BNL Home
January 2018
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

2

  1. No events scheduled

3

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: ''QOL/BERA/Recreation''

    Enjoy coffee & pastry, meet new BNLers, and, if you have children, they'll play.

4

  1. Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    10:30 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Hosted by: 'Mike Jensen'

    pending

5

  1. Sustainable Energy Technologies Department

    11 am, Bldg. 734 Room 201

    Hosted by: 'Pat Looney'

    There is considerable promise in developing integrated graphene devices for various optical and electrical applications. Being able to reliably fabricate devices is absolutely vital for the success and proliferation of graphene and other 2 dimensional materials; however, there are numerous challenges that need to be addressed, beginning with material synthesis and continuing all the way through fabrication and device characterization. In this presentation an overview of my work will be presented, starting with my Ph.D. thesis work in fabricating high quality monolayer graphene films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Common particle contamination occurring from the CVD growth of graphene in quartz tubes is examined, identified and eliminated resulting in pristine CVD films. Next the copper surface morphology effects on CVD graphene growth are presented and a method for rapid (sub 1 min growth time) high quality graphene synthesis is demonstrated. More recent work involving graphene device fabrication and integration conducted at Sandia National Laboratories is shown. Some of the common pitfalls of graphene integration are presented along with solutions, which have increased our yield and reliability greatly in just 2 years. Finally, I demonstrate 2 applications that we have been able to integrate with great success. The control of the visibility of graphene films encapsulated in different dielectrics and dielectric thicknesses is shown and a model is developed which is in good agreement with experimentally measured values. To conclude I give an overview of SNL's latest graphene based optical detector, the deeply depleted graphene/oxide/semiconductor junction detector (D2GOS). We demonstrate its high responsivity (~2800 A/W) in the visible wavelength range and its potential to be used in other optical frequencies.

  2. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: ''''Mark Dean''''

    Advances in unit cell scale synthesis have unlocked the ability to create artificial materials at the interface of complex oxides. This opens the door to the rational design of materials properties. To explore the spin, charge, and orbital character of these synthetic materials, resonant x-ray scattering techniques are utilized which unveil their long-range ordering and low energy excitations. In this talk, we will explore several recent examples of this new methodology and provide an outlook on the future of this emergent field.

  3. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    We study the Hagedorn transition in the singlet sector of the simplest super-string bit model in the tensionless limit. The gauge group of our model is SU(N) and this transition takes place when N is infinite. We use orthogonality of group characters in order to calculate the partition function. At the Hagedorn temperature there is a change in the distribution of parameters that maximize this partition function. We conclude by devising a field-theoretic interpretation of the this phenomenon.

6

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7

  1. No events scheduled

8

  1. Nuclear Theory Seminar

    11 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Andrey Tarasov'

    We study the Hagedorn transition in the singlet sector of the simplest super-string bit model in the tensionless limit. The gauge group of our model is SU(N) and this transition takes place when N is infinite. We use orthogonality of group characters in order to calculate the partition function. At the Hagedorn temperature there is a change in the distribution of parameters that maximize this partition function. We conclude by devising a field-theoretic interpretation of the this phenomenon.

  2. Biology Department Seminar

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: ''Dr. Crysten Blaby''

    Understanding how microalgae adapt to fluctuating environments contributes to a better understanding of habitat driven evolution, the potential impacts of climate change on primary producers, and identifies potential targets for exploitation in biomass applications. The halotolerant green algal taxa, Picochlorum (Chloropyta, Trebouxiophycae), have highly reduced and specialized genomes, and are tolerant of fluctuating salinity and light, making Picochlorum a good model to investigate environmental evolution. The broad environmental stress tolerance, robust photosystem II, productivity, and genetic manipulability of Picochlorum make this species an interest for biomass applications. Habitat-specific differences in the salinity stress response in two sister species, Picochlorum oklahomensis (salt plains environment) and Picochlorum SENEW3 (brackish lagoon environment), shows that the coordination of gene regulation may be key to environmental adaptation in species with limited gene inventories. Genome organization of coexpressed genes under salinity shock into 'gene neighborhoods' suggests a role for this genomic architecture in the rapid response to salinity stress in Picochlorum. HGT from prokaryotic origin is an ongoing and dynamic process in this algal lineage involving gene transfer, divergence, loss, and genomic rearrangement. Acquisition of functional relevant genes of bacterial origin contributes to metabolic diversity and salinity tolerance. Overall, the Picochlorum lineage highlights that allelic diversity, coordinated gene regulation and organization, and acquisition of novel functions through HGT contribute to rapid stress responses and niche expansion from a freshwater to hypersaline environment.

  3. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    3 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Seminar Room 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: '''Cedomir Petrovic'''

    Longer than 70 years solid state research has been focused on the study of materials with strong electron correlations due to their remarkable electronic and magnetic properties. In such systems, the average energy of the Coulomb interaction is greater or comparable to its kinetic energy and electrons tend to be localized. This localization is strong enough that electrons can be considered in the framework of the atomic approach. Interaction with itinerant electrons makes the interpretation of their physical properties more complicated. A typical example of a strongly-correlated system contains transition and rare earth (RE) elements. Here, I present both theoretical and experimental insight into the itinerant-localized electron interaction in rare-earth 122 silicides (RERh2Si2). The properties of RERh2Si2 change from the heavy-fermion behavior in YbRh2Si2 up to well-pronounced magnetic properties in EuRh2Si2 and GdRh2Si2. The competition between the Kondo effect and the magnetic RKKY interactions determines the properties of a large class of materials which have localized 4f magnetic moments coupled to itinerant valence electrons. The strong electron correlations, also well known in the transition metal oxides, rise up their remarkable functional and magnetic properties. It gives a route in a manipulation of electron, spin, orbital and lattice degrees of freedom for novel electronic and spintronic devices based on oxide interfaces. An important role in the electronic and magnetic properties of this interface is played by oxygen vacancies which form a dichotomic electron system where strongly correlated localized electrons in the in-gap states (IGSs) coexist with less correlated ones constituting the mobile two-dimensional electron system (2DES). On the example of the interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 we consider a complex band ordering in the dichotomic LAO/STO electron system that goes beyond the conventional eg vs t2g picture.

9

  1. No events scheduled

10

  1. Computational Science Initiative Event

    11 am, Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: 'Kerstin Kleese van Dam'

    This talk will discuss the classical limit of quantum mechanics. In more detail we will elaborate on a method introduced by Hepp in 1974 for studying the asymptotic behavior of quantum expectations in the limit as Plank's constant (~) tends to zero. Our goal is to allow for unbounded observables which are (non-commutative) polynomial functions of the position and momentum operators. This is in contrast to Hepp's original paper where the observables were, roughly speaking, required to be bounded functions of the position and momentum operators. As expected the leading order contributions of the quantum expectations come from evaluating the observables along the classical trajectories while the next order contributions are computed by evolving the ~=1 observables by a linear canonical transformations which is purely determined by the Newtonian equation and its initial state.

