BNL Home
June 2016
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

2

  1. CFN Colloquium

    11 am, CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Hosted by: 'Dmitri Zakharov'

    An in-depth look at numerous methods to make graphene, ranging from single-crystal sheets that grown in precise hexagonal arrays to growth of graphene in air at room temperature using lasers, and 2- and 3-D hybrid graphene nanotube structures. Use of the graphene materials in composites will be discussed. Many of the devices made and their transitions to industry will be shown. These devices include fuel cells, water splitting systems, batteries, supercapacitors and more.

  2. Office of Educational Programs Event

    6 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

3

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN, Bldg 735 Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: '''Pawel Majewski'''

    My research is focused on rational design of materials for efficient electrocatalysis and electrochemical energy conversion and storage. In particular, I am interested in electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide, a potent greenhouse gas and a contributor to global warming. Given the fact that the CO2 molecule is very stable, its electroreduction processes are characterized by large overpotentials. To optimize the hydrogenation-type electrocatalytic approach, we have utilized nanostructured metallic centers (e.g. Pd, Pt or Ru) in a form of highly dispersed nanoparticles generated within a supramolecular network of distinct N-, S- or oxygen-coordination complexes. Another possibility to enhance electroreduction of carbon dioxide is to explore direct transformation of solar-to-chemical energy using transition metal oxide semiconductors. We showed that, by controlled combination of semiconducting oxides (TiO2 and Cu2O), we were able to drive photoelectrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide mostly to methanol. Application of mixed-metal oxides as active matrices is important in electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules in low-temperature fuel cells. The oxide's chemical properties and morphology, which favor hydrous proton mobility affect the overall reactivity during oxidation of ethanol (e.g. at PtRu). When metal nanoparticles were dispersed between WO3 and ZrO2 layers, significant current enhancements were observed. The result can be rationalized by the mechanism in which Rh induces splitting of C-C bonds in C2H5OH molecules before the actual electrooxidation. We also consider nanoelectrocatalytic systems permitting effective operation of the iodine-based dye sensitized solar cells. The ability of Pd or Pt nanostructures to induce splitting of I-I bonds in the triiodide molecules is explored here to enhance electron transfers in the triiodide/iodide-containing 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ionic liquids.

  2. Nuclear Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Yi Yin'

    Recent developments have shown that relativistic Landau and Lifshitz hydrodynamics does not possess the most general structure. It has to generalized to account for new phenomena. I will show how to do that in two directions. One will include parity-odd transport contributions connected to anomalies, the other will capture a dissipative fluid coupled to non-Abelian degrees of freedom such as color currents or spin currents. I will mention possible applications to quark-gluon plasma and condensed matter systems.

4

  1. No events scheduled

5

  1. No events scheduled

6

  1. Chemistry Department Seminar

    11 am, Room 300, 3rd floor, Chemistry Building 555

    Hosted by: ''Trevor Sears''

    Research focuses on using various instrumental analysis approaches (e.g., mass spectrometry, spectroscopy, and ion-molecule reactions) to probe biologically relevant processes in a spectrum of systems ranging from isolated biomolecules, through micelles and aerosols containing biomolecules, to biomolecule solution.

7

  1. Annual Users' Meeting

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: Kelly Guiffreda

8

  1. Annual Users' Meeting

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: Kelly Guiffreda

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    1:30 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

  3. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

9

  1. Annual User' Meeting

    9 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: ''Kelly Guiffreda''

  2. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    1:30 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: ''''Matthew Sfeir''''

    Traditional solid-state compounds are infinite crystalline arrays of densely packed atoms. The emergence of collective properties in structured clusters of atoms, which we term "superatoms", offers a new class of fundamental building blocks for assembling materials. The superatom concept has the potential to usher in a new era where materials are designed to have a specific function, rather than discovered by trial and error. To realize this concept, we are exploring the use of molecular clusters as superatomic building blocks, designing and synthesizing not only the molecular clusters but also the means by which they interact. In this presentation, I will show how the atomic control and the diversity afforded by our superatoms allows us to dictate the structure of the solids and control the interactions between the building blocks. I will discuss how collective properties emerge from these interactions by providing examples of magnetic phase transition, electrical transport and thermal energy transport.

