NSLS-II Seminar

"On the assessment of radiation damage and high temperature effects in novel nuclear materials using the BNL accelerators and synchrotrons"

Presented by Nick Simos, Sr Scientist Emeritus, BNL

Friday, September 8, 2017, 3:00 pm — Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

In search for new and improved materials, composites and super-alloys capable of withstanding the anticipated extreme states associated fusion reactors; high temperature fast reactors and multi-MW particle accelerators, novel reactor steels, super-alloys and composites are continuously being explored to help meet both the challenge of the higher demand environments and the intended application. Higher fluxes and fluences of irradiating species (neutrons and/or protons), extreme temperatures and aggressively corrosive environments make up the new cocktail of operating conditions of the new array of material structures.
One of the challenges in characterizing the effects that high radiation fluxes of neutrons and protons induce on these novel material structures in conjunction with high temperatures is the link between lattice induced damage and phase transformation and macroscopic physical properties which ultimately determine performance in the real environment. High energy X-rays at the BNL synchrotrons have offered a path in establishing this important connection between micro-scale effects and physical properties of novel material structures exposed to high radiation fluxes.
Specifically, by integrating the unique capabilities of the BNL accelerator complex that includes, in addition to the NSLS and NSLS II, the proton accelerator and Tandem as well as those of CFN, the evolution and/or damage of materials ranging from classical structures such as graphite, beryllium and steels to novel super-alloys, such as those of Invar and "Gum" metal, and new composites have been characterized both at the two length scales.
The pivotal role of high energy X-rays from NSLS to NSLS II in making the connection will be presented demonstrating the enormous potential of the NSLS II in answering fundamental questions in our path towards the next generation nuclear materials. Furthermore, first glimpses of the correlation of lattice effects or damage induced by differ

Hosted by: Ron Pindak

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