11

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Yuya Tanizaki'

    Three-dimensional gauge theories with massless fermions provide a simple yet non-perturbative setting to understand why QCD has a scale, and also provide effective descriptions of condensed matter systems. Along these lines, I will present results on infra-red scaling and scale-breaking in three-dimensional QED, QCD and large-Nc theories. I will also present some preliminary results on three-dimensional QED with one flavor of fermion regulated with and without parity anomaly.

  2. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Room 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: ''Peter D. Johnson''

    Bose condensation has shaped our understanding of macroscopic quantum phenomena, having been realized in superconductors, atomic gases, and liquid helium. Excitons are bosons that have been predicted to condense into either a superfluid or an insulating electronic crystal. But definitive evidence for a thermodynamically stable exciton condensate has never been achieved. In this talk I will describe our use of momentum-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy (M-EELS) to study the valence plasmon in the transition metal dichalcogenide semimetal, 1T-TiSe2. Near the phase transition temperature, TC = 190 K, the plasmon energy falls to zero at nonzero momentum, indicating dynamical slowing down of plasma fluctuations and crystallization of the valence electrons into an exciton condensate. At low temperature, the plasmon evolves into an amplitude mode of this electronic crystal. Our study represents the first observation of a soft plasmon in any material, the first definitive evidence for exciton condensation in a three-dimensional solid, and the discovery of a new form of matter, "excitonium."

  3. NSLS-II Colloquium Series

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''''''John Hill''''''

    Insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) are essential components for accelerator based light sources, such as synchrotron radiation facilities implemented on storage rings and free electron lasers. The wide panoply of insertion devices developed at Synchrotron SOLEIL (electromagnetic, combined permanent magnet and electromagnetic for rapid switching of the polarization, permanent magnet APPLE-II, hybrid in-vacuum and cryogenic undulators, out and in-vacuum wigglers) enables to cover a very wide spectral range (from the UV to the hard X-rays), and to provide flexibility for the users of the SOLEIL third generation light source. Starting from the description of the developments carried out at SOLEIL on the different types of systems, some future perspectives will be given, considering the evolution of the specifications of the different light source types. The use of the undulator radiation for photon beam based alignment and adjustment (such as taper) will be discussed. Furthermore, undulator radiation can serve as an electron beam diagnostic and provide a further insight on the electron beam quality itself, as illustrated in the case of the COXINEL project, using laser plasma acceleration.

  4. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

12

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    11 am, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Room 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: ''Peter D. Johnson''

    High-temperature superconductivity arises out of an anomalous normal state commonly referred to as a "bad" or "strange" metal, since it lacks the usual signatures of electron quasiparticles. In ordinary metals, such quasiparticles manifest as propagating collective modes encoded in the dynamic charge susceptibility ??(q,?), which describes the response of the system to applied fields. However, the analogous collective modes of a strange metal are currently unknown. Here, we present the first measurement of ??(q,?) for a prototypical strange metal, Bi2.1Sr1.9CaCu2O8+x (BSCCO), using momentum-resolved inelastic electron scattering (M-EELS). We discover a surprising energy- and momentum-independent continuum of fluctuations extending up to 1 eV, at odds with the dispersive plasmons expected in normal metals. This spectrum is found to be temperature-independent across the superconducting phase transition at optimal doping. Tuning the composition to overdoping, where a crossover to Fermi liquid behavior is expected, this momentum-independent continuum is found to persist, though a 0.5 eV gap-like feature now emerges at low temperature. Our results indicate that the phenomenon underlying the strange metal is a singular form a charge dynamics of a new kind, that does not fit into any known picture of quantum critical scaling.

  2. NSLS-II Seminar

    12 pm, NSLS-II Bldg. 743 Rm 156

    Hosted by: 'Lisa Miller'

  3. HET Lunch Discussions

    12:15 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Lehner'

13

  1. No events scheduled

14

  1. No events scheduled

15

16

  1. Particle Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: 'Erin Sheldon'

    Cataloging is challenging in crowded fields because sources are extremely covariant with their neighbors and blending makes even the number of sources ambiguous. We present the first optical probabilistic stellar catalogue, cataloguing a crowded (~0.1 sources per pixel) SDSS r band image from M2. We show that our probabilistic catalogue goes more than a magnitude deeper than the DAOPHOT while having a lower false discovery rate brighter than 20th magnitude. We detail our efforts to speed up the method and extend it to galaxies, making probabilistic cataloguing applicable to the data that will be collected in the LSST era.

  2. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: ''''Rob Pisarski''''

17

  1. JAN

    17

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, January 17, 2018, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'QOL/BERA/Recreation'

    Newcomers are welcome to stop by for coffee & to meet other BNLers, and if you have children, they will play. Open to all BNL families!

  2. JAN

    17

    Wednesday

    Sustainable Energy Technologies Department

    11 am, Bldg. 734 (ISB) 2nd Floor Seminar Room 201

    Wednesday, January 17, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Pat Looney'

    There is considerable promise in developing integrated graphene devices for various optical and electrical applications. Being able to reliably fabricate devices is absolutely vital for the success and proliferation of graphene and other 2 dimensional materials; however, there are numerous challenges that need to be addressed, beginning with material synthesis and continuing all the way through fabrication and device characterization. In this presentation an overview of my work will be presented, starting with my Ph.D. thesis work in fabricating high quality monolayer graphene films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Common particle contamination occurring from the CVD growth of graphene in quartz tubes is examined, identified and eliminated resulting in pristine CVD films. Next the copper surface morphology effects on CVD graphene growth are presented and a method for rapid (sub 1 min growth time) high quality graphene synthesis is demonstrated. More recent work involving graphene device fabrication and integration conducted at Sandia National Laboratories is shown. Some of the common pitfalls of graphene integration are presented along with solutions, which have increased our yield and reliability greatly in just 2 years. Finally, I demonstrate 2 applications that we have been able to integrate with great success. The control of the visibility of graphene films encapsulated in different dielectrics and dielectric thicknesses is shown and a model is developed which is in good agreement with experimentally measured values. To conclude I give an overview of SNL's latest graphene based optical detector, the deeply depleted graphene/oxide/semiconductor junction detector (D2GOS). We demonstrate its high responsivity (~2800 A/W) in the visible wavelength range and its potential to be used in other optical frequencies.