  3. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Brookhaven Center

10

  1. Annual Users' Meeting

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Kelly Guiffreda''

  2. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN, Bldg 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: 'Mingzhao Liu'

    Catalysis research is essential to addressing the energy and environmental challenges we face today. In this talk, I will present an overview of catalysis research being performed at National Energy Technology Laboratory. I will first discuss the utilization of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and plasmonic nanoparticles for photocatalysis applications. These heterostructured catalysts combine the interesting optical properties of QDs and plasmonic nanoparticles with the catalytically active metal oxides to drive photocatalytic reduction of CO2 under visible light illumination. Preliminary effort on the demonstration of a continuous flow plasmonic reactor will be described. A second class of electrocatalysts using atomically precise metal clusters for electrocatalytic CO2 reduction and oxygen evolution reaction will be presented. These catalysts not only display excellent catalytic activity but also facilitate joint experimental and computational studies. Finally, I will briefly discuss our recent effort on the synthesis of nanocatalyts for Fischer-Tropsch catalysis.

  3. NSLS-II Friday Lunchtime Seminar Series

    12 pm, NSLS-II 744 (LOB4) rm 156

    Hosted by: ''L. Carr, S. Chodankar and B. Ocko''

11

  1. No events scheduled

12

  1. No events scheduled

13

  1. No events scheduled

14

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Oleg Eyser'

    Exclusive dimuon pairs with invariant mass Mμμ>10 GeV have been measured in ultra-peripheral lead-lead collisions at √sNN=5.02 TeV, using an integrated luminosity of 515 μb−1 taken with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2015. These very low-multiplicity interactions were recorded using an experimental trigger requiring a muon, low total transverse energy recorded in the calorimeter system, gaps at forward angles, and a reconstructed track. Events are selected to have no-other final state particles than a pair of opposite-sign dimuons. The cross section for dimuon pairs in Pb+Pb collisions is presented as a function of pair mass (Mμμ) and pair rapidity (Yμμ) and is well-described by calculations of Pb+Pb→Pb(*)+Pb(*)+μ+μ− using STARLIGHT 1.1 calculations. These data will improve the understanding of the strong electromagnetic fields surrounding the nucleus, which enable future UPC measurements utilizing these high energy probes.

  2. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: 'Peter D. Johnson'

    I will report on Laser based ARPES of unprecedented accuracy and stability (taken by the group of Xingjiang Zhou, IOP, Beijing), together with a method of analysis suggested by me (and carried out with the group of Han-Yong Choi, Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Korea), to quantitatively extract the e↵ective frequency and momentum dependent interactions of fermions in both the full symmetry (normal) and the d-wave (pairing) symmetry in a family of cuprates. The results are remarkably simple. The principal interactions are of the form: I(k, k',w)~g0 [(1−cos(20k)cos(20'k)]F(w) They are separable functions of momentum and frequency, the first part is the repulsive part and the second part is the attractive d-wave part. F(w) is nearly constant with an upper-energy cutoff of about 0.4eV. The dimensionless coupling constant g0 ~ 0.15. These results were predicted in a theory of superconductivity and of the strange metal phase by quantum-critical fluctuation of loop-currents. They also rule out several alternatives proposed. I will also comment on the normal state and superconductivity in the Fe-based compounds.

15

  1. HET Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: '''Sally Dawson'''

  2. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    4 pm, Bldg. 911B - Large Conf. Rm. Rm A202

    "The Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL) at TRIUMF will triple the available rare isotope beam (RIB) time for experiments. The major part of ARIEL is the 50 MeV, high intensity cw eLINAC based on 1.3GHz SRF cavities. An eventual addition to the eLINAC is a recirculating beam line to allow FEL-ERL operation in addition to the RIB production beam. To avoid multipass beam break-up (BBU), the design of the SRF cavity had to be modified to reduce the shunt impedance of dipole higher order modes (HOM). Work on the cavity design and HOM load measurements will be shown as well as results of the vertical and horizontal cavity tests."

