BNL Home
September 2016
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    2 pm, 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Thomas Ullrich'

    In the last years, significant progress has been made in obtaining nuclear PDFs (nPDFs) from data. In addition to the theoretical improvements routinely used in modern extractions of free proton PDFs, the most recent determinations of nPDFs have move towards truly global QCD analyses of nuclear effects. Furthermore, the end of the Run at the LHC I has shown promising results for the improvement of our knowledge on the nuclear medium. In this talk I will discuss the current state of nPDFs, comparing the most recent determinations, and address the possible impact of LHC and future colliders' data on the nPDFs.

  2. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    The CMS muon system is planning an upgrade, which is necessary to maintain the high level of performance in the high luminosity phase of the LHC. One of the improvements is the installation of an additional set of muon detectors - Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) - in the first endcap muon station of the CMS. Recently a novel and complex chip - VFAT3 - for the readout of GEM detectors was designed within the CERN Microelectronics section. In this seminar I will present the architecture of the CMS-GEM readout system with a focus on the VFAT3 chip, including the main challenges, which include the low-power and low-noise front-end required to tolerate high range of detector capacitances, a wide dynamic range and reduction of the discriminator time-walk to less than five nanosecond. The digital back end of the chip includes a novel radiation-hard communication port and data formatting techniques resulting in a lossless compression of the data-stream, amongst other functionality. The entire design has been made radiation hard, for both, TID and SEE.

2

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A - 1st floor

    Hosted by: 'Dario Stacchiola'

    The study of surface structure and interface phenomena is an interdisciplinary research area, involving materials synthesis, characterization, performance evaluation and theoretical calculations. The performance at the surface of functional materials is of paramount relevance for many applications: in catalysis, sensors, corrosion-resistant materials and microelectronic devices. Progress in nanomaterials and catalysis stands on three pillars: 1) synthesis of nanomaterials, including the preparation of hierarchically dispersed nano-particles; 2) theoretical studies of materials that enable experimental results to be understood; and 3) advanced, in situ characterization during actual operation (operando methodology). An interdisciplinary approach fosters knowledge-based design of functional materials (e.g., catalysts). Our research focuses on catalysis, where the understanding of the structure-property relationships at the molecular level provides rational basis for the development of catalysts with improved performance and stability. We will present our research on operando methodology to understand structure-properties on supported oxide catalysts, addressing the state of the catalyst during activation and deactivation processes. In this seminar, we summarize the use of operando Raman methodology to assess the molecular basis of catalyst activation-operation-deactivation, mainly focused on alkane oxidative dehydrogenation and ammoxidation reactions. The transversal operando approach places it at the junction between fundamental catalytic chemistry and applied chemical engineering. We will present data about fundamental computational chemistry study on catalysts structure/performance; but also engineering operando to honeycomb shaped working catalysts, and design of operando cells for these applications.

3

  1. No events scheduled

4

  1. No events scheduled

5

  1. No events scheduled

6

  1. No events scheduled

7

  1. No events scheduled

8

  1. CFN Colloquium

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Hosted by: ''''Qin Wu''''

    Many of the challenges of the twenty-first century are related to molecular processes such as the generation and storage of clean energy, water purification and desalination. These transformations require a next generation of more efficient, chemically stable, and non-toxic materials. Chemical space, the space of all possible synthesizable molecules, is practically infinite and promises to have relevant candidate functional molecules to address these challenges. One of the main goals of my research group is to develop understanding and tools for the exploration chemical space in order to accelerate the discovery of organic materials. Our design cycle is sped up by the constant interaction of theoreticians and experimentalists, the use of high-throughput computational techniques, machine learning, and the development of specialized big data tools. We have had recent successes in theoretically predicting and experimentally confirming in record times top performers in the areas of organic electronics, organic flow batteries and organic light-emitting diodes. In this talk, I will discuss what I consider are the key factors related with a successful high-performance screening approach as illustrated by these three different applications. I will end by discussing the future prospects and challenges associated with developing appropriate metrics for the cartography of chemical space.

  2. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

9

  1. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    9 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

  2. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

  3. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Matthew Sievert'

    A major experimental theme at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), is the the study of observables that could signal the location and character of the critical endpoint (CEP) – the end point of the first-order coexistence curve in the temperature vs. baryon chemical potential (T, μB) plane of the phase diagram for Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). I will show that Finite-Size Scaling of measurements linked to both the susceptibility and critical fluctuations, lead to scaling functions which provide a potent tool for locating and characterizing the CEP. A recent estimate of the location of the CEP and the associated critical exponents used to assign the order of the transition and its universality class will be presented as well.

10

  1. No events scheduled

11

  1. No events scheduled

12

  1. No events scheduled

13

  1. NSLS-II Engineering Seminar Series

    2 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: 'Sushil Sharma and Mary Carlucci-Dayton'

    During the last decade, we have seen ultra-fast progress in X-ray optics performances. This enhancement is directly linked to the development of the necessary tools to control these optical components. In parallel to the design and construction of new synchrotron radiation sources quite important efforts are required to upgrade existing and develop new x-ray optics that is capable of conditioning powerful x-ray beams with minimum losses of brilliance. In the context of these research and development activities a well-equipped laboratory is absolutely vital. It is now necessary to characterize optical surface figures, slope errors and roughness on meter-long optics over spatial frequencies as short as 0.1 mm and with slope errors reaching less than 100 nrad rms or surface figure errors close to 1 nm to preserve the high brightness made available by third and fourth generation synchrotron/FEL sources like NSLSII or LCLS. The NSLS-II Optical Metrology Laboratory (NSLSII-OML) includes commercial instruments for measuring long spatial frequency figure errors, mid spatial frequencies and high frequency roughness and had developed new instruments to measure slope errors: This talk provides a brief description of the different instruments currently available in the laboratory and gives an overview of the active R&D efforts within the NSLSII-OML.

