BNL Home
March 2017
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. NSLS-II

    1 pm, NSLS-II Building 745, Conference Room 156

    Hosted by: 'NSLS-II UEC'

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    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, March 2, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Hiromichi Nishimura''

    Symmetry and its spontaneous breaking are of basic importance for understanding the low energy physics in many-body systems. When a continuum symmetry is spontaneously broken, there exist a zero mode called Nambu-Goldstone (NG) mode, which is well developed in Lorentz invariant systems. In contrast, in non-Lorentz invariant systems, the NG theorem has not been well developed. In this talk, we discuss the recent progress in generalization of NG theorem in non-relativistic systems, open systems, and systems with higher form symmetries.

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    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, March 2, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''''Gabi Kotliar''''

    TBA

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    Friday

    Computational Science Initiative Event

    11 am, Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Friday, March 3, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Kerstin Kleese van Dam'

    Data-related challenges are quickly dominating computational and data-enabled sciences, and are limiting the potential impact of scientific application workflows enabled by current and emerging extreme scale, high-performance distributed computing environments. These data-intensive application workflows involve dynamic coordination, interactions and data coupling between multiple application processes that run at scale on different resources, and with services for monitoring, analysis and visualization and archiving, and present challenges due to increasing data volumes and complex data-coupling patterns, system energy constraints, increasing failure rates, etc. In this talk I will explore these data challenges in extreme scale science and investigate how solutions based on data sharing abstractions, managed data pipelines, in-memory data-staging, in-situ placement and execution, and in-transit data processing can be used to address these data challenges at extreme scales. This research is part of the DataSpaces project at the Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute.

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    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, March 3, 2017, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: ''Christoph Lehner''

    Searches for permanent electric dipole moments (EDM) of neutrons, protons, and nuclei are the most sensitive probes for CP violation, which is necessary for baryogenesis. Currently developed experiments will improve bounds on the neutron EDM by 2-3 orders of magnitude. However, to put constraints on CP-violating interactions, nonperturbative QCD calculations of nucleon structure are necessary. I will present some recent developments in lattice calculations of nucleon EDMs induced by quark-gluon CP-odd interaction

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    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 3, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    Since decades expressions for the thermodynamic potential were calculated perturbatively at finite temperature (and density) and pushed to higher orders. I review the current status of these efforts including resummation techniques and compare them to results of lattice Monte Carlo simulations and address unanswered questions. Finally, I present results for several thermodynamic quantities within the next-to-leading order calculation of the thermodynamic potential at finite T and \mu including non-vanishing quark masses.

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    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 7, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Jin Huang'

    In recent years, there been rapid progresses in our understanding of the long-range ridge in small collision system at RHIC and LHC. I will discuss the nature of collectivity (flow) driving the ridge, as well as the dominating non-collective (or non-flow) background that complicates the extraction of the ridge. I shows that the standard multi-particle cumulant method, often used to defined collectivity in heavy ion collisions, is overwhelmed by non-collective background in pp and low multiplicity pPb collisions. This problem is resolved with an alternative method based on two or more subevents separated in pseudorapidity (η), and therefore offers a robust data-driven definition of collectivity based on the existence of long-range azimuthal correlations between multiple distinct η ranges. With this new cumulant method, we are able to probe reliably the event-by-event fluctuation of collectivity in small collision systems.

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    Tuesday

    NSLS-II Engineering Seminar Series

    2 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, March 7, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Sushil Sharma and Mary Carlucci-Dayton''

    High-resolution monochromators (HRMs) are key components at nuclear resonant scattering beamlines, and their development at the APS has been ongoing for decades. They are used to resolve the frequency spectrum of isotope-specific atomic dynamics using nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy and to reduce the enormous electronic charge scattering that accompanies nuclear excitation using synchrotron radiation. The latter allowing the measurement of hyperfine fields using synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy. The narrow line-widths (neV) associated with nuclear resonances also offer an excellent diagnostic tool for the characterization of HRMs, and have greatly facilitated their development. HRMs with ultra-high energy-resolution exposed the need for greater energy-alignment stability and prompted the development of cryo-stabilization. A recent prototype sub-meV-bandwidth monochromator for hard X-rays that implements cryo-stabilization has been built that displays a 100-fold improvement in energy-alignment stability over other designs. This unprecedented level of control allows one to observe the intrinsic factors that limit the energy resolution obtainable with silicon. I will present the principle design aspects of this prototype along with its performance, and discuss what has been learned.

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    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

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    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

    Electroweak symmetry breaking is a central pillar of the standard model, and experimentally one of the least understood. Many physics scenarios predict modifications to this mechanism resulting in new particles or interactions. This talk will summarize our knowledge of the electroweak sector with a particular focus on the interactions between W-bosons.

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    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    12 pm, B911 - Large Conference Room - 2nd floor

    Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 12:00 pm

    Come meet the FY2017 BWIS Executive Board to voice your concerns, learn about our future events and volunteer opportunities. We hope to see you there and bring a friend! Brookhaven Women in Science is a diverse community that promotes equal opportunity and advancement for all women in support of world-class science. BWIS is a volunteer-run non-profit funded by BSA and membership fees. If you have any questions, please email agoldberg@bnl.gov.

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    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    11 am, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Gabi Kotliar''

    In this seminar I will focus two fundamental aspects of strongly correlated metals: the transport properties and the origin of correlation. Recent advances enables us to study quantitatively various properties of two archetypal correlated oxides, vanadium oxides and ruthenates, using the LDA+DMFT method. Both are strongly correlation, these two materials are quite different in their origins of correlation: V2O3 is proximate to a Mott state while Sr2RuO4 is not. Thus V2O3 is regarded as a prototype Mott system, while recent studies emphasize that Sr2RuO4 belongs to new category termed "Hund's metal" in which Hund's coupling is responsible for the correlations. We carried out a systematical theoretical study on the transport properties of V2O3 and ruthenates family. Our computed resistivity and optical conductivity are in very good agreement with experimental measurements, which clearly demonstrates that the strong correlation dominates the transport of this material , despite their origin of correlation. We demonstrated that "resilient quasiparticles" dominates the transport. Furthermore by expressing the resistivity in terms of an effective plasma frequency and an effective scattering rate, we uncover the so-called "hidden Fermi liquid" behavior. We identified signatures of Mottness and Hundness by a comparative study of V2O3 and Sr2RuO4. In V2O3 the low temperature coherent resonance emerges from the pseudogap regime appearing at high temperature between incoherent peaks, while in Sr2RuO4, it emerges from a single incoherent peak with large finite value at the Fermi level.. We show that these two contrasting scenarios features interesting behaviors in the local properties of correlated atoms including charge fluctuations, spin and orbit susceptibility and entropy. The findings shed new lights on the understanding of strongly correlated metals.

