BNL Home
May 2016
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. No events scheduled

2

  1. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    1:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    The LCLS-II injector is a high brightness electron source for injection into a CW superconducting L-band linac to drive an X-ray FEL up to 1 MHz repetition rate. The injector was designed by a collaboration including SLAC, LBNL, Cornell and FERMI labs. An update on the status of the injector will be given including an overview of the injector layout, baseline performance specification, upcoming commissioning work and current results from the APEX prototype injector. Theoretical work to accurately simulate emission from photocathodes will also be presented.

  2. High Tc Superconductor Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: ''Ron Pindak and Ivan Bozovic''

    We propose a model of Cooper-like pairing induced by the large ion polarizabilities of O2- in Bismutates and Cuprates and As3- and Se2- in the iron pnictides*. We show that the electrical potential field induced by a charge carrier contains in its vicinity pockets of negative potential causing charge carriers to attract each other. Using this model we calculate the approximate pairing and gap energies showing they are compatible with the gap energies measured in high-Tc superconductors. Furthermore we show that the isotope effect, coherence length, and the gap energy dependence on doping are consistent with those observed in high-Tc systems. * Work done in collaboration with Yakov Girshberg

3

  1. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Robert Pisarski'

    With the addition of a 20 GeV polarized electron accelerator to the existing Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the world?s only high energy heavy ion and polarized proton collider, a future eRHIC facility will be able to produce polarized electron-nucleon collisions at center-of-mass energies of up to 145 GeV and cover the whole science case as outlined in the Electron-Ion Collider White Paper and endorsed by the 2015 Nuclear Physics Long Range Plan with high luminosity. The presentation will describe the eRHIC design concepts and recent efforts to reduce the technical risks of the project.

4

  1. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Tomomi Ishikawa'

5

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Daniel Pitonyak''

    Vorticity describes the local rotation of the fluid. I will talk about our recent study of the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in heavy-ion collisions. Several special properties of the vorticity in heavy-ion collisions will be discussed, e.g., the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction. Vorticity can drive vector and axial current in chiral quark-gluon plasma via the chiral vortical effect. I will discuss the collective gapless mode, the chiral vortical wave, emerging from CVE and its experimental implications in heavy-ion collisions. Finally, I will consider the rotating trapped cold atomic gases and show that when there is a Weyl spin-orbit coupling such cold atomic gases provide a desktop simulator of the chiral magnetic effect and chiral separation effect.

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Understanding fundamental properties of neutrinos is of compelling interest to the nuclear and particle physics community. The discovery of neutrino oscillations is one of our first hints of physics beyond the Standard Model. Searching for neutrinoless double decay can provide key insights into the neutrino mass generation mechanism and put stringent constraints on the absolute neutrino mass scale. Such a rare decay, if exists, would signify the Majorana nature of neutrinos and the non-conservation of lepton number. In the past decade, large ultra-low background liquid xenon detectors have emerged as a promising technology that can push the neutrinoless double beta decay search to unprecedented sensitivity. In this talk I will describe recent results and prospects of current generation experiment EXO-200, as well as the R&D program for future tonne scale detector nEXO.

6

  1. Fundraiser

    11 am, Berkner Hall Cafeteria

  2. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Soeren Schlichting''

    Local momentum anisotropies become large in the early stages of the quark-gluon plasma created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, due to the extreme difference in the longitudinal and transverse expansion rates. In such situations, fluid dynamics derived from an expansion around an isotropic local equilibrium state is bound to break down. Instead, we subsume the slowest nonhydrodynamic degree of freedom (associated with the deviation from momentum isotropy) at leading order defining a local anisoptropic quasi-equilibrium state, thereby treating the longitudinal/transverse pressure anisotropy nonperturbatively. Perturbative transport equations are then derived to deal with the remaining residual momentum anisotropies creating a complete transient effective theory called viscous anisotropic hydrodynamics. This approach has been shown to dramatically outperform viscous hydrodynamics in several simplified situations for which exact solutions exits but which share with realistic expansion scenarios the problem of large dissipative currents. We will discuss the present status of applying viscous anisotropic hydrodynamics to the phenomenological description of the quark-gluon plasma in realistic expansion scenarios.

