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July 2015
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Moving towards continuous data readout and transmission in the future Phase-II upgrade of the LAr Calorimeter creates a few technical challenges for the front-end electronics design as well as the back-end signal-processing needs. Particularly, the elevated pileup corruption to the data samples at an unprecedented luminosity level dictates a revision of the linear optimal filtering (LOF) approach currently deployed in the ATLAS experiment. In addition, the analog front-end (AFE) architecture needs to be revisited for supporting an ultra-high dynamic range (16-18 bits), in anticipation of any potential future evolution to a highly integrated, low cost implementation platform or technology for further power and cost reductions. In this talk, a few topics along these lines will be addressed with some preliminary results showcased in an attempt to meeting these challenges, including an extended LOF algorithm for continuous sequence detection and an AFE behavioral modeling platform.

2

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

3

4

  1. No events scheduled

5

  1. No events scheduled

6

  1. No events scheduled

7

  1. No events scheduled

8

  1. No events scheduled

9

  1. No events scheduled

10

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN, Building 735, conference room A, 1st fl.

    Hosted by: Qin Wu

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Cu-CHA in Emission Control Dr. Xiaofan Yang BASF Corporation Friday, July 10, 2015 11:00 a.m. Building, 735, Conference Room A Chabazite supported Cu is the most promising catalyst platform for implementing a NH3/urea-based Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system to remove hazardous NOx gases from the lean-burn engine exhaust. Whereas in-depth spectroscopic and other studies have attempted to identify key features of the catalytic cycle previously, a deep understanding of the SCR mechanism amenable for a systematic improvement of the catalyst performance continues to be elusive. To establish a more rational approach to catalyst optimization and identify chemically sound design principles based on the thermodynamics and kinetics of the key steps of the underlying NOx-transformations we developed a quantum chemical model and benchmarked it to match vibrational data from Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform spectroscopy resulting in plausible assignments of each observable intermediate to specific oxidation states of Cu and NO-binding properties. This approach allows for making a much more precise assignment of the experimental vibrational data to key intermediates potentially involved in the catalytic cycle of the SCR reaction and provides a high-resolution model that can be examined to develop a micromechanistic proposal for the catalytic reaction cycle that is chemically meaningful and is logically consistent. In addition, the presentation also covers industrial application utilizing Cu-CHA in emission control. Host: Qin Wu

  2. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    11 am, Bldg 911B, Large Conf. Rm., Rm. A202

    "Longitudinal space charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as detrimental in free-electron lasers as they can seed unwanted energy modulations and emittance growth. There has however been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beam lines capable of sustaining this LSC instability as a mechanism to operate as a coherent light source. In such a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier (LSCA), initial noise present in the beam density is amplified via the interplay of longitudinal space charge forces and properly located dispersive sections. To date most of these studies have been carried out with a one-dimensional impedance model for the LSC. We use an available grid-less three-dimensional N-body ``Barnes-Hut'' algorithm to simulate the 3D space charge force in the beam combined with ELEGANT and explore the limitations of the 1D model often used. We investigate, via numerical simulations, the performances of a cascaded LSCA beam line at the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)."