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    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

    We will review recent diboson measurements and searches in the WW final state performed with the CMS detector. We will discuss the perspectives for some of these measurements with the full HL-LHC dataset. We will briefly describe some of the upgrades being designed for the CMS Silicon Tracker in order to operate in the high pileup environment of the HL-LHC while maintaining excellent performance for the final states discussed in this talk.

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    Thursday

    Open Mic Night @ the Center

    4:30 pm, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 4:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'African American Affinity Group'

    Open Mic Night is back! Tickets $10 in BERA Store. All talent is welcome - singers, spoken word, musicians, comedy, poetry (acts must be PG-13). Refreshments will be served.

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    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

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    Friday

    Biology Department Seminar

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Friday, March 10, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Dr. Ian Blaby'

    The rapidly increasing quantity of biological data offers novel and diverse resources to study biological functions at the system level. Integrating and mining these various large-scale datasets is both a central priority and a great challenge for the field of systems biology and necessitates the development of specialized computational approaches. In this talk, I will present several novel computational systems approaches in a multi-scale modeling framework to study gene expression and regulation: 1) an algorithm to simultaneously cluster multi-layer networks such as gene co-expression networks across multiple species, which discovered novel human developmental genomic functions and behaviors; 2) a logic-circuit based method to identify the genome-wide cooperative logics among gene regulatory factors and pathways for the first time in cancers such as acute myeloid leukemia, which provided unprecedented insights into the gene regulatory logics in complex biological systems; 3) an integrated method using the state-space model and dimensionality reduction to identify principal temporal expression patterns driven by internal and external gene regulatory networks, which established an entirely new analytical platform to identify systematic and robust dynamic patterns from high dimensional, complex and noisy biomedical data. In addition, I will introduce some ongoing research projects and discuss the future directions where multi-scale approaches can make a significant impact in systems biology.

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    Friday

    Tax Overview Workshop for Visiting Foreign Nationals

    12 pm, Bldg 400, RSB #1

    Friday, March 10, 2017, 12:00 pm

    Please RSVP to ccarter@bnl.gov Bring your lunch and coffee will be provided.

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    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 1-224

    Friday, March 10, 2017, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

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    Friday

    Nuclear Theory Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 10, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    The Skyrme model is a candidate to describe the low energy regime of QCD where baryons and nuclei are topological excitations in a low-energy effective field theory of pions. The Skyrme model and its BPS variant (Skyrme model with a lower topological energy bound which is saturated) have been applied to the description of nuclei with notable recent success, e.g. quantitative description of Carbon-12 (including the Holye state and its rotational band) and of the low-lying energy spectrum of Oxygen-16. In this talk, we test Skyrme theories as models for nuclear matter at high densities and explore the thermodynamical properties of skyrmionic matter at zero temperature. We compute analytically the mean-field equation of state in the high and medium pressure regimes by applying topological bounds on compact domains. We identify which term in a generalised Skyrme model is responsible for which part in the equation of state and compare our findings with the corresponding results in the Walecka model. We find that the BPS submodel plays the dominant role at large densities. The BPS Skyrme model even allows us to derive thermodynamical variables and densities directly from the theory without having to perform a mean-field limit. This distinguishes the BPS Skyrme model from other models of nuclear matter where usually a mean-field limit has to be performed. Note that this is the first of two talks on Skyrme models and their predictions for nuclear matter at high densities. The second part on the description of neutron stars as Skyrme solitons will be given by Carlos Naya (Durham) on March, 24th at BNL.

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    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Jin Huang'

    sPHENIX, scheduled to start taking data in 2022 at RHIC, is a detector designed to probe the inner workings of the quark gluon plasma by measuring jets and their substructure, heavy flavor tagged jets and quarkonia. The design includes tracking systems, a solenoid magnet and calorimeter system. The calorimeter system, designed to measure the energy of jets, is comprised of an electromagnetic calorimeter, an inner hadronic calorimeter and and outer hadronic calorimeter. Prototypes of these detectors were built and tested in 2016. The results of the test beam show that the performance is well within the requirements set by the sPHENIX program. In addition, the results validate the GEANT4 simulation studies. The design of the sPHENIX calorimeter system, the test beam results from the calorimeter prototypes and additional studies will be presented

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    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

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    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

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    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

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    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 16, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Michael Begel''

    Search for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) has been one of the most important goals of the physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).Among all the final states, the multijet final state has long been considered as a challenging one for the search of physics beyond the SM due to its large background. Though, exciting new physics phenomena, such as the production of black hole as well as massive supersymmetric (SUSY) particles, may well result in signals in multijet final state. I present searches for physics beyond the SM using multijet events from 13 TeV collision data taken in 2015 and the first half of 2016 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. I focus on a search for the production of black hole and a search for massive supersymmetric particles decaying to many jets via R-Parity Violating (RPV) couplings. The two examples represent searches targeting physics beyond the SM at different mass scales, and therefore different analysis strategies are employed. These searches have greatly improved the sensitivity of the LHC to the black hole production and RPV SUSY scenarios, and they are complementary to searches using events of leptons, photons and missing transverse energy.

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    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, March 16, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Oleg Gang'

    Block copolymer self-assembly allows the rapid formation of nanostructures over wide areas. Yet, the range of possible patterns is fairly limited. I will present emerging strategies for constructing three-dimensional nanostructures whose shapes and symmetries go beyond those of the bulk equilibrium diblock copolymer phase diagram. Photo-thermal methods are used to accelerate assembly, and control block copolymer ordering and orientation. Self-assembly is known to be pathway-dependent, which can be exploited to select a particular nano-pattern. Ordered layers can be stacked to yield new lattice symmetries. This multi-layered ordering can be performed in a responsive mode, where each self-assembled layer templates the ones that follow. Taken together, these new motifs point towards the ability to construct designed, multi-functional 3D nanostructures.