  3. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

16

  1. Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room, Bldg 815E

    Initial results are presented of a analysis of high resolution photographs of clouds at the ARM SGP site in July, 2015. A commercially available camera having 35-mm equivalent focal length up to 1200 mm (nominal resolution as fine as 6 µrad, which corresponds to 12 mm for cloud height 2 km) is used to obtain a measure of zenith radiance of a 40 m x 40 m domain as a two-dimensional image consisting of 3456 x 3456 pixels (12 million pixels). Downwelling zenith radiance varies substantially within single images and between successive images obtained at 4-s intervals. Variation in zenith radiance found on scales down to about 10 cm is attributed to variation in cloud optical depth (COD). Attention here is directed primarily to optically thin clouds, COD less than roughly 3. A radiation transfer model used to relate downwelling zenith radiance to COD and to relate the counts in the camera image to zenith radiance, permits determination of COD and cloud albedo on a pixel-by-pixel basis. COD for thin clouds determined in this way exhibits considerable variation, for example, an order of magnitude within the 40 m domain examined here and 50% over a distance of 1 m. An alternative to the widely used areal or temporal cloud fraction, denoted radiative cloud fraction, also evaluated on a pixel-by-pixel basis, is introduced. This highly data-intensive approach, which examines cloud structure on scales 3 to 5 orders of magnitude finer than satellite products, opens new avenues for examination of cloud structure and evolution.

  2. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-84

    Hosted by: 'Hiroshi Oki'

  3. BSA Distinguished Lecture

    4:30 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: 'Peter Wanderer'

    One hundred years ago, Albert Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves, ripples in the very fabric of space-time. Gravitational waves can be created during the birth and collision of black holes, and can reach us from distant galaxies. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) recently detected gravitational waves for the first time in history from black holes billions of light years away. LIGO measured miniscule disturbances in space, much smaller than the size of the atoms from which the detector is built. The detection of gravitational waves and black holes will fundamentally change our understanding of gravity and space, and will expand the frontiers of astrophysics and cosmology by opening a new window to the universe. I will introduce gravitational waves, their recent discovery and how this will change the course of astronomy.

17

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    We estimate the dilepton and photon production rate from an SU(3) plasma at temperatures of about 1.1 Tc to 1.5 Tc. Lattice results for the vector current correlator at zero and non-zero momenta are extrapolated to the continuum limit and analyzed with the help of phenomenological and perturbative input for the corresponding spectral functions. We compare our results with NLO weak-coupling results, hydrodynamics, and a holographic model. At vanishing invariant mass we extract the photon rate which for k>3T is found to be close to the NLO weak-coupling prediction. For k

18

  1. No events scheduled

19

  1. No events scheduled

20

  1. No events scheduled

21

  1. Chemistry Department Seminar

    11 am, Room 300, 3rd Floor, Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Hosted by: ''Jim Muckerman''

    Abstract: High efficiency artificial photosynthesis, that can convert solar energy directly into chemical fuels, has been extensively investigated. Critical to this development is the stable and efficient generation of H2 from water under direct sunlight irradiation. To date, however, success in finding abundant visible-light active photocatalyst has been very limited. Recently, metal-nitrides have attracted considerable attention for applications in artificial photosynthesis, due to their extraordinary stability and tunable energy bandgap across nearly the entire solar spectrum. Moreover, III-nitrides are the only known material whose energy bandgap can straddle the redox potential of water under deep visible and near-infrared light irradiation. In 2011, we have demonstrated, for the first time, spontaneous overall water splitting on GaN nanowire arrays. We have discovered that the quantum efficiency for overall water splitting and hydrogen generation on the emerging nanostructured photocatalysts can be dramatically enhanced by precisely tuning the surface Fermi-level. We have further developed InGaN/GaN nanowire photoanodes and photocathodes, which are monolithically integrated on Si solar cell wafer through a polarization-enhanced tunnel junction. The devices exhibit highly stable hydrogen generation under simulated sunlight illumination. Such high efficiency photocatalysts also offer an entirely new avenue for recycling anthropogenic carbon dioxide to renewable fuels and for reducing nitrogen to ammonia. Zetian Mi is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at McGill University. He received the Ph.D. degree in Applied Physics from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor in 2006. Prof. Mi's teaching and research interests are in the areas of III-nitride semiconductors, solid state lighting, nanophotonics, and solar fuels. He has published 7 book chapters and more than 150 refereed journal papers. He has received ma

  2. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Oleg Eyser'

    The proton is a composite particle in which the binding force is responsible for the majority of its mass. To understand this structure, the distributions and origins of the quark-antiquark pairs produced by the strong force must be measured. The SeaQuest collaboration is using the Drell-Yan process to elucidate antiquark distributions in the proton and to study the modification of these distributions when the proton is held within a nucleus. Preliminary results based on a fraction of the anticipated final data set will be presented.

