER and many other chemical reactions [3].

28

  1. APR

    28

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 28, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    The study of CP violation addresses fundamental questions such as - are the laws of physics the same for matter and anti-matter. CP is a discrete symmetry of nature given by a product of two quantities : charge conjugation (C) and parity (P). Detecting leptonic CP violation is one of the most challenging goals in particle physics today. An attractive possibility to measure CP phase is via long baseline accelerator experiments such as Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). In this talk, we will show that clean extraction of CP violating phase becomes a formidable task in presence of new physics and one needs to devise ways to distinguish between standard paradigm and the new physics scenarios.

  2. APR

    28

    Friday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    11 am, Bldg. 734, ISB. Conf. Rm. 168

    Friday, April 28, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: '''''''Qiang Li'''''''

    This talk would be focused on my study of the phase diagram of underdoped cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.55 using torque magnetometry as well as my exploration of extending magnetometry method into even higher magnetic fields (>45T) using pulsed magnet. The complex phase diagrams of cuprates are sometimes referred to as "competing orders", where a large variety of ordering tendencies are known to (co-)exist. Our experiment managed to reveal an anomaly on the magnetic susceptibility, which we believe was related to charge density wave transition. Particularly interesting is that this anomaly is observed in the strong diamagnetic regime where vortex liquid exists. We believe this should be considered as a direct experimental evidence for the picture of "competing orders". To further our understanding of the quantum vortex liquid, experiments at mK temperatures and at magnetic field exceeding 40 Tesla are necessary. During my PhD study, considerable amount of time was devoted to developing a reliable magnetometry method utilizing the pulsed magnet at NHMFL, Los Alamos. I would like to present my trail-and-error as well as the proposition of "time-delayed probe design", which should be able to bypass the inherent noise of a pulsed environment.

  3. APR

    28

    Friday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Friday, April 28, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Igor Zaliznyak'''

    Insulating magnets combining the effects of geometrical frustration with strong spin-orbit coupling offer a prime route to realize correlated quantum states with exotic ground-states and excitations. Spin-space anisotropy and bond-directional magnetic exchange interactions are naturally present in rare-earth oxides. One of the most celebrated consequence is the existence of classical and quantum "spin-ice" physics in rare-earth pyrochlores, materials in which magnetic ions occupy a three-dimensional network of corner-sharing tetrahedra. In this talk, I will present the discovery of distinct flavors of exotic magnetic matter in families of rare-earth oxides with two-dimensional kagome [1] and triangular [2] geometries. This experimental work relies on recent advances in materials synthesis and combines thermodynamic characterization with state-of-the-art neutron scattering experiments to unravel the classical or quantum nature of these newly discovered quasi-two-dimensional spin-liquids. [1] Emergent order in the kagome Ising magnet Dy3Mg2Sb3O14, J. A. M. Paddison, H. S. Ong, J. O. Hamp, P. Mukherjee, X. Bai, M. G. Tucker, N. P. Butch, C. Castelnovo, M. Mourigal, and S. E. Dutton, Nature Communications 7, 13842 (2016). [2] Continuous excitations of the triangular-lattice quantum spin liquid YbMgGaO4, J. A. M. Paddison, M. Daum, Z. L. Dun, G. Ehlers, Y. Liu, M. B. Stone, H. D. Zhou, and M. Mourigal, Nature Physics AOP (2016).

  4. APR

    28

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 28, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    The conformal bootstrap aims to calculate scaling dimensions and correlation functions in various theories, starting from general principles such as unitarity and crossing symmetry. I will explain that local operators are not independent of each other but organize into analytic functions of spin, and I will present a formula, extending a classic one due to Froissart and Gribov in the early days of Regge theory, which quantifies the consequences of this fact. Applications will include a new way to solve crossing symmetry at large spin, as well as new bounds encoding bulk locality in theories with a gravity dual. Based on 1703.00278.