11

  1. No events scheduled

12

  1. CFN Summer Sunday

    10 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: CFN

13

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 480 Conference Room

    Hosted by: Ivan Bozovic

    The Josephson effect is still a unique key towards a variety of frontier problems ranging from the detection of Majorana fermions to macroscopic quantum phenomena and qubit applications. Progress in material science in producing a larger variety of interfaces and in nanotechnologies applied to superconductivity, may promote a renewal on the paradigms of the phase dynamics of Josephson junctions with relevant consequences on a series of key issues. We will discuss some relevant experiments mostly realized on unconventional junctions, including hybrid devices, nano-junctions, and especially high critical temperature superconductors (HTS). Novel phenomena emerge because of the possibility of driving materials and junctions with an accurate control in unexplored regimes. We have investigated different micro-structural configurations, which offer a wide range of junction dynamical parameters. A transition from classical Josephson phase dynamics, which takes place in junctions characterized by low values of critical current density Jc, to a regime in which dissipation is driven by local heating processes, for high values of Jc. We demonstrate how non-equilibrium effects and local processes in constrained geometry are codified in the response of the junctions and can be disentangled from other effects. Escape dynamics turns as an active 'imaging' of nano-scale transport with an enormous potential and the ability of encoding subtle transport information in fluctuations. We speculate on possible intrinsic nanoscale ordering occurring in HTS systems. This transition is of relevance for all kinds of weak links including the emergent family of nano-hybrid junctions. Information on the search of quantum phase slips can be also derived. Experiments on reference systems as HTS nanowires and Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic spin-valve tunnel barriers (experiment made in collaboration with University of Cambridge) will be finally

14

  1. No events scheduled

15

  1. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    This presentation will describe the design of specific high speed and high resolution converters in LPSC Grenoble. ADC designs for calorimeters and different pixels detectors will be discussed in detail. Trends and constraints for future converter designs in DSM process will also be described.

  2. Association of Students and Postdocs (ASAP) Event

    5:30 pm, BNL Gazebo

    All you can eat burgers, hot dogs, snacks, drinks Beer for those 21+ (bring photo ID) $2 admission, purchase at BERA store in Berkner Hall (open 9am-3pm) $4 at the 'door' Sponsored by the NSLS-II User Community and BNL/BSA Hosted by the Association of Students and Postdocs (ASAP)

16

  1. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    12 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, lst Floor, Conference Room A

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

17

  1. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    High-energy particles passing through matter lose energy by showering via hard bremsstrahlung and pair production. At very high energy, the quantum duration of each splitting process, known as the formation time, exceeds the mean free time for collisions with the medium, leading to a significant reduction in the splitting rate, known as the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect. A long-standing problem in field theory has been to understand how to implement this effect in cases where the formation times of two consecutive splittings overlap. I will review why this question is interesting and discuss recent progress in the context of jet energy loss in quark-gluon plasmas.

18

  1. No events scheduled

19

  1. Summer Sundays

    10 am, Berkner Hall

  2. Family Science Talk

    11 am, Science Education Center

    This talk is also being presented at 12:30 pm and 2:00 pm

20

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Conference Room, Building 480

    Hosted by: Myung-Geun Han

    The atomic-scale mechanisms that govern the adhesion, mechanical deformation, and bonding of surfaces in contact are not well understood. Yet accurate description and prediction of such contact phenomena is critically important in advanced nanoscale applications, including scanning probe microscopy (e.g., nanoscale mapping of mechanical and functional properties), micro-/nano-electromechanical systems (e.g., actuators, switches), and nanomanufacturing processes (e.g., scanning probe lithography). In this talk, I will discuss contact and sliding tests on nanoscale tips of silicon and other technologically relevant materials. These tests were performed inside of a transmission electron microscope (TEM), enabling in situ interrogation of a contact interface while controlling the displacement of the bodies and measuring normal forces with sub-nanonewton resolution. Quantitative data were extracted using custom analysis routines to resolve the geometry of the contacting bodies, adhesive forces, and volumes removed due to sliding wear, all with unprecedented resolution. In the first part of the talk, TEM adhesion tests of carbon-based coatings on diamond performed using this setup will be discussed. Sub-nanonewton force resolution was paired with Angstrom-scale measurements of asperity geometry. Combined with complementary molecular dynamics simulations, these results revealed an order-of-magnitude reduction in apparent work of adhesion as tip roughness increased from atomic-scale corrugation to a root-mean-square value of 1 nm. These results demonstrate the strong effect of sub-nanoscale topography on adhesion, and highlight a key limitation of conventional approaches for measuring the work of adhesion. In the second part of the talk, in situ sliding tests of silicon tips sliding on diamond at low applied loads reveal that wear occurs by atomic attrition: gradual material removal at the atomic scale. The process can be accurately described using stress

21

  1. Sambamurti Lecture

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Laurence Littenberg

    Why are we made of matter, not antimatter? Where such asymmetry comes from remains one of the biggest mysteries in physics. In this talk, the speaker will take you through the process how physicists design a scientific experiment aiming to address this important question. We will examine the thinking behind, review the current progress, and discuss the challenges in the future.