7

  1. No events scheduled

8

  1. No events scheduled

9

  1. Chemistry Department Colloquium

    10 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    TBA

  2. Chemistry Department Colloquium

    10 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: 'Sanjaya Senanayake'

    One of the major challenges in heterogeneous catalysis is the preparation of highly selective and robust catalysts. The goal is to be able to synthesize solids with stable surfaces containing a large number of specific surface sites designed for the promotion of a particular reaction. New synergies between surface-science studies and novel nanosynthesis methodology promise to afford new ways to design such highly selective catalysts in a controlled way. Here we will provide a progress report on several projects ongoing in our laboratory based on this approach. First, we will offer a general discussion on the unresolved issues associated with olefin- conversion reactions promoted by metal surfaces. In a specific project, platinum-based catalysts were designed for the selective trans-to-cis conversion of olefins based on early surface-science work with model single-crystal surfaces and quantum mechanical calculations that indicated a particular preference for (111) facets in promoting the formation of the cis isomers. A metal- nanoparticle encapsulation procedure was also developed to increase catalyst stability and to prevent sintering. In a second example, new metal@TiO2 yolk-shell nanomaterials were conceived for both regular and photo-induced catalytic applications. These catalysts can promote CO oxidation at cryogenic temperatures, and suggest that in photocatalysis the role of the metal may not be to scavenge the excited electrons produced in the semiconductor upon absorption of light, as commonly believed, but rather to promote the recombination of the adsorbed atomic hydrogen initially produced by reduction of H+ on the surface of that semiconductor. Additional examples will be briefly introduced, including the use of "click" chemistry to tether molecular functionality on porous solid materials and the use of self-assembly and sol-gel chemistry to prepare catalysts with well-defined structural characteristics.

10

  1. No events scheduled

11

  1. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Tomomi Ishikawa''

    This talk will be centered around the calculation of the high temperature topological susceptibility in QCD. It will provide some background on our motivation from cosmology and particle physics, which is the dependence of axion physics on non-perturbative QCD. I will show our recent results on the quenched high temperature topological susceptibility and discuss difficulties with this conventional approach, which render dynamical studies unfeasible. I will also present our new approach based on formulating QCD on a non-orientable manifold, which is a promising candidate to solve issues related to topological freezing and the divergence of autocorrelations when approaching the continuum limit.

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

12

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, Bldg 735, Conference Room B

    Hosted by: 'Chang-Yong Nam'

    Membrane-based technologies are energy efficient and have a small footprint, making them economically attractive candidates to help address our water and energy needs. Ion exchange membranes (i.e., charged membranes, ionomers, etc.) are critical for efficient operation of a number of membrane-based technologies such as electrodialysis, reverse electrodialysis, fuel cells, etc., due to their ability to effectively control rates of water and ion transport. Efforts are also underway to harness their separation properties for applications that have not traditionally used them (e.g., reverse osmosis, pressure retarded osmosis, etc.). One avenue for improving these technologies is to develop more effective membranes. Rational design of high performance membranes could be catalyzed by fundamental knowledge of the connection between polymer structure (physical or chemical) and transport properties. However, despite the long history of literature on the topic and the industrial importance of such materials, the current state of understanding is incomplete. Experimental techniques for characterizing ion sorption and transport in charged membranes have been established, however, a simple theoretical framework for interpreting the experimental findings is missing. In this study, a framework for ion sorption and diffusion in charged membranes based upon ideas from polyelectrolyte theory (e.g., counter-ion condensation) has been formulated and tested against experimental data. For the membranes considered in this study, the framework accurately described, and in some cases predicted, concentration gradient (i.e., salt permeability) and electric field (i.e., ionic conductivity) driven ion transport. The main factors governing ion sorption and transport in charged polymers are discussed. Our long-term goal is to use such knowledge to establish structure/property relations leading to rational design of membranes with improved performance.

  2. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Daniel Pitonyak''

    This talk will start with a very general introduction to the Functional Renormalization Group method, a powerful non-perturbative tool which can be applied to various problems. The second part of the talk will demonstrate this by discussing the influence of an external magnetic field on the chiral phase transition in the theory of strong interaction. The Functional Renormalization Group analysis shows that, driven by gluon dynamics, the chiral critical temperature decreases for small values of the magnetic field. For large values of the external field, however, the phase transition temperature increases.