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    Wednesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    8:30 am, Brookhaven Center

    Wednesday, March 22, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Aleida Perez'

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    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 22, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

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    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 22, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Michael Begel''

    The large amount of high-energy proton-proton collision data at the LHC provides an unprecedented opportunity to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model at the TeV scale. The 2012 discovery of a 125 GeV Higgs boson opened a new door to understanding the universe, providing an exciting new tool to use in these searches, given it is now produced about once per second at the current collision rate. The talk will review recent ATLAS searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, focusing on the central role of processes with heavy bosons, including the Higgs, and the corresponding new possible signatures that range from spectacular new resonances to subtle changes in kinematic distributions.

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    Friday

    Long Island Environment

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Friday, March 24, 2017, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Tim Green'

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    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 24, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    The extraction of neutrino mixing parameters and the CP-violating phase requires knowledge of the neutrino energy. This energy must be reconstructed from the final state of a neutrino-nucleus reaction since all long-baseline experiments use nuclear targets. This reconstruction requires detailed knowledge of the neutrino reactions with bound nucleons and of the final state interactions of hadrons with the nuclear environment. Quantum-kinetic transport theory can be used to build an event generator for this reconstruction that takes basic nuclear properties, such as binding, into account. Some examples are discussed that show the effects of nuclear interactions on observables in long-baseline experiments.

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    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 24, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    The Skyrme model is a low energy effective field theory of strong interactions where nuclei and baryons appear as collective excitations of pionic degrees of freedom. Proposed by Tony Skyrme in the sixties, his ideas received further support when it was discovered that in the limit of the large number of colours of QCD, an effective theory of mesons arises. In the last years, there has been a revival of Skyrme's ideas and new related models, some of them with BPS bounds (topological lower energy bounds), have been proposed. It is the aim of this talk to focus on the one known as BPS Skyrme model. After a brief introduction to this BPS limit we study its application to neutron stars where we will find that high maximal masses are supported. In addition, the BPS Skyrme model allow us to perform both mean-field and exact calculations and a comparison between both approaches will be presented.

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    Saturday

    Long Island Environment

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Saturday, March 25, 2017, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Tim Green'

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    Tuesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Neil Robinson''

    We employ equation of motion techniques to study the non-equilibrium dynamics in a lattice model of weakly interacting spinless fermions. Our model provides a simple setting for analyzing the effects of weak integrability breaking perturbations on the time evolution after a quantum quench. We establish the accuracy of the method by comparing results at short and intermediate times to time-dependent density matrix renormalization group computations. For sufficiently weak integrability-breaking interactions we always observe prethermalization plateaux, where local observables relax to non-thermal values at intermediate time scales. At later times a crossover towards thermal behaviour sets in. We determine the associated time scale, which depends on the initial state, the band structure of the non-interacting theory, and the strength of the integrability breaking perturbation. Our method allows us to analyze in some detail the spreading of correlations and in particular the structure of the associated light cones in our model. We find that the interior and exterior of the light cone are separated by an intermediate region, the temporal width of which appears to scale with a universal power-law t 1/3.

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    Tuesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 2:30 pm

    Radiation sensors detect and convert radiation of interest (e.g. charged particles, neutrino, X- and gamma–rays) into electric charge. Reading out from radiation sensors requires highly specialized electronics. In this talk, the low-noise design techniques and circuits adopted in state-of-the-art CMOS Front-End ASICs for radiation detectors are presented. Design applications include high-energy and particle physics, energy science, space, and medical imaging. Special design challenges on CMOS devices at extreme environment. e.g. cryogenic operation and space radiation, are also discussed.

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    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Robert Pisarski''

    The theory of complex variables is extremely useful because it helps to explain the mathematical behavior of functions of a real variable. Complex variable theory also provides insight into the nature of physical theories. For example, it provides a simple and beautiful picture of quantization and it explains the underlying reason for the divergence of perturbation theory. By using complex-variable methods one can generalize conventional Hermitian quantum theories into the complex domain. The result is a new class of parity-time-symmetric (PT-symmetric) theories whose remarkable physical properties have been studied and verified in many recent laboratory experiments.

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    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

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    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Geoffrey Hind'

    Jiji is an adventurous artist on both acoustic and electric guitar, playing an extensive range of music from traditional and contemporary classical music to free improvisation. Her impeccable musicianship combined with compelling stage presence and fascinating repertoire earned the Korean guitarist First Prize at the 2016 Concert Artists Guild International Competition. Jiji's program for BSA includes works by Albeniz, Ginastera, Vivaldi, Bach, Lansky and Reich.

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    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 30, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Evaluation of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum is an essential ingredient of their application in the neutrino oscillation studies. Two anomalies, i.e. discrepancies between the observed and expected count rates, are widely discussed at the present time. The total rate is about 6% lower than the expectation at all distances > 10 m from the reactor. And there is a shoulder (often referred to as "bump") at neutrino energies 5-7 MeV, not predicted in the calculated spectrum. I review the ways the flux and spectrum is evaluated. I argue that far reaching conclusions based on these anomalies should await a thorough understanding of the uncertainties of the spectrum, and point out possible standard physics sources of the anomalies.

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    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 31, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Search for the neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the main goals of nuclear physics community worldwide. If observed, it would be an example of "physics beyond the Standard Model", showing that the lepton number is not a conserved quantity and that neutrinos are massive Majorana fermions. After introducing the subject and its particle physics consequences I will concentrate on the issue of evaluation of the nuclear matrix elements. Despite decades of effort and hundreds of publications, different approaches give results that differ by roughly a factor of three, and it is difficult to decide which of them is the most realistic. I will describe the strengths and weaknesses of the nuclear models used. In addition, I will discuss the problem of "quenching", i.e. of reduction of the matrix elements of weak axial current in complex nuclei, that potentially affects the neutrinoless double beta decay matrix element values signiffcantly

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    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Generalized Nambu-Goldstone theorem"

    Presented by Yoshimasa Hidaka, RIKEN

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, March 2, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Hiromichi Nishimura''

    Symmetry and its spontaneous breaking are of basic importance for understanding the low energy physics in many-body systems. When a continuum symmetry is spontaneously broken, there exist a zero mode called Nambu-Goldstone (NG) mode, which is well developed in Lorentz invariant systems. In contrast, in non-Lorentz invariant systems, the NG theorem has not been well developed. In this talk, we discuss the recent progress in generalization of NG theorem in non-relativistic systems, open systems, and systems with higher form symmetries.