22

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN, Building 735, 1st floor conference room A

    Hosted by: Deyu Lu

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Configurational Sampling for Problems in Energy Storage, Photovoltaics, and Force Field Fitting Maria Chan Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL USA Wednesday, July 22, 2015 11:00 a.m. Bldg. 735, Conf. Rm. A, first floor Abstract Atomistic modeling, whether in conjunction with classical or quantum mechanical Hamiltonians, depends heavily on the determination of actual or probable atomistic structures. A large variety of approaches towards such determination have been developed for global minimum structures as well as equilibrium thermal fluctuations, including Monte Carlo, basin hopping, simulated annealing, molecular dynamics etc. In this talk, we will discuss the determination of atomistic structures outside of thermodynamic ground state or typical thermal situations, including the modeling of nonequilibrium solid-state amorphization and experiment-guided atomistic structure determination. We will also discuss the importance of appropriate configurational sampling for force field development. Biography Maria Chan obtained her BSc in Physics and Applied Mathematics from UCLA and PhD in Physics in MIT. Dr. Chan has been a staff scientist at the Center of Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, since 2012. Dr. Chan's research focuses on the computational prediction of materials properties, using first principles, atomistic, and data mining methods, particularly in applications towards materials relevant to energy technologies, such as photovoltaics, energy storage, and thermoelectrics. Examples include development of methods for high-throughput screening of photovoltaic and photocatalytic materials, prediction of thermal conductivity in nanostructured thermoelectric materials, modeling of point and extended defects in inorganic photovoltaics, and modeling o

  2. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conf. Room 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: Peter D. Johnson

    In 1929, a German mathematician and physicist Hermann Weyl proposed that a massless solution of the Dirac equation represents a pair of new type of particles, the so-called Weyl fermions. However, their existence in particle physics remains elusive after more than eight decades, e.g., neutrino has been regarded as a Weyl fermion in the Standard Model until it was found to have mass. Recently, significant advances in both topological insulators and topological semimetals have provided an alternative way to realize Weyl fermions in condensed matter as an emergent phenomenon. Weyl semimetals are predicted as a class of topological materials that can be regarded as three-dimensional analogs of graphene breaking time reversal or inversion symmetry. Electrons in a Weyl semimetal behave exactly as Weyl fermions, which have many exotic properties, such as chiral anomaly, magnetic monopoles in the crystal momentum space, and open Fermi arcs on the surface. In this talk I will report our discovery of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs by observing Fermi arcs in the surface states and Weyl nodes in the bulk states using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  3. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg 911B, Large Conf. Rm. Rm A202

    Hosted by: Steve Peggs/Kevin Brown

    "High reliability has become a crucial issue in the design and operation of accelerators due to the demands of specific applications (e.g. medical accelerators, neutron spallation sources, nuclear waste transmutation). This is particularly relevant for accelerator-driven neutron facilities and for Accelerator-Driven Systems technologies for waste transmutation. Until now, accelerator reliability analysis has mostly been performed using simplified methods either in the design phase of projects, or after the accelerator is operational. This talk discusses a holistic approach to accelerator reliability modeling using Hidden Markov Models to look for emergent behavior of the accelerator, using system-complexity agnostics datasets from the operating machine, e.g. beam current or charge."