  2. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Robert Pisarski''

    After summarizing the role of hydrodynamics in QCD and heavy ion physics, I will focus on what we know, theoretically, about the transport coefficients which enter hydrodynamics. I will focus on shear viscosity and heavy quark diffusion. I will explain the problems and limitations of the theoretical tools we have, and how we hope to push them a little farther — and better characterize their weaknesses.

14

  1. HET

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: '''Sally Dawson'''

15

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Hiroshi Oki''

    Parton distribution functions in the small-x limit have long been known to be dominated by gluon bremsstrahlung produced in the BFKL and BK / JIMWLK evolution mechanisms. This small-x gluon cascade generates high color-charge densities, leading to the effective semi-classical theory known as the color-glass condensate (CGC). While this unpolarized small-x evolution has been thoroughly studied, the evolution of the polarized parton distributions is much less understood. Using modern CGC techniques, we calculate the small-x evolution equations for the helicity distribution of polarized quarks. This polarized small-x evolution is quite different from the unpolarized evolution, bringing in much more complicated dynamics which transfer spin to small x. Although the quark polarization at small x is initially suppressed, strong evolution corrections substantially enhance the amount of spin at small x. By solving our equations (numerically, in the large-Nc limit), we compute the asymptotic behavior of the quark helicity at small x, and we discuss the implications of this result for the outstanding Proton Spin Puzzle.

  2. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Seminar Room, 2nd Fl, ISB Bldg. 734

    Hosted by: ''Robert Konik''

    Both cuprates and Fe-based superconductors, the two known high Tc superconducting families, show rich emergent phenomena near the superconductivity (SC). To understand the mechanism of unconventional SC, it is crucial to unravel the nature of these emergent orders. The 112 Fe pnictide superconductor (FPS), Ca1−xRExFeAs2 (CaRE112), shows SC up to 42 K, the highest bulk Tc among all nonoxide FPS. Being an exceptional FPS where the global C4 rotational symmetry is broken even at room temperature, it is important to extract the similarities and di?erences between 112 and other FPS so that critical ingredients in inducing SC in FPS can be ?ltered. In this talk, I will review current progress in the study of 112. The comparison between Co doped CaLa112 and Co doped 10-3-8 will be made and the importance of interlayer coupling will be discussed.

  3. BSA Distinguished Lecture

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: 'Peter Wanderer'

16

  1. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

17

  1. No events scheduled

18

  1. No events scheduled

19

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN, Bldg 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: ''Oleg Gang''

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCPs) has become a promising patterning technique for advanced node hole shrink process due to its material-controlled CD uniformity and process simplicity. In practice, multiple patterning and self-aligned via (SAV) processes have been implemented in semiconductor manufacturing to address resolution issue. In this talk, DSA of lamella-forming BCP was evaluated as a candidate for forming SAV, which requires the DSA process to support structures from circular via to lines and spaces. The basic process flow is similar to general graphoepitaxy method. The morphologies of the DSA vias derived from lamellar BCPs were found to be less sensitive to the BCP coating thickness compared to the cylindrical BCP system of similar L0. This implies that lamellar BCP may provide a larger process window and higher tolerance for local pattern density variation. The profile and the thickness of the residual PS layer of DSA structures were studied using Monte Carlo simulation and FIB cross-section SEM. Furthermore, a series of defectivity study using the lamellar system will be discussed, including film stack, DSA, and etch process fine-tuning. Finally, the benefits and challenges of implementing DSA for via process will be discussed.

20

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Oleg Eyser'

    The HERMES experiment at DESY, Hamburg, collected data using the 27.6 GeV HERA electron/positron beam incident on a variety of gaseous targets, among others transversely polarized and unpolarized hydrogen as well as unpolarized deuterium, neon, krypton, and xenon. From the data taken with hydrogen and deuterium targets, charge-separated kaon and pion multiplicities in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering were extracted. These allow the study of the spin-independent fragmentation of quarks into the identified hadrons. Hadronization in the nuclear environment studied via the analysis of multiplicities provides additional qualitative information on the space-time evolution of hadron formation. From the analysis of the azimuthal distribution of the produced hadrons, spin effects in hadronization can be studied, in particular the Collins fragmentation function, which describes the formation of a transversely polarized quark into an unpolarized hadron. The latter fragmentation function can also be accessed independently analyzing semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering events using the transversely polarized hydrogen target. The study of two-pion and two-kaon production from this same data sample provides access to a series of di-hadron fragmentation functions, including those in which the transverse spin of the fragmenting quark is transferred to the relative orbital angular momentum of the hadron pair. An overview of the results of the mentioned analyses as well as their possible interpretations will be presented.