  3. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    The T2K ("Tokai to Kamioka") experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in Japan. A beam of muon neutrinos or muon antineutrinos is produced at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) in Tokai. The unoscillated neutrino flux is measured by the near detector complex 280 m from the proton target, and the oscillated neutrino flux is measured by the far detector, Super-Kamiokande, 295 km away. Using a beam of muon neutrinos, T2K has performed precise measurements of muon neutrino disappearance, and discovered muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation by measuring electron neutrino appearance. Since the summer of 2014, T2K has been taking data using a beam of muon antineutrinos, and has released the results of both a muon antineutrino disappearance analysis and an electron antineutrino appearance analysis, both using antineutrino beam data up to the summer of 2015. This talk will discuss these analyses, going into detail about the role played by the near detector, and looking at future directions.

  4. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

13

  1. Biology Department Seminar

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: '''Ian Blaby'''

  2. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Soeren Schlichting''

    Energetic jets are particularly interesting probes of QGP created in heavy ion collisions. Recently a lot of progress was made in attempting to describe the jet evolution in holography. In this talk I'll present an application of a simple dual model to study the jet substructure starting with energy and angle distributions from pQCD. In particular I will show that there are two competing effects: (1) each individual jet widens as it propagates through plasma; (2) the final jet opening angle distribution becomes narrower since wider jets lose more energy and less likely to survive. So, the mean opening angle for jets with a given energy can easily shift toward smaller angles, even while every jet in the ensemble broadens.

14

  1. No events scheduled

15

  1. No events scheduled

16

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    11 am, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: 'Peter D. Johnson'

    Discoveries of superfluid phases in 3He, high Tc superconductors, graphene and topological insulators have brought into focus materials where quasiparticles are described by same Dirac equation that governs behavior of relativistic particles. I will discuss how this class of materials, called Dirac materials, exhibits unusual universal features seen in numerous realizations: Klein tunneling, chiral symmetries and impurity resonances. Goal of this talk is to explore these similarities and discuss the unique role of symmetries that protect Dirac spectrum and possible routes to generate gaps due to many body instabilities. We will also discuss ongoing investigation of the symmetries of Dirac materials, quantum imaging, and means to control their properties. At the end we will propose to use modern tools to design artificial Dirac Materials. One example would be the design Bosonic Dirac materials that host bosonic Dirac excitations, something that would not be possible in particle physics.

  2. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: ''Oleg Gang''

    A living cell is a complex soft matter system that is far from equilibrium. While its components have definite mechanical properties like stiffness and viscosity, cells consume energy to generate force and exhibit adaptation by modulating their mechanical properties through regulatory pathways. In this work, we explore cell mechanics by stretching single fibroblast cells and simultaneously measuring their traction stresses. We show that a minimal active linear viscoelastic model captures essential features of cell response, especially during early times shortly after stretch. On longer time scales, cells often exhibit an adaptive response to stretch that contradicts the minimal mechanical model. We find that while molecular perturbations of myosin and vinculin change quiescent traction stresses, surprisingly they have no significant impact on the stiffness or viscoelastic timescale of the cell response.

  3. Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11 pm, Conference Room, Bldg 815E

    Hosted by: 'Jian Wang'

    pending

17

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    11 am, Building 480, Conference Room

    Hosted by: 'Lijun Wu'

    The orientation of spin assemblies in ferromagnetic thin films and nanostructures can take a variety of shapes depending on the relative strength of factors contributing to their magnetic free energy. These factors are derived from the direct quantum mechanical exchange between the electronic spins or those mediated by impurities, and those associated with the size, shape, crystallographic structure, strain, dipolar interactions and external fields. Here we present three cases where the orientational dynamics has been studied as functions of temperature, magnetic field strength and the elapsed time after acquiring a particular configuration. These studies are based on magnetic force microscopy and bulk magnetometry measurements on strain epitaxial films of La0.67Ca0.33MnO3, and lithographically patterned submicron size ring assemblies of permalloy and Co/Pd multilayers, which also form artificial spin ices. Towards the end of this lecture we will discuss interface driven magnetic and electronic phenomena in magnetic thin films.

18

  1. Office of Educational Programs Event

    9:45 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    9:45 am - Network with the LI STEM Hub's Business and Academic Partners across Long Island. Interact with some of LI's top students & learn about their STEM Research and projects. 11:00 am - Annual Meeting - Keynote speaker Robert Catell, Chairman, Advanced Energy Center followed by Collaborative team discussions and more. Please register at: http://www.listemhub.org/celebration2016/

  2. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

    Higgs pair production is not only interesting as a probe of the trilinear Higgs self-coupling, but beyond the Standard Model physics can influence the Higgs pair production cross section in many different ways, for example by new couplings, new loop particles or new resonances. In this talk, I will address the question whether we could see for the first time deviations from the Standard Model in Higgs pair production assuming that no deviations were seen before. Furthermore, for certain models I will show how higher order corrections influence the cross section.