  3. JAN

    17

    Wednesday

    English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Wednesday, January 17, 2018, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

  4. JAN

    17

    Wednesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Room 201 (upstairs)

    Wednesday, January 17, 2018, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Ian Robinson''

    In situ characterization of the phase behavior of materials in the lab is complicated by the difficulty of designing compatible sample environments as well as the long time scales required to acquire diffraction data with sufficient counting statistics for crystallographic analyses. The high energy x-rays available at synchrotron sources allow for penetration of most sample environments, while high flux allows for rapid acquisition of diffraction patterns, thereby allowing construction of detailed phase diagrams. Low and negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials have been studied extensively, as they can potentially be used to create composites with finely controlled thermal expansion characteristics, improved resistance to thermal shock, and a broader range of operating temperatures.1-4 While the thermal expansion behavior of the NTE materials ZrW2O8 and HfW2O8 was well-described at ambient pressures,4-6 knowledge of the effects of stress on their thermal expansion was limited.7 In situ synchrotron powder diffraction was utilized to explore the role of orientational disorder in determining both the phase behavior and the thermoelastic properties of these materials. An especially designed pressure cell allowed for simultaneous sampling of temperatures up to 513 K and pressures up to 414 MPa.8 Reversible compression-induced orientational disordering of MO4 tetrahedra occurred concomitantly with elastic softening on heating and enhanced negative thermal expansion upon compression in ZrW2O8 and HfW2O8, but only in the ordered phase.9, 10 In light of the comparatively recent nuclear disaster in Fukushima, understanding interactions and phase behavior in nuclear fuels under severe accident conditions is of paramount interest. While diffraction measurements have been performed on materials recovered from melts of corium (UO2-ZrO2), there is a lack of in situ characterization of this material at elevated temperatures. Achieving the extreme temperatures required

18

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    18

    Thursday

    EIC Generic Detector R&D Advisory Committee Meeting

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, January 18, 2018, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: '''Thomas Ullrich'''

  2. JAN

    18

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, January 18, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Bob McGraw''

    Long duration floods cause substantial damage and prolonged interruptions to water resource facilities, critical infrastructure, and regional economic development. We present a novel physics-based model for inference of such floods with a deeper understanding of dynamically integrated nexus of land surface wetness, effective atmospheric blocking/circulation, and moisture transport/release mechanism. Diagnostic results indicate that the flood duration is varying in proportion to the antecedent flow condition which itself is a function of the available moisture in the air, the persistency in atmospheric pressure blocking, convergence of water vapor, and the effectiveness of divergent wind to condense the aforesaid atmospheric water vapor into liquid precipitation. A physics-based Bayesian inference model is developed that considers the complex interactions between moisture transport, synoptic-to-large-scale atmospheric blocking/circulation pattern, and the antecedent wetness condition in the basin. We explain more than 80% variations in flood duration with a high success rate on the occurrence of long duration floods. Our findings underline that the synergy between a large persistent low-pressure blocking system and a higher rate of divergent wind often triggers a long duration flood, even in the presence of moderate moisture supply in the atmosphere. This condition in turn causes an extremely long duration flood if the basin-wide surface wetness prior to the flood event was already high.

  3. JAN

    18

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 1-224

    Thursday, January 18, 2018, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Enrico Rinaldi''

    Experimental searches for messengers of CP- and P- odd phenomena at RHIC and LHC have attracted much interest and are a prime motivation for significant theoretical effort: Anomalous and topological effects receive important contributions from the pre-equilibrium phase of a collision and an interesting question of phenomenological relevance is how the chiral imbalance generated at early times persists through a fluctuating background of sphalerons in addition to other "non-anomalous" interactions with the QGP. To address this question, we construct a relativistic chiral kinetic theory using the world-line formulation of quantum field theory. We outline how Berry's phase arises in this framework, and how its effects can be clearly distinguished from those arising from the chiral anomaly. We further outline how this framework can be matched to classical statistical simulations at early times and to anomalous chiral hydrodynamics at late times.

  4. JAN

    18

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, January 18, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Alessandro Tricoli'

    The discovery of a particle compatible with the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at LHC is a milestone in particle physics. In order to assess whether or not this Higgs boson belongs to the SM, it is necessary to measure its properties, in particular its coupling to the top quark (the strongest Yukawa coupling in the SM). The associated production of a Higgs boson with a pair of top quarks, ttH gives the most favorable direct access to the top quark Yukawa coupling and is accessible for the first time in LHC Run 2. A search for the ttH production with the Higgs boson decaying into a b quark pair, ttH(bb), will be presented. It uses the 36.1 fb^-1 of data recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2015 and 2016. The main limitation to the search of ttH(bb) events is the tt+jets background and its systematic uncertainties. To achieve sufficient sensitivity, this complex analysis relies on several advanced tools to separate the leading background tt+jets from the signal, and to extract both of these processes from data (multi-variate analysis, profile likelihood fit, etc.). All these key aspects of the analysis will be discussed. The combination of the ttH(bb) channel with the other decay modes is necessary to improve the sensitivity to the ttH production mode. This combination leads to 4.2 sigma evidence of the ttH production and will be also presented.

19

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    19

    Friday

    EIC Generic Detector R&D Advisory Committee Meeting

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, January 19, 2018, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Thomas Ullrich'

  2. JAN

    19

    Friday

    NSLS-II Seminar

    12 pm, NSLS-II, Bldg. 743 Room 156

    Friday, January 19, 2018, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Ben Ocko''

  3. JAN

    19

    Friday

    NSLS-II Seminar

    12:30 pm, NSLS-II, Bldg. 743 Rm 156

    Friday, January 19, 2018, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Xiaojing Huang'''

    Acquiring necessary optics are a major constraint in developing state-of-the-art hard X-ray imaging techniques. We have been developing nanofabrication methods to produce various optics for beamlines at APS and for the APS-Upgrade. These optics are primarily hard X-ray zone plates, which are similar to circular diffraction gratings but with changing pitch as a function of radius, but other optics such as diffraction gratings and imaging standards have been fabricated. I will introduce some of the nanofabrication capabilities, present several types of optics fabricated and in use at APS beamlines, then discuss some optics requested for the APS-Upgrade.