21

  1. Joint YITP/HET Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''Amarjit Soni''

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

22

  1. Particle Physics Seminar

    12 pm, Stony Brook

    Hosted by: 'Anze Slosar'

  2. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    4:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of spacetime produced by some of the most energetic astrophysical events in the Universe. These spacetime waves are very weakly interacting. This makes them difficult to detect, but allows us to observe the interior dynamics of violent systems that are obscured to telescopes, which rely on radiated light. The Advanced LIGO detectors are engineered to sense gravitational waves, which produce tiny fluctuations in the relative distance between points in space as they pass. The detectors' sensitivity is equivalent to measuring a change in distance between Earth and Alpha Centauri, the closest star to our sun, as small as the thickness of a human hair. On September 14, 2015, LIGO made history with the detection of gravitational waves from binary black hole merger GW150914. 1.3 billion years prior and far, far away, two black holes about 36 and 29 times the mass of the sun collided, forming a bigger black hole roughly 62 times the mass of the sun. This event radiated an enormous amount of energy in gravitational waves in less than 20 milliseconds; more energy than 3 suns would radiate over many billions of years. GW150914 was the first direct detection of gravitational waves, a prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity, and the first observation of a binary black hole merger. During the same observing run, LIGO discovered another gravitational wave signal from a different binary black hole merger on December 26, 2015 (GW151226). These observed events reveal a population of binary black hole systems in the Universe with mass and spin properties never before measured. This talk will cover astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, the gravitational wave signals detected during Advanced LIGO's first observing run, noise sources and technical challenges for the Advanced LIGO detectors, and the prospects for future observing runs.

23

  1. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: ''Christoph Lehner''

24

  1. No events scheduled

25

  1. No events scheduled

26

  1. No events scheduled

27

  1. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Peter Petreczky'

    Synthetic biology is a new interdisciplinary field that designs and builds artificial biological systems, using principles from physics, engineering, and mathematics. Recent success stories include the massive, low-cost synthesis of the anti-malaria drug artemisinin, and the construction of genetic switches, oscillators and logic gates. In my laboratory we build synthetic gene circuits and use them as new research tools to precisely perturb cells and watch how they respond. This way, we hope to develop a predictive, quantitative understanding of biological processes such as microbial drug resistance and cancer. We have developed an expanding library of synthetic gene regulatory circuits first in yeast, and then in cancer cells for this purpose. I will illustrate through a few examples how we can gain a deeper, quantitative understanding of microbial drug resistance and cancer using synthetic gene circuits.

28

  1. HET Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Mattia Bruno'

29

  1. SEP

    29

    Today

    Particle Physics Seminar

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 29, 2016, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    The J-PARC E34 experiment aims to measure the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) and electric dipole moment (EDM) of the positive muon with a novel technique utilizing an ultra-cold muons accelerated to 300 MeV/c and a 66 cm-diameter compact muon storage ring without focusing electric field. This measurement will be complementary to the previous BNL E821 experiment and upcoming FNAL E989 experiment with the muon beam at the magic momentum 3.1GeV/c in a 14 m-diameter storage ring. In this talk, I'd like to discuss the present status and prospects.

  2. SEP

    29

    Today

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 29, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Anze Slosar'''

    Understanding structure formation is one of the most important issues in modern cosmology. In particular, in the era of big astronomical data, connecting observation and theory is crucial to improve precision cosmology, and possibly probe new physics. The observables of large-scale structure, such as galaxy number density, generally depend on the density of the environment. This dependence can traditionally be studied by performing gigantic cosmological N-body simulations and measuring the observables in different density environments. Alternatively, we can perform so-called ``separate universe simulations,'' in which the effect of the environment is absorbed into the change of the cosmological parameters. In other words, an overdense universe is equivalent to a positively curved universe, and the structure formation would change accordingly. In this talk, I will introduce the separate universe mapping, and present how the power spectrum and halo mass function changes in different density environments, which are related to the squeezed-limit bispectrum and the halo bias, respectively. I will also discuss our recent progress on extending this approach to multiple fluids such as dynamic dark energy and massive neutrinos.

30

  1. SEP

    30

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 30, 2016, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    Daya Bay recently updated the light sterile neutrino searching results with 621 days of data. The new analysis has 3.6 times of statistics, improved energy calibration as well as the reduced backgrounds compared to the previous publication. The resulting limits on sin22theta14 are improved by approximately a factor of two over previous results and constitute the most stringent constraints to date in the Delta m2_41 < 0.2 eV2 region. The result is combined with those from MINOS and Bugey-3 experiments to constrain oscillation into light sterile neutrinos. The three experiments are sensitive to complementary regions of parameter space, enabling the combined analysis to probe regions allowed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments in 3+1 neutrino framework. Stringent limits on sin22theta_mue are set over six orders of magnitude in the sterile mass-squared splitting Delta m2_41. In this talk, I will show details of the recent update sterile neutrino search at Daya Bay, the reproduction of Bugey-3's results and the combination of Daya Bay, Bugey-3 and MINOS results.