19

  1. CFN Colloquium

    11 am, CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Hosted by: ''''''Chuck Black''''''

    Photonics on chip could enable a platform for monolithic integration of optics and microelectronics for applications of optical interconnects in which high data streams are required in a small footprint. This approach could alleviate some of the current bottlenecks in traditional microelectronics. In this talk I will review the challenges and achievement in the field of Silicon Nanophotonics and present our recent results. Using highly confined photonic structures, much smaller than the wavelength of light, we have demonstrated ultra-compact passive and active silicon photonic components that enhance the electro-optical, mechanical and non-linear properties of Silicon. Based on the ability to dynamically modulate light on the same time scale as the time of flight we have demonstrated novel GHz structures for a variety of applications including all-optical synchronized RF oscillators and optical isolators on a silicon chip. Michal Lipson is the Higgins Professor of Electrical Engineering at Columbia University, New York, NY. Her research focuses on novel on-chip Nanophotonics devices. She has pioneered several of the critical building blocks for silicon photonics including the GHz silicon modulators. Professor Lipson's honors and awards include 2010 Macarthur fellow, NYAS Blavatnik award, OSA Fellow, IBM Faculty Award, and NSF Early Career Award. More information on Professor Lipson can be found at http://lipson.ee.columbia.edu/

  2. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Daniel Pitonyak''

    In 2+1 dimensional system, the most important phase transition should be of the Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) type. We determined the KT transition temperature T_KT as well as the mass melting temperature T^* as a function of the magnetic field. It is found that the pseudogap domain T_KT < T < T^* is enlarged with increasing strength of the magnetic field. The influence of a chiral imbalanceμ_5 was also studied. We found that even a constant axial chemical potential μ_5 can lead to inverse magnetic catalysis of the KT transition temperature in 2+1 dimensions. This is actually the de Haas—van Alphen oscillation. Furthermore, we studied the QCD vacuum structure under the influence of an electromagnetic field with a nonzero second Lorentz invariant I_2=E·B. We showed that the presence of I_2 can induce neutral pion (π_0) condensation in the QCD vacuum through the electromagnetic triangle anomaly. Within the frameworks of chiral perturbation theory at leading small-momenta expansion as well as the Nambu—Jona-Lasinio model at leading 1/Nc expansion, a universal dependence of the π_0 condensate on I_2 was found. The stability of the π_0-condensed vacuum is also discussed.

  3. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

    The large increase in collision energy that the LHC reached in Run 2 provides an unprecedented opportunity to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). Various extensions of the SM predict the existence of heavy resonances at the TeV scale, which couple predominantly to the Higgs and electroweak gauge bosons. At high resonance masses the hadronic decay products of these energetic bosons tend to be highly collimated and the usual identification techniques fail to disentangle the decay products of our bosons. In this seminar I will describe the jet-substructure techniques explored by ATLAS analyses and present the results of the ATLAS searches using Run-2 data.

20

  1. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Sally Dawson''

  2. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: '''Soeren Schlichting'''

    Based on prior work by the JET collaboration, the importance of the factorization and scale evolution of the jet quenching parameter q-hat will be outlined. This will turn out to be important for both phenomenological extractions of q-hat as well as for first principle determinations on the lattice. I will argue that for jets at RHIC and LHC, q-hat does not lie within the range of Bjoerken-x where small x effects would be considered to be dominant. Given this situation, q-hat will be found to be an integral over an operator product separated in both light-cone and transverse distance, but somewhat different from a ``traditional'' TMDPDF. This new distribution will be studied at Next-to-Leading Order and the fate of non-standard divergences discussed.