  4. JAN

    19

    Friday

    Computational Science Initiative Event

    2 pm, Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Friday, January 19, 2018, 2:00 pm

    "Who is Bram Stoker?" – With this $1 million prize winning final question in the game show Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer using DeepQA technology ushered in a new era in artificial intelligence and informatics. Welcome to the era of deep neural networks and self-driving cars! This has far reaching implications for knowledge modeling and reasoning in a number of fields including materials engineering. Designing new materials and formulations with desired properties is an important and difficult problem, encompassing a wide variety of products in the specialty chemicals and pharmaceuticals industries. Traditional trial-and-error design approaches are laborious and expensive, and cause delays time-to-market as well as miss some potential solutions. Furthermore, the growing avalanche of high throughput experimentation data has created both an opportunity, and a major modeling and informatics challenge, for material design and discovery. Such a data deluge is coming from smart sensors in process plants, ab initio quantum calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and so on. We are moving from an era of limited data obtained through time consuming experiments and simulations to one of a tsunami enabled by high throughput experiments and TeraGrid computing environments— it's a dramatic transition from a "data poor" to a "data rich" era. A systematic way to convert raw data into information and first-principles knowledge that can be used ‎for real-time decision making is very much lacking. A new paradigm is needed that increases the idea flow, broadens the search horizon, and archives the knowledge from today's successes to accelerate those of tomorrow. Data science, loosely defined as a body of knowledge comprising of machine learning, natural language processing, databases and informatics, will play a crucial role in materials design and discovery, process development and commercial scale manufa

  5. JAN

    19

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, January 19, 2018, 2:00 pm

    We review the de nition of semi-inclusive jet functions within Soft Collinear E ective Theory (SCET) and their application to inclusive jet cross sections. We consider the fully inclusive production cross section of jets as well as several jet substructure observables in proton-proton collisions relevant for the LHC and RHIC. The corresponding semi-inclusive jet functions satisfy renormalization group (RG) equations which take the form of standard timelike DGLAP evolution equations, analogous to collinear fragmentation functions. By solving these RG equations, the resummation of potentially large single logarithms n s lnn R can be achieved. We present numerical results at NLO+NLLR accuracy and compare to the available data.

20

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21

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22

  1. JAN

    22

    Monday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Monday, January 22, 2018, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Gabi Kotliar'''

    We investigate the interplay of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and Hund's rule coupling driven electronic correlations in Sr2RuO4 using dynamical mean-field theory. We find that the orbital diagonal components of the dynamical electronic correlations are unaffected by the SOC, which validates the concept of a Hund's metal in the presence of SOC. In contrast, SOC itself is enhanced by approximately a factor of two by electronic correlations. We introduce the concept of an energy dependent quasiparticle SOC, which is found to be essential in accounting simultaneously for: (i) the Fermi surface (ii) the low-energy dispersion of quasiparticles and (iii) the splitting between bands at higher binding energy. Our calculations are in good agreement with available experimental data. References: [1-4] [1] C. Veenstra et al., Physical Review Letters 112, 127002 (2014) [2] M. Haverkort et al., Physical Review Letters 101, 026406 (2008) [3] J. Mravlje et al., Physical Review Letters 106, 096401 (2011) [4] M. Kim et al., arXiv preprint arXiv:1707.02462 (2017)

23

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    23

    Tuesday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, CFN, Bldg. 735, conference room A, 1st floor

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Mark Hybertsen'

    Advances in scanning transmission electron and scanning probe microscopies have recently allowed researchers to measure materials structural and electronic properties, such as atomic displacements and charge density modulations, at a picometer scale in real space. These developments necessitate adequate methods for extracting relevant physical and chemical information from the large data sets, for which a priori information on the structures of various atomic configurations and lattice defects is limited or absent. In this seminar, I discuss our recent progress in applying big-data analytical tools, such as multivariate statistical analysis and machine learning, to structural and functional imaging of quantum materials. Specifically, I focus on applications of these tools to scanning probe and transmission electron microscopy experiments on graphene,1 Kitaev quantum spin liquid candidate alpha-RuCl3,2,3 and films of buckybowl molecules.4 References: 1. Ziatdinov, M.; Dyck, O.; Maksov, A.; Li, X.; Sang, X. et al. ACS Nano 2017, doi: 10.1021/acsnano.7b07504. 2. Ziatdinov, M.; Banerjee, A.; Maksov, A.; Berlijn, T.; Zhou, W. et al. Nature Communications 2016, 7, 13774. 3. Vasudevan, R. K.; Ziatdinov, M.; Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S. V. Nano Letters 2016, 16, 5574-5581. 4. Ziatdinov, M.; Maksov, A.; Kalinin, S. V. npj Computational Materials 2017 3, 31.

  2. JAN

    23

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Rongrong Ma'

    The measurements of heavy flavor production and collective flow could be used to extract the properties of the high-density QCD medium created in heavy-ion collisions as heavy quarks are sensitive to the transport properties of the medium and may interact with the QCD matter differently from light quarks. In particular, the comparison between the nuclear modification factors (RAA) of light- and heavy-flavor particles provides insights into the expected flavor dependence of in-medium parton energy loss. Furthermore, azimuthal anisotropy coefficient (vn) of heavy-flavor particles provide information about the degree of the thermalization of the bulk medium at low pT, and unique information about the path length dependence of heavy quark energy loss at high pT. Recently, a comprehensive heavy flavor program is established in the CMS collaboration including the detection of charm and beauty meson. Using the large statistics heavy ion data samples collected during the 2015 and 2016 LHC runs, high precision open charm and beauty measurements are performed with CMS over a wide transverse momentum range. This allows us to set an important milestone in our understanding of the interactions between heavy quarks and the medium. In this talk, the most recent results of v2 and v3 of D0 mesons in PbPb collisions at 5.02 TeV are presented and compared to the same results for charged hadrons at the same energy. Latest results on nuclear modification factor of D, non-prompt J/psi and B mesons in PbPb collisions are also presented.

  3. JAN

    23

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Rob Pisarski'

    The ability to use lasers to cool atoms to micro-kelvin temperatures and to subsequently control their quantum mechanical behavior1 has led to the development of exquisitely precise 'quantum' sensors.2 Applications of these sensors include the measurement of local gravitational anomalies to unprecedented accuracy and very accurate, highly stable gyroscopes. Our LLNL - AOSense, Inc. collaboration is pursuing diverse applications of these sensors that directly exploit their extraordinary scale factor stability, low noise and bias drift characteristics. These applications include shielded threat detection in passing vehicles, emergency response, and treaty verification, all of which require rapid, passive methods to determine hidden mass configurations precisely and/or verify the masses present in containers. Such dense, localized objects can in principle be discovered and accurately measured by their effect on the local gravitational field.3 Furthermore, near field measurements of these gravitational perturbations from multiple vantage points allow for a kind of gravitational 'tomography,' leading to the real-time determination of the hidden mass distribution. Additionally, we are interested in the potential of atom interferometer Sagnac gyroscopes to do accurate 'dead reckoning' navigation without the aid of GPS.4 After reviewing the physics of atom interferometry in atomic fountain-Mach-Zehnder and Sagnac configurations, I will describe the development of a 'gravity tomography' signal analysis system for vehicle portals, including the optimal synthesis of the gravitational sensor signals with complementary radiation detection.