  4. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

23

  1. Photon Sciences Seminar

    11 am, Building 744, Conference Room 156

    Hosted by: Paul Zschack

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    12 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, lst Floor, Conference Room A

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

  3. High Energy Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worcester

    Beginning in 2011, the Double Chooz experiment has produced increasingly precise measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameter sin22θ13. These measurements rely on the detection of reactor antineutrinos through the inverse beta decay (IBD) interaction. The most recent analysis uses IBD interactions followed by neutron capture on hydrogen, rather than the standard Gd capture channel. A new artificial neural network-based signal selection, novel background rejection techniques, and reduced detection systematics make this analysis far more sensitive than the original H-channel measurement in Double Chooz. The precision of this new sin22θ13 measurement approaches that of the Gd-channel measurement, demonstrating the possibility of performing high-sensitivity physics measurements without a Gd dopant.

  4. Science on Screen

    7 pm, Cinema Arts Centre in Huntington, New York

24

  1. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Speren Schlichting

    The BK-JIMWLK equations describing the evolution of the Color Glass Condensate with increasing energy have recently been extended to next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy. However, some of the NLO corrections turn out to be extremely large, since amplified by (double and single) `collinear' logarithms, i.e. logarithms of ratios of transverse momenta. This difficulty points towards the existence of large radiative corrections to all orders in $\alpha_s$, as generated by the transverse phase-space, which must be computed and resummed in order to restore the convergence of the perturbative expansion. In a couple of recent papers, we developed a resummation scheme in that sense, which achieves a complete resummation of the double-logarithmic corrections and a partial resummation of the single-logarithmic ones (including the running coupling effects). We have thus deduced a collinearly-improved version of the BK equation which includes the largest radiative corrections to all orders. To demonstrate the usefulness of this equation as a tool for phenomenology, for have used it for fits to the HERA data for electron-proton deep inelastic scattering at high energy. We have obtained excellent fits with a reduced number of free parameters and with initial conditions at low energy taken from perturbative QCD.

  2. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    4 pm, Physics Dept. Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    The structure of human hair has been extensively studied over the last 70 years. However, its detailed structure has proven to be elusive. Dr. Stanic, a scientist at LNLS - Brazil, and Dr. Evans-Lutterodt, a scientist at Brookhaven Lab's NSLS II, used very small beams of x-ray light, a fraction of a single hair diameter, to image the detailed structure of human hair. These results may lead to the development of new and better hair products.

25

  1. No events scheduled

26

  1. Summer Sundays

    10 am, Berkner Hall

  2. Science Talks

    11 am, Science Education Center

    The "History of Camp Upton" talk will take place at 11:00 am and 2:00 pm; the "History of BNL Site" talk will take place at 12:30 and 3:00 pm

27

  1. No events scheduled

28

  1. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

    Faced with the recent experimental discoveries of pentaquarks and tetraquarks, one would like to establish whether these states arise directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions - QCD. I will present how the exotic and conventional hadrons are investigated with ab-initio lattice QCD simulations. The approach will be illustrated with recent lattice results on the charmonium-like states Zc and X(3872), conventional resonances, bound states and pentaquarks.

29

  1. JUL

    29

    Today

    BSA Noon Recital

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 12:00 pm

  2. JUL

    29

    Today

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

30

  1. JUL

    30

    Thursday

    Colloquium

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, July 30, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  2. JUL

    30

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, July 30, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    The P-odd spectral density of current correlation functions appears in several physical observables which are related to chiral anomaly, and is a sensitive probe of microscopic dynamics which is less protected by symmetry alone. We discuss two examples of their appearance: photon emission and the second order transport coefficient from chiral anomaly. We describe leading order weak coupling computations for these examples.

  3. JUL

    30

    Thursday

    C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    3:30 pm, Building 911B, Large Conference Room, Second Floor

    Thursday, July 30, 2015, 3:30 pm

    This talk will describe the evolution of Muon accelerator R&D. An overview of what has been accomplished under the U.S. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP), what remains to be done, and how the elements of the program are evolving will be presented.

  4. JUL

    30

    Thursday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    4:30 pm, Physics Dept. Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, July 30, 2015, 4:30 pm

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    The discoveries and wonder of science have great capacity to inspire. Ágnes Mócsy, a theoretical physicist, will discuss how as a physicist and professor at an art and design institute she has been able to share this inspiration with students and faculty from diverse backgrounds and use it to build cross-sections between physics and art. Mócsy will discuss how breaking down barriers between art and science may better propagate the scientific way of seeing the world.