  2. SEP

    30

    Friday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Friday, September 30, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Robert McGraw'

    Field measurements in the recent past have shown that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are often amorphous glasses or highly viscous liquids under dry and/or cold conditions. Chemical and physical processes occurring in the interior of the aerosol particle and at the gas/particle interface are influenced by the viscous state in which condensed-phase diffusion is slows down considerably. I will discuss measurements of water diffusion in single, levitated aerosol particles for a number of model systems of SOA. In particular, I will show how Mie-resonance spectroscopy allows to "image" diffusion fronts within these particles and discuss atmospheric implications of kinetic limitations of water uptake.

  3. SEP

    30

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, September 30, 2016, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

  4. SEP

    30

    Friday

    Computational Science Initiative Event

    2 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Friday, September 30, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Kerstin Kleese van Dam'

    Linked Science is the practice of inter-connecting scientific assets by publishing, sharing and linking scientific data and processes in end-to-end loosely coupled workflows that enable the sharing and re-use of scientific data. Linked science relies on provenance, curation, and preservation for obtaining reproducible results and sharing datasets for re-use. Many scientific questions are addressed by using data that live in numerous data centers and archives that do not expose their content directly to search engines. A researcher must perform searches on numerous sites, using queries based on multiple metadata schemas, and access data from heterogeneous sources in order to find the data they need to answer scientific questions. We will present a semantic service to enhance the discoverability of datasets in earth science data archives and how it is used in a Linked Science scenario related to the discovery of datasets for a climate change study. We also present how the applicability of this service is expanded by the deployment of an ontology repository and the creation of mappings between ontology entities to link various annotations. Linked ontology entities provide new annotations for datasets. When datasets are better annotated with more granular descriptions, they can be discovered, accessed and operationalized by workflows for numerous provenance and other tasks. This work demonstrates that the use of ontologies—even lightweight ones—provides a path for helping domain experts find the information that they need from heterogeneous datasets for use in complex multi-disciplinary studies, builds better trust in results, and works toward improved reproducibility.

  5. SEP

    30

    Friday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 30, 2016, 4:00 pm

    The Lab community is invited to attend the 2016 Gertrude Scharff-Goldhaber Award Event. Kathryn Meehan, the 2016 Goldhaber Award recipient will make her presentation by Skype. Featured speakers include Alfred (Fred) Scharff Goldhaber (son of Gertrude), who is a Professor at the C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics at Stony Brook University. Fred will be speaking about his mother's career as a woman scientist, particularly here at BNL, and of her participation in the formation of Brookhaven Women in Science and other programs at BNL that still thrive today. In addition we will have Camille van der Watt who will talk about her experiences attending the Lab-sponsored SciComp-100 Workshop this summer. A reception will be held following the award ceremony in honor of Gertrude Scharff-Goldhaber and all the participants

  1. SEP

    29

    Today

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Measurement of muon g-2 and EDM with ultra-cold muon beam at J-PARC"

    Presented by Dr. Tsutomu Mibe, KEK

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 29, 2016, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    The J-PARC E34 experiment aims to measure the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) and electric dipole moment (EDM) of the positive muon with a novel technique utilizing an ultra-cold muons accelerated to 300 MeV/c and a 66 cm-diameter compact muon storage ring without focusing electric field. This measurement will be complementary to the previous BNL E821 experiment and upcoming FNAL E989 experiment with the muon beam at the magic momentum 3.1GeV/c in a 14 m-diameter storage ring. In this talk, I'd like to discuss the present status and prospects.

  2. SEP

    29

    Today

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Simulating the large-scale structure in different density environments"

    Presented by Chi-Ting Chiang, Stony Brook University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 29, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Anze Slosar'''

    Understanding structure formation is one of the most important issues in modern cosmology. In particular, in the era of big astronomical data, connecting observation and theory is crucial to improve precision cosmology, and possibly probe new physics. The observables of large-scale structure, such as galaxy number density, generally depend on the density of the environment. This dependence can traditionally be studied by performing gigantic cosmological N-body simulations and measuring the observables in different density environments. Alternatively, we can perform so-called ``separate universe simulations,'' in which the effect of the environment is absorbed into the change of the cosmological parameters. In other words, an overdense universe is equivalent to a positively curved universe, and the structure formation would change accordingly. In this talk, I will introduce the separate universe mapping, and present how the power spectrum and halo mass function changes in different density environments, which are related to the squeezed-limit bispectrum and the halo bias, respectively. I will also discuss our recent progress on extending this approach to multiple fluids such as dynamic dark energy and massive neutrinos.

  3. SEP

    30

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Sterile Neutrino Search at Daya Bay"

    Presented by Dr. Wei Tang, BNL

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 30, 2016, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    Daya Bay recently updated the light sterile neutrino searching results with 621 days of data. The new analysis has 3.6 times of statistics, improved energy calibration as well as the reduced backgrounds compared to the previous publication. The resulting limits on sin22theta14 are improved by approximately a factor of two over previous results and constitute the most stringent constraints to date in the Delta m2_41 < 0.2 eV2 region. The result is combined with those from MINOS and Bugey-3 experiments to constrain oscillation into light sterile neutrinos. The three experiments are sensitive to complementary regions of parameter space, enabling the combined analysis to probe regions allowed by the LSND and MiniBooNE experiments in 3+1 neutrino framework. Stringent limits on sin22theta_mue are set over six orders of magnitude in the sterile mass-squared splitting Delta m2_41. In this talk, I will show details of the recent update sterile neutrino search at Daya Bay, the reproduction of Bugey-3's results and the combination of Daya Bay, Bugey-3 and MINOS results.