  4. JAN

    23

    Tuesday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Colloquium

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Mircea Cotlet'''

    Lamellar inclusion compounds synthesized by directed assembly of guanidinium organomonosulfonates (GMS) and disulfonates (GDS) display a variety of framework architectures that are characterized by nanoscale pores bounded by organic walls and a common two-dimensional (2D) network of complementary guanidinium ions (G) and sulfonate moieties (S) assembly through charge-assisted hydrogen bonds. The structural robustness of this network and the versatility of organic synthesis provides an avenue to frameworks with well-defined pores with sizes, shapes and physicochemical characteristics that can be tuned systematically without loss of generic architectural features, representing a rare example of true "crystal engineering." These pores can be occupied by functional guest molecules with retention of framework architecture, illustrating a materials design strategy wherein function and solid-state structure are regulated independently. Furthermore, guest molecules serve as templates for the cooperative assembly of a number of compositionally identical framework isomers, not unlike templating strategies employed for zeolite synthesis. Notably, the framework architecture often can be predicted based on simple steric principles that account for the relative sizes of the guest and the organosulfonate substituent. This capability has permitted the development of protocols for inclusion-based separations, design of non-linear optical materials, new prospects for lasing materials, unusual "endo-inclusion" compounds, and structural engineering that can afford unusual cylindrical and cubic zeolite-like frameworks, all with a reasonable degree of predictability that is rare in the design of crystalline organic materials. More recently, these frameworks have been used to encapsulate complex molecules with multiple chiral centers, promising a new route to solving crystal structures that otherwise can be challenging.

24

  1. No events scheduled

25

  1. JAN

    25

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, January 25, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Alessandro Tricoli'

    An enhanced production of double Higgs bosons at the LHC would be a clear sign of beyond Standard Model physics. An ATLAS search is performed for resonant and non-resonant production, where the two Higgs bosons both decay to a pair of Bottom quarks. The analyses use up to ~13/36 fb−1 of p-p collision data collected at 13 TeV. The talk will focus on the boosted analysis, with the resolved analysis introduced as well. Other RunII double Higgs search results and future prospect will also be discussed.

26

  1. No events scheduled

27

  1. No events scheduled

28

  1. No events scheduled

29

  1. No events scheduled

30

  1. JAN

    30

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, January 30, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

31

  1. JAN

    31

    Wednesday

    Joint BNL / SBU Seminar

    2:30 pm, Stony Brook University YITP

    Wednesday, January 31, 2018, 2:30 pm

  1. JAN

    17

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, January 17, 2018, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'QOL/BERA/Recreation'

    Newcomers are welcome to stop by for coffee & to meet other BNLers, and if you have children, they will play. Open to all BNL families!

  2. JAN

    17

    Wednesday

    Sustainable Energy Technologies Department

    "Graphene Synthesis, Fabrication and Applications in Optical Detection"

    Presented by Isaac Ruiz, Sandia National Laboratory

    11 am, Bldg. 734 (ISB) 2nd Floor Seminar Room 201

    Wednesday, January 17, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Pat Looney'

    There is considerable promise in developing integrated graphene devices for various optical and electrical applications. Being able to reliably fabricate devices is absolutely vital for the success and proliferation of graphene and other 2 dimensional materials; however, there are numerous challenges that need to be addressed, beginning with material synthesis and continuing all the way through fabrication and device characterization. In this presentation an overview of my work will be presented, starting with my Ph.D. thesis work in fabricating high quality monolayer graphene films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Common particle contamination occurring from the CVD growth of graphene in quartz tubes is examined, identified and eliminated resulting in pristine CVD films. Next the copper surface morphology effects on CVD graphene growth are presented and a method for rapid (sub 1 min growth time) high quality graphene synthesis is demonstrated. More recent work involving graphene device fabrication and integration conducted at Sandia National Laboratories is shown. Some of the common pitfalls of graphene integration are presented along with solutions, which have increased our yield and reliability greatly in just 2 years. Finally, I demonstrate 2 applications that we have been able to integrate with great success. The control of the visibility of graphene films encapsulated in different dielectrics and dielectric thicknesses is shown and a model is developed which is in good agreement with experimentally measured values. To conclude I give an overview of SNL's latest graphene based optical detector, the deeply depleted graphene/oxide/semiconductor junction detector (D2GOS). We demonstrate its high responsivity (~2800 A/W) in the visible wavelength range and its potential to be used in other optical frequencies.

  3. JAN

    17

    Wednesday

    English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    "ESOL presents Dr. MLK's "I Have a Dream", speech"

    English for Speakers of Other Languages

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Wednesday, January 17, 2018, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'T. Sampieri'

  4. JAN

    17

    Wednesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    ""In situ characterization of the phase behavior of metal oxides at extreme conditions""

    Presented by Leighanne Gallington, Argonne National Laboratory

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Room 201 (upstairs)

    Wednesday, January 17, 2018, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Ian Robinson''

    In situ characterization of the phase behavior of materials in the lab is complicated by the difficulty of designing compatible sample environments as well as the long time scales required to acquire diffraction data with sufficient counting statistics for crystallographic analyses. The high energy x-rays available at synchrotron sources allow for penetration of most sample environments, while high flux allows for rapid acquisition of diffraction patterns, thereby allowing construction of detailed phase diagrams. Low and negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials have been studied extensively, as they can potentially be used to create composites with finely controlled thermal expansion characteristics, improved resistance to thermal shock, and a broader range of operating temperatures.1-4 While the thermal expansion behavior of the NTE materials ZrW2O8 and HfW2O8 was well-described at ambient pressures,4-6 knowledge of the effects of stress on their thermal expansion was limited.7 In situ synchrotron powder diffraction was utilized to explore the role of orientational disorder in determining both the phase behavior and the thermoelastic properties of these materials. An especially designed pressure cell allowed for simultaneous sampling of temperatures up to 513 K and pressures up to 414 MPa.8 Reversible compression-induced orientational disordering of MO4 tetrahedra occurred concomitantly with elastic softening on heating and enhanced negative thermal expansion upon compression in ZrW2O8 and HfW2O8, but only in the ordered phase.9, 10 In light of the comparatively recent nuclear disaster in Fukushima, understanding interactions and phase behavior in nuclear fuels under severe accident conditions is of paramount interest. While diffraction measurements have been performed on materials recovered from melts of corium (UO2-ZrO2), there is a lack of in situ characterization of this material at elevated temperatures. Achieving the extreme temperatures required

  5. JAN

    18

    Thursday

    EIC Generic Detector R&D Advisory Committee Meeting

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, January 18, 2018, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: '''Thomas Ullrich'''

  6. JAN

    18

    Thursday

    Environmental & Climate Sciences Department Seminar

    "Understanding the Structure and Dynamics of Long-Duration Floods using Physics Informed Bayesian Multilevel Models"

    Presented by Naresh Devineni, CUNY

    11 am, Conference Room Bldg 815E

    Thursday, January 18, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Bob McGraw''

    Long duration floods cause substantial damage and prolonged interruptions to water resource facilities, critical infrastructure, and regional economic development. We present a novel physics-based model for inference of such floods with a deeper understanding of dynamically integrated nexus of land surface wetness, effective atmospheric blocking/circulation, and moisture transport/release mechanism. Diagnostic results indicate that the flood duration is varying in proportion to the antecedent flow condition which itself is a function of the available moisture in the air, the persistency in atmospheric pressure blocking, convergence of water vapor, and the effectiveness of divergent wind to condense the aforesaid atmospheric water vapor into liquid precipitation. A physics-based Bayesian inference model is developed that considers the complex interactions between moisture transport, synoptic-to-large-scale atmospheric blocking/circulation pattern, and the antecedent wetness condition in the basin. We explain more than 80% variations in flood duration with a high success rate on the occurrence of long duration floods. Our findings underline that the synergy between a large persistent low-pressure blocking system and a higher rate of divergent wind often triggers a long duration flood, even in the presence of moderate moisture supply in the atmosphere. This condition in turn causes an extremely long duration flood if the basin-wide surface wetness prior to the flood event was already high.