  3. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    3 pm, CFN, Bldg. 735,Conf. Rm. A

    Hosted by: ''Qin Wu''

    Abstract Hybrid quantum mechanical molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations are widely used to investigate condensed-phase phenomena, such as chemical/enzymatic reactions, molecular solvation, ligand-receptor binding, and various photochemical/photobiological processes. In QM/MM calculations, the electronic structure of the QM region gets polarized by the MM environment (as represented by MM electrostatic potential). In order to understand such polarization effects, we will employ exact (and approximate) response kernels for the QM region, and show that this leads to more efficient QM/MM calculations as well as to a new theoretical framework for approaching polarizable force fields.

  4. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Robert Pisarski'

    I will discuss how three sterile neutrinos alone can simultaneously explain neutrino oscillations, the observed dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe without new physics above the Fermi scale. The experimental prospects to search for these particles will be outlined.

22

  1. Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room, Bldg 815E

    Hosted by: 'Alice Cialella'

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) has emerged as a powerful simulation-based engineering science tool in a broad range of engineering applications involving complex turbulent flows. In my talk I will review computational advances that have enabled the LES of multi-physics flows in arbitrarily complex domains and with flow-structure interaction. I will highlight the predictive power of these algorithms by presenting simulations of: 1) atmospheric turbulence past land-based and offshore wind farms; 2) complex floating structures in the ocean under the action of broadband waves; 3) marine and hydrokinetic energy harvesting devices in real-life waterways, and 4) flow, sediment transport and scour in large rivers during extreme flooding events. I will also discuss the potential of coupling such computational power with field-scale experiments with DNA-based flow tracers to study pathogen and pollutant transport in indoor and outdoor environments.

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

23

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Hiroshi Oki'

24

  1. Nuclear/Riken Theory Committee

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Soeren Schlichting''

    In this talk, I would like to start with a brief introduction to non-equilibrium quantum field theory in the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism. This formalism provides a systematic way to study isotropization and other time-dependent non-equilibrium (and equilibrium) phenomena in heavy-ion collisions. I shall first discuss the foundation of classical field approximations (CSA), which is an important tool to study the evolution at very early stages. It is, however, found to be non-renormalizable. This helps us understand better the applicability of such an approximation. it is now well-known that isotropization can not be established before the breakdown of the CSA. We then use another approximation, the quasi-particle approximation (the Boltzmann equation), to study the isotropization in a scalar field theory. Our result shows explicitly the importance of quantum effects. Motivated by these observations, we have been studying whether the isotropization can be reached before the dense system of gluons, produced in the collisions of two big nuclei, becomes too dilute to be studied perturbatively in the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism. Some preliminary results shall be reported.

25

  1. No events scheduled

26

  1. No events scheduled

27

  1. JUN

    27

    Monday

    Teacher Training

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Monday, June 27, 2016, 8:00 am

28

  1. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Teacher Training

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 8:00 am

  2. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Oleg Eyser'

    The electromagnetic form factors of the proton as measured by polarized and unpolarized electron scattering experiments differ by up to a factor of three at large momentum transfer. Calculations show that this discrepancy can be reconciled by treating the interaction in 2nd Born Approximation, i.e., including two photon exchange (TPE). While calculation of TPE effects is highly model dependent, these effects can be measured directly by comparing elastic electron-proton and positron-proton scattering. Three experiments, TPE at Jefferson Lab, VEPP-3 at Novosibirsk, and OLYMPUS at DESY, measured this. VEPP-3 and OLYMPUS used alternating monochromatic e+ and e- beams in storage rings; TPE created a tertiary mixed simultaneous e+/e- beam covering a wide range of energies. This talk will present the proton form factor problem, the experimental effort to measure the positron-electron ratio (with special emphasis on the Jefferson Lab experiment), and the results.