29

  1. No events scheduled

30

  1. No events scheduled

  1. APR

    26

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. APR

    26

    Wednesday

    Chemistry Department Colloquium

    "Designing Catalysts Using Atomic Layer Deposition"

    Presented by Stacey F. Bent, Stanford University, Department of Chemical Engineering

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Alex Harris''

    With the intensifying global need for alternative energy and fuels, there is strong interest in the development of efficient catalysts that can drive the chemical conversion of renewable resources into useful products. This talk will describe the use of an emerging synthetic strategy, atomic layer deposition (ALD), to generate nanoscale catalyst materials with a high level of control over composition, structure, and thickness. Two catalytic applications will be described. The first example is the conversion of synthesis gas (CO + H2) to synthetic liquid fuels and high-value chemicals using supported metal, heterogeneous catalysts. The promotion of rhodium-based catalysts, which have intrinsic selectivity towards desirable higher oxygenate production, is explored using various metal oxides deposited by ALD. The interactions between catalyst and promoter are studied using a variety of experimental techniques complemented by theory and the promoted catalysts are shown to have an increase in activity and higher oxygenate selectivity relative to unpromoted Rh nanoparticles. The second application is electrocatalysis for water splitting to produce hydrogen for fuel. We show that nanometer thick electrocatalyst layers of earth abundant materials deposited by ALD are active for the oxygen evolution reaction, an important reaction in the conversion of sunlight to fuels. We also demonstrate use of this layer-by-layer synthetic strategy to explore other metal oxides for electrocatalysis, to study charge transport limitations in the catalysts, and to achieve compositional control over ternary metal oxide and doped metal oxide thin films. The potential of atomic layer deposition to synthesize nanoscale materials for catalytic applications will be discussed.

  3. APR

    26

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "A TPC for sPHENIX at RHIC"

    Presented by Thomas Hemmick, Stony Brook University

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 2:30 pm

    The sPHENIX detector is being proposed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to measure jets and upsilons for advancing our understanding of the quark gluon plasma formed in heavy ion collisions. It is also expected to form the basis of a day-1 detector for a future U.S. Electron Ion Collider. sPHENIX is based on a superconducting solenoidal magnet formerly used by the BaBar experiment, and of charged particle tracking, electromagnetic as well as hadronic calorimetry. It covers a large acceptance, 2 π in azimuth and | η | < 1 in pseudorapidities and allows to acquire data at a rate of up to 15 kHz. A Gas Electron Multiplier based Time Projection Chamber has been proposed for tracking in a high multiplicity environment. In this talk the current TPC design and status of ongoing R&D and simulation studies will be presented.

  4. APR

    26

    Wednesday

    YITP/HET Joint Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by John Donoghue, U. Mass Amherst

    3 pm, YITP Seminar Room, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 3:00 pm

  5. APR

    27

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Searching for Optical Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Events in the Dark Energy Survey"

    Presented by Jim Annis, Fermilab

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 27, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Erin Sheldon'

  6. APR

    27

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Darkening Pt Nanocrystals for Photocatalysis"

    Presented by Yugang Sun, Department of Chemistry, Temple University

    4 pm, CFN Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, April 27, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''''Fang Lu'''''

    Platinum (Pt) nanocrystals are commonly used in chemical reactions because of their unusual catalytic activity, for example, photocatalytic water splitting of water. In a typical design, Pt nanocrystals can accept photo-excited electrons from light absorbers such as semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) to catalyze hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) [1]. Charge transfer from QDs to Pt nanocrystals is very inefficient, and shuttle molecules (e.g., methyl viologen) or other shuttle species are necessary to facilitate the charge transfer [2]. In addition to receiving energetic electrons from semiconductor QDs, Pt nanocrystal can also absorb visible light to generate energetic electrons (or hot electrons), which can directly reduce reactive species or migrate across a metal/semiconductor Schottky barrier to the conduction band of a semiconductor. Different from the widely studied plasmonic metal nanocrystals (e.g., Au, Ag), the efficiency of generating hot electrons in the weakly absorbing Pt nanocrystals is very low. We found that depositing Pt nanocrystals on spherical glass beads (i.e., SiO2 particles) could significantly enhance the visible absorption coefficient of the Pt nanocrystals. For example, in SiO2@Pt nanocrystals@TiO2 core-shell nanostructures, the enhancement in visible absorption enables the efficient generation of energetic electrons in photoexcited Pt nanocrystals, which can easily transfer to the TiO2 surface layer to drive HER and many other chemical reactions [3].