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    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Ab Initio electronic structure of solids: correlation effects beyond the GW method"

    Presented by Andrei Kutepov, Rutgers University

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, March 2, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''''Gabi Kotliar''''

    TBA

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    Friday

    Computational Science Initiative Event

    "Addressing Big Data Challenges in Extreme-Scale Science"

    Presented by Manish Parashar, Rutgers University

    11 am, Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Friday, March 3, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Kerstin Kleese van Dam'

    Data-related challenges are quickly dominating computational and data-enabled sciences, and are limiting the potential impact of scientific application workflows enabled by current and emerging extreme scale, high-performance distributed computing environments. These data-intensive application workflows involve dynamic coordination, interactions and data coupling between multiple application processes that run at scale on different resources, and with services for monitoring, analysis and visualization and archiving, and present challenges due to increasing data volumes and complex data-coupling patterns, system energy constraints, increasing failure rates, etc. In this talk I will explore these data challenges in extreme scale science and investigate how solutions based on data sharing abstractions, managed data pipelines, in-memory data-staging, in-situ placement and execution, and in-transit data processing can be used to address these data challenges at extreme scales. This research is part of the DataSpaces project at the Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute.

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    3

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    "Lattice Calculation ?of Nucleon Electric Dipole Moments"

    Presented by Sergey Syritsyn, Stony Brook

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, March 3, 2017, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: ''Christoph Lehner''

    Searches for permanent electric dipole moments (EDM) of neutrons, protons, and nuclei are the most sensitive probes for CP violation, which is necessary for baryogenesis. Currently developed experiments will improve bounds on the neutron EDM by 2-3 orders of magnitude. However, to put constraints on CP-violating interactions, nonperturbative QCD calculations of nucleon structure are necessary. I will present some recent developments in lattice calculations of nucleon EDMs induced by quark-gluon CP-odd interaction

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    3

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Finite-Temperature Perturbative QCD confronts Lattice"

    Presented by Thorben Graf, University of Frankfurt

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 3, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    Since decades expressions for the thermodynamic potential were calculated perturbatively at finite temperature (and density) and pushed to higher orders. I review the current status of these efforts including resummation techniques and compare them to results of lattice Monte Carlo simulations and address unanswered questions. Finally, I present results for several thermodynamic quantities within the next-to-leading order calculation of the thermodynamic potential at finite T and \mu including non-vanishing quark masses.

  6. MAR

    7

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Collectivity in small collision systems, what is it?"

    Presented by Jiangyong Jia, BNL and Stony Brook University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 7, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Jin Huang'

    In recent years, there been rapid progresses in our understanding of the long-range ridge in small collision system at RHIC and LHC. I will discuss the nature of collectivity (flow) driving the ridge, as well as the dominating non-collective (or non-flow) background that complicates the extraction of the ridge. I shows that the standard multi-particle cumulant method, often used to defined collectivity in heavy ion collisions, is overwhelmed by non-collective background in pp and low multiplicity pPb collisions. This problem is resolved with an alternative method based on two or more subevents separated in pseudorapidity (η), and therefore offers a robust data-driven definition of collectivity based on the existence of long-range azimuthal correlations between multiple distinct η ranges. With this new cumulant method, we are able to probe reliably the event-by-event fluctuation of collectivity in small collision systems.

  7. MAR

    7

    Tuesday

    NSLS-II Engineering Seminar Series

    "High-Resolution Monochromator Development for Nuclear Resonant Scattering"

    Presented by Thomas Toellner, X-Ray Science Division,

    2 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, March 7, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Sushil Sharma and Mary Carlucci-Dayton''

    High-resolution monochromators (HRMs) are key components at nuclear resonant scattering beamlines, and their development at the APS has been ongoing for decades. They are used to resolve the frequency spectrum of isotope-specific atomic dynamics using nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy and to reduce the enormous electronic charge scattering that accompanies nuclear excitation using synchrotron radiation. The latter allowing the measurement of hyperfine fields using synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy. The narrow line-widths (neV) associated with nuclear resonances also offer an excellent diagnostic tool for the characterization of HRMs, and have greatly facilitated their development. HRMs with ultra-high energy-resolution exposed the need for greater energy-alignment stability and prompted the development of cryo-stabilization. A recent prototype sub-meV-bandwidth monochromator for hard X-rays that implements cryo-stabilization has been built that displays a 100-fold improvement in energy-alignment stability over other designs. This unprecedented level of control allows one to observe the intrinsic factors that limit the energy resolution obtainable with silicon. I will present the principle design aspects of this prototype along with its performance, and discuss what has been learned.

  8. MAR

    8

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  9. MAR

    8

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Electroweak Physics at ATLAS"

    Presented by Jake Searcy, Michigan

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

    Electroweak symmetry breaking is a central pillar of the standard model, and experimentally one of the least understood. Many physics scenarios predict modifications to this mechanism resulting in new particles or interactions. This talk will summarize our knowledge of the electroweak sector with a particular focus on the interactions between W-bosons.

  10. MAR

    8

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    "Monthly BWIS Board Meeting"

    12 pm, B911 - Large Conference Room - 2nd floor

    Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 12:00 pm

    Come meet the FY2017 BWIS Executive Board to voice your concerns, learn about our future events and volunteer opportunities. We hope to see you there and bring a friend! Brookhaven Women in Science is a diverse community that promotes equal opportunity and advancement for all women in support of world-class science. BWIS is a volunteer-run non-profit funded by BSA and membership fees. If you have any questions, please email agoldberg@bnl.gov.