  4. SEP

    30

    Friday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Viscous organic aerosol particles and water uptake: From observations of internal diffusion fronts in single, levitated particles to estimating kinetic limitations under atmospheric conditions"

    Presented by Dr. Ulrich Krieger, Institut für Atmosphäre und Klima, Zürich, Switzerland

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Friday, September 30, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Robert McGraw'

    Field measurements in the recent past have shown that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are often amorphous glasses or highly viscous liquids under dry and/or cold conditions. Chemical and physical processes occurring in the interior of the aerosol particle and at the gas/particle interface are influenced by the viscous state in which condensed-phase diffusion is slows down considerably. I will discuss measurements of water diffusion in single, levitated aerosol particles for a number of model systems of SOA. In particular, I will show how Mie-resonance spectroscopy allows to "image" diffusion fronts within these particles and discuss atmospheric implications of kinetic limitations of water uptake.

  5. SEP

    30

    Friday

    HET Lunch Discussions

    "Gravitational Wave Signatures of Sub-Millimeter Primordial Black Holes"

    Presented by Hooman Davoudiasl, BNL

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, September 30, 2016, 12:15 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

  6. SEP

    30

    Friday

    Computational Science Initiative Event

    "Data Discovery in Linked Science"

    Presented by Dr. Line Pouchard, Purdue University

    2 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Friday, September 30, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Kerstin Kleese van Dam'

    Linked Science is the practice of inter-connecting scientific assets by publishing, sharing and linking scientific data and processes in end-to-end loosely coupled workflows that enable the sharing and re-use of scientific data. Linked science relies on provenance, curation, and preservation for obtaining reproducible results and sharing datasets for re-use. Many scientific questions are addressed by using data that live in numerous data centers and archives that do not expose their content directly to search engines. A researcher must perform searches on numerous sites, using queries based on multiple metadata schemas, and access data from heterogeneous sources in order to find the data they need to answer scientific questions. We will present a semantic service to enhance the discoverability of datasets in earth science data archives and how it is used in a Linked Science scenario related to the discovery of datasets for a climate change study. We also present how the applicability of this service is expanded by the deployment of an ontology repository and the creation of mappings between ontology entities to link various annotations. Linked ontology entities provide new annotations for datasets. When datasets are better annotated with more granular descriptions, they can be discovered, accessed and operationalized by workflows for numerous provenance and other tasks. This work demonstrates that the use of ontologies—even lightweight ones—provides a path for helping domain experts find the information that they need from heterogeneous datasets for use in complex multi-disciplinary studies, builds better trust in results, and works toward improved reproducibility.

  7. SEP

    30

    Friday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    "2016 Gertrude Scharff-Goldhaber Award"

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 30, 2016, 4:00 pm

    The Lab community is invited to attend the 2016 Gertrude Scharff-Goldhaber Award Event. Kathryn Meehan, the 2016 Goldhaber Award recipient will make her presentation by Skype. Featured speakers include Alfred (Fred) Scharff Goldhaber (son of Gertrude), who is a Professor at the C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics at Stony Brook University. Fred will be speaking about his mother's career as a woman scientist, particularly here at BNL, and of her participation in the formation of Brookhaven Women in Science and other programs at BNL that still thrive today. In addition we will have Camille van der Watt who will talk about her experiences attending the Lab-sponsored SciComp-100 Workshop this summer. A reception will be held following the award ceremony in honor of Gertrude Scharff-Goldhaber and all the participants

  8. OCT

    3

    Monday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Extending the Capabilities of Scanning Probe Microscopy: The Path towards Robust, Quantitative, Multidimensional Atomic Resolution Imaging with Chemical Selectivity"

    Presented by Udo D. Schwarz, Yale University, New Haven, CT

    2 pm, CFN, Bldg. 735 - Seminar Room, 2nd floor

    Monday, October 3, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Percy Zahl'

    Despite the evolution of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) into a powerful set of techniques that image surfaces and map their properties down to the atomic level, significant limitations in both imaging and mapping persist. Currently, typical SPM capabilities qualitatively record only one property at a time and at a fixed distance from the surface. Furthermore, the probing tip's apex is chemically and electronically undefined, complicating data interpretation. To overcome these limitations, we have started to integrate significant extensions to existing SPM approaches. First, we expanded noncontact atomic force microscopy with atomic resolution to three dimensions by adding the capability to quantify the tip-sample force fields near a surface with picometer and piconewton resolution [1, 2]. Next, we gained electronic information by recording the tunneling current simultaneously with the force interaction [3] and introduced a new operating scheme called tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy that substantially improved imaging robustness and therefore sample throughput and user friendliness [4]. Finally, we will illustrate how the tip chemistry, tip asymmetry, and tip-sample distance influence the recorded interactions – and thus the information one can gain from images –, ultimately allowing to selectively image specific atomic species [3, 5]. During the talk, applications to various model systems including oxides, metals, ionic crystals, and layered materials will be presented. [1] B. J. Albers et al., Nature Nanotechnology 4, 307 (2009). [2] M. Z. Baykara et al., Advanced Materials 22, 2838 (2010). [3] M. Z. Baykara et al., Physical Review B 87, 155414 (2013). [4] O. E. Dagdeviren et al, Nanotechnology 27, 065703 (2016). [4] H. Mönig et al., ACS Nano 7, 10233 (2013). Host: Percy Zahl