  7. APR

    28

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "CP violation in neutrino oscillations and impact of new physics"

    Presented by Dr. Poonam Mehta

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 28, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    The study of CP violation addresses fundamental questions such as - are the laws of physics the same for matter and anti-matter. CP is a discrete symmetry of nature given by a product of two quantities : charge conjugation (C) and parity (P). Detecting leptonic CP violation is one of the most challenging goals in particle physics today. An attractive possibility to measure CP phase is via long baseline accelerator experiments such as Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). In this talk, we will show that clean extraction of CP violating phase becomes a formidable task in presence of new physics and one needs to devise ways to distinguish between standard paradigm and the new physics scenarios.

  8. APR

    28

    Friday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Magnetometry Study of Underdoped Cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.55"

    Presented by Fan Yu, University of Michigan

    11 am, Bldg. 734, ISB. Conf. Rm. 168

    Friday, April 28, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: '''''''Qiang Li'''''''

    This talk would be focused on my study of the phase diagram of underdoped cuprate YBa2Cu3O6.55 using torque magnetometry as well as my exploration of extending magnetometry method into even higher magnetic fields (>45T) using pulsed magnet. The complex phase diagrams of cuprates are sometimes referred to as "competing orders", where a large variety of ordering tendencies are known to (co-)exist. Our experiment managed to reveal an anomaly on the magnetic susceptibility, which we believe was related to charge density wave transition. Particularly interesting is that this anomaly is observed in the strong diamagnetic regime where vortex liquid exists. We believe this should be considered as a direct experimental evidence for the picture of "competing orders". To further our understanding of the quantum vortex liquid, experiments at mK temperatures and at magnetic field exceeding 40 Tesla are necessary. During my PhD study, considerable amount of time was devoted to developing a reliable magnetometry method utilizing the pulsed magnet at NHMFL, Los Alamos. I would like to present my trail-and-error as well as the proposition of "time-delayed probe design", which should be able to bypass the inherent noise of a pulsed environment.

  9. APR

    28

    Friday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Spin-liquids in novel triangular and kagome rare-earth magnets"

    Presented by Martin Mourigal, Georgia Tech

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Friday, April 28, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Igor Zaliznyak'''

    Insulating magnets combining the effects of geometrical frustration with strong spin-orbit coupling offer a prime route to realize correlated quantum states with exotic ground-states and excitations. Spin-space anisotropy and bond-directional magnetic exchange interactions are naturally present in rare-earth oxides. One of the most celebrated consequence is the existence of classical and quantum "spin-ice" physics in rare-earth pyrochlores, materials in which magnetic ions occupy a three-dimensional network of corner-sharing tetrahedra. In this talk, I will present the discovery of distinct flavors of exotic magnetic matter in families of rare-earth oxides with two-dimensional kagome [1] and triangular [2] geometries. This experimental work relies on recent advances in materials synthesis and combines thermodynamic characterization with state-of-the-art neutron scattering experiments to unravel the classical or quantum nature of these newly discovered quasi-two-dimensional spin-liquids. [1] Emergent order in the kagome Ising magnet Dy3Mg2Sb3O14, J. A. M. Paddison, H. S. Ong, J. O. Hamp, P. Mukherjee, X. Bai, M. G. Tucker, N. P. Butch, C. Castelnovo, M. Mourigal, and S. E. Dutton, Nature Communications 7, 13842 (2016). [2] Continuous excitations of the triangular-lattice quantum spin liquid YbMgGaO4, J. A. M. Paddison, M. Daum, Z. L. Dun, G. Ehlers, Y. Liu, M. B. Stone, H. D. Zhou, and M. Mourigal, Nature Physics AOP (2016).