  11. MAR

    9

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Transport and signatures of Mottness versus Hundness in strongly correlated metals"

    Presented by Xiaoyu Deng, Rutgers

    11 am, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Gabi Kotliar''

    In this seminar I will focus two fundamental aspects of strongly correlated metals: the transport properties and the origin of correlation. Recent advances enables us to study quantitatively various properties of two archetypal correlated oxides, vanadium oxides and ruthenates, using the LDA+DMFT method. Both are strongly correlation, these two materials are quite different in their origins of correlation: V2O3 is proximate to a Mott state while Sr2RuO4 is not. Thus V2O3 is regarded as a prototype Mott system, while recent studies emphasize that Sr2RuO4 belongs to new category termed "Hund's metal" in which Hund's coupling is responsible for the correlations. We carried out a systematical theoretical study on the transport properties of V2O3 and ruthenates family. Our computed resistivity and optical conductivity are in very good agreement with experimental measurements, which clearly demonstrates that the strong correlation dominates the transport of this material , despite their origin of correlation. We demonstrated that "resilient quasiparticles" dominates the transport. Furthermore by expressing the resistivity in terms of an effective plasma frequency and an effective scattering rate, we uncover the so-called "hidden Fermi liquid" behavior. We identified signatures of Mottness and Hundness by a comparative study of V2O3 and Sr2RuO4. In V2O3 the low temperature coherent resonance emerges from the pseudogap regime appearing at high temperature between incoherent peaks, while in Sr2RuO4, it emerges from a single incoherent peak with large finite value at the Fermi level.. We show that these two contrasting scenarios features interesting behaviors in the local properties of correlated atoms including charge fluctuations, spin and orbit susceptibility and entropy. The findings shed new lights on the understanding of strongly correlated metals.

  12. MAR

    9

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "WW measurements at CMS and perspectives for the HL-LHC"

    Presented by Rafael Coelho Lopes de Sa, FNAL

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

    We will review recent diboson measurements and searches in the WW final state performed with the CMS detector. We will discuss the perspectives for some of these measurements with the full HL-LHC dataset. We will briefly describe some of the upgrades being designed for the CMS Silicon Tracker in order to operate in the high pileup environment of the HL-LHC while maintaining excellent performance for the final states discussed in this talk.

  13. MAR

    9

    Thursday

    Open Mic Night @ the Center

    "Open Mic Night presented by AAAG"

    4:30 pm, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 4:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'African American Affinity Group'

    Open Mic Night is back! Tickets $10 in BERA Store. All talent is welcome - singers, spoken word, musicians, comedy, poetry (acts must be PG-13). Refreshments will be served.

  14. MAR

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  15. MAR

    10

    Friday

    Biology Department Seminar

    "Systematic Multi-scale Modeling and Analysis for Gene Regulation"

    Presented by Dr. Daifeng Wang, Stony Brook University, China

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Friday, March 10, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Dr. Ian Blaby'

    The rapidly increasing quantity of biological data offers novel and diverse resources to study biological functions at the system level. Integrating and mining these various large-scale datasets is both a central priority and a great challenge for the field of systems biology and necessitates the development of specialized computational approaches. In this talk, I will present several novel computational systems approaches in a multi-scale modeling framework to study gene expression and regulation: 1) an algorithm to simultaneously cluster multi-layer networks such as gene co-expression networks across multiple species, which discovered novel human developmental genomic functions and behaviors; 2) a logic-circuit based method to identify the genome-wide cooperative logics among gene regulatory factors and pathways for the first time in cancers such as acute myeloid leukemia, which provided unprecedented insights into the gene regulatory logics in complex biological systems; 3) an integrated method using the state-space model and dimensionality reduction to identify principal temporal expression patterns driven by internal and external gene regulatory networks, which established an entirely new analytical platform to identify systematic and robust dynamic patterns from high dimensional, complex and noisy biomedical data. In addition, I will introduce some ongoing research projects and discuss the future directions where multi-scale approaches can make a significant impact in systems biology.

  16. MAR

    10

    Friday

    Tax Overview Workshop for Visiting Foreign Nationals

    "Tax Overview Workshop"

    12 pm, Bldg 400, RSB #1

    Friday, March 10, 2017, 12:00 pm

    Please RSVP to ccarter@bnl.gov Bring your lunch and coffee will be provided.

  17. MAR

    10

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    "Progress towards sub-percent precision for the muon g-2 HVP contribution from lattice QCD"

    Presented by Christoph Lehner, BNL

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 1-224

    Friday, March 10, 2017, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

  18. MAR

    10

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory Seminar

    "Nuclear Matter EoS and thermodynamic Properties of Skyrme models"

    Presented by Mareike Haberichter, Amherst

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 10, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    The Skyrme model is a candidate to describe the low energy regime of QCD where baryons and nuclei are topological excitations in a low-energy effective field theory of pions. The Skyrme model and its BPS variant (Skyrme model with a lower topological energy bound which is saturated) have been applied to the description of nuclei with notable recent success, e.g. quantitative description of Carbon-12 (including the Holye state and its rotational band) and of the low-lying energy spectrum of Oxygen-16. In this talk, we test Skyrme theories as models for nuclear matter at high densities and explore the thermodynamical properties of skyrmionic matter at zero temperature. We compute analytically the mean-field equation of state in the high and medium pressure regimes by applying topological bounds on compact domains. We identify which term in a generalised Skyrme model is responsible for which part in the equation of state and compare our findings with the corresponding results in the Walecka model. We find that the BPS submodel plays the dominant role at large densities. The BPS Skyrme model even allows us to derive thermodynamical variables and densities directly from the theory without having to perform a mean-field limit. This distinguishes the BPS Skyrme model from other models of nuclear matter where usually a mean-field limit has to be performed. Note that this is the first of two talks on Skyrme models and their predictions for nuclear matter at high densities. The second part on the description of neutron stars as Skyrme solitons will be given by Carlos Naya (Durham) on March, 24th at BNL.