  7. JAN

    18

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "World-line Approach to Chiral Kinetic Theory and the Chiral Magnetic Effect"

    Presented by Niklas Mueller, BNL

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 1-224

    Thursday, January 18, 2018, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Enrico Rinaldi''

    Experimental searches for messengers of CP- and P- odd phenomena at RHIC and LHC have attracted much interest and are a prime motivation for significant theoretical effort: Anomalous and topological effects receive important contributions from the pre-equilibrium phase of a collision and an interesting question of phenomenological relevance is how the chiral imbalance generated at early times persists through a fluctuating background of sphalerons in addition to other "non-anomalous" interactions with the QGP. To address this question, we construct a relativistic chiral kinetic theory using the world-line formulation of quantum field theory. We outline how Berry's phase arises in this framework, and how its effects can be clearly distinguished from those arising from the chiral anomaly. We further outline how this framework can be matched to classical statistical simulations at early times and to anomalous chiral hydrodynamics at late times.

  8. JAN

    18

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search for the Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks and decaying into a b quark pair with the ATLAS detector at LHC"

    Presented by Thomas Calvet, Stony Brook University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, January 18, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Alessandro Tricoli'

    The discovery of a particle compatible with the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at LHC is a milestone in particle physics. In order to assess whether or not this Higgs boson belongs to the SM, it is necessary to measure its properties, in particular its coupling to the top quark (the strongest Yukawa coupling in the SM). The associated production of a Higgs boson with a pair of top quarks, ttH gives the most favorable direct access to the top quark Yukawa coupling and is accessible for the first time in LHC Run 2. A search for the ttH production with the Higgs boson decaying into a b quark pair, ttH(bb), will be presented. It uses the 36.1 fb^-1 of data recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2015 and 2016. The main limitation to the search of ttH(bb) events is the tt+jets background and its systematic uncertainties. To achieve sufficient sensitivity, this complex analysis relies on several advanced tools to separate the leading background tt+jets from the signal, and to extract both of these processes from data (multi-variate analysis, profile likelihood fit, etc.). All these key aspects of the analysis will be discussed. The combination of the ttH(bb) channel with the other decay modes is necessary to improve the sensitivity to the ttH production mode. This combination leads to 4.2 sigma evidence of the ttH production and will be also presented.

  9. JAN

    19

    Friday

    EIC Generic Detector R&D Advisory Committee Meeting

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, January 19, 2018, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Thomas Ullrich'

  10. JAN

    19

    Friday

    NSLS-II Seminar

    "Revolutionizing synchrotron science: the National Synchrotron Light Source"

    Presented by John Hill, NSLS-II Director

    12 pm, NSLS-II, Bldg. 743 Room 156

    Friday, January 19, 2018, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Ben Ocko''

  11. JAN

    19

    Friday

    NSLS-II Seminar

    "Nanofabrication of Hard X-ray Optics for the APS and APS-Upgrade"

    Presented by Dr. Michael Wojcik, APS, Argonne National Laboratory

    12:30 pm, NSLS-II, Bldg. 743 Rm 156

    Friday, January 19, 2018, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Xiaojing Huang'''

    Acquiring necessary optics are a major constraint in developing state-of-the-art hard X-ray imaging techniques. We have been developing nanofabrication methods to produce various optics for beamlines at APS and for the APS-Upgrade. These optics are primarily hard X-ray zone plates, which are similar to circular diffraction gratings but with changing pitch as a function of radius, but other optics such as diffraction gratings and imaging standards have been fabricated. I will introduce some of the nanofabrication capabilities, present several types of optics fabricated and in use at APS beamlines, then discuss some optics requested for the APS-Upgrade.

  12. JAN

    19

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Semi-inclusive jet cross sections within SCET"

    Presented by Felix Ringer, LBL

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, January 19, 2018, 2:00 pm

    We review the de nition of semi-inclusive jet functions within Soft Collinear E ective Theory (SCET) and their application to inclusive jet cross sections. We consider the fully inclusive production cross section of jets as well as several jet substructure observables in proton-proton collisions relevant for the LHC and RHIC. The corresponding semi-inclusive jet functions satisfy renormalization group (RG) equations which take the form of standard timelike DGLAP evolution equations, analogous to collinear fragmentation functions. By solving these RG equations, the resummation of potentially large single logarithms n s lnn R can be achieved. We present numerical results at NLO+NLLR accuracy and compare to the available data.

  13. JAN

    19

    Friday

    Computational Science Initiative Event

    "Materials Design and Discovery in the Era of Watson: Challenges and Opportunities in Data Science"

    Presented by Venkat Venkatasubramanian, Department of Chemical Engineering Columbia University

    2 pm, Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Friday, January 19, 2018, 2:00 pm

    "Who is Bram Stoker?" – With this $1 million prize winning final question in the game show Jeopardy, IBM's Watson supercomputer using DeepQA technology ushered in a new era in artificial intelligence and informatics. Welcome to the era of deep neural networks and self-driving cars! This has far reaching implications for knowledge modeling and reasoning in a number of fields including materials engineering. Designing new materials and formulations with desired properties is an important and difficult problem, encompassing a wide variety of products in the specialty chemicals and pharmaceuticals industries. Traditional trial-and-error design approaches are laborious and expensive, and cause delays time-to-market as well as miss some potential solutions. Furthermore, the growing avalanche of high throughput experimentation data has created both an opportunity, and a major modeling and informatics challenge, for material design and discovery. Such a data deluge is coming from smart sensors in process plants, ab initio quantum calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and so on. We are moving from an era of limited data obtained through time consuming experiments and simulations to one of a tsunami enabled by high throughput experiments and TeraGrid computing environments— it's a dramatic transition from a "data poor" to a "data rich" era. A systematic way to convert raw data into information and first-principles knowledge that can be used ‎for real-time decision making is very much lacking. A new paradigm is needed that increases the idea flow, broadens the search horizon, and archives the knowledge from today's successes to accelerate those of tomorrow. Data science, loosely defined as a body of knowledge comprising of machine learning, natural language processing, databases and informatics, will play a crucial role in materials design and discovery, process development and commercial scale manufa