  10. APR

    28

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Analyticity in Spin and Causality in Conformal Theories"

    Presented by Simon Caron-Huot, McGill

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 28, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    The conformal bootstrap aims to calculate scaling dimensions and correlation functions in various theories, starting from general principles such as unitarity and crossing symmetry. I will explain that local operators are not independent of each other but organize into analytic functions of spin, and I will present a formula, extending a classic one due to Froissart and Gribov in the early days of Regge theory, which quantifies the consequences of this fact. Applications will include a new way to solve crossing symmetry at large spin, as well as new bounds encoding bulk locality in theories with a gravity dual. Based on 1703.00278.

  11. MAY

    3

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 3, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  12. MAY

    3

    Wednesday

    Joint YITP/HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Tim Tait, UCI

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, May 3, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Amarjit Soni'

  13. MAY

    3

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "MAPS-based vertex detectors in collider experiments"

    Presented by Giacomo Contin, LBNL

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, May 3, 2017, 2:30 pm

    The PiXeL detector (PXL) of the STAR experiment at RHIC is the first application of the state-of-the-art thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) technology in a collider environment. Designed to extend the STAR measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain, it took data in Au+Au collisions, p+p and p+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}=$200 GeV at RHIC, during the period 2014-2016. The PXL detector is based on 50 μm-thin MAPS sensors with a pitch of 20.7 μm. Each sensor includes an array of nearly 1 million pixels, read out in rolling shutter mode in 185.6 μs. The 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation allows for air cooling and contributes to reduce the global material budget to 0.4% radiation length on the innermost layer. Detector performance and lessons learned from construction and operations will be presented in this talk. Following the successful experience in STAR, the next-generation MAPS sensor will be used to upgrade the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) at LHC. Compared to the STAR PXL detector, the integration time for the future ALICE ITS Upgrade has been reduced by more than a factor of 10, and down to

  14. MAY

    3

    Wednesday

    Fire Ecology Workshop

    "Keeping the Pine in the Pine Barrens: Fire Science & Management on LI"

    7 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Wednesday, May 3, 2017, 7:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Kathy Schwager''

  15. MAY

    4

    Thursday

    Fire Ecology Workshop

    "Keeping the Pine in the Pine Barrens: Fire Science & Management on LI"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 4, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: ''Kathy Schwager''

  16. MAY

    4

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Transient Dynamics of Strongly Correlated Electrons After Sudden Excitations"

    Presented by Marco Schiro, Institut de Physique Theorique (IPhT), CEA, Saclay, France

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, May 4, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Robert Konik'

    The development of pump-probe spectroscopies with femtosecond time resolution, which allows to track the dynamics of electronic degrees of freedom in solids under optical excitations, opens up a new window to understand strongly correlated materials and offers the intriguing possibility of controlling their properties with light, on ultra-fast time scales. Triggered by these advances, the interest around time dependent phenomena in quantum many body systems has recently substantially grown. In this talk will review recent progress in understanding transient dynamics of electrons in correlated metals, Mott Insulators and superconductors. I will show that quite generically these systems display very sharp dynamical transitions as a function of the external perturbation, in correspondence of which the lattice response and the sensitivity to density inhomogeneities can be greatly enhanced.

  17. MAY

    4

    Thursday

    Book Swap ~ Monthly

    "Book Swap ~ Monthly"

    3 pm, 400 Lobby by Starbucks

    Thursday, May 4, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'QOL/BERA/Recreation'

    Meeting on the first Thursday of each month in 400 Lobby! Bring book to swap, share resources, have conversations about great books you've read, have a coffee, meet others!

  18. MAY

    4

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "New MEG Results and Prospects for Improved Searches for Muon and Electron Number Violation in the Charged Sector"

    Presented by William Molzon, University of California, Irvine

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 4, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Searches for muon and electron number violation in the charged sector continue to be a sensitive probe of non Standard Model physics. I will give results of the full data-set of the MEG collaboration's search for muons decaying to electron plus photon and describe improvements to the MEG muon beam and apparatus that will improve sensitivity by a factor of ten in the next few years. I will also briefly review other experiments in the planning and early construction phases that are expected to improve sensitivity in related processes in the coming 5-10 years.