  19. MAR

    14

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "The sPHENIX Calorimeters: a proto-type story"

    Presented by Megan Connors, Georgia State University and RBRC

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Jin Huang'

    sPHENIX, scheduled to start taking data in 2022 at RHIC, is a detector designed to probe the inner workings of the quark gluon plasma by measuring jets and their substructure, heavy flavor tagged jets and quarkonia. The design includes tracking systems, a solenoid magnet and calorimeter system. The calorimeter system, designed to measure the energy of jets, is comprised of an electromagnetic calorimeter, an inner hadronic calorimeter and and outer hadronic calorimeter. Prototypes of these detectors were built and tested in 2016. The results of the test beam show that the performance is well within the requirements set by the sPHENIX program. In addition, the results validate the GEANT4 simulation studies. The design of the sPHENIX calorimeter system, the test beam results from the calorimeter prototypes and additional studies will be presented

  20. MAR

    14

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Bob McKeown, Jefferson Lab

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  21. MAR

    15

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  22. MAR

    15

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Brian Shuve, SLAC

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

  23. MAR

    16

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search for physics beyond the SM using multijet events with the ATLAS detector at the LHC"

    Presented by Haichen Wang, LBL

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 16, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Michael Begel''

    Search for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) has been one of the most important goals of the physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).Among all the final states, the multijet final state has long been considered as a challenging one for the search of physics beyond the SM due to its large background. Though, exciting new physics phenomena, such as the production of black hole as well as massive supersymmetric (SUSY) particles, may well result in signals in multijet final state. I present searches for physics beyond the SM using multijet events from 13 TeV collision data taken in 2015 and the first half of 2016 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. I focus on a search for the production of black hole and a search for massive supersymmetric particles decaying to many jets via R-Parity Violating (RPV) couplings. The two examples represent searches targeting physics beyond the SM at different mass scales, and therefore different analysis strategies are employed. These searches have greatly improved the sensitivity of the LHC to the black hole production and RPV SUSY scenarios, and they are complementary to searches using events of leptons, photons and missing transverse energy.

  24. MAR

    16

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Tricking Block Copolymers into Forming New Morphologies"

    Presented by Kevin Yager, CFN / BNL

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, March 16, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Oleg Gang'

    Block copolymer self-assembly allows the rapid formation of nanostructures over wide areas. Yet, the range of possible patterns is fairly limited. I will present emerging strategies for constructing three-dimensional nanostructures whose shapes and symmetries go beyond those of the bulk equilibrium diblock copolymer phase diagram. Photo-thermal methods are used to accelerate assembly, and control block copolymer ordering and orientation. Self-assembly is known to be pathway-dependent, which can be exploited to select a particular nano-pattern. Ordered layers can be stacked to yield new lattice symmetries. This multi-layered ordering can be performed in a responsive mode, where each self-assembled layer templates the ones that follow. Taken together, these new motifs point towards the ability to construct designed, multi-functional 3D nanostructures.

  25. MAR

    22

    Wednesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "MagLev Competition"

    8:30 am, Brookhaven Center

    Wednesday, March 22, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Aleida Perez'

  26. MAR

    22

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 22, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  27. MAR

    22

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Heavy bosons: a probe into the unknown"

    Presented by Viviana Cavaliere, University of Illinois Champaign/Urbana

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 22, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Michael Begel''

    The large amount of high-energy proton-proton collision data at the LHC provides an unprecedented opportunity to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model at the TeV scale. The 2012 discovery of a 125 GeV Higgs boson opened a new door to understanding the universe, providing an exciting new tool to use in these searches, given it is now produced about once per second at the current collision rate. The talk will review recent ATLAS searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, focusing on the central role of processes with heavy bosons, including the Higgs, and the corresponding new possible signatures that range from spectacular new resonances to subtle changes in kinematic distributions.

  28. MAR

    24

    Friday

    Long Island Environment

    "2017 Long Island Natural History Conference"

    Presented by Various

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Friday, March 24, 2017, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Tim Green'

  29. MAR

    24

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Neutrino Interactions with Nuclei and Long-Baseline Experiments"

    Presented by Professor Ulrich Mosel, Giessen University

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 24, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    The extraction of neutrino mixing parameters and the CP-violating phase requires knowledge of the neutrino energy. This energy must be reconstructed from the final state of a neutrino-nucleus reaction since all long-baseline experiments use nuclear targets. This reconstruction requires detailed knowledge of the neutrino reactions with bound nucleons and of the final state interactions of hadrons with the nuclear environment. Quantum-kinetic transport theory can be used to build an event generator for this reconstruction that takes basic nuclear properties, such as binding, into account. Some examples are discussed that show the effects of nuclear interactions on observables in long-baseline experiments.

  30. MAR

    24

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "A solitonic approach to neutron stars: The (BPS) Skyrme model"

    Presented by Carlos Naya, Durham

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 24, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    The Skyrme model is a low energy effective field theory of strong interactions where nuclei and baryons appear as collective excitations of pionic degrees of freedom. Proposed by Tony Skyrme in the sixties, his ideas received further support when it was discovered that in the limit of the large number of colours of QCD, an effective theory of mesons arises. In the last years, there has been a revival of Skyrme's ideas and new related models, some of them with BPS bounds (topological lower energy bounds), have been proposed. It is the aim of this talk to focus on the one known as BPS Skyrme model. After a brief introduction to this BPS limit we study its application to neutron stars where we will find that high maximal masses are supported. In addition, the BPS Skyrme model allow us to perform both mean-field and exact calculations and a comparison between both approaches will be presented.

  31. MAR

    25

    Saturday

    Long Island Environment

    "2017 Long Island Natural History Conference"

    Presented by Various

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Saturday, March 25, 2017, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Tim Green'

  32. MAR

    28

    Tuesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Thermalization and light cones in a model with weak integrability breaking"

    Presented by Stefan Groha, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Neil Robinson''

    We employ equation of motion techniques to study the non-equilibrium dynamics in a lattice model of weakly interacting spinless fermions. Our model provides a simple setting for analyzing the effects of weak integrability breaking perturbations on the time evolution after a quantum quench. We establish the accuracy of the method by comparing results at short and intermediate times to time-dependent density matrix renormalization group computations. For sufficiently weak integrability-breaking interactions we always observe prethermalization plateaux, where local observables relax to non-thermal values at intermediate time scales. At later times a crossover towards thermal behaviour sets in. We determine the associated time scale, which depends on the initial state, the band structure of the non-interacting theory, and the strength of the integrability breaking perturbation. Our method allows us to analyze in some detail the spreading of correlations and in particular the structure of the associated light cones in our model. We find that the interior and exterior of the light cone are separated by an intermediate region, the temporal width of which appears to scale with a universal power-law t 1/3.