  9. OCT

    4

    Tuesday

    Second workshop at BNL on dark interactions, di2016

    "Dark Interactions: perspective from theory and experiment"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, October 4, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Ketevi A. Assamagan, Mary Bishai and Hooman Davoudiasl'

    Dates: October 4-7, 2016. Time: 9:00-18:00 on October 4-6, 2016 and 9:00-12:30 on October 7. Place: Physics Department Large Seminar Room. As part of this workshop, on Tuesday October 4th at 3:30pm: BSA lecture on Dark Interactions in Berknar Hall. Wednesday October 5 at 18:30. Workshop Dinner. Please contact Linda at feierabe@bnl.gov to register for the dinner. For more details about this workshop, see the workshop website:

  10. OCT

    4

    Tuesday

    2 mile Site-wide Walk

    "2 mile Site-wide Walk"

    12 pm, Bldg 438 starting place

    Tuesday, October 4, 2016, 12:00 pm

    (Rain date Oct 10) New this year! A friendly inter DOE Lab competition for the 1st mile. Timed Event. DOE sites with the highest proportion of participants and shortest times will win. Pre-registration is required at the web link. Meet at Bldg 438 walk along Brookhaven Ave to the Weather Station and back. Contact healthfest@bnl.gov if any questions.

  11. OCT

    4

    Tuesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "The Quantum Universe"

    Presented by Prof. Hitoshi Murayama, Univ. of California Berkeley and Kavli Institute, Univ. of Tokyo

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Tuesday, October 4, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Peter Wanderer''

    Where do we come from? Science is making progress on this age-old question of humankind. The Universe was once much smaller than the size of an atom. Small things mattered in the small Universe, where quantum physics dominated the scene. To understand the way the Universe is today, we have to solve remaining major puzzles. The Higgs boson that was discovered recently is holding our body together from evaporating in a nanosecond. But we still do not know what exactly it is. The mysterious dark matter is holding the galaxy together, and we would not have been born without it. But nobody has seen it directly. And what is the very beginning of the Universe?

  12. OCT

    4

    Tuesday

    Table Tennis Open Singles (All Levels)

    "Table Tennis Open Singles (All Levels)"

    5 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Tuesday, October 4, 2016, 5:00 pm

    Preliminary Rounds - Bldg 317 (downstairs main room) To register, please email Mike McGuigan at mcguigan@bnl.gov

  13. OCT

    5

    Wednesday

    Health Day

    "Health Day"

    11 am, Berkner Lobby & Room D

    Wednesday, October 5, 2016, 11:00 am

    Pre-registration recommended for the 10 min massages at: http://intranet.bnl.gov/healthfest (11am-2pm) There will be: Ergonomic display, OMC display on Zika, FLU etc, Radiology Imaging, Audiologist, Organ Donor information, Intro to Weight Watchers, LI Blood Services. Room D: Health Screening-Biometrics, cholesterol and Blood sugar by AETNA (11am-1pm)

  14. OCT

    5

    Wednesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "The numerical renormalization group as a viable multi-band impurity solver for dynamical mean-field theory"

    Presented by Katharina Stadler, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, ASC, Germany

    1 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conference Room 201 (upstairs)

    Wednesday, October 5, 2016, 1:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''''Gabi Kotliar''''

    In my talk I will present the numerical renormalization group (NRG) as a viable multi-band impurity solver for dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). NRG offers unprecedented real-frequency spectral resolution at arbitrarily low energies and temperatures. It is thus perfectly suited to study "Hund metals" [1], which show - in experiments and theoretical DMFT calculations - puzzling behavior at unusually low energy scales, like Fermi-liquid behavior at low temperatures, a coherence-incoherence crossover with increasing temperature [2, 3] and fractional power laws for the imaginary part of the Matsubara self-energy in the incoherent regime, discovered already early on with continuous time quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC) as DMFT solver [3]. I will explicitly demonstrate the advantages of NRG+DMFT in the context of a channel-symmetric three-band Anderson-Hund model on a Bethe lattice at 1/3 filling (with NRG exploiting the non-abelian SU(3) channel symmetry to reduce numerical costs) [4]. In contrast to CTQMC, our NRG+DMFT calculations finally settled the existence of a Fermi-liquid ground state. We further revealed new important insights: our real-frequency one-particle spectral function shows a coherence-incoherence crossover (driven by Hund J rather than Hubbard U) and strong particle-hole asymmetry, which leads to the above-mentioned apparent fractional power laws; two-stage screening, where spin screening occurs at much lower energies than orbital screening ("spin-orbital separation"); and zero-temperature spectral properties that are similar with or without DMFT self-consistency, in contrast to Mott-Hubbard systems, where the DMFT self-consistency opens a gap. A recent reformulation of NRG, called "interleaved NRG" (iNRG) [5, 6] allows to tackle more realistic models of Hund metals where channel symmetries are generally broken (for example, due to crystal field splitting).