31

  1. JUL

    31

    Friday

    Colloquium

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Friday, July 31, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  2. JUL

    31

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, July 31, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    I will discuss the recently proposed generalized Landau-level representation for charged fermions in an external magnetic field. After demonstrating its key advantages over the other existing representations, I will mention several of its applications. One of them is the quantum Hall effect in graphene, where the new representation is essential for a sufficiently detailed theoretical description, in which all the dynamical parameters are running functions of the Landau-level index. The other application is the chiral asymmetry induced in dense relativistic matter in an external magnetic field. The quantitative measure of such an asymmetry is the chiral shift parameter that measures a relative shift of the longitudinal momenta (along the direction of the magnetic field) in the dispersion relations of opposite chirality fermions. Using the language of solid state physics, the corresponding ground state of dense relativistic matter could be interpreted as a Weyl metal state. Incidentally, the exact same mechanism also works in real Dirac metals.

  1. JUL

    29

    Today

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Pianofest II"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 12:00 pm

  2. JUL

    29

    Today

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Probing Charm-Yukawa at LHC, Status and Prospects"

    Presented by Kohsaku Tobioka, Weizmann Institute/Tel Aviv University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  3. JUL

    30

    Thursday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, July 30, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  4. JUL

    30

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "P-odd Spectral Density at Weak Coupling: Photon Emission and Second"

    Presented by Ho-Ung Yee, University of Illinois at Chicago

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, July 30, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    The P-odd spectral density of current correlation functions appears in several physical observables which are related to chiral anomaly, and is a sensitive probe of microscopic dynamics which is less protected by symmetry alone. We discuss two examples of their appearance: photon emission and the second order transport coefficient from chiral anomaly. We describe leading order weak coupling computations for these examples.

  5. JUL

    30

    Thursday

    C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    "Muon Accelerators: R&D Towards Future Neutrino Factory and Lepton Collider Capabilities"

    Presented by Mark Palmer, Fermilab

    3:30 pm, Building 911B, Large Conference Room, Second Floor

    Thursday, July 30, 2015, 3:30 pm

    This talk will describe the evolution of Muon accelerator R&D. An overview of what has been accomplished under the U.S. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP), what remains to be done, and how the elements of the program are evolving will be presented.

  6. JUL

    30

    Thursday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    "Unexpected Unions: A Physicist's Dip Into the Art and Design World"

    Presented by Ágnes Mócsy

    4:30 pm, Physics Dept. Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, July 30, 2015, 4:30 pm

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    The discoveries and wonder of science have great capacity to inspire. Ágnes Mócsy, a theoretical physicist, will discuss how as a physicist and professor at an art and design institute she has been able to share this inspiration with students and faculty from diverse backgrounds and use it to build cross-sections between physics and art. Mócsy will discuss how breaking down barriers between art and science may better propagate the scientific way of seeing the world.

  7. JUL

    31

    Friday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Friday, July 31, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  8. JUL

    31

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Generalized Landau-level representation for spin-1/2 fermions and its applications"

    Presented by Igor Shovkovy, Arizona State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, July 31, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    I will discuss the recently proposed generalized Landau-level representation for charged fermions in an external magnetic field. After demonstrating its key advantages over the other existing representations, I will mention several of its applications. One of them is the quantum Hall effect in graphene, where the new representation is essential for a sufficiently detailed theoretical description, in which all the dynamical parameters are running functions of the Landau-level index. The other application is the chiral asymmetry induced in dense relativistic matter in an external magnetic field. The quantitative measure of such an asymmetry is the chiral shift parameter that measures a relative shift of the longitudinal momenta (along the direction of the magnetic field) in the dispersion relations of opposite chirality fermions. Using the language of solid state physics, the corresponding ground state of dense relativistic matter could be interpreted as a Weyl metal state. Incidentally, the exact same mechanism also works in real Dirac metals.