  3. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room, Bldg 815E

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Mike Jensen''

    Large areas over subtropical and tropical oceans experience neither strong subsidence nor strong ascent. In these regions shallow trade-wind clouds prevail, whose vertical distribution has emerged as a key factor determining the sensitivity of our climate in global climate models. But how susceptible are trade-wind clouds in our current climate? Do we understand the role of the large-scale flow in observed variations in these clouds? And do global models represent those patterns of variability? Using long time series of ground-based and space-borne remote sensing in the trades (the Barbados Cloud Observatory), combined with Large-Eddy Simulation, I will analyze how shallow cumuli and their associated cloudiness respond to changes in the large-scale atmospheric state, providing constraints on modeled cloud feedbacks. Unlike climate models, the major component of trade-wind cloudiness, which is cloudiness near the saturation level, appears remarkably robust to variability in the thermal structure of the lower atmosphere, and I will explain how convection itself plays an important role in that robustness. Variability in cloudiness is far more pronounced at levels further aloft, related to the deepening of shallow convection on mesoscale and synoptic time scales. This mesoscale variability explains, in part, why cloudiness is poorly predicted by large-scale factors on longer time scales. However, variations in vertical motion and wind speed are shown to play an important role, suggesting that we should be mindful of how the large-scale flow conditions the lower atmosphere. Global models underestimate the strength of a relationship with wind speed and diverge in particular in their response to large-scale vertical motion. I will explain why models overestimate the low cloud feedback in these regions, and discuss possible pathways through which these seemingly persistent clouds are critical to climate, even if their feedback on global mean temperature is small

  4. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Robert Pisarski'''

29

  1. JUN

    29

    Wednesday

    Teacher Training

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Wednesday, June 29, 2016, 8:00 am

  2. JUN

    29

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, June 29, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Thomas Watson''

30

  1. JUN

    30

    Thursday

    Teacher Training

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Thursday, June 30, 2016, 8:00 am

  2. JUN

    30

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, June 30, 2016, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Hiroshi Oki'

  3. JUN

    30

    Thursday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, June 30, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Prosper, a high-energy physics experimentalist, is among the U.S. scientists who played a significant role in the search for and 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson, the particle that proves the existence of the Higgs field, which gives mass to elementary particles. His research interests include high-energy physics, cosmology, advanced analysis methods and Bayesian statistics. At Florida State, Prosper is the Kirby Kemper Professor of Physics and has been a leader in experimental high-energy physics for many years and has built a robust research record while contributing significantly to collaborations at both Fermilab and CERN. He earned a doctorate in experimental physics from the University of Manchester in 1980.

  1. JUN

    27

    Monday

    Teacher Training

    "Exploring Life Science with a New Light"

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Monday, June 27, 2016, 8:00 am

  2. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Teacher Training

    "Exploring Life Science with a New Light"

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 8:00 am

  3. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Two Photon Exchange and the Proton Form Factor Problem"

    Presented by Lawrence Weinstein, Old Dominion University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Oleg Eyser'

    The electromagnetic form factors of the proton as measured by polarized and unpolarized electron scattering experiments differ by up to a factor of three at large momentum transfer. Calculations show that this discrepancy can be reconciled by treating the interaction in 2nd Born Approximation, i.e., including two photon exchange (TPE). While calculation of TPE effects is highly model dependent, these effects can be measured directly by comparing elastic electron-proton and positron-proton scattering. Three experiments, TPE at Jefferson Lab, VEPP-3 at Novosibirsk, and OLYMPUS at DESY, measured this. VEPP-3 and OLYMPUS used alternating monochromatic e+ and e- beams in storage rings; TPE created a tertiary mixed simultaneous e+/e- beam covering a wide range of energies. This talk will present the proton form factor problem, the experimental effort to measure the positron-electron ratio (with special emphasis on the Jefferson Lab experiment), and the results.

  4. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Observed and modeled sensitivity of trade-wind clouds to changes in the large-scale flow"

    Presented by Louise Nuijens, MIT

    11 am, Conference Room, Bldg 815E

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Mike Jensen''