  15. OCT

    6

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Dark Interactions: perspective from theory and experiment"

    9 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 6, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

  16. OCT

    6

    Thursday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Reversed Nanoscale Kirkendall Effect in Au-InAs Hybrid Nanoparticles"

    Presented by Anatoly I. Frenkel, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University / Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    11 am, Bldg 735, Conference Room A

    Thursday, October 6, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Eric Stach''

    Metal-semiconductor hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) have synergistic properties that have been exploited in photocatalysis, electrical, and optoelectronic applications. Rational design of hybrid NPs requires the knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of diffusion of the metal species through the nanoscale semiconductor lattice. One extensively studied process of diffusion of two materials across the nanoparticle surface is known as the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. There, an atomic species A with the lower diffusion rate enters the nanocrystal slower than the B species diffusing from the nanocrystal outward. As a result, voids are formed in B, providing an interesting avenue for making hollow nanocrystals. We used time-resolved X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy to monitor the diffusion process of Au atoms through InAs nanocrystals in real time. In this system the diffusion rate of the inward diffusing species (Au) is faster than that of the outward diffusion species (InAs), which results in the formation of a crystalline metallic Au core surrounded by an amorphous, oxidized InAs shell with voids in it. These observations indicate that in hybrid Au-InAs NPs the rarely observed "reversed nanoscale Kirkendall effect" is in play. It presents a potentially new way to synthesize unique nanoscale core-shell structures.

  17. OCT

    6

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Hiromichi Nishimura, RBRC

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, October 6, 2016, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Hiroshi Oki'

  18. OCT

    6

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Crystal Microstructure and Dynamics by Bragg Coherent X-ray Diffraction"

    Presented by Ian Robinson, Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    4 pm, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, October 6, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Mircea Cotlet'''

  19. OCT

    7

    Friday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "X-ray Imaging via Bragg CDI: From Ultrafast Physics to Defect Dynamics"

    Presented by Andrew Ulvestad, Argonne National Laboratory

    11 am, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Friday, October 7, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Ian Robinson''

    Bragg coherent diffractive imaging is an emerging x-ray imaging technique capable of resolving both defect and ultrafast dynamics in nanocrystals with three-dimensional detail and nanometer resolution. This ability to study single nanocrystals in their reactive environments opens new insight into a broad range of materials science questions, including how to improve materials that convert heat into electricity, understanding degradation in advanced battery cathodes, and probing the structure-stability relationship in fuel cell catalysts. Here I will discuss Bragg CDI studies of phonon dynamics in Zinc Oxide and defect dynamics in thin film grains driven by temperature. Finally, I will touch on future directions for BCDI with the anticipated increase in coherent flux at upgraded synchrotrons.

  20. OCT

    12

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Marco Farina, Rutgers University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 12, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Pier Paolo Giardino''

  21. OCT

    13

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Raju Venugopalan, BNL

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, October 13, 2016, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Hiroshi Oki'

  22. OCT

    13

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, October 13, 2016, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Nora Sundin''

  23. OCT

    19

    Wednesday

    Joint: YITP/HET

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jesse Thaler, MIT

    2:30 pm, YITP Seminar Room

    Wednesday, October 19, 2016, 2:30 pm

  24. OCT

    20

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Chun Shen, BNL

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, October 20, 2016, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Hiroshi Oki'

  25. OCT

    20

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Large area GEM detectors with zigzag readouts"

    Presented by Aiwu Zhang, Florida Institute of Technology

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 20, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors have been widely studied and applied in many experiments. The so called zigzag readout has been studied for reading out large area GEM detectors for tracking purposes. Using of the zigzag readout can significantly reduce number of electronic channels and hence the cost of a detector while still preserving good spatial resolution on a detector. In this presentation, I will first briefly review the GEM detectors and their applications, then I will focus on the R&D activities on GEM detectors with zigzag readout for tracking at a future electron ion collider (EIC), I'll also cover some potential applications of large area GEM detectors and the zigzag readout for other experiments.

  26. OCT

    26

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "TBA"

    Presented by Stefania Gori, University of Cincinnati

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 26, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

  27. OCT

    28

    Friday

    Nuclear/ Riken Theory Committee

    "Perturbative QCD and beyond: Bose-Eitstein correlation and $v_n$ at any n"

    Presented by Genya Levin, Tel Aviv University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, October 28, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

  28. NOV

    2

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "TBA"

    Presented by Amy Nicholson, UC Berkeley

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 2, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Mattia Bruno'

  29. NOV

    4

    Friday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Roberto Felici, Istituto SPIN - CNR, Italy

    11 am, ISB Bldg. 734, Sem. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Friday, November 4, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Ian Robinson''

    TBA

  30. NOV

    7

    Monday

    CFN Colloquium

    "The role of chemical and steric environment of active sites on catalytic activity"

    Presented by Prof. Dr. Johannes A. Lercher, Department of Chemistry Technische Universität München, Garching, Germany / Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, Germany

    4 pm, CFN Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Monday, November 7, 2016, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Mircea Cotlet''

    Understanding the elementary steps in acid-base and metal catalyzed organic transformations is a key for sustainable chemical conversions. Solid acids and bases with nano-pores such as zeolites act as solid Brønsted and Lewis acids, widely used as catalysts with well-defined acid-base sites and a well-defined reaction space around the sites. Within the pores of molecular sieves reacting molecules are constrained in a reaction space, which can be subtly adjusted via direct synthesis, as well as via the addition of cations, oxidic clusters or organic fragments. The impact of such changes on mono- and bimolecular reactions such as elimination reactions of alcohols, cracking and alkylation of hydrocarbons are discussed for gas and liquid phase reactions. Experimental methods to define the state of the reacting molecules combined with detailed kinetic analysis and theory will be used to explain the principal contributions of the interactions and the confinement to determine reaction rates. It will be discussed how reaction rates and pathways can be tailored using the space available for a transition state and the chemical constituents around the active site.