  9. AUG

    1

    Saturday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Saturday, August 1, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  10. AUG

    2

    Sunday

    Summer Sunday

    "Atom-Smashing Fun"

    10 am, Berkner Hall

    Sunday, August 2, 2015, 10:00 am

  11. AUG

    2

    Sunday

    Science Talk

    "Discovery of the Higgs Boson: An Update," at 11:00 am and 12:30 pm"

    Howard Gordon, ATLAS Collaboration Chair and Deputy Chair of BNL Physics Department

    11 am, Physics Bldg

    Sunday, August 2, 2015, 11:00 am

  12. AUG

    5

    Wednesday

    NSLS-ll Town Meeting

    1 pm, Building 703, Large Conference Room

    Wednesday, August 5, 2015, 1:00 pm

    Hosted by: NSLS-ll Users' Executive Committee

    The NSLS-II staff and user community are invited to a Town Meeting on Wednesday, August 5, from 1-3 p.m. in building 703, Large Conference Room. Watch webcast starting at 1 p.m. http://www.bnl.gov/video/

  13. AUG

    5

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN seminar

    "Higgs coupling deviations, vacuum stability and new bosons at the TeV scale"

    Presented by Raffaele D'Agnolo, Institute for Advanced Study

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, August 5, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

    Higgs coupling measurements can shed light on the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking. However it is not trivial to go beyond generic intuitions, such as the expectation that natural theories generate large deviations, and make precise statements. In this talk I will show in a model independent way that measuring deviations at the LHC implies the existence of new bosons between a few TeV and a few hundred TeV. This is true in general, including theories where new fermions produce the deviations.

  14. AUG

    7

    Friday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    "2015 Goldhaber Award"

    Fen Guan, Stony Brook University

    12 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, August 7, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Linda Bowerman

    2015 Goldhaber Award Seminar and Lunch Reception

  15. AUG

    7

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Marco Strathmann, University of Tuebingen

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, August 7, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  16. AUG

    11

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Life after Physics: A look back on 20 years in Finance"

    Presented by Andreas Gocksch

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, August 11, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

    After 10 years of research in High Energy Theory this BNL graduate ('83-'85 and '88-'93) followed the call of Wall Street. In my talk I reflect on over 20 years in the financial industry with an emphasis on highlighting possible career choices for young people that might one day be faced with searching for a "life after Physics". Along the way I also hope to leave the audience with an understanding of some basic facts about Finance and an appreciation for the utility of the physicist's toolkit in the "real world".

  17. AUG

    12

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminar

    "Constraining Extended Higgs Sectors at the LHC and Beyond"

    Presented by Tania Robens, Technical University of Dresden

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, August 12, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  18. AUG

    13

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Emilio Bagan, IFAE, Barcelona

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, August 13, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

  19. AUG

    13

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Exciting New Results From LHCb"

    Presented by Sheldon Stone, Syracuse University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, August 13, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worchester

    LHCb has presented groundbreaking new results this summer in exotic particle spectroscopy and searches for new physics.

  20. AUG

    14

    Friday

    Chemistry Department Colloquium

    "Hydrogen Storage in Formic Acid/Formate Solutions - Kinetics and Mechanism"

    Presented by Prof. Laurenczy Gabor, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Friday, August 14, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Etsuko Fujita

  21. AUG

    21

    Friday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Caught in the Act! Live Observations of Catalysts Using High-pressure Scanning Probe Microscopy"

    Presented by Irene M. N. Groot, Leiden Institute of Physics and Leiden Institute of Chemistry, the Netherlands

    10 am, CFN, Bldg. 735, first fl. conference room A

    Friday, August 21, 2015, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Anibal Boscoboinik