    Large areas over subtropical and tropical oceans experience neither strong subsidence nor strong ascent. In these regions shallow trade-wind clouds prevail, whose vertical distribution has emerged as a key factor determining the sensitivity of our climate in global climate models. But how susceptible are trade-wind clouds in our current climate? Do we understand the role of the large-scale flow in observed variations in these clouds? And do global models represent those patterns of variability? Using long time series of ground-based and space-borne remote sensing in the trades (the Barbados Cloud Observatory), combined with Large-Eddy Simulation, I will analyze how shallow cumuli and their associated cloudiness respond to changes in the large-scale atmospheric state, providing constraints on modeled cloud feedbacks. Unlike climate models, the major component of trade-wind cloudiness, which is cloudiness near the saturation level, appears remarkably robust to variability in the thermal structure of the lower atmosphere, and I will explain how convection itself plays an important role in that robustness. Variability in cloudiness is far more pronounced at levels further aloft, related to the deepening of shallow convection on mesoscale and synoptic time scales. This mesoscale variability explains, in part, why cloudiness is poorly predicted by large-scale factors on longer time scales. However, variations in vertical motion and wind speed are shown to play an important role, suggesting that we should be mindful of how the large-scale flow conditions the lower atmosphere. Global models underestimate the strength of a relationship with wind speed and diverge in particular in their response to large-scale vertical motion. I will explain why models overestimate the low cloud feedback in these regions, and discuss possible pathways through which these seemingly persistent clouds are critical to climate, even if their feedback on global mean temperature is small

  5. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Lawrence Weinstein, Old Dominion University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Robert Pisarski'''

  6. JUN

    29

    Wednesday

    Teacher Training

    "Exploring Life Science with a New Light"

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Wednesday, June 29, 2016, 8:00 am

  7. JUN

    29

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "515th Brookhaven Lecture: 'Structural Biology: Studying Living Things as They Jiggle and Wiggle'"

    Presented by Sean McSweeney, National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven Lab

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, June 29, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Thomas Watson''

  8. JUN

    30

    Thursday

    Teacher Training

    "Exploring Life Science with a New Light"

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Thursday, June 30, 2016, 8:00 am

  9. JUN

    30

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Sho Ozaki, Keio University

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, June 30, 2016, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Hiroshi Oki'

  10. JUN

    30

    Thursday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    "In Search of a Smoother Pebble"

    Harrison B. Prosper, Professor of Physics and Distinguished Researcher Florida State University

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, June 30, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Prosper, a high-energy physics experimentalist, is among the U.S. scientists who played a significant role in the search for and 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson, the particle that proves the existence of the Higgs field, which gives mass to elementary particles. His research interests include high-energy physics, cosmology, advanced analysis methods and Bayesian statistics. At Florida State, Prosper is the Kirby Kemper Professor of Physics and has been a leader in experimental high-energy physics for many years and has built a robust research record while contributing significantly to collaborations at both Fermilab and CERN. He earned a doctorate in experimental physics from the University of Manchester in 1980.

  11. JUL

    1

    Friday

    Teacher Training

    "Exploring Life Science with a New Light"

    8 am, Building 801/NSLS II

    Friday, July 1, 2016, 8:00 am

  12. JUL

    6

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Pianofest"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, July 6, 2016, 12:00 pm

    Paul Schenly, director of Pianofest in the Hamptons, brings a group of young pianist participants in this workshop. Performances may be critiqued on stage. A wide range of compositions is selected, including works for two pianos.

  13. JUL

    8

    Friday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Observatory Control System and Imaging System for Astronomical Telescopes"

    Presented by Jian Wang, University of Science and Technology - China, China

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Friday, July 8, 2016, 2:30 pm

    I will introduce my work on astronomical telescopes, especially on the Observatory and Control Imaging system. From 1998, we began work on LAMOST, including its Observatory Control System (OCS), Survey Strategy System (SSS), and its Instrument Control System (ICS). Based on this work, we developed generic models and a framework for control Systems of Large Astronomy Telescopes, including a basic hierarchical structure, workflow model, and telescope control models based on object-oriented analysis, the main data flow model of a general purpose telescope. A layered and orthogonal architecture which will have a wide range of adaptability and a concrete architecture based on the message bus will be designed and applied to LAMOST and FAST. For the requirement of autonomous control and observation for astronomical telescopes in Antarctic, we also developed a framework based on RTS2 and EPICS. In the telescope, the imaging system, especially the detector system, is the key component. By adapting it to the requirements of low temperature and stability of operation in the Antarctic, we are developing a camera for CSTAR including vacuum chamber and CCD controller. Now in China, a 2.5-meter optic/infrared telescope, the Kunlun Dark Universe Survey Telescope is planned with a large focal plane similar with LSST but more challenges for us.