  19. MAY

    5

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Probing nucleon substructure with Bayesian parameter estimation"

    Presented by Scott Moreland, Duke

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 5, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    Multi-particle correlations observed in small collision systems at top LHC energies exhibit signatures which are similar to those observed in large collision systems and generally attributed to the formation of a deconfined quark-gluon plasma (QGP). This suggests that even proton-proton and proton-lead collisions may produce small droplets of QGP which translate spatial inhomogeneities into final-state momentum anisotropies. A primary challenge in testing hydrodynamic descriptions of small collision systems is in modeling the initial stages of the collision. In this talk, I discuss recent efforts to apply Bayesian methodology to parametric descriptions of initial state physics. I show that such methods can be extended to smaller length scales which include partonic degrees of freedom and glean information regarding the fluctuating nature of the proton.

  20. MAY

    8

    Monday

    Computational Science Initiative Event

    "Enabling Computational Chemistry With New Algorithms on Next-Generation Platform"

    Presented by Wibe deJong, Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Lab

    11 am, Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Monday, May 8, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Kerstin Kleese van Dam'

    With the advent of exascale computing the field of computational chemistry is on the verge of entering a new era of modeling. Large computing resources can enable researchers to tackle scientific problems that are larger and more realistic than ever before, and to include more of the complex dynamical behavior of nature. However, the future exascale architectures will be significantly different and require advances in algorithms and new programming paradigms. We will discuss some of the work on developing scalable algorithms for strongly correlated systems, simulations of complexes in dynamical environments, and complex spectra. Significant improvements will be reported in our development efforts of a full threaded plane wave ab initio molecular dynamics code in NWChem on Intel Phi platforms. Finally, we will demonstrate advances in the parallel communication layer Global Arrays utlizing LBNL's GasNET and barrier elision techniques. Bio: Bert de Jong leads the Computational Chemistry, Materials, and Climate Group at LBNL. He has a background in general chemistry, chemical engineering and high performance computational chemistry, with specialization and strong capabilities in modeling heavy element chemistry. He is a main developer of the NWChem software at the EMSL, one of four developers of the unique fully relativistic software MOLFDIR for quantum chemistry. Prior to joining Berkeley Lab, de Jong was at PNNL, where he lead the High Performance Software Development Group responsible for NWChem. He has published 89 journal papers, 14 conference papers and 7 book chapters and has given over 65 invited presentations and lectures at international conferences and universities.De Jong earned his doctorate in theoretical chemistry in 1998 from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. He was a postdoctoral fellow at PNNL before transitioning to a staff member in 2000.

  21. MAY

    10

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 10, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  22. MAY

    11

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "> Probing quantum entanglement at the Electron Ion Collider"

    Presented by Dima Kharzeev, BNL and Stony Brook University

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, May 11, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Hiromichi Nishimura'

  23. MAY

    11

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by TBD

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, May 11, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''TBD''

  24. MAY

    11

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 11, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  25. MAY

    17

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 17, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  26. MAY

    17

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jonathan Kozaczuk, UMass Amherst

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, May 17, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

  27. MAY

    18

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Probing quantum entanglement at the Electron Ion Collider"

    Presented by Dima Kharzeev, BNL and Stony Brook University

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, May 18, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Hiromichi Nishimura''

  28. MAY

    18

    Thursday

    Brookhaven Women In Science Lecture

    "Self-Organization and Understanding"

    Presented by Natika Newton, PhD, Nassau Community College

    4 pm, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Thursday, May 18, 2017, 4:00 pm