  33. MAR

    28

    Tuesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Developing Low-Noise Front-End ASICs for Radiation Detectors"

    Presented by Shaorui LI, BNL

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 2:30 pm

    Radiation sensors detect and convert radiation of interest (e.g. charged particles, neutrino, X- and gamma–rays) into electric charge. Reading out from radiation sensors requires highly specialized electronics. In this talk, the low-noise design techniques and circuits adopted in state-of-the-art CMOS Front-End ASICs for radiation detectors are presented. Design applications include high-energy and particle physics, energy science, space, and medical imaging. Special design challenges on CMOS devices at extreme environment. e.g. cryogenic operation and space radiation, are also discussed.

  34. MAR

    28

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Physics in the complex domain"

    Presented by Carl Bender, Washington University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Robert Pisarski''

    The theory of complex variables is extremely useful because it helps to explain the mathematical behavior of functions of a real variable. Complex variable theory also provides insight into the nature of physical theories. For example, it provides a simple and beautiful picture of quantization and it explains the underlying reason for the divergence of perturbation theory. By using complex-variable methods one can generalize conventional Hermitian quantum theories into the complex domain. The result is a new class of parity-time-symmetric (PT-symmetric) theories whose remarkable physical properties have been studied and verified in many recent laboratory experiments.

  35. MAR

    29

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  36. MAR

    29

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "GUITARIST JIJI"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Geoffrey Hind'

    Jiji is an adventurous artist on both acoustic and electric guitar, playing an extensive range of music from traditional and contemporary classical music to free improvisation. Her impeccable musicianship combined with compelling stage presence and fascinating repertoire earned the Korean guitarist First Prize at the 2016 Concert Artists Guild International Competition. Jiji's program for BSA includes works by Albeniz, Ginastera, Vivaldi, Bach, Lansky and Reich.

  37. MAR

    30

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Evaluation of reactor neutrino flux: issues and uncertainties"

    Presented by Professor Petr Vogel, Caltech

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 30, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Evaluation of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum is an essential ingredient of their application in the neutrino oscillation studies. Two anomalies, i.e. discrepancies between the observed and expected count rates, are widely discussed at the present time. The total rate is about 6% lower than the expectation at all distances > 10 m from the reactor. And there is a shoulder (often referred to as "bump") at neutrino energies 5-7 MeV, not predicted in the calculated spectrum. I review the ways the flux and spectrum is evaluated. I argue that far reaching conclusions based on these anomalies should await a thorough understanding of the uncertainties of the spectrum, and point out possible standard physics sources of the anomalies.

  38. MAR

    31

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "neutrinoless double beta decay and nuclear structure theory"

    Presented by Professor Petr Vogel, Caltech

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 31, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Search for the neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the main goals of nuclear physics community worldwide. If observed, it would be an example of "physics beyond the Standard Model", showing that the lepton number is not a conserved quantity and that neutrinos are massive Majorana fermions. After introducing the subject and its particle physics consequences I will concentrate on the issue of evaluation of the nuclear matrix elements. Despite decades of effort and hundreds of publications, different approaches give results that differ by roughly a factor of three, and it is difficult to decide which of them is the most realistic. I will describe the strengths and weaknesses of the nuclear models used. In addition, I will discuss the problem of "quenching", i.e. of reduction of the matrix elements of weak axial current in complex nuclei, that potentially affects the neutrinoless double beta decay matrix element values signiffcantly

  39. APR

    5

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  40. APR

    5

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Diptimoy Ghosh, Weizman

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Amarjit Soni'

  41. APR

    6

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Carl Mesters, Shell

    4 pm, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, April 6, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Dario Stacchiola''

    TBD

  42. APR

    7

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Dirk Rischke, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitat

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 7, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

  43. APR

    13

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Natural Seesaw in Warped/Composite Higgs framework and its LHC Signals"

    Presented by Kaustubh Agashe, University of Maryland

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 13, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Christoph Lehner''

    I will show how a natural seesaw model for SM neutrino mass arises within the general framework of a warped extra dimension (dual to composite Higgs in 4D). It starts out as an attempt at implementing the high-scale seesaw mechanism. I will first carefully determine what the underlying dynamical picture really is. Motivated by this physical understanding, LHC signals of TeV-mass SM singlet neutrinos within a specific model for the electroweak gauge sector will be discussed. Some of these channels are similar to those studied in 4D left-right (LR) symmetric models, but nonetheless the two can be distinguished. While other signals are more characteristic of the 5D/composite framework, i.e., are absent in 4D LR models.

  44. APR

    13

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, April 13, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  45. APR

    14

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Effect of magnetic field on flow fluctuations in"

    Presented by Ajit M. Srivvastava

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 14, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    Very strong magnetic fields can arise in non-central heavy-ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies, which may not decay quickly in a conducting plasma. We carry out magnetohydrodynamics simulations to study the effects of this magnetic field on the evolution of the plasma and on resulting flow fluctuations. Our results show that magnetic field leads to enhancement in elliptic flow, while flow fluctuations lead to reorganization of magnetic flux resulting in a transient increase in the local magnetic field. We also show generation of vorticity arising from nontrivial dependence of magnetosonic waves on pressure gradients and magnetic field direction. Magnetic field from collision of deformed nuclei shows very nontrivial features and can lead to qualitatively new effects on plasma evolutions. We discuss possibility of dynamo effect in the presence of vortices if any exotic high baryon density QCD phases are achieved in heavy-ion collisions.

  46. APR

    18

    Tuesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "LI STEM Hub's 5th Annual Celebration & Student Showcase"

    9:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Tuesday, April 18, 2017, 9:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Kenneth White'

    Please join us to celebrate our 5th year and learn about the exciting things that have been happening in STEM on Long Island! Opening Address: Kathleen Hochul, NYS Lieutenant Governor Keynote Speaker: Mark Alessi, Executive Director, Business Incubator Association of NYS 9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. - Student and Industry Showcases 11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. - Annual Meeting • Network with the LI STEM Hub's Business and Academic Partners from across Long Island • Interact with some of LI's top students & learn about their STEM research and projects • Learn from Industry Leaders about future trends and skills needed in their fields • Hear from Innovators about their path to success • Learn about the LI STEM Hub's progress to date and plans going forward Registration link: www.listemhub.org/li-stem-hub-annual-celebration All visitors to the Laboratory age 16 and over MUST BRING a photo ID. This event is free and open to the public. Event photos will be taken.