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Caught in the Act! Live Observations of Catalysts Using High-pressure Scanning Probe Microscopy Irene M. N. Groot Leiden Institute of Physics and Leiden Institute of Chemistry, the Netherlands Friday, August 21, 2015 10:00 am Bldg. 735 " Conf. Rm. A Recently it has become clear that essential differences can exist between the behavior of catalysts under industrial conditions (high pressure and temperature) and the (ultra) high vacuum conditions of traditional laboratory experiments. Differences in structure, composition, reaction mechanism, activity, and selectivity have been observed. These observations indicated the presence of the so-called pressure gap, and made it clear that meaningful results can only be obtained at high pressures and temperatures. However, most of the techniques traditionally used to study catalysts and their reactions were designed to operate under (ultra) high vacuum conditions. To bridge the pressure gap, the last years have seen a tremendous effort in designing new instruments and adapting existing ones to be able to investigate catalysts in situ under industrially relevant conditions. This talk focuses on the development of scanning probe microscopy for operando observations of active model catalysts. In our group, we have developed set-ups that combine an ultrahigh vacuum environment for model catalyst preparation and characterization with a high-pressure flow reactor cell, integrated with either a scanning tunneling microscope or an atomic force microscope. With these set-ups we are able to perform atomic-scale investigations of well-defined model catalysts under industrial conditions. Additionally, we combine the structural information from scanning probe microscopy with time-resolved mass spectrometry measurements on the gas mixture that leaves the re

  22. AUG

    26

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Matthew Baumgart, Rutgers University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, August 26, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  23. SEP

    8

    Tuesday

    Joint Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics Seminar

    "Understanding the nature of neutrinos via neutrinoless double-beta decay"

    Presented by Wenqin Xu, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, September 8, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    Neutrinos provide a critical portal to physics beyond the Standard Model, yet the nature of neutrinos is largely unknown, including the neutrino mass hierarcy and if neutrinos are Majorana particles. Majorana particles are fermions that are their own antiparticles. Neutrinos being Majorana particles would explicitly violate lepton number conservation, and would pave the way to understand the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. Neutrinoless double-beta (0 ) decay is a hypothesized process where two neutrons decay into two protons and two electrons simultaneously without emitting neutrinos. It is possible only if neutrinos are Majorana particles, and it is the only feasible way to experimentally establish the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos. The observation of 0 decay would also provide complementary information related to neutrino masses. After decades of experimental e orts, the next generation 0 decay experiments will have a signi cant discovery potential to observe 0 decay, if neutrinos are indeed Majorana particles. In this talk, we will discuss the physics of neutrinoless double beta decay and review the experiments searching for it. We will focus on the Majorana Demonstrator, a 40-kg modular Germanium detector array, which searches for 0 decay in 76Ge and aims at demonstrating a path forward to next generation 0 decay experiments.

  24. SEP

    10

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, September 10, 2015, 6:30 pm

  25. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Enso String Quartet: Salonen, Sibelius"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 12:00 pm

  26. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    CFN Proposal Deadline

    "CFN Proposal Deadline for January-April Cycle 2016"

    11:45 pm, CFN

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 11:45 pm

  27. OCT

    1

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Top Quark Precision Physics and the Fate of the Universe"

    Presented by Andreas Jung, Fermilab

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 1, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The talk will discuss recent measurements in the top quark sector, the heaviest known elementary particle known so far, performed at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and at the LHC. I will highlight Tevatron results that are competitive to those at the LHC, especially regarding the top quark mass and production asymmetry. The talk will also present CMS results on the top quark mass and Yukawa coupling. I will discuss the implications for the standard model electroweak sector regarding the vacuum stability. I will conclude with an outlook towards the high luminosity phase of the LHC and the CMS silicon detector upgrades required for the high luminosity phase.

  28. OCT

    12

    Monday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, October 12, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  29. OCT

    13

    Tuesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, October 13, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  30. OCT

    14

    Wednesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  31. OCT

    15

    Thursday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 15, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  32. OCT

    15

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Recent Results from the BaBar Experiment"

    Presented by David Norvil Brown, University of Louisville

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 15, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    TBD

  33. OCT

    16

    Friday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, October 16, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong