General Information

Top of Page
April 2014
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hui Wang

    RHIC science has entered an era where the goal is to make quantitative statements about the evolution and properties of the super-hadronic matter created in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Given the heterogenous nature of the RHIC and LHC heavy-ion data sets, the significant uncertainties to the theoretical models, and the complex intertwined dependencies between model parameters and observables, stating conclusions with meaningful uncertainties represents a major challenge. I will present results from the MADAI collaboration, where we have constructed a statistical infrastructure for addressing exactly such problems and applied it to a subset of soft observables from 100A GeV + 100A GeV Au + Au collisions. The results from this pilot project are promising and the techniques should be extendable to larger data sets and to more flexible models with greater numbers of parameters.

  2. Computational Science Center Seminar

    11 am, Bldg. 463B, John Dunn Seminar Room 157

    Hosted by: Robert Harrison

    Plasma-Material Interface (PMI) mixes materials of the two worlds, creating a dynamical surface which is one of the most challenging areas of multidisciplinary science, with many fundamental processes and synergies. We present the experimentally validated atomistic theory and computation for studying the dynamics of the creation and evolution of the PMI under irradiation by atoms and molecules at carbon, lithiated carbon and tungsten, as well as the emerging elastic and inelastic processes, in particular retention and sputtering chemistry. Recent work with lithium coatings deposited on a variety of metallic and graphitic surfaces, in a number of tokamak fusion machines around the world, has provided evidence of the sensitive dependence plasma behavior has on these ultra-thin deposited films. Our computer simulations, done in collaboration with Japanese and French scientists, and validated by in-situ experiments at Purdue University and at NSTX of PPPL have elucidated roles of lithium in carbon walls to the recycling of the plasma hydrogen. We performed quantum-classical atomistic calculations on many thousands of random trajectories to clarify the interplay of lithium and oxygen in amorphous carbon. We show that the presence of oxygen in the surface plays the key role in the increased uptake chemistry and suppression of erosion, while lithium has a decisive role in achieving high concentrations of oxygen in the upper layers of the surface upon bombardment by deuterium. D atoms preferentially bind with O and C-O when there is a comparable amount of oxygen to Li at surface. This finding explains a number of previously puzzling laboratory and reactor-based experimental results obtained over the last decade, having ramifications that go well beyond fusion.

  3. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 480 Conf Rm

    Hosted by: Ivan Bozovic

    The talk will review work at the division of quantum device physics at Chalmers. Quantum, limited dimensional devices can be used to study fundamental physical effect. At Chalmers, microwave pumped SQUID (Josephson inductance) terminated transmission lines have been used to study dynamical Casimir effects, i.e., vacuum fluctuations parametrically amplified to photons at half the pumping frequency. An imaginary component to the energy gap at node directions have been detected in YBCO by a single electron transistor. YBCO nanostructures can also be used to fabricate low noise SQUIDs. One use may be to study brain rhythms. Quantum Hall resistance normals have been realized in SiC based graphene. Their resolution is of the order of one part in ten-to-the-ten, and they promise to be the resistance standards in the future.

  4. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

    After reviewing the basic properties of jets produced in elementary collisions, and how these can be understood from quantum chromodynamics (QCD), I shall show how the QCD cascade is modified by the presence of a quark-gluon plasma. Coherence effects that determine the most salient features of the QCD cascade in vacuum are suppressed, and the in-medium cascade exhibit turbulent behavior. Interestingly, the same self-similar behavior that characterizes this turbulent behavior shows up in the late stage of the "bottom-up" scenario for quark-gluon plasma thermalization.

2

  1. NSLS-II Seminar

    11 am, NSLS-II, Bldg. 745 Room 156

    Hosted by: Ignace Jarrige

    Inelastic scattering measurements performed with resonance-tuned X-rays can provide a unique window into electron behavior at a femtosecond time scale and atomic length scale. Experiments of this type have a broad range of applications, granting key insight into the energetics of complex chemical environments (e.g. charging battery electrodes) and correlated electron systems (e.g. high temperature superconductors). I will discuss current efforts to turn the phase and energy profile of scattered light into a time-resolved picture of electron dynamics in quantum materials. The talk will review how many-body systems respond when impacted by resonant X-rays, and how scattered photons provide a fingerprint of important material properties such as atomic valence and spin states. Throughout the talk, I will touch on the long term trajectory of research, and ways in which the rapid ongoing development of spectrometers and X-ray light sources is opening exploration into new realms of fundamental physics.

  2. Shuttle Services

    4:45 pm, Apartment Area & Dorms

3

  1. No events scheduled

4

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    12 pm, Bldg. 744 (LOB 4) Room: 4L 156

    Hosted by: Klaus Attenkofer and Sanjit Ghose

  2. HET/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    12 pm, Physics, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

5

  1. No events scheduled

6

  1. No events scheduled

7

  1. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    3:30 pm, Bldg 911B, Large Conf. Rm., Rm. A202

    Hosted by: Ilan Ben-Zvi

    "MaRIE stands for Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes. As ultimately envisioned, the MaRIE facility as a whole will be capable of applying several in situ diagnostics to observe transient phenomena at high resolution, in real time. These include both proton radiography from the existing LANSCE accelerator, and X-ray and electron radiography from the MaRIE 1.0 XFEL. MaRIE 1.0 will be the world's first very-hard (40 kV) x-ray free-electron laser. Designed to operate with a beam energy of 12 GeV, the MaRIE linac will require performance currently beyond state-of-the-art in most aspects of its design: beam source, linac structures, bunch compression, bunch train, and the diagnostics required to monitor all of the above. MaRIE presents challenges not only in terms of achieving the basic performance requirements, but also to the modeling and simulation tools we use to design such a machine. This talk will review the baseline MaRIE 1.0 requirements and present the current status of the baseline accelerator design. Approaches to addressing the design and modeling challenges will be presented, along with broader-ranging potential alternatives."

8

  1. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    8 am, Suffolk County Community College Michael J Grant C

    Hosted by: Suffolk County Office of Women's Services

    Panel Discussion with Christina Swinson of BWIS, Q & A, light breakfast served. Equal Pay Day The Annual Equal Pay Day Event is held to bring awareness statewide about the inequality in pay between men and women. Over fifty years ago the United States Congress passed the Equal Pay Act, yet women who work full time still earn just 77 cents for every dollar earned by a man. Every year EPW chapters plan an event that brings awareness to this inequality and participate in activities that make an impact on achieving change. Examples of Equal Pay Day and local projects.

  2. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN, Building 735, Seminar Room, 2nd fl.

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    Coffee and cookies at 10:45 am Center for Functional Nanomaterials Colloquium Series Professor Paul V. Braun Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Soft Matter Enhanced Electrochemical Energy Storage and 3D Photonic Crystals Tuesday, April 8, 2014 11:00 a.m. Seminar Room, 2nd Fl. Over the past decade, the sophistication of self and directed-assembly approaches for functional composite structures has increased dramatically, however, application of such structures in real-world systems has remained largely elusive, in part because such structures almost always contain finite defect densities. The storing, generating and harvesting of photons and electrons presents a unique opportunity for self-assembled composite materials. These applications are not only generally much more defect tolerant than for example self-assembled computational electronics, but also for these areas to make a substantive impact on the world energy situation, they must be produced in exceptionally large volume. In my talk, I will attempt to capture the state-of-the-art in highly functional self-assembled three-dimensional composites for energy harvesting and storage illustrated with examples from both my research and other groups with a particular focus on high charge and discharge rate nanostructured electrochemical energy storage systems (batteries and supercapacitors), and photonic crystals which exhibit unprecedented control over the absorption and emission of light (lasers, LEDs, and solar cells). Host: Oleg Gang

  3. Weight Watchers

    12:15 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    Hosted by: Michael Thorn

    Weight Watchers "Weight Watchers" Tuesday, March 4, 2014, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490 Hosted by: michael Thorn On Site Weight Watchers Meetings!! Getting started with Weight Watchers is now Simpler then ever with Simple Start. Come on in and learn about our straight forward do-able 2 week started plan with delicious meal ideas and a great new app to get you started losing weight and on the path to long term success. Weight Watchers today at 12:15 in the Conference Room #490. If you are not already a member check out a meeting for free and hear all about Simple Start! Take advantage of the convenience of On-Site weekly meetings every Tuesday. Time for a new beginning.

  4. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Bill Morse

    We all know that High Energy Physics research in the U.S. is funded almost entirely by the federal government. Our field competes for federal dollars with colleagues as close as Nuclear Physics, and as far removed as the National Park Service or School Lunch Program. Just how does our budget get put together, and by whom? What do we do, specifically as a User community, to advocate for our research program to the people who make the funding decisions for our field? Do we have any real, positive effect? And finally, how are the answers to these questions impacted by the current P5 process?

9

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    To join Play Group, go to: meetup.com/BNL-playgroup Tours, snacks, information and general socializing! All are welcome!

  2. Chemistry Department Seminar

    10 am, Room 300, Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Water oxidation to oxygen in nature's photosynthesis is the source of most of the energy we use today. It is also anticipated to be (and it has to be) the source of most of the energy we use in the future through artificial photosynthesis. For the latter, one of the main challenges is the development of efficient and robust water oxidation catalysts. In this presentation, water oxidation catalysis by ruthenium complexes with two types of tetradentate ligands (2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid,bda and 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-diphosphonic acid, bpa) will be discussed. These catalysts oxidize water through seven-coordinate intermediates but follow different mechanisms. Water oxidation catalysts of the type [Ru(bda)(L)2] (L is 4-picoline (pic), or isoquinoline (isq)), as well as their mechanism for water oxidation, have been reported by Sun and coworkers. Nevertheless, unlikely 20- and 19-electron intermediates were proposed in the catalytic cycle. Here we revisit the mechanism for water oxidation by these catalysts based on electrochemistry, X-ray crystallography and well established inorganic and organometallic chemistry principles. In addition, a comparison between the two types of complexes in solution and bound to metal-oxide electrodes will be made with respect to catalytic performance. This comparison sheds light on the mechanism by which these complexes oxidize water in a true solar cell device configuration.

  3. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room D

    Monthly meeting of the Brookhaven Women in Science (BWIS) board. All BWIS members and affiliates are welcome to attend.

  4. BSA Noon Recital

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Pianist Di Wu, praised in the Wall Street Journal as "most mature and sensitive," who charms audiences with her "charisma, steely technique, and keen musical intelligence" (Philadelphia Inquirer) and her "fire and authority" (Washington Post), will perform at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory on Wednesday, April 9, at noon in Berkner Hall. Sponsored by Brookhaven Science Associates, the concert is free and open to the public. All visitors to the Laboratory age 16 and older must bring a photo I.D.

  5. Joint HET/YITP/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

    "I will first analytically show a simple, yet subtle "invariance" of two-body decay kinematics for the case of a massless daughter and a mother particle which is unpolarized and has a generic boost distribution in the laboratory frame. Namely, the laboratory frame energy distribution of the massless decay product has a peak, whose location is identical to the (fixed) energy of that particle in the rest frame of the corresponding mother particle. As a proof of principle of the usefulness of this observation, I will then apply it for measuring the mass of the top quark at the LHC, using simulated data (including experimental effects). Finally, I will show how it can be used to measure all the superpartner masses in a cascade decay chain of the gluino."

  6. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Among the future hopes for high energy nuclear physics is the construction of an Electron-Ion Collider or EIC. BNL has developed detailed plans for the RHIC machine to evolve into the EIC (locally called eRHIC) by the addition of an electron ring. For the past several years, BNL has hosted an EIC R&D program targeted at addressing the technology needs for the EIC. I will report on the so-called "Tracking Consortium" work with particular emphasis on the compact RICH. The compact RICH uses CsI-coated Gas-Electron-Multipliers (GEMs) along with a specialized thin-coating mirror for good reflectivity into the deep UV. Results from test beam will be presented along with thoughts for further work.

10

  1. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Retirement is not as far away as you think! Learn what you can do to help make your retirement dream come true on schedule. TIAA-CREF's workshop leaders will share retirement strategies that work: - Identify your "retirement vision," how much you'll need and when, so you can have the retirement you want - Define the simple steps to getting your finances on track to reach your ideal retirement - Learn the unique characteristics of retirement plans from 403(b) to IRAs to annuities and which work best for you Save your spot today! RSVP by calling 800 732-8353 Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. (ET) or schedule online at www.tiaa-cref.org/schedulenow Feel free to invite a colleague who'll enjoy this workshop! Bring your lunch, snacks and beverages will be served. "MONEY ISN'T A DESTINATION. It's how you reach one." A TIAA-CREF Financial Essentials Workshop Postcards From the Future: A Woman's Guide to Financially Ever After Consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses carefully before investing. Please call 877 518-9161 or go to www.tiaa-cref.org/prospectus for a prospectus that contains this and other information. Read the prospectus carefully before investing. Join us on Thu, Apr 10, 2014 from 12:00 p.m. �" 1:00 p.m. at Berkner Hall - Room B as we share experiences, develop new investing skills and bring retirement into focus. Add it to your calendar now!

  2. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    4 pm, Bldg 911B, Large Conf. Rm., Rm. A202

    Hosted by: V. Litvinenko

    "eRHIC is an ongoing vibrant project under a full blown study. In this presentation, the author will show studies of several beam dynamic issues - Dynamic aperture, FEL amplifier in CeC and possible CSR issue in arcs and chicanes. The author also presents possible solutions/remedies for those issues.

  3. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

11

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    11 am, Seminar Room (201), Bldg. 734

    Hosted by: Antonio Checco and Ernie Lewis

    Interfacial fluid mechanics, such as the dynamics of drops and bubbles, are important to problems in a variety of fields. For example, superhydrophobic surfaces can repel droplets, and bursting bubbles can disperse marine aerosols into the atmopshere. In this talk, I focus on two distinct phenomena: the reduction in contact time of a bouncing drop and the drainage of a viscous bubble prior to rupture. I will show both high-speed and time-lapse movies to highlight the phenomena, and I will discuss how experiments and mathematical modeling have given us insight into the underlying physics.

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    12 pm, Bldg. 744 (LOB 4) Room: 4L 156

    Hosted by: Klaus Attenkofer and Sanjit Ghose

12

  1. No events scheduled

13

  1. No events scheduled

14

  1. National Library Week Event

    10 am, Research Library, Bldg. 477

  2. Myron Strongin Seminar

    11 am, Bldg. 734, ISB Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: Jonathan Rameau

    In all known types of high-Tc superconductors - cuprate, Fe-based, and heavy fermion compounds - superconductivity emerges from the suppression of long range antiferromagnetic order. However, while superconductivity emerges from a Mott insulating state in the cuprates, the parent compounds of the Fe-based superconductors are metallic. Could a higher Tc be realized in compounds similar to the Fe-based superconductors if we start with a more correlated parent compound? We have synthesized single crystals of LaMnPO, which is isostructural to LaFeAsO, by the ux growth method. We find LaMnPO is an antiferromagnetic insulator that orders at TN = 375 K with a moment μ= 3.3 μB as T right arrow 0. I will present a combination of inelastic neutron scattering and optical transmission measurements and to show that antiferromagnetic exchange plays only a small role in formation of the charge gap. Instead, DFT+DMFT electronic structure calculations find Hunds coupling, thought to be responsible for correlations in the Fe-based compounds, is crucial for the formation of a charge gap in LaMnPO. Having identified LaMnPO as a more correlated version of the Fe-based superconductors, I will present our pressure and doping studies of LaMnPO. We find pressure drives LaMnPO toward a metallic and paramagnetic phase, but do not observe superconductivity. Doping studies are successful in reducing the activation gap in LaMnPO but the charge gap remains nearly unchanged.

  3. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    We propose to place a stack of ultra thin transmission dynodes on top of a pixel chip, in vacuum. A single electron arriving at the first dynode will cause an electron avalanche on the pixel input pad. Due to the small source capacitance, a gain of 30 k of the dynode stack is sufficient to create a digital signal. The rise time of this signal could be ~ 2 ps. This single-electron sensitive device has therefore an excellent time resolution, and, due to the granularity of the pixel chip, a good 2D position resolution. When capped with a classical window + photocathode, a new photomultiplier is created. This Timed Photon Counter 'Tipsy' is single soft photon sensitive, has 2D position resolution defined by the granularity of the pixel chip, and a potential time resolution of ~ 2 ps per photon. Thanks to the granularity of the pixel chip, a high rate of multiple photon events results in an acceptable pixel occupancy. When capped with an electron emission membrane 'e-brane', the electron detector turns into Trixy: a tracker for charged particles (MIPs). The essential property of this membrane is the emission, with a high probability, of at least one electron after the passage of a MIP, at the crossing point of the MIPs' track and the membrane. We report on the progress in the development of the transmission dynode, and on theoretical aspects and simulations associated with the emission of (secondary) electrons.

15

  1. CRC PHYSICSnetBASE Handbook of Chemistry and Physics

    10 am, Berkner Hall, Room C

    Hosted by: Research Library

    introduction and tips & tricks for using CRC series including structure searching, draw & combine structures, use interactive tables, sort & filter search results. Learn how to keep your research organized with personalized bookshelves, export to citation managers and track your research with saved search results and histories http://www.crcnetbase.com/

  2. Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Lunchtime Talk

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Topics to be Covered: Warning Signs of Financial; Physical or Mental Elder Abuse; Importance of a Power of Attorney & Health Care Proxy; How you should title bank accounts for the best protection Joint Account, Power of Attorney,Payable on death designations; Legal Recourse: Guardianship and Criminal Proceedings

  3. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: Genda Gu

    In this talk I will outline our groups efforts to generate and understand the high temperature superconducting proximity effect. Our focus is on interfaces between high Tc cuprates and topological insulators, in the hopes of observing and manipulating Majorana Fermions. I will also discuss the interest in these particles from both a fundamental and applied point of view. This has led us to develop the Mechanical Bonding processes that resulted in the first observation of high temperature superconductivity in Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3 and Graphite. I will also discuss recent efforts on the proximity effect in Bi2Te2Se where the fermi energy is in the gap. Interestingly in Bi2Te2Se/Bi2212 junctions we have observed a new zero bias conductance peak that does not couple to the orbital component, but only the spin.

  4. Register for ResearcherID/ORCID

    2 pm, Interdisciplinary Science Bldg. 734 (2nd floor)

  5. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    Despite the complexities of the nucleonic interactions in atomic nuclei, nuclei display remarkably simple patterns, and regularities as a function of neutron and proton number. Many of these patterns are associated with the emergence of collective behavior. Such behavior is largely the result of a competition between pairing interactions between like nucleons and proton-neutron (p-n) interactions. The Colloquium will survey the empirical behavior of nuclei and present ways to experimentally extract the strength of p-n interactions. The pivotal role of the latter in determining the former will then be discussed in terms of the correlations of p-n interaction strengths with the onset of collectivity and a newly recognized parallelism in the filling of proton and neutron orbits.

  6. Association of Students & Postdocs (ASAP) Event

    5:30 pm, ASAP Lounge (Bldg 462) corner of Bell Av & Cen

    Hosted by: Association of Students and Postdocs

    Come and meet your peers from BNL and Stony Brook. Enjoy good food and board games. Sandwiches, snacks, and drinks will be available.

16

  1. Environmental, Biological and Computational Sciences Directorate Seminar

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Reinhold Mann

    Understanding extreme events, such as hurricanes or forest fires, is of paramount importance because of their adverse impacts on human beings. Such events often propagate in space and time. Predicting��"even a few days in advance��"what locations will get affected by the event tracks and/or at what seasonal intensity these events are anticipated at those regions could benefit our society in many ways. Arguably, simulations from first principles, where underlying physics-based models are described by a system of equations, provide least reliable predictions for variables characterizing the dynamics of these extreme events. Data-driven model building has been recently emerging as a complementary approach that could learn the relationships between historically observed or simulated multiple, spatio-temporal ancillary variables and the dynamic behavior of extreme events of interest. While promising, the methodology for predictive learning from such complex data is still in its infancy. I will present a suit of dynamic networks-based methodologies for in-advance prediction of the dynamic tracks of emerging extreme events, for quantifying seasonal hurricane activity in North America, and for assessing rainfall activity in the Western Africa. These methods offer a superior predictive skill compared to any other methodology currently available in literature. In addition, various strategies for dealing with large-scale graphs will be presented.

  2. APS Lunchtime Seminar

    12 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Research Library

    APS Publications - What's New with the Physical Review - Presented by Editors from the American Physical Society: Gene Sprouse, Editor in Chief; Daniel Kulp, Editorial Director; Ling Miao, Managing Editor, Physical Review X; and Julie Kim-Zajonz, Managing Editor, Physical Review Applied. A light lunch will be served.

  3. High-Energy Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    1:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Ian Lewis

  4. Register for ResearcherID/ORCID

    2 pm, Physics Library, Bldg. 510 (2nd floor)

  5. Physics Colloquium

    3 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Anze Slosar

    I will review the BICEP results and summarize potential concerns one might have about their validity. I will then discuss the implications of large tensor modes for Early Universe phenomenology.

  6. Brookhaven Lecture

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Allen Orville

17

  1. IEEE Xplore Workshop

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Research Library

    Ruth Wolfish from IEEE will share a sneak peek of what's new and what's coming this year. Her presentation will include IEEE content and features coming soon, 2014 IEEE journal titles and details, collaborations with other publishers, the new image applications, patent citations, and new library resources. For more information, please visit http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/Xplore/home.jsp

  2. Photon Science Seminar

    11 am, Building 745, Conference Room 156

    Hosted by: David P. Siddons

    In this seminar we will start with a brief overview of 3 X-ray lithography beamlines and the microfabrication facility at CAMD. This will follow with the examples showing the research work involving X-ray LIGA (German acronym for Lithography-Electroplating-Molding) based fabrication of high aspect ratio (HAR) microstructures for micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), BioMEMS and/or microfluidic applications. These will include fabrication of X-ray mask using different type of substrates (carbon, silicon nitride & beryllium), precision alignment of pre-patterned substrate to mask & patterning of positive (PMMA) and negative resist (SU-8/ MRX/ SUEX), electroplating of patterned structures and molding using the electroplated mold insert. Here, we will also discuss the fabrication of multi-level structures using both positive and negative resist on silicon, polymer or printed circuit board substrates. Additionally, in brief we will discuss micromilling to produce rapidly high quality mold inserts for molding microfluidic chips for biomedical, biochemical as well as biological applications; and nanostructured &/or biocompatible thin films (Parylene & Diamond-like Carbon) deposition and characterization.

  3. RIKEN/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    12:30 pm, Physics, Bldg. 510, Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    I will discuss how multi-particle flow cumulants can help to distinguish between various models of p+A interactions.

  4. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    4 pm, Bldg. 911B, Large Conf. Rm., Rm. A202

    Hosted by: Vladimir Litvinenko

    "In a muon accelerator complex, a target is bombarded by a multi-MW proton beam to produce pions. The pion beam is captured by a high field tapered solenoid and later decay into muons. The captured muon beam has a large 6D emittance which requires reduction in order to fit within the muon accelerator acceptance and provide the required luminosity during collision in the collider ring. An optimization study of the muon beam production and capture will be presented including the impact of the capture solenoid field on the transverse and longitudinal phase-space of the muon beam. Additionally a design study of the muon collider final ionization cooling channel utilizing high field solenoids will be discussed."

18

  1. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    4 am, Bldg 911B, Large Conf. Rm., Rm. A202

    Hosted by: V. Litvinenko

    "When a low energy electron beam crosses from top of a storage ring electron bunch, its coulomb force will kick a short slice from the core of the storage ring electron bunch. The separated slices, when passing through an undulator, will radiate ultra-short x-ray pulses at about 160fs. In the presentation, I will talk about the new approach to generate ultra-short x-ray pulses of the order of 100fs pulse length by electron beam slicing, and I will discuss our from start to end design of the electron beam slicing method in NSLS-II which includes the design of low energy bunch compressor, the design of the interaction of the linac bunch and the ring bunch and the separation design of the synchrotron radiation of the core and satellite."

  2. National Library Week Event

    10 am, Research Library, Bldg. 477

  3. African American Affinity Group Meeting

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room D

    Hosted by: BERA AAAG

  4. Nuclear Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Bjoern Schenke

    We introduce a "renormalized entanglement entropy" which is intrinsically UV finite and is most sensitive to the degrees of freedom at the scale of the size R of the entangled region. We illustrated the power of this construction by showing that the qualitative behavior of the entanglement entropy for a non-Fermi liquid can be obtained by simple dimensional analysis. The functional dependence of the "renormalized entanglement entropy" on R can be interpreted as describing the renormalization group flow of the entanglement entropy with distance scale. The corresponding quantity for a spherical region in the vacuum, has some particularly interesting properties. For example in three (spacetime) dimensions, it is always monotonic along RG flows, and provides a measure of the number of degrees of freedom of a system at scale R.

19

  1. No events scheduled

20

  1. No events scheduled

21

  1. No events scheduled

22

  1. Employee Lunch-time Tour

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Lobby

  2. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    Hadron physics is unique at the forefront of science in tackling a problem whose fundamental degrees of freedom have never been directly observed. This presentation will describe some of the opportunities and challenges presented by the next decade — with an upgrade at Jefferson Lab, fixed target experiments at FermiLab and worldwide discussions about an electron ion collider.

  3. AAAG Scholarship Reception

    5 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: BERA African American Affinity Group

    Second Annual AAAG STEM Scholarship Reception. Five local high school students who plan to pursue STEM careers in college will be honored. Refreshments will be served. RSVP to Patrice Greenwood at greenwood@bnl.gov.

23

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/1438521623060022/ and open Brookhaven Lab Hospitality & Play Group and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. Home Ownership & Financing

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thinking of Buying or Selling? Join us for another workshop in the "Fiscally Fit" seminar series that focuses on buying, selling and financing real estate. Topics covered include: • Where to start - " A winning strategy for renters, buyers and owners. • How to reduce stress while saving time and money. • Qualifying - " How to get approval now. • Income tax savings/benefits. • R.I.C.E. - " Reserve, Income, Credit & Equity. • Understanding the closing process. Today's Real Estate Market - " Where the high and low-markets are headed and what this means for buyers, sellers and owners.

  3. High-Energy Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Taichi Kawanai

24

  1. APR

    24

    Today

    RIKEN/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    12:30 pm, Physics, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, April 24, 2014, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    I will show that the acoustic scaling patterns of anisotropic flow for different event shapes at a fixed collision centrality (shape-engineered events), provide robust constraints for the event-by-event fluctuations in the initial-state density distribution from ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. The empirical scaling parameters also provide a dual-path method for studying the temperature and baryon chemical potential (T, \mu_B) dependence of the specific shear viscosity (eta/s) of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) produced in these collisions. An initial calibration of the scaling parameters via detailed viscous hydrodynamical model calculations, gives robust eta/s estimates for the plasma produced in Au+Au and Pb+Pb collisions at RHIC (Root_s =0.2 TeV) and the LHC (Root_s = 2.76 TeV) (respectively) which are insensitive to the initial-state geometry models considered.

  2. APR

    24

    Today

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 24, 2014, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    In this talk, I will highlight some the latest searches for SUSY performed with the CMS detector at the LHC using the 8TeV dataset up to 20/fb. The results cover a broad range of signatures and final states, and probe a large range of the SUSY parameter space. The searches set stringent limits on the production of 1st and 2nd generation squarks and gluinos, 3rd generation squarks, EWK gauginos, sleptons, and include searches for R-parity violating SUSY.

  3. APR

    24

    Today

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 24, 2014, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    Human epithelial cancers remain incurable, putting researchers on a constant quest to develop models and methods that will lead toward a deeper understanding of the disease. Bugallo, Electrical and Computer Engineering professor at Stony Brook University believes that it is possible to provide information on the evolution of cancer stem cells and tumors that are highly drug-resistant and do not respond to standard anti-cancer drugs through the development of models and methods that follow signal processing methods. These methods could provide fast, scalable, and expandable information filling in missing gaps, further enabling the fight against cancer

25

  1. APR

    25

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 25, 2014, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Ketevi Assamagan

    The measurement of the shape of the Z boson rapidity distribution for pp Z/�'*  e+e- + X events at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is presented in this seminar. Data collected with the D0 detector during the whole RunII period of the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider are used. By using these data with an integrated luminosity of up to 9.86 fb-1, the uncertainties on the rapidity distribution in the forward region are significantly reduced compared with previous measurements. The measurement is made for events with electron-positron mass between 66 and 111 GeV. Predictions of Next-to-Leading-Order QCD theory with CTEQ and MSTW parton distribution functions are found to agree well with the data over the full rapidity range.

  2. APR

    25

    Friday

    English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    12 pm, CAD Building 911, 2nd Floor Conference Room.

    Friday, April 25, 2014, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

    English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Have to give a Scientific Talk? Concepts focusing on Public Speaking & Presentation Skills.

  3. APR

    25

    Friday

    Nuclear Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 25, 2014, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Bjoern Schenke

    At the highest possible transverse momenta at the LHC, quarkonia production should be dominated by fragmentation. I review recent developments in the calculation of quarkonium fragmentation functions using Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) and SCET, including both single and double parton fragmentation functions. I then describe the recently developed fragmenting jet functions, which are applicable for calculating the cross section for an identified hadron produced within a jet. For a jet containing a quarkonium, these functions are calculable in terms of NRQCD production matrix elements. We show that measurement of the momentum distribution of quarkonium within a jet provides a novel means of extracting these matrix elements, thereby providing an interesting new test of NRQCD.

26

  1. No events scheduled

27

  1. No events scheduled

28

  1. No events scheduled

29

  1. APR

    29

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Peter Steinberg

    The suppression of high transverse momentum charged particles is an important signature of the strongly interacting medium produced in central PbPb collisions. Both partonic energy loss and the initial state of the collision system may contribute to the nuclear modification factor. To further understand and distinguish these effects, the charged particle production in pPb collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV per nucleon pair has been measured with the CMS detector. This measurement covers a broad transverse momentum range of 0.4 to 100 GeV/c, and several pseudorapidity ranges. The nuclear modification factor is determined at midrapidity by normalizing the measured pPb spectrum to an interpolated pp reference spectrum constructed from previous measurements, and is significantly enhanced for particles with a transverse momentum above 30 GeV/c. The asymmetry of the collision system provides an opportunity to study nuclear effects on the parton distribution function by considering the production of charged particles in different pseudorapdity ranges. To quantitatively measure these effects, the ratios of the charged particle yields between corresponding positive and negative pseudorapidity ranges have been determined. The evolution of these ratios with pseudorapidity will be discussed.

  2. APR

    29

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

    Advances at the intersection of quantum optics, nanoscience, gravitational wave interferometry and microwave technology are currently allowing experimentalists to extend the reach of quantum mechanics to large mechanical objects. As an emerging frontier in physics, macroscopic quantum mechanics is expected to yield fundamental insights as well as novel technologies. This talk will be centered around experiments on cryogenic electromechanical systems, optical resonator-cooled mechanics and levitated microparticles. Recent theoretical work on optomechanics in our group at RIT will also be discussed.

30

  1. APR

    30

    Wednesday

    Chemistry Department Seminar

    10 am, Room 300, Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: James Muckerman

    Modern capabilities in computations and simulations in multi-scale approaches allow us to address successfully many of the complex chemistry and physics fundamentals of sun-to-fuel and electricity-to-fuel energy conversions. In this presentation we will highlight recent studies dealing with photo-electrodes, proton membranes, and molecular electro-catalysis, relevant to new energy technologies. In the context of photo conversions, efficient e/h polaron transport in single and multiphase oxide electrodes (such as TiO2 or Fe2O3) is essential. We successfully characterized the single-phase e/h transport properties of these materials using density functional theory DFT combined with Marcus/Holstein theory. Challenges remain for multi-phase materials. Our calculations led us also to formulate a universal role of excess electrons on the surface chemistry of oxides. In the context of proton membranes for fuel cells, understanding the factors affecting proton transport and molecular selectivity in polymeric and ionic liquid membranes is critical to the design of efficient low cost stable membranes. Ab initio and classical molecular dynamics MD combined with percolation theory provided a means to characterize successfully pore structure and proton transport properties. Water percolation is a key to efficient proton transport. Most recently, our focus has been on molecular electro-catalysis. DFT-based quantum QM and mixed QM/MM approaches coupled with accelerated MD simulations for free energy calculation, and micro-kinetic modeling have been combined to predict accurately the catalytic performance of novel proton relay-based molecular catalysts for H2 oxidation and evolution. These efforts have reached what is perhaps an unprecedented level of success that put us within grasp of design by computer. These studies underscore the power of computations and the impact of high performance computing in characterizing the fundamental chemistry in such complex mole

  2. APR

    30

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/1438521623060022/ and open Brookhaven Lab Hospitality & Play Group and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  3. APR

    30

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Hui Wang

    I will discuss heavy ion jet measurements carried out by ALICE at the LHC and STAR at RHIC, which take a systematically different approach than other experiments to this complex problem. Special emphasis is placed on inclusive and semi-inclusive observables that employ strictly infrared and collinear-safe (IRC) jet reconstruction, even in the high background environment of heavy ion collision events. I will compare selected measurements at the two colliders, and discuss what measurements using this approach may tell us about the nature of the Quark-Gluon Plasma.

  4. APR

    30

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 11:00 am

    Beyond the standard noise terms (shot, series and 1/f noise), in some cases microstrip sensors are affected by other noise sources, which can be recognized by their odd time (or frequency) dependence. One source of additional noise is the continuity of resistive layers surrounding the strips, e.g. p-spray on the n-side of a double sided sensor or electron accumulation layer on the p-side. Another one is the thermal noise induced by p-stops to n-side strips. The results obtained on a set of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors showing these excess noises will be presented. The static measurements which can foresee such effects will also be discussed. The seminar will start with a brief overview of the activities on silicon sensors, fabricated in the clean room of FBK (Trento).

  5. APR

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

    Synthetic biology is bringing together engineers, physicists and biologists to model, design and construct biological circuits out of proteins, genes and other bits of DNA, and to use these circuits to rewire and reprogram organisms. These re-engineered organisms are going to change our lives in the coming years, leading to cheaper drugs, rapid diagnostic tests, and targeted therapies to attack "superbugs". In this talk, we highlight recent efforts to create synthetic gene networks and programmable cells, and discuss a variety of synthetic biology applications in biocomputing, biotechnology and biomedicine.

  1. APR

    24

    Today

    RIKEN/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    "Acoustic scaling of anisotropic flow in shape-engineered events: implications for extraction of η/s(μB,T) of the QGP"

    Presented by Roy Lacey, Stony Brook University

    12:30 pm, Physics, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, April 24, 2014, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    I will show that the acoustic scaling patterns of anisotropic flow for different event shapes at a fixed collision centrality (shape-engineered events), provide robust constraints for the event-by-event fluctuations in the initial-state density distribution from ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. The empirical scaling parameters also provide a dual-path method for studying the temperature and baryon chemical potential (T, \mu_B) dependence of the specific shear viscosity (eta/s) of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) produced in these collisions. An initial calibration of the scaling parameters via detailed viscous hydrodynamical model calculations, gives robust eta/s estimates for the plasma produced in Au+Au and Pb+Pb collisions at RHIC (Root_s =0.2 TeV) and the LHC (Root_s = 2.76 TeV) (respectively) which are insensitive to the initial-state geometry models considered.

  2. APR

    24

    Today

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Latest results on SUSY searches from CMS"

    Presented by Eva Halkiadakis, Rutgers University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 24, 2014, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    In this talk, I will highlight some the latest searches for SUSY performed with the CMS detector at the LHC using the 8TeV dataset up to 20/fb. The results cover a broad range of signatures and final states, and probe a large range of the SUSY parameter space. The searches set stringent limits on the production of 1st and 2nd generation squarks and gluinos, 3rd generation squarks, EWK gauginos, sleptons, and include searches for R-parity violating SUSY.

  3. APR

    24

    Today

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    "How Signal Processing May Lead to Advances in Cancer Research"

    Monica F. Bugallo

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 24, 2014, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    Human epithelial cancers remain incurable, putting researchers on a constant quest to develop models and methods that will lead toward a deeper understanding of the disease. Bugallo, Electrical and Computer Engineering professor at Stony Brook University believes that it is possible to provide information on the evolution of cancer stem cells and tumors that are highly drug-resistant and do not respond to standard anti-cancer drugs through the development of models and methods that follow signal processing methods. These methods could provide fast, scalable, and expandable information filling in missing gaps, further enabling the fight against cancer

  4. APR

    25

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Measurement of the shape of the boson rapidity distribution for pp Z/�'*  e+e- + X events produced at √s = 1.96 TeV"

    Presented by Pengfei Ding, The University of Manchester, UK

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 25, 2014, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Ketevi Assamagan

    The measurement of the shape of the Z boson rapidity distribution for pp Z/�'*  e+e- + X events at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is presented in this seminar. Data collected with the D0 detector during the whole RunII period of the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider are used. By using these data with an integrated luminosity of up to 9.86 fb-1, the uncertainties on the rapidity distribution in the forward region are significantly reduced compared with previous measurements. The measurement is made for events with electron-positron mass between 66 and 111 GeV. Predictions of Next-to-Leading-Order QCD theory with CTEQ and MSTW parton distribution functions are found to agree well with the data over the full rapidity range.

  5. APR

    25

    Friday

    English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    "English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event ESOL: Have to give a Scientific Talk? Concepts focusing on Public Speaking & Presentation Skills."

    12 pm, CAD Building 911, 2nd Floor Conference Room.

    Friday, April 25, 2014, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

    English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Have to give a Scientific Talk? Concepts focusing on Public Speaking & Presentation Skills.

  6. APR

    25

    Friday

    Nuclear Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "Fragmentation and Fragmenting Jet functions in Quarkonium Production"

    Presented by Thomas Mehen, Duke University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 25, 2014, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Bjoern Schenke

    At the highest possible transverse momenta at the LHC, quarkonia production should be dominated by fragmentation. I review recent developments in the calculation of quarkonium fragmentation functions using Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) and SCET, including both single and double parton fragmentation functions. I then describe the recently developed fragmenting jet functions, which are applicable for calculating the cross section for an identified hadron produced within a jet. For a jet containing a quarkonium, these functions are calculable in terms of NRQCD production matrix elements. We show that measurement of the momentum distribution of quarkonium within a jet provides a novel means of extracting these matrix elements, thereby providing an interesting new test of NRQCD.

  7. APR

    29

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Charged particle production in pPb collisions measured with CMS"

    Presented by Eric Appelt, Vanderbilt University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Peter Steinberg

    The suppression of high transverse momentum charged particles is an important signature of the strongly interacting medium produced in central PbPb collisions. Both partonic energy loss and the initial state of the collision system may contribute to the nuclear modification factor. To further understand and distinguish these effects, the charged particle production in pPb collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV per nucleon pair has been measured with the CMS detector. This measurement covers a broad transverse momentum range of 0.4 to 100 GeV/c, and several pseudorapidity ranges. The nuclear modification factor is determined at midrapidity by normalizing the measured pPb spectrum to an interpolated pp reference spectrum constructed from previous measurements, and is significantly enhanced for particles with a transverse momentum above 30 GeV/c. The asymmetry of the collision system provides an opportunity to study nuclear effects on the parton distribution function by considering the production of charged particles in different pseudorapdity ranges. To quantitatively measure these effects, the ratios of the charged particle yields between corresponding positive and negative pseudorapidity ranges have been determined. The evolution of these ratios with pseudorapidity will be discussed.

  8. APR

    29

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Redrawing the boundary between classical and quantum mechanics"

    Presented by Mishkatul Bhattacharya, Rochester Institute of Technology

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

    Advances at the intersection of quantum optics, nanoscience, gravitational wave interferometry and microwave technology are currently allowing experimentalists to extend the reach of quantum mechanics to large mechanical objects. As an emerging frontier in physics, macroscopic quantum mechanics is expected to yield fundamental insights as well as novel technologies. This talk will be centered around experiments on cryogenic electromechanical systems, optical resonator-cooled mechanics and levitated microparticles. Recent theoretical work on optomechanics in our group at RIT will also be discussed.

  9. APR

    30

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/1438521623060022/ and open Brookhaven Lab Hospitality & Play Group and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  10. APR

    30

    Wednesday

    Chemistry Department Seminar

    "The Power of Computing to Elaborate Fundamentals in New Energy Technologies"

    Presented by Michel Dupuis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    10 am, Room 300, Chemistry Bldg. 555

    Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: James Muckerman

    Modern capabilities in computations and simulations in multi-scale approaches allow us to address successfully many of the complex chemistry and physics fundamentals of sun-to-fuel and electricity-to-fuel energy conversions. In this presentation we will highlight recent studies dealing with photo-electrodes, proton membranes, and molecular electro-catalysis, relevant to new energy technologies. In the context of photo conversions, efficient e/h polaron transport in single and multiphase oxide electrodes (such as TiO2 or Fe2O3) is essential. We successfully characterized the single-phase e/h transport properties of these materials using density functional theory DFT combined with Marcus/Holstein theory. Challenges remain for multi-phase materials. Our calculations led us also to formulate a universal role of excess electrons on the surface chemistry of oxides. In the context of proton membranes for fuel cells, understanding the factors affecting proton transport and molecular selectivity in polymeric and ionic liquid membranes is critical to the design of efficient low cost stable membranes. Ab initio and classical molecular dynamics MD combined with percolation theory provided a means to characterize successfully pore structure and proton transport properties. Water percolation is a key to efficient proton transport. Most recently, our focus has been on molecular electro-catalysis. DFT-based quantum QM and mixed QM/MM approaches coupled with accelerated MD simulations for free energy calculation, and micro-kinetic modeling have been combined to predict accurately the catalytic performance of novel proton relay-based molecular catalysts for H2 oxidation and evolution. These efforts have reached what is perhaps an unprecedented level of success that put us within grasp of design by computer. These studies underscore the power of computations and the impact of high performance computing in characterizing the fundamental chemistry in such complex mole

  11. APR

    30

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "And now for something completely different: heavy ion jets in ALICE and STAR"

    Presented by Peter Jacobs, LBL

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Hui Wang

    I will discuss heavy ion jet measurements carried out by ALICE at the LHC and STAR at RHIC, which take a systematically different approach than other experiments to this complex problem. Special emphasis is placed on inclusive and semi-inclusive observables that employ strictly infrared and collinear-safe (IRC) jet reconstruction, even in the high background environment of heavy ion collision events. I will compare selected measurements at the two colliders, and discuss what measurements using this approach may tell us about the nature of the Quark-Gluon Plasma.

  12. APR

    30

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Non-standard noise sources in silicon microstrip detectors"

    Presented by Gabriele Giacomini, , Bruno Kessler Foundation, Italy

    11 am, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 11:00 am

    Beyond the standard noise terms (shot, series and 1/f noise), in some cases microstrip sensors are affected by other noise sources, which can be recognized by their odd time (or frequency) dependence. One source of additional noise is the continuity of resistive layers surrounding the strips, e.g. p-spray on the n-side of a double sided sensor or electron accumulation layer on the p-side. Another one is the thermal noise induced by p-stops to n-side strips. The results obtained on a set of double-sided silicon microstrip detectors showing these excess noises will be presented. The static measurements which can foresee such effects will also be discussed. The seminar will start with a brief overview of the activities on silicon sensors, fabricated in the clean room of FBK (Trento).

  13. APR

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "Life Redesigned: The Emergence of Synthetic Biology"

    Presented by Professor James Collins, Howard Hughest Medical Institute, Boston University, Harvard University

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

    Synthetic biology is bringing together engineers, physicists and biologists to model, design and construct biological circuits out of proteins, genes and other bits of DNA, and to use these circuits to rewire and reprogram organisms. These re-engineered organisms are going to change our lives in the coming years, leading to cheaper drugs, rapid diagnostic tests, and targeted therapies to attack "superbugs". In this talk, we highlight recent efforts to create synthetic gene networks and programmable cells, and discuss a variety of synthetic biology applications in biocomputing, biotechnology and biomedicine.

  14. MAY

    1

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Probing Light WIMPs with SuperCDMS"

    Presented by Adam Anderson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 1, 2014, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worcester

    The SuperCDMS experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory is designed to detect dark matter directly by its interaction with nuclei in cryogenic germanium detectors. The improved detectors measure particle interactions using ionization and athermal phonon signals, whose topology allows for powerful rejection of radioactive backgrounds. In this talk, I will review recent SuperCDMS results focused on light WIMPs, including an analysis of 577 kg-d of low-energy data, and an analysis of specialized high-voltage data (CDMSlite). I will also discuss plans for a larger 100 kg germanium and silicon array planned for installation at SNOLAB.

  15. MAY

    1

    Thursday

    Defensive Driving, Part 1

    "Defensive Driving, Part 1"

    Edward Sierra, BNL

    6 pm, Brookhaven Center, South Room

    Thursday, May 1, 2014, 6:00 pm

  16. MAY

    2

    Friday

    New Employee Breakfast

    "New Employee Breakfast"

    8:15 am, Brookhaven Center

    Friday, May 2, 2014, 8:15 am

    Hosted by: Robyn McKay

    New Employee breakfast for employees hired between 11/1/13 and 3/31/14.

  17. MAY

    2

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Exploring three-flavor neutrino oscillations with MINOS"

    Presented by Joao Coelho, Tufts University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 2, 2014, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worcester

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations and through the combined efforts of many experiments we now know all of the neutrino mass splittings and mixing angles with reasonable precision. The remaining unknown quantity is perhaps the most relevant piece of the puzzle: the CP violating phase $\delta$. While a two-flavor approximation is usually applicable in measurements of mixing angles and mass splittings, CP violation is only present in a complete three-flavor description of neutrino oscillations. Additionally, two other discrete symmetries are broken by the inclusion of a third neutrino flavor: the mass ordering and the mixing angle octant. The determination of these extra discrete parameters is paramount to resolving degeneracies and enabling the precise measurement of $\delta$. In this seminar the latest oscillation results from the MINOS long-baseline neutrino experiment will be presented. The analysis performs a fit to three-flavor neutrino oscillations including the full data set of beam and atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos. It is the first combined analysis of $\nu_\mu$ disappearance and $nu_e$ appearance data by a long-baseline neutrino experiment.

  18. MAY

    2

    Friday

    Nuclear Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "Aspects of functional renormalisation"

    Presented by Daniel Litim, University of Sussex

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 2, 2014, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Bjoern Schenke

    The past decade has seen substantial progress in the application of Wilson's ideas in modern quantum field theory. In this talk, I review the basics of functional renormalisation in the continuum, and illustrate its applications for a variety of strong coupling phenomena in quantum field theory and statistical physics.

  19. MAY

    3

    Saturday

    Habitat for Humanity Build Day

    8:45 am, Mastic Beach, NY

    Saturday, May 3, 2014, 8:45 am

  20. MAY

    3

    Saturday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "Science Fair"

    9 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Saturday, May 3, 2014, 9:00 am

  21. MAY

    6

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "How Do Massive Stars Supernova?"

    Presented by Adam Burrows, Princeton University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    "Core-collapse supernovae have challenged theorists and computational science for half a century. Such explosions are the source of many of the heavy elements in the Universe and the birthplace of neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes. However, determining the mechanism of explosion remains the key goal of theory. Though the synergistic operation of turbulence and neutrino heating seems implicated, and multi-dimensional simulations with some physical fidelity that have provided insight, we have yet to reproduce the phenomenon theoretically. In this talk, I will review the goals of supernova theory, the state of the field, and the contending explosion models. In the process, I will highlight the computational astrophysics that has been applied to date, and that may be necessary in the future to credibly unravel this mystery."

  22. MAY

    6

    Tuesday

    BNL Toastmasters

    "Guest Night"

    5:30 pm, Biology (Bldg. 463, room 160)

    Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 5:30 pm

    Hosted by: Margaret Foster

    If you are worried about your next big presentation, Toastmasters can help. BNL Toastmasters Club will hold a special Guest Night on Tuesday, May 6, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in Biology (Bldg.163), room 160. BNL Toastmasters will present a special demonstration during the meeting and light refreshments will be served. Contacts: Beth Lin bylin@bnl.gov and Don Romard dromard@optonline.net. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Toastmasters club meets regularly on the first and third Tuesdays of the month to practice speaking and presentation skills.

  23. MAY

    7

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/1438521623060022/ and open Brookhaven Lab Hospitality & Play Group and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  24. MAY

    7

    Wednesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Economic Impact Of Particle Physics"

    Presented by Herman B. White, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    3 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi Assamagan

    Many metrics are not universally accepted in quantifying the impact of scientific research in general. The problem is more acute in the case of discovery science, where the motivation for pursuing the research was not necessarily to address or solve a specific economic problem, and therefore not readily tied to a return on investment for example. The topic to be presented in this colloquium focuses on the economic impact of particle physics research, and in general the impact of discovery science. The information is derived from one of our study groups, completed in the summer of 2013 at the University of Minnesota for the strategic planning exercise of the particle physics community of the United States. Making the case for supporting this science for DOE Laboratories occasionally includes a response to questions about the benefits to society of this research, including the economic benefits. If it were possible to better understand the broader impacts of the direction of this research, then hopefully this would contribute to making a clearer case for pursuing this research among decision makers.

  25. MAY

    7

    Wednesday

    Defensive Driving, Part 2

    "Defensive Driving, Part 2"

    Edward Sierra, BNL

    6 pm, Brookhaven Center, South Room

    Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 6:00 pm

  26. MAY

    8

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 8, 2014, 6:30 pm

  27. MAY

    9

    Friday

    HET/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    "TBA"

    Presented by Cen Zhang, UCL, Brussels

    12 pm, Physics, Building 510, Room 2-95

    Friday, May 9, 2014, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  28. MAY

    9

    Friday

    Nuclear Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "Quarks in strong magnetic fields"

    Presented by Toru Kojo

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 9, 2014, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Bjoern Schenke

    It has been known that magnetic fields enhance the chiral symmetry breaking (ChSB). According to studies of QED or models of the 4-fermi interactions, it was expected that the enhanced ChSB would resist the chiral restoration effects, increasing critical temperatures for the chiral restoration and deconfinement. Recent lattice calculations, however, showed the opposite behavior: the critical temperatures are reduced as a magnetic field increases. I will discuss how to resolve this apparent paradox, emphasizing which characteristic features of QCD make differences from other models.