  14. JAN

    22

    Monday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Spin-orbit coupling and electronic correlations in Hund's metals: Sr2RuO4"

    Presented by Minjae Kim, École Polytechnique, France

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734 Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Monday, January 22, 2018, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: '''Gabi Kotliar'''

    We investigate the interplay of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and Hund's rule coupling driven electronic correlations in Sr2RuO4 using dynamical mean-field theory. We find that the orbital diagonal components of the dynamical electronic correlations are unaffected by the SOC, which validates the concept of a Hund's metal in the presence of SOC. In contrast, SOC itself is enhanced by approximately a factor of two by electronic correlations. We introduce the concept of an energy dependent quasiparticle SOC, which is found to be essential in accounting simultaneously for: (i) the Fermi surface (ii) the low-energy dispersion of quasiparticles and (iii) the splitting between bands at higher binding energy. Our calculations are in good agreement with available experimental data. References: [1-4] [1] C. Veenstra et al., Physical Review Letters 112, 127002 (2014) [2] M. Haverkort et al., Physical Review Letters 101, 026406 (2008) [3] J. Mravlje et al., Physical Review Letters 106, 096401 (2011) [4] M. Kim et al., arXiv preprint arXiv:1707.02462 (2017)

  15. JAN

    23

    Tuesday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Deep Data Analytics in Nanoscale Imaging of Quantum Materials"

    Presented by Maxim Ziatdinov, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    10 am, CFN, Bldg. 735, conference room A, 1st floor

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Mark Hybertsen'

    Advances in scanning transmission electron and scanning probe microscopies have recently allowed researchers to measure materials structural and electronic properties, such as atomic displacements and charge density modulations, at a picometer scale in real space. These developments necessitate adequate methods for extracting relevant physical and chemical information from the large data sets, for which a priori information on the structures of various atomic configurations and lattice defects is limited or absent. In this seminar, I discuss our recent progress in applying big-data analytical tools, such as multivariate statistical analysis and machine learning, to structural and functional imaging of quantum materials. Specifically, I focus on applications of these tools to scanning probe and transmission electron microscopy experiments on graphene,1 Kitaev quantum spin liquid candidate alpha-RuCl3,2,3 and films of buckybowl molecules.4 References: 1. Ziatdinov, M.; Dyck, O.; Maksov, A.; Li, X.; Sang, X. et al. ACS Nano 2017, doi: 10.1021/acsnano.7b07504. 2. Ziatdinov, M.; Banerjee, A.; Maksov, A.; Berlijn, T.; Zhou, W. et al. Nature Communications 2016, 7, 13774. 3. Vasudevan, R. K.; Ziatdinov, M.; Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S. V. Nano Letters 2016, 16, 5574-5581. 4. Ziatdinov, M.; Maksov, A.; Kalinin, S. V. npj Computational Materials 2017 3, 31.

  16. JAN

    23

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Probing the Quark-Gluon Plasma with Open Heavy Flavor Mesons using CMS detector"

    Presented by Professor Yen-Jie Lee, MIT

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Rongrong Ma'

    The measurements of heavy flavor production and collective flow could be used to extract the properties of the high-density QCD medium created in heavy-ion collisions as heavy quarks are sensitive to the transport properties of the medium and may interact with the QCD matter differently from light quarks. In particular, the comparison between the nuclear modification factors (RAA) of light- and heavy-flavor particles provides insights into the expected flavor dependence of in-medium parton energy loss. Furthermore, azimuthal anisotropy coefficient (vn) of heavy-flavor particles provide information about the degree of the thermalization of the bulk medium at low pT, and unique information about the path length dependence of heavy quark energy loss at high pT. Recently, a comprehensive heavy flavor program is established in the CMS collaboration including the detection of charm and beauty meson. Using the large statistics heavy ion data samples collected during the 2015 and 2016 LHC runs, high precision open charm and beauty measurements are performed with CMS over a wide transverse momentum range. This allows us to set an important milestone in our understanding of the interactions between heavy quarks and the medium. In this talk, the most recent results of v2 and v3 of D0 mesons in PbPb collisions at 5.02 TeV are presented and compared to the same results for charged hadrons at the same energy. Latest results on nuclear modification factor of D, non-prompt J/psi and B mesons in PbPb collisions are also presented.

  17. JAN

    23

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Cold Atom Sensing: Gravity, Tomography, and Gyroscopes"

    Presented by Steve Libby, LLNL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Rob Pisarski'

    The ability to use lasers to cool atoms to micro-kelvin temperatures and to subsequently control their quantum mechanical behavior1 has led to the development of exquisitely precise 'quantum' sensors.2 Applications of these sensors include the measurement of local gravitational anomalies to unprecedented accuracy and very accurate, highly stable gyroscopes. Our LLNL - AOSense, Inc. collaboration is pursuing diverse applications of these sensors that directly exploit their extraordinary scale factor stability, low noise and bias drift characteristics. These applications include shielded threat detection in passing vehicles, emergency response, and treaty verification, all of which require rapid, passive methods to determine hidden mass configurations precisely and/or verify the masses present in containers. Such dense, localized objects can in principle be discovered and accurately measured by their effect on the local gravitational field.3 Furthermore, near field measurements of these gravitational perturbations from multiple vantage points allow for a kind of gravitational 'tomography,' leading to the real-time determination of the hidden mass distribution. Additionally, we are interested in the potential of atom interferometer Sagnac gyroscopes to do accurate 'dead reckoning' navigation without the aid of GPS.4 After reviewing the physics of atom interferometry in atomic fountain-Mach-Zehnder and Sagnac configurations, I will describe the development of a 'gravity tomography' signal analysis system for vehicle portals, including the optimal synthesis of the gravitational sensor signals with complementary radiation detection.