21

  1. No events scheduled

22

  1. No events scheduled

23

  1. Biology Department Seminar

    3 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: 'Huilin Li'

    My research program focuses on understanding the structural mechanisms of macromlecular assemblies using an integrated approach by combining three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM), with biochemical, biophysical, computational methods. With the recent advance in direct electron detection, cryoEM has become a powerful tool for structure determination of protein complexes and assemblies. Our current research efforts are directed to two such large assemblies: HIV-1 viral capsid and bacterial chemotaxis receptor signaling arrays. In this presentation, I will mainly focus on HIV-1 capsid assembly, maturation and interaction with host cell factors that modulate viral infectivity. I will also present some of the technologies we developed, in particular the correlative fluorescent light microscopy and cryoEM method (CLEM), to advance our understanding of HIV-1 pathogenesis.

24

  1. High Performance Computing and Programming

    8:30 am, Stony Brook University

    NVIDIA and the Institute for Advanced Computational Science (IACS) at Stony Brook University are pleased to be organizing a 2-day High Performance Computing and Programming event. Presented by NVIDIA instructor Bob Crovella, the workshop will introduce programming techniques using OpenACC and will include topics such as optimization and profiling methods for GPU programming.

  2. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Oleg Eyser'

    Jefferson Lab experiment E06-014, performed in Hall A, made measurements of the double-spin asymmetries and absolute cross sections in both the DIS and resonance regions by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at beam energies of 4.74 and 5.89 GeV from a longitudinally and transversely polarized 3He target. Through these measurements various aspects of the neutron spin structure were investigated. The g2 nucleon spin-dependent structure function contains information beyond the simple parton model description of the nucleon. It provides insight into quark-gluon correlations and a path to access the confining local color force a struck quark experiences just as it is hit by the virtual photon due to the remnant di-quark. The quantity d2, a measure of this local color force, has its information encoded in an x2 weighted integral of a linear combination of spin structure functions g1 and g2 and thus is dominated by the valence-quark region at large momentum fraction x. To date, theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of the neutron d2 differ by about two standard deviations. Therefore E06-014 made a precision measurement of this quantity. The polarized quark distributions were also investigated through measurements of the virtual photon-nucleon asymmetry A1^n, the structure function ratio g1/F1, and quark ratio (delta d+delta d_bar)/(d+d_bar). The E06-014 results for the spin structure functions (g1,g2) on 3He, dn2, An1, (delta d+delta d_bar)/(d+d_bar), and our extractions of the neutron color electric and magnetic forces will be presented.

25

  1. High Performance Computing and Programming Event

    8:30 am, Stony Brook University

    NVIDIA and the Institute for Advanced Computational Science (IACS) at Stony Brook University are pleased to be organizing a 2-day High Performance Computing and Programming event. Presented by NVIDIA instructor Bob Crovella, the workshop will introduce programming techniques using OpenACC and will include topics such as optimization and profiling methods for GPU programming.

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

26

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Hiroshi Ohki'

    Recently, Picard-Lefschetz theory gets much attention in the context of the sign problem, because it enables us to study the system with the complex classical action nonperturbatively by employing the semiclassical analysis. In this seminar, after its brief introduction, I will apply it to the one-site Hubbard model. This model has a severe sign problem, which looks quite similar to that of the finite-density QCD at low temperatures. By solving this model using the Lefschetz-thimble path integral, we are trying to understand the structure of the sign problem of finite-density QCD. Especially, I give a qualitative picture (or speculation) about the early-onset problem of the baryon number density, called the baryon Silver Blaze problem. The complex Langevin method will also be discussed if time allows.

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: '''Xin Qian'''

27

  1. No events scheduled

28

  1. No events scheduled

29

  1. No events scheduled

30

  1. No events scheduled

31

  1. Nuclear Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Oleg Eyser'

    Non-central collisions between ultra-relativistic heavy ions involve thousands of h-bar of angular momentum. Some of this angular momentum may be transferred to the quark-gluon plasma through shear forces that generate a vortical substructure in the hydrodynamic flow field. Understanding this fundamental femtoscopic substructure may be crucial, as we move beyond boost-invariant scenarios and rely more on sophisticated three-dimensional viscous models of the plasma. The vortical nature of the system is expected to polarize the spins of hadrons that eventually emerge. Lambda and Anti-Lambda hyperons, which reveal their polarization through their decay topology, should be polarized similarly in the direction of the system's angular momentum. These same collisions are also characterized by dynamic magnetic fields with magnitude as large as 10^{14} Tesla. Magnetic effects have been the focus of intense study in recent years due to their relevance to the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) and other novel phenomena. A splitting between Lambda and Anti-Lambda polarization may signal a magnetic coupling and provide a quantitative estimate of the field strength at freeze out. Physically, this strength depends on the conductivity of the QGP. The STAR Collaboration has made the first observation of global hyperon polarization along the direction of the angular momentum in non-central Au+Au collisions at Beam Energy Scan energies. Our preliminary results indicate that the QGP created at RHIC is the highest-vorticity fluid ever created in the laboratory. A magnetic splitting is hinted at, but the improved statistics and resolution achievable with future runs are required to make a definitive measurement of the magnetic field.

  1. JUN

    1

    Wednesday

    English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    "Identifying positive & negative speech patterns"

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 1, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

  2. JUN

    2

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Graphene Synthesis and Devices"

    Presented by Dr. James Tour, Rice University

    11 am, CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, June 2, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Dmitri Zakharov'

    An in-depth look at numerous methods to make graphene, ranging from single-crystal sheets that grown in precise hexagonal arrays to growth of graphene in air at room temperature using lasers, and 2- and 3-D hybrid graphene nanotube structures. Use of the graphene materials in composites will be discussed. Many of the devices made and their transitions to industry will be shown. These devices include fuel cells, water splitting systems, batteries, supercapacitors and more.

  3. JUN

    2

    Thursday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Open Space Stewardship Celebration"

    6 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, June 2, 2016, 6:00 pm

  4. JUN

    3

    Friday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Research in Chemical Sciences at University of Warsaw: from General Information to Activities in Area of Electrocatalytic Functional Materials"

    Presented by Pawel J. Kulesza, University of Warsaw, Poland

    11 am, CFN, Bldg 735 Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Friday, June 3, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: '''Pawel Majewski'''

    My research is focused on rational design of materials for efficient electrocatalysis and electrochemical energy conversion and storage. In particular, I am interested in electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide, a potent greenhouse gas and a contributor to global warming. Given the fact that the CO2 molecule is very stable, its electroreduction processes are characterized by large overpotentials. To optimize the hydrogenation-type electrocatalytic approach, we have utilized nanostructured metallic centers (e.g. Pd, Pt or Ru) in a form of highly dispersed nanoparticles generated within a supramolecular network of distinct N-, S- or oxygen-coordination complexes. Another possibility to enhance electroreduction of carbon dioxide is to explore direct transformation of solar-to-chemical energy using transition metal oxide semiconductors. We showed that, by controlled combination of semiconducting oxides (TiO2 and Cu2O), we were able to drive photoelectrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide mostly to methanol. Application of mixed-metal oxides as active matrices is important in electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules in low-temperature fuel cells. The oxide's chemical properties and morphology, which favor hydrous proton mobility affect the overall reactivity during oxidation of ethanol (e.g. at PtRu). When metal nanoparticles were dispersed between WO3 and ZrO2 layers, significant current enhancements were observed. The result can be rationalized by the mechanism in which Rh induces splitting of C-C bonds in C2H5OH molecules before the actual electrooxidation. We also consider nanoelectrocatalytic systems permitting effective operation of the iodine-based dye sensitized solar cells. The ability of Pd or Pt nanostructures to induce splitting of I-I bonds in the triiodide molecules is explored here to enhance electron transfers in the triiodide/iodide-containing 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ionic liquids.

  5. JUN

    3

    Friday

    Nuclear Seminar

    "Generalizations of relativistic hydrodynamics"

    Presented by Piotr Surowka, Harvard

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 3, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Yi Yin'

    Recent developments have shown that relativistic Landau and Lifshitz hydrodynamics does not possess the most general structure. It has to generalized to account for new phenomena. I will show how to do that in two directions. One will include parity-odd transport contributions connected to anomalies, the other will capture a dissipative fluid coupled to non-Abelian degrees of freedom such as color currents or spin currents. I will mention possible applications to quark-gluon plasma and condensed matter systems.