    This talk has three parts: 1. I discuss the phenomenon of understanding – our ordinary experience of understanding the objects and events in our environment. Normally we do not pay attention to the understanding process itself, but just to what is understood (e.g. I understand the ordinary things you say, but do not enquire how it is that I understand them); here we focus upon the process. I argue that understanding holds an important key to the nature of human cognition—our ability to think and reason. 2. Next I examine the process of self-organization – the process whereby a type of general order arises from local interactions between parts of an originally chaotic system. Self-organization is so-called because the order is not controlled by any agent external to the system. Many familiar phenomena are self-organized, from rush-hour traffic patterns to ant hills, as well as many organic processes within our bodies. 3. Finally, I attempt to show that understanding is a self-organizing process. In considering cognitive functions in the brain, I take a top-down rather than a bottom-up approach. A top-down approach starts with a general system, in this case our conscious awareness of understanding, and breaks it down into (sometimes unconscious) subsystems. I argue that the sort of understanding we are familiar with is possible only through the self-organized subsystems of our ordinary understanding of our situation and environment.

  29. MAY

    19

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Tiny Bubbles in the Mine: New Results from the PICO-60 Dark Matter Detector"

    Presented by Dr. Eric Dahl, North Western

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 19, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    The PICO Collaboration builds bubble chambers for the direct detection of WIMP dark matter. These devices are unique among direct detection experiments both in the WIMP models they can probe and the backgrounds they face. The PICO collaboration has set consecutive world-leading direct-detection limits on the spin-dependent WIMP-proton cross section, most recently with a zero-background 1.2 ton-day exposure with a C3F8 target in the PICO-60 detector at SNOLAB. This result is significant not just because it reaches new WIMP parameter space, but also because it demonstrates our ability to eliminate the anomalous bubble nucleation background that limited past bubble chamber WIMP searches, opening the door for experiments at the ton scale and beyond. I will describe this new result from PICO, our immediate plans for new detectors at SNOLAB, and the broader role bubble chambers will play in the future of dark matter detection, including the new scintillating bubble chamber technology developed by my group at Northwestern.

  30. MAY

    23

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Searching for collectivity and testing the limits of hydrodynamics: results from the 2016 d+Au beam energy scan"

    Presented by Ron Belmont, University of Colorado Boulder

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 23, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Jin Huang'

    The standard picture of heavy ion collisions is that large systems (collisions of large nuclei like Au+Au and Pb+Pb) create a quark-gluon plasma that exhibits collective behavior indicative of nearly inviscid hydrodynamical evolution. Recently, data from small systems (collisions of a small projectile and a large target like d+Au and p+Pb) have been found to exhibit strikingly similar evidence for collective behavior. To further elucidate these results, RHIC delivered in 2016 a beam energy scan of d+Au collisions at 4 different energies: 200, 62.4, 39, and 19.6 GeV. In this talk we present a wide array of results from the Run16 d+Au BES and discuss the implications for collective behavior and the limits of applicability for hydrodynamics.

  31. MAY

    24

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 24, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  32. MAY

    30

    Tuesday

    Chemistry Department Colloquium

    "Adsorption and oxidation reactions on RuO2 and IrO2 surfaces"

    Presented by Jason F. Weaver, University of Florida, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, May 30, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Sanjaya Senanayake'

    Interest in the surface chemistry of late transition-metal oxides has been stimulated by observations that the formation of metal oxide layers tends to dramatically alter the catalytic performance of transition metals in applications of oxidation catalysis. In this talk, I will discuss our recent investigations of the growth and chemical properties of rutile RuO2 and IrO2 surfaces. Our interest in these oxides derives mainly from computational predictions that CH4 binds strongly and should undergo C-H bond activation at low temperature on certain facets of IrO2. I will discuss our investigations of the oxidation of metallic Ir surfaces by O-atom beams as well as O2 at pressures above 1 Torr. We find that stoichiometrically-terminated IrO2(110) layers could only be formed by oxidizing Ir(111) and Ir(100) at sufficiently high temperature and O2 pressure. I will discuss the binding characteristics of small molecules, and our recent discovery of highly facile CH4 activation on the IrO2(110) surface at temperatures as low as 150 K. We show that CH4 activation occurs by a mechanism wherein a molecularly-adsorbed ?-complex serves as the precursor for CH4 dissociation on the IrO2(110) surface and that the barrier for C-H bond cleavage is nearly 10 kJ/mol less than the molecular binding energy. Lastly, I will discuss results showing how the partial replacement of surface O-atoms with Cl-atoms alters the oxidation chemistry of methanol on RuO2(110), and may provide an approach for modifying the selectivity of RuO2 and IrO2 surfaces for other oxidation chemistries.

  33. MAY

    31

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 31, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  34. MAY

    31

    Wednesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Open Space Stewardship Program Celebration"

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, May 31, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Melvyn Morris'''

  35. JUN

    1

    Thursday

    Book Swap ~ Monthly

    "Book Swap ~ Monthly"

    11:45 am, 400 Lobby by Starbucks

    Thursday, June 1, 2017, 11:45 am

    Hosted by: 'QOL/BERA/Recreation'

    Meeting on the first Thursday of each month in 400 Lobby! Bring book to swap, share resources, have conversations about great books you've read, have a coffee, meet others!

  36. JUN

    1

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Materials Chemistry via Electrochemistry: Electrochemical Synthesis of Semiconductor Electrodes and Catalysts for Use in Solar Energy Conversion"

    Presented by Kyoung-Shin Choi, Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53796

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, June 1, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Mingzhao Lu'

    Harvesting energy directly from sunlight as nature accomplishes through photosynthesis is a very attractive and desirable way to solve the energy challenge. Many efforts have been made to find appropriate materials and systems that can utilize solar energy to produce chemical fuels. One of the most viable options is the construction of a photoelectrochemical cell that can directly utilize solar energy to drive chemical reactions (e.g. reduction of water to H2, reduction of CO2 to carbon-based molecules). For successful construction of photoelectrochemical cells, simultaneous developments of photoelectrodes, which will efficiently capture photons to generate and separate electron-hole pairs, and catalysts, which will facilitate the use of photogenerated electrons and holes for desired interfacial charge transfer reactions, are necessary. Furthermore, optimally interfacing photoelectrodes and catalysts is critical because the photoelectrode/catalyst interface can govern the overall efficiency of the integrated photoelectrode system. Our research group has been developing new electrochemical synthesis conditions to produce semiconductor electrodes and catalysts with precisely controlled compositions and architectures. In this seminar, we will discuss synthesis and properties of a few promising photoelectrode and catalyst systems for use in solar energy conversion. New synthesis strategies to improve photon absorption, charge transport properties, and catalytic properties will be presented. We will also discuss various strategies to increase the overall utility and efficiency of the photoelectrochemical cells, which include our new results on electrochemical and photoelectrochemical biomass conversion.

  37. JUN

    5

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Summer "DOE/BNL" Internship Program Begins"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Monday, June 5, 2017, 8:30 am

  38. JUN

    7

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 7, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  39. JUN

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 8, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  40. JUN

    14

    Wednesday

    Blood Drive

    9 am, Brookhaven Center

    Wednesday, June 14, 2017, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Patricia Edwards'

  41. JUN

    14

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 14, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  42. JUN

    15

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    9 am, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, June 15, 2017, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Patricia Edwards'

  43. JUN

    20

    Tuesday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2017 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    8:30 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, June 20, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: '''Kelly Guiffreda'''

  44. JUN

    21

    Wednesday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2017 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    8:30 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, June 21, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: ''Kelly Guiffreda''

  45. JUN

    21

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 21, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  46. JUN

    22

    Thursday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2017 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, June 22, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Kelly Guiffreda'

  47. JUN

    23

    Friday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2017 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    8:30 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 23, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Kelly Guiffreda'

  48. JUL

    6

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by TBD

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, July 6, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'TBD'

  49. JUL

    10

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "High School Research Program Begins"

    8:30 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Monday, July 10, 2017, 8:30 am

  50. AUG

    10

    Thursday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2017 Summer Poster Symposium"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, August 10, 2017, 8:30 am

  51. AUG

    28

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2017 Fall Internship Begins"

    8:30 am, BLDG. 438

    Monday, August 28, 2017, 8:30 am