  47. APR

    19

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "STONY BROOK OPERA"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, April 19, 2017, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Geoffrey Hind'

    Stony Brook Opera will present a preview of its upcoming* production of Benjamin Britten's opera The Rape of Lucretia. The preview will include the most important scenes from the opera, conducted by Timothy Long and staged by Ted Altschuler. The scenes will be sung in the original English language with projected titles, and performed with piano accompaniment. *4/22/2017, 8:00 PM, Staller Center,SUSB

  48. APR

    20

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Unpaired Spins in Superconductors: From Assassin to Enabler"

    Presented by Jeffrey Lynn, NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology

    11 am, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, April 20, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: '''Igor Zaliznyak'''

    The magnetic properties of superconductors have a rich and interesting history, and we will briefly review some highlights. Early work showed that even tiny concentrations of magnetic impurities destroyed the superconducting pairing through the exchange-driven spin depairing mechanism, prohibiting any possibility of magnetic order coexisting with superconductivity. The first exceptions to this rule were provided by the cubic rare-earth substituted CeRu2 alloys, followed by the ternary Chevrel-phase superconductors (e.g. HoMo6S8) and related compounds, where long range magnetic order coexists or competes with superconductivity. The very low magnetic ordering temperatures (~1 K) suggested that dipolar rather than exchange interactions dominate, thus (it was thought) allowing the coexistence. These materials also provided the first examples of the competition between ferromagnetism and superconductivity. In the newer borocarbide class of magnetic superconductors (e.g. ErNi2B2C), however, it became clear that the magnetic order is in fact exchange driven. The borocarbides also provided the first example of the spontaneous formation of flux quanta (vortices). For the cuprate and iron-based superconductors (formerly known as "high Tc") we now have come full circle, as the spins are not only tolerated but are intimately tied to the superconductivity. The "parent" cuprate systems are Mott-Hubbard antiferromagnetic insulators with very strong magnetic interactions that are two-dimensional in nature. These strong exchange interactions survive into the superconducting state, yielding highly correlated electrons that participate directly in the superconducting pairing. The "parent" materials of the new iron-based high TC superconductors are also antiferromagnets with very energetic spin excitations, and in the superconducting regime they form a "magnetic resonance" that is directly tied to the superconducting order parameter, ju

  49. APR

    20

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Discovery of New Mikly Way Dwarf Galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey"

    Presented by Alex Drlica- Wagner, Fermilab

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 20, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Erin Sheldon'

  50. APR

    26

    Wednesday

    YITP/HET Joint Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by John Donoghue, U. Mass Amherst

    2 pm, YITP Seminar Room, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 2:00 pm

  51. APR

    27

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Searching for Optical Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Events in the Dark Energy Survey"

    Presented by Jim Annis, Fermilab

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 27, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Erin Sheldon'

  52. APR

    27

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Darkening Pt Nanocrystals for Photocatalysis"

    Presented by Yugang Sun, Department of Chemistry, Temple University

    4 pm, CFN Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, April 27, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''''Fang Lu'''''

    Platinum (Pt) nanocrystals are commonly used in chemical reactions because of their unusual catalytic activity, for example, photocatalytic water splitting of water. In a typical design, Pt nanocrystals can accept photo-excited electrons from light absorbers such as semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) to catalyze hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) [1]. Charge transfer from QDs to Pt nanocrystals is very inefficient, and shuttle molecules (e.g., methyl viologen) or other shuttle species are necessary to facilitate the charge transfer [2]. In addition to receiving energetic electrons from semiconductor QDs, Pt nanocrystal can also absorb visible light to generate energetic electrons (or hot electrons), which can directly reduce reactive species or migrate across a metal/semiconductor Schottky barrier to the conduction band of a semiconductor. Different from the widely studied plasmonic metal nanocrystals (e.g., Au, Ag), the efficiency of generating hot electrons in the weakly absorbing Pt nanocrystals is very low. We found that depositing Pt nanocrystals on spherical glass beads (i.e., SiO2 particles) could significantly enhance the visible absorption coefficient of the Pt nanocrystals. For example, in SiO2@Pt nanocrystals@TiO2 core-shell nanostructures, the enhancement in visible absorption enables the efficient generation of energetic electrons in photoexcited Pt nanocrystals, which can easily transfer to the TiO2 surface layer to drive HER and many other chemical reactions [3].

  53. APR

    28

    Friday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "TBD"

    Presented by Martin Mourigal, Georgia Tech

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Friday, April 28, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Igor Zaliznyak''

    TBD

  54. MAY

    3

    Wednesday

    Joint YITP/HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Tim Tait, UCI

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, May 3, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Amarjit Soni'

  55. MAY

    11

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by TBD

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, May 11, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''TBD''

  56. MAY

    11

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 11, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  57. MAY

    17

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jonathan Kozaczuk, UMass Amherst

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, May 17, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

  58. MAY

    31

    Wednesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Open Space Stewardship Program Celebration"

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, May 31, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Melvyn Morris'''

  59. JUN

    1

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Kyoung-Shin Choi

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, June 1, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''''Mingzhao Lu'''''

  60. JUN

    5

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Summer "DOE/BNL" Internship Program Begins"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Monday, June 5, 2017, 8:30 am

  61. JUN

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 8, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  62. JUN

    14

    Wednesday

    Blood Drive

    9 am, Brookhaven Center

    Wednesday, June 14, 2017, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Patricia Edwards'

  63. JUN

    15

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    9 am, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, June 15, 2017, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Patricia Edwards'

  64. JUN

    20

    Tuesday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2017 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    8:30 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, June 20, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: '''Kelly Guiffreda'''

  65. JUN

    21

    Wednesday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2017 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    8:30 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, June 21, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: ''Kelly Guiffreda''

  66. JUN

    22

    Thursday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2017 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, June 22, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Kelly Guiffreda'

  67. JUN

    23

    Friday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2017 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    8:30 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 23, 2017, 8:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Kelly Guiffreda'

  68. JUL

    6

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by TBD

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Thursday, July 6, 2017, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'TBD'

  69. JUL

    10

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "High School Research Program Begins"

    8:30 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Monday, July 10, 2017, 8:30 am

  70. AUG

    10

    Thursday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2017 Summer Poster Symposium"

    8:30 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, August 10, 2017, 8:30 am

  71. AUG

    28

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "2017 Fall Internship Begins"

    8:30 am, BLDG. 438

    Monday, August 28, 2017, 8:30 am