  6. JUN

    7

    Tuesday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2016 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, June 7, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Kelly Guiffreda

  7. JUN

    8

    Wednesday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2016 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Wednesday, June 8, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Kelly Guiffreda

  8. JUN

    8

    Wednesday

    Long Island Chapter: American Nuclear Society

    "Cheating Scandal at Naval Nuclear Power Training Unit"

    Edward Sierra, BNL

    6 pm, Brickhouse Brewery, Patchogue, NY

    Wednesday, June 8, 2016, 6:00 pm

    America's submarines and aircraft carriers rely on nuclear reactors as well as nuclear technicians, power plant operators, and subsystems specialists to keep them running. The men and women of the US Navy Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP) operate and maintain the most formidable fleet of nuclear-powered submarines and aircraft carriers on the planet. These sailors are among the best and brightest in America's Navy. However, an exam cheating scandal was reported in 2014 at the Naval Nuclear Power Training Unit at Charleston, SC. From his perspective as a graduate of the Naval Nuclear Power School, Ed Sierra will provide an overview of this demanding school and the 2014 cheating scandal, which he obtained by exercising the Freedom of Information Act. More specifically, he will discuss the details involving a ring of cheating among the instructors that went on for years.

  9. JUN

    9

    Thursday

    Annual User' Meeting

    "2016 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    9 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, June 9, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Kelly Guiffreda

  10. JUN

    9

    Thursday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Molecular Cluster as Superatoms in Solid-State Chemistry"

    Presented by Xavier Roy, Columbia University

    1:30 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Thursday, June 9, 2016, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''''Matthew Sfeir''''

    Traditional solid-state compounds are infinite crystalline arrays of densely packed atoms. The emergence of collective properties in structured clusters of atoms, which we term "superatoms", offers a new class of fundamental building blocks for assembling materials. The superatom concept has the potential to usher in a new era where materials are designed to have a specific function, rather than discovered by trial and error. To realize this concept, we are exploring the use of molecular clusters as superatomic building blocks, designing and synthesizing not only the molecular clusters but also the means by which they interact. In this presentation, I will show how the atomic control and the diversity afforded by our superatoms allows us to dictate the structure of the solids and control the interactions between the building blocks. I will discuss how collective properties emerge from these interactions by providing examples of magnetic phase transition, electrical transport and thermal energy transport.

  11. JUN

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, June 9, 2016, 6:30 pm

  12. JUN

    10

    Friday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "2016 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 10, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Kelly Guiffreda

  13. JUN

    15

    Wednesday

    Blood Drive

    9:30 am, Brookhaven Center

    Wednesday, June 15, 2016, 9:30 am

    Hosted by: Long Island Blood Services

  14. JUN

    15

    Wednesday

    HET

    "TBA"

    Presented by J. Laiho, Syracuse

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, June 15, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Sally Dawson''

  15. JUN

    16

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    9:30 am, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, June 16, 2016, 9:30 am

    Hosted by: Long Island Blood Services

  16. JUN

    16

    Thursday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "The Discovery of Gravitational Waves from Colliding Black Holes"

    Presented by Dr. Imre Bartos, Physics Department, Columbia University

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, June 16, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Peter Wanderer'

    One hundred years ago, Albert Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves, ripples in the very fabric of space-time. Gravitational waves can be created during the birth and collision of black holes, and can reach us from distant galaxies. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) recently detected gravitational waves for the first time in history from black holes billions of light years away. LIGO measured miniscule disturbances in space, much smaller than the size of the atoms from which the detector is built. The detection of gravitational waves and black holes will fundamentally change our understanding of gravity and space, and will expand the frontiers of astrophysics and cosmology by opening a new window to the universe. I will introduce gravitational waves, their recent discovery and how this will change the course of astronomy.

  17. JUN

    21

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Sterile Neutrinos as the Origin of Dark and Baryonic Matter"

    Presented by Mikhail Shaposhnikov, EPFL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 21, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Robert Pisarski'

    I will discuss how three sterile neutrinos alone can simultaneously explain neutrino oscillations, the observed dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe without new physics above the Fermi scale. The experimental prospects to search for these particles will be outlined.

  18. JUN

    23

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBD"

    Presented by Claire Lee

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, June 23, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

  19. JUN

    24

    Friday

    Nuclear/Riken Theory Committee

    "On Pressure Isotropization in Heavy-Ion Collisions"

    Presented by Bin Wu, The Ohio State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 24, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Soeren Schlichting''

    In this talk, I would like to start with a brief introduction to non-equilibrium quantum field theory in the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism. This formalism provides a systematic way to study isotropization and other time-dependent non-equilibrium (and equilibrium) phenomena in heavy-ion collisions. I shall first discuss the foundation of classical field approximations (CSA), which is an important tool to study the evolution at very early stages. It is, however, found to be non-renormalizable. This helps us understand better the applicability of such an approximation. it is now well-known that isotropization can not be established before the breakdown of the CSA. We then use another approximation, the quasi-particle approximation (the Boltzmann equation), to study the isotropization in a scalar field theory. Our result shows explicitly the importance of quantum effects. Motivated by these observations, we have been studying whether the isotropization can be reached before the dense system of gluons, produced in the collisions of two big nuclei, becomes too dilute to be studied perturbatively in the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism. Some preliminary results shall be reported.