  31. NOV

    9

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jo Bovy

    1:30 pm, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, November 9, 2016, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Neelima Sehgal'

  32. NOV

    9

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "TBA"

    Presented by Chung Kao, University of Oklahoma

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 9, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

  33. NOV

    10

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Observational constraints on mixed-phase clouds imply higher climate sensitivity"

    Presented by Ivy Tan, Yale Univ.

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, November 10, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Robert McGraw'

    Mixed-phase clouds are comprised of both liquid droplets and ice crystals. For a given total water content, mixed-phase clouds with higher liquid water contents are optically thicker and therefore more reflective to sunlight compared to those with higher ice water contents. This is due to the fact that liquid droplets tend to be smaller in size and more abundant than ice crystals in Earth's atmosphere. Given the ubiquity of mixed-phase clouds, the ratio of liquid to ice in these clouds is expected to be important for Earth's radiation budget. We determine the climatic impact of thermodynamic phase partitioning in mixed-phase clouds by using five pairs of simulations run with CAM5/CESM. Of the five pairs of simulations, the thermodynamic phase partitioning of two of the simulations were constrained to better agree with observations from CALIPSO. The other three pairs of simulations include a control simulation, as well as an upper and lower bound simulation with maximally high and low amounts of mixed-phase cloud liquid fractions. An analysis of the simulations shows that a negative "cloud phase feedback" that occurs due to the repartitioning of cloud droplets and ice crystals under global warming is weakened when mixed-phase clouds initially contain a higher amount of liquid. Simulations that exhibited weaker cloud phase feedbacks also had higher climate sensitivities. The results suggest that an unrealistically strong cloud phase feedback leading to lower climate sensitivities may be lurking in the many climate models that underestimate mixed-phase cloud liquid fractions compared to observations.

  34. NOV

    10

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar: TBA"

    1:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 10, 2016, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Anze Slosar'

  35. NOV

    10

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, November 10, 2016, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  36. NOV

    16

    Wednesday

    Joint YITP/HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Scott Thomas, Rutgers

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 16, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Amarjit Soni'

  37. NOV

    17

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminars- SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar

    "A more precise and accurate route from sky images to cosmological constraints"

    Presented by Gary Bernstein, U Penn

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 17, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Anze Slosar'

    Current (e.g. DES) and future (e.g. LSST, Euclid) experiments aim to convert multiband images of the sky into precise constraints on cosmological models, neutrino masses, and modifications of general relativity. This standard path for this inference involves making point estimates of the galaxies' redshifts (from observed colors) and weak gravitational lensing distortions (from observed morphologies), then combining these into various cross-correlations and other summary statistics that are compared to numerical simulations of the Universe. These estimators require a slew of empirical corrections to various biases, and have yet to demonstrate accuracies sufficient to reduce biases below systematic errors. I describe two steps to greatly simplify this process and eliminate the need for simulation-based calibration of estimators: first, a practical means to estimate the joint posterior probability of a galaxies' redshift and line-of-sight lensing; second, a method to sample from the posterior distribution of all mass distributions and cosmologies conditional on the galaxy density and lensing data. The main advantages of the new scheme include improved lensing and photo-z accuracy (to the required part-per-thousand level), recovery of non-Gaussian information that is lost in the usual 2-point summary statistics, and correct propagation of uncertainties (including photo-z uncertainties) into the cosmological inferences.

  38. NOV

    29

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Juergen Berges, University of Heidelberg

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, November 29, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Rob Pisarski'

  39. NOV

    30

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "TBA"

    Presented by Luka Leskovec, University of Arizona

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 30, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Mattia Bruno'

  40. DEC

    1

    Thursday

    PACCD Workshop (Precision Astronomy with Fully Depleted CCDs)

    8 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, December 1, 2016, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  41. DEC

    1

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    9:30 am, Bldg 30 North Room

    Thursday, December 1, 2016, 9:30 am

    Hosted by: 'Long Island Blood Services'

  42. DEC

    2

    Friday

    PACCD Workshop (Precision Astronomy with Fully Depleted CCDs)

    8 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, December 2, 2016, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  43. DEC

    7

    Wednesday

    Joint: YITP/HET

    "TBA"

    Presented by Michele Papucci, Berkeley

    2:30 pm, YITP Seminar Room

    Wednesday, December 7, 2016, 2:30 pm

  44. DEC

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, December 8, 2016, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  45. DEC

    14

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Hong Zhang, Ohio State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, December 14, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Pier Paolo Giardino'

  46. JAN

    12

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, January 12, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  47. FEB

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, February 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  48. MAR

    9

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  49. APR

    13

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, April 13, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  50. MAY

    11

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 11, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'

  51. JUN

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 8, 2017, 6:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Nora Sundin'