  18. JAN

    23

    Tuesday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Colloquium

    "Hydrogen-bonded Frameworks with Malleable Nanocavities"

    Presented by Dr. Michael Ward, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Design Institute, New York University

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Mircea Cotlet'''

    Lamellar inclusion compounds synthesized by directed assembly of guanidinium organomonosulfonates (GMS) and disulfonates (GDS) display a variety of framework architectures that are characterized by nanoscale pores bounded by organic walls and a common two-dimensional (2D) network of complementary guanidinium ions (G) and sulfonate moieties (S) assembly through charge-assisted hydrogen bonds. The structural robustness of this network and the versatility of organic synthesis provides an avenue to frameworks with well-defined pores with sizes, shapes and physicochemical characteristics that can be tuned systematically without loss of generic architectural features, representing a rare example of true "crystal engineering." These pores can be occupied by functional guest molecules with retention of framework architecture, illustrating a materials design strategy wherein function and solid-state structure are regulated independently. Furthermore, guest molecules serve as templates for the cooperative assembly of a number of compositionally identical framework isomers, not unlike templating strategies employed for zeolite synthesis. Notably, the framework architecture often can be predicted based on simple steric principles that account for the relative sizes of the guest and the organosulfonate substituent. This capability has permitted the development of protocols for inclusion-based separations, design of non-linear optical materials, new prospects for lasing materials, unusual "endo-inclusion" compounds, and structural engineering that can afford unusual cylindrical and cubic zeolite-like frameworks, all with a reasonable degree of predictability that is rare in the design of crystalline organic materials. More recently, these frameworks have been used to encapsulate complex molecules with multiple chiral centers, promising a new route to solving crystal structures that otherwise can be challenging.

  19. JAN

    25

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "A Tale of Two Higgs"

    Presented by Baojia Tong, Harvard University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, January 25, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Alessandro Tricoli'

    An enhanced production of double Higgs bosons at the LHC would be a clear sign of beyond Standard Model physics. An ATLAS search is performed for resonant and non-resonant production, where the two Higgs bosons both decay to a pair of Bottom quarks. The analyses use up to ~13/36 fb−1 of p-p collision data collected at 13 TeV. The talk will focus on the boosted analysis, with the resolved analysis introduced as well. Other RunII double Higgs search results and future prospect will also be discussed.

  20. JAN

    30

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Science policy in DC - How we got the government we have, and why scientists should care"

    Presented by Benn Tannenbaum, Sandia

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, January 30, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  21. JAN

    31

    Wednesday

    Joint BNL / SBU Seminar

    "New SM Physics and the LHC"

    Presented by Yuval Grossman, Cornell University

    2:30 pm, Stony Brook University YITP

    Wednesday, January 31, 2018, 2:30 pm

  22. FEB

    2

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Mohamed Anber, Lewis & Clark College

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 2, 2018, 2:00 pm

  23. FEB

    2

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "New nonperturbative scales and glueballs in confining gauge theories"

    Presented by Mohamed Anber, Lewis & Clark College

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 2, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Chun Shen'

    Studying confining gauge theories on a circle can provide answers to some of the deepest questions about QCD. In this talk, I start by summarizing the main characteristics shared by the compactified theories and their four dimensional cousins. Next, I show that the glueball spectrum of the compactified theories is much richer than what have been thought before. In particular, new nonperturbative scales and glueballs emerge in the deep IR regime of the theory. I discuss the spectrum in the context of super Yang-Mills and show that the lightest glueball states fill a chiral supermultiplet with doubly nonperturbative binding energy. I end with possible implications of these findings for the four dimensional gauge theories.

  24. FEB

    7

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Michael Ramsey-Musolf, U. Mass. Amherst

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, February 7, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christopher Murphy'

  25. FEB

    8

    Thursday

    Blood Drive

    "Blood Drive"

    9:30 am, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, February 8, 2018, 9:30 am

    Hosted by: ''Patricia Edwards''

  26. FEB

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, February 8, 2018, 6:30 pm

  27. FEB

    9

    Friday

    Joint Nuclear Theory and HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Michael Ramsey-Musolf, U. Mass. Amherst

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 9, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Chun Shen'

  28. FEB

    13

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Social Life of Heavy Quarks"

    Presented by Marek Karliner, Tel Aviv University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Peter Petreczky'

    I will discuss recent developments regarding new types of hadrons involving heavy quarks: hadronic molecules, doubly heavy baryons, stable tetraquarks and others. I will also explain how the discovery of the doubly heavy baryon leads to quark-level analogue of nuclear fusion, with energy release per reaction an order of magnitude greater than in ordinary fusion.

  29. FEB

    15

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "21-cm cosmology topics"

    Presented by Dr. Francisco Villaescusa-Navarro, Center for Computational Astrophysics, Flatiron Institute

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, February 15, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Chris Sheehy'

  30. FEB

    21

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "Analysis of a Dilaton EFT for Lattice Data"

    Presented by Thomas Appelquist, Yale University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, February 21, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christoph Murphy'

  31. FEB

    23

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Yi Yin, MIT

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 23, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Chun Shen'

  32. FEB

    27

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Multi-Messenger Picture of a Neutron Star Merger"

    Presented by Brian Metzger, Columbia University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 27, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Peter Petreczky''

    On August 17 the LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave observatories detected the first binary neutron star merger event (GW170817), a discovery followed by the most ambitious electromagnetic (EM) follow-up campaign ever conducted. A gamma-ray burst (GRB) of short duration and very low luminosity was discovered by the Fermi and INTEGRAL satellites within 2 seconds of the merger. Within 11 hours, a bright but rapidly-fading thermal optical counterpart was discovered in the galaxy NGC 4993 at a distance of only 40 Mpc. The properties of the optical transient match remarkably well predictions for kilonova emission powered by the radioactive decay of heavy nuclei synthesized in the expanding merger ejecta by the r-process. The rapid spectral evolution of the kilonova emission to near-infrared wavelengths demonstrates that a portion of the ejecta contains heavy lanthanide nuclei. Two weeks after the merger, rising non-thermal X-ray and radio emission were detected from the position of the optical transient, consistent with delayed synchrotron afterglow radiation from an initially off-axis relativistic jet with the properties consistent with those of (on-axis) cosmological short GRB. I will describe a unified scenario for the range of EM counterparts from GW170817 and their implications for the astrophysical origin of the r-process and the properties of neutron stars. I will preview the upcoming era of multi-messenger astronomy, once Advanced LIGO/Virgo reach design sensitivity and a neutron star merger is detected every few weeks.

  33. FEB

    28

    Wednesday

    Joint BNL/SBU HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Yonatan Kahn, Princeton University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, February 28, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christopher Murphy'

  34. MAR

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, March 8, 2018, 6:30 pm

  35. MAR

    21

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Lina Necib, Caltech

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 21, 2018, 2:00 pm

  36. APR

    4

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Katelin Schutz, UC Berkeley

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 4, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christopher Murphy'

  37. APR

    12

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, April 12, 2018, 6:30 pm

  38. APR

    13

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Andreas Schmitt, University of Southampton

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 13, 2018, 2:00 pm

  39. APR

    18

    Wednesday

    Joint BNL/SBU HET seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Csaba Csaki, Cornell University

    2:30 pm, YITP

    Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christopher Murphy'

  40. APR

    25

    Wednesday

    Joint BNL/SBU HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Matthew Buckley, Rutgers University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 25, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Christopher Murphy'

  41. MAY

    10

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 10, 2018, 6:30 pm

  42. JUN

    14

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 14, 2018, 6:30 pm