  20. JUN

    27

    Monday

    Teacher Training

    "Exploring Life Science with a New Light"

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Monday, June 27, 2016, 8:00 am

  21. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Teacher Training

    "Exploring Life Science with a New Light"

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 8:00 am

  22. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Two Photon Exchange and the Proton Form Factor Problem"

    Presented by Lawrence Weinstein, Old Dominion University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Oleg Eyser'

    The electromagnetic form factors of the proton as measured by polarized and unpolarized electron scattering experiments differ by up to a factor of three at large momentum transfer. Calculations show that this discrepancy can be reconciled by treating the interaction in 2nd Born Approximation, i.e., including two photon exchange (TPE). While calculation of TPE effects is highly model dependent, these effects can be measured directly by comparing elastic electron-proton and positron-proton scattering. Three experiments, TPE at Jefferson Lab, VEPP-3 at Novosibirsk, and OLYMPUS at DESY, measured this. VEPP-3 and OLYMPUS used alternating monochromatic e+ and e- beams in storage rings; TPE created a tertiary mixed simultaneous e+/e- beam covering a wide range of energies. This talk will present the proton form factor problem, the experimental effort to measure the positron-electron ratio (with special emphasis on the Jefferson Lab experiment), and the results.

  23. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "pending"

    Presented by Louise Nuijens, MIT

    11 am, Conference Room, Bldg 815E

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Mike Jensen'

    (abstract pending)

  24. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Lawrence Weinstein, Old Dominion University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Robert Pisarski'''

  25. JUN

    29

    Wednesday

    Teacher Training

    "Exploring Life Science with a New Light"

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Wednesday, June 29, 2016, 8:00 am

  26. JUN

    30

    Thursday

    Teacher Training

    "Exploring Life Science with a New Light"

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Thursday, June 30, 2016, 8:00 am

  27. JUL

    1

    Friday

    Teacher Training

    "Exploring Life Science with a New Light"

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Friday, July 1, 2016, 8:00 am

  28. JUL

    10

    Sunday

    Summer Sunday

    "Family Fun Day: The Science Learning Center and Environmental Protection"

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Sunday, July 10, 2016, 10:00 am

    A fabulous day of hands-on family fun with the Science Learning Center and Environmental Extravaganza, both ready for you to explore.

  29. JUL

    14

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Sarah Demers

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, July 14, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

  30. JUL

    17

    Sunday

    Summer Sunday

    "Exploring the Ultra Small: The Center for Functional Nanomaterials"

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Sunday, July 17, 2016, 10:00 am

    Tour the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, where Brookhaven scientists study structures as tiny as a billionth of a meter.

  31. JUL

    24

    Sunday

    Summer Sunday

    "Brilliant Light, Dazzling Discoveries: National Synchrotron Light Source II"

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Sunday, July 24, 2016, 10:00 am

    Visit the National Synchrotron Light Source II, where scientists use intense beams of light to see the inner structure of batteries, proteins, space dust, and more.

  32. JUL

    31

    Sunday

    Summer Sunday

    "Atom-Smashing Fun: Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider"

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Sunday, July 31, 2016, 10:00 am

    Explore the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, where particles are smashed together at near-light-speed to reveal the secrets of our universe. * Facility tour appropriate for ages 10 and over.

  33. AUG

    26

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    "TBA"

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, BNL

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, August 26, 2016, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

  34. SEP

    14

    Wednesday

    HET

    "TBA"

    Presented by Gopolang Mohlabeng, University of Kansas

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, September 14, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  35. SEP

    15

    Thursday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "Solar Driven Water Splitting"

    Presented by Professor Harry Gray, California Institute of Technology

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, September 15, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Peter Wanderer'

  36. DEC

    1

    Thursday

    PACCD Workshop (Precision Astronomy with Fully Depleted CCDs)

    8 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, December 1, 2016, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  37. DEC

    2

    Friday

    PACCD Workshop (Precision Astronomy with Fully Depleted CCDs)

    8 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, December 2, 2016, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'