  14. JUL

    10

    Sunday

    Summer Sunday

    "Family Fun Day: The Science Learning Center and Environmental Protection"

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Sunday, July 10, 2016, 10:00 am

    A fabulous day of hands-on family fun with the Science Learning Center and Environmental Extravaganza, both ready for you to explore.

  15. JUL

    14

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Sarah Demers

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, July 14, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

  16. JUL

    17

    Sunday

    Summer Sunday

    "Exploring the Ultra Small: The Center for Functional Nanomaterials"

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Sunday, July 17, 2016, 10:00 am

    Tour the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, where Brookhaven scientists study structures as tiny as a billionth of a meter.

  17. JUL

    24

    Sunday

    Summer Sunday

    "Brilliant Light, Dazzling Discoveries: National Synchrotron Light Source II"

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Sunday, July 24, 2016, 10:00 am

    Visit the National Synchrotron Light Source II, where scientists use intense beams of light to see the inner structure of batteries, proteins, space dust, and more.

  18. JUL

    28

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Modeling electron- and neutrino-nucleus scattering in kinematics"

    Presented by Vishvas Pandey, Ghent University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, July 28, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Thomas Ullrich''

    The accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program, aimed for the measurement of oscillation parameters and observing the leptonic CP violation, is moving full steam ahead. However, the recent measurements have revealed unexpected and interesting neutrino interaction physics, and exposed the inadequacy of the relativistic Fermi gas (RFG) based Monte-Carlo generators (in describing neutrino-nucleus scatterings) resulting in large systematic uncertainties. A more detailed and careful neutrino-nucleus modeling, covering the whole experimental kinematical space, is inevitable in order to achieve the unprecedented precision goal of the present and future accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation experiments. In this talk, I will present a microscopic Hartree-Fock (HF) and continuum random phase approximation (CRPA) approach to electroweak scattering off nuclei from low energy (threshold) to the intermediate energy region. As a necessary check to test the reliability of this approach, I will first present a electron-nucleus (^12 C, ^16 O, ^40 Ca) cross section comparison (in the kinematics range of interest) with the data to validate the model. Then, I will present flux-folded (anti)neutrino cross section calculations and comparison with the measurements of MiniBooNE and T2K experiments. I will draw special attention to the contribution emerging from the low-energy nuclear excitations, at the most forward scattering bins, in the signal of MiniBooNE and T2K experiments and their impact on the non-trivial differences between muon-neutrino and electron-neutrino cross sections. These effects remain inaccessible in the (current) relativistic Fermi-gas (RFG) based Monte-Carlo generators.

  19. JUL

    31

    Sunday

    Summer Sunday

    "Atom-Smashing Fun: Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider"

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Sunday, July 31, 2016, 10:00 am

    Explore the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, where particles are smashed together at near-light-speed to reveal the secrets of our universe. * Facility tour appropriate for ages 10 and over.

  20. AUG

    3

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Pianofest"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, August 3, 2016, 12:00 pm

    Paul Schenly, Director of Pianofest in the Hamptons, brings a group of young pianist participants in the second session of this workshop. Performances may be critiqued on stage. A wide range of compositions will be selected, including works for two pianos.

  21. AUG

    26

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    "TBA"

    Presented by Taku Izubuchi, BNL

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, August 26, 2016, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

  22. SEP

    8

    Thursday

    CAC Meeting

    ""Open to the Public""

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, September 8, 2016, 6:30 pm

  23. SEP

    14

    Wednesday

    HET

    "TBA"

    Presented by Gopolang Mohlabeng, University of Kansas

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, September 14, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Sally Dawson'

  24. SEP

    15

    Thursday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "Solar Driven Water Splitting"

    Presented by Professor Harry Gray, California Institute of Technology

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, September 15, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Peter Wanderer'

  25. OCT

    6

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Dark Interactions: perspective from theory and experiment"

    9 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 6, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

  26. DEC

    1

    Thursday

    PACCD Workshop (Precision Astronomy with Fully Depleted CCDs)

    8 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, December 1, 2016, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  27. DEC

    2

    Friday

    PACCD Workshop (Precision Astronomy with Fully Depleted CCDs)

    8 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, December 2, 2016, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'