  29. MAY

    13

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Materials in 2-dimension and beyond"

    Presented by Philip Kim, Columbia University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 13, 2014, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: John Tranquada

    The recent advent of atomically thin 2-dimensional materials such as graphene, hexa boronitride, layered transition metal chalcogenide and many strongly correlated materials, where weak van der Waals (vdW) force holds the layers together, has provide a new opportunity of studying novel quantum phenomena in low dimensional systems. The vdW layered materials consist of covalently bonded atomic layers entities that weakly interact with other constituents. With a strong built-in anisotropy in their components, vdW materials often show a quasi-low dimensionality leading to strongly correlated electron behaviors. These materials in 2-d limits also allow us to apply new experimental techniques such as electrolyte gating, scanning potentiometry, and electromechanical magnetometry. Moreover, combination of different layered constituents may produce heterogeneous and functional materials. In this talk, we will discuss to develop the method of transferring two-dimensional atomic layers of van der Waals solids to build functional heterostacks. Novel electron transport and optoelectronic phenomena can occur across these hetero-interfaces of atomicallycontrolled quantum heterostructures.

  30. MAY

    14

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/1438521623060022/ and open Brookhaven Lab Hospitality & Play Group and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  31. MAY

    14

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    "Board Meeting"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room D

    Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Christina Swinson

    Monthly meeting of the Brookhaven Women in Science (BWIS) board. All BWIS members and affiliates are welcome to attend.

  32. MAY

    15

    Thursday

    RIKEN/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    "TBA"

    Presented by Shu Lin, RBRC

    12:30 pm, Physics, Bldg. 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, May 15, 2014, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Potonyak

  33. MAY

    16

    Friday

    HET/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    "TBA"

    Presented by Tien-Tien Yu, YITP (SBU)

    12 pm, Physics, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, May 16, 2014, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  34. MAY

    18

    Sunday

    Movie Screening & Discussion

    "Particle Fever" Documentary Screening & Panel Discussion"

    2 pm, Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington, NY

    Sunday, May 18, 2014, 2:00 pm

    "Particle Fever," a new documentary showcasing the hunt for the Higgs boson at CERN's Large Hadron Collider, will be hitting Long Island on Sunday, May 18, at 2 p.m. at the Cinema Arts Centre in Huntington. A panel discussion following the film will feature researchers from Brookhaven Lab and Stony Brook University who played a role in the Higgs search, along with a live video feed from CERN. After the panel discussion, the Centre will host a wine and cheese event to provide attendees with an opportunity to talk with the scientists about their work in an informal setting. Tickets for the event are not yet available as of March 10, but will be announced when they go on sale.

  35. MAY

    19

    Monday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "Joint NSLS/NSLS-II & CFN Users' Meeting"

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Monday, May 19, 2014, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Photon Sciences and CFN Useres' Executive Committees

  36. MAY

    20

    Tuesday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "Joint NSLS/NSLS-II & CFN Users' Meeting"

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Tuesday, May 20, 2014, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Photon Sciences and CFN Useres' Executive Committees

  37. MAY

    21

    Wednesday

    Annual Users' Meeting

    "Joint NSLS/NSLS-II & CFN Users' Meeting"

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, May 21, 2014, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Photon Sciences and CFN Useres' Executive Committees

  38. MAY

    21

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 21, 2014, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/1438521623060022/ and open Brookhaven Lab Hospitality & Play Group and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  39. MAY

    22

    Thursday

    Passport to Retirement

    "Presented by The Foundation for Personal Financial Education"

    Craig J. Ferrantino, NY Director, The Foundation for Personal Financial Education

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 22, 2014, 12:00 pm

    Are You on Your Way to a First Class Retirement? Join the Foundation for Personal Financial Education for an introductory seminar on becoming fiscally fit through the process of proper investment planning. Learn how to: • Assess Your Investment Profile • Measure Risk in Your Portfolio • Develop Strategies to Minimize Risk • Discuss Taxes and Health Care Costs • Create Your Own Action Plan for Success

  40. MAY

    22

    Thursday

    Passport to Retirement

    "Presented by The Foundation for Personal Financial Education"

    Craig J. Ferrantino, NY Director, The Foundation for Personal Financial Education

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, May 22, 2014, 12:00 pm

    Are You on Your Way to a First Class Retirement? Join the Foundation for Personal Financial Education for an introductory seminar on becoming fiscally fit through the process of proper investment planning. Learn how to: • Assess Your Investment Profile • Measure Risk in Your Portfolio • Develop Strategies to Minimize Risk • Discuss Taxes and Health Care Costs • Create Your Own Action Plan for Success

  41. MAY

    22

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Selected topics in Higgs physics"

    Presented by Andrey Korytov, University of Florida

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 22, 2014, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    I will cover the most recent Higgs boson physics results from LHC with a special focus on precision measurements of properties of the recently discovered SM-like Higgs boson, which can potentially reveal signs for new physics.

  42. MAY

    28

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 28, 2014, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/1438521623060022/ and open Brookhaven Lab Hospitality & Play Group and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  43. MAY

    28

    Wednesday

    High-Energy Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "Relic Neutrinos in Cosmology-The prospects of detecting relic antineutrinos by capturing them in nuclei"

    Presented by J.D. Vergados, University of Ioannina

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, May 28, 2014, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

  44. MAY

    30

    Friday

    HET/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    "TBA"

    Presented by David Curtin, YITP, SBU

    12 pm, Physics, Bldg. 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, May 30, 2014, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  45. JUN

    2

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "DOE Summer Intern Program Begins"

    8 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Monday, June 2, 2014, 8:00 am

  46. JUN

    4

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 4, 2014, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/1438521623060022/ and open Brookhaven Lab Hospitality & Play Group and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  47. JUN

    5

    Thursday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "OSSP Celebration"

    4:30 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, June 5, 2014, 4:30 pm

    Hosted by: Mel Morris

  48. JUN

    10

    Tuesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "The JUNO Reactor Neutrino Experiment"

    Presented by Zeyuan Yu, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China, China

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 10, 2014, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worcester

    Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) is a medium baseline reactor neutrino experiment, to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy better than 3 sigma with 20kt liquid scintillator and six year data taking. The seminar will focus on the measurement of neutrino mass hierarchy with a short discussion on other possible physics topics, such as solar neutrino, supernova neutrino, etc. The progress of JUNO will also be reported, including project status, detector conceptual design, civil construction, electronics and offline software progress.

  49. JUN

    10

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Chao-Lin Kuo, Stanford University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 10, 2014, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

  50. JUN

    11

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group (10am-noon)"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 11, 2014, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/1438521623060022/ and open Brookhaven Lab Hospitality & Play Group and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  51. JUN

    11

    Wednesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Frustration-induced phase separation and magnetoelectric effects in a triangular spin lattice"

    Presented by Alexandros Lappas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Greece

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Wednesday, June 11, 2014, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Simon Billinge

    Chemically homogeneous, strongly correlated transition-metal oxides, with competing states, may display phase separation when the electron charge is coupled to spin or lattice degrees of freedom. Similar nanoscale inhomogeneities in insulating spin systems are rare and poorly understood, although they have been theoretically predicted to arise from geometrical frustration already in the doping-free limit. In this respect, the spatially-anisotropic triangular spin system NaMnO2 [1, 2], provides a paradigm where fingerprints of a unique magnetostructurally inhomogeneous ground state are identified. For this purpose we review our comprehensive structural synchrotron X-ray diffraction and HAADF-STEM investigations, which are complemented by local-probe NMR and muon-spin relaxation (μ+SR) measurements, incorporating also ab initio calculations [2]. We argue that the Néel order evolves as the outcome of symmetry-breaking pinning sites (e.g. interphases) due to the local-scale inhomogeneity which is endorsed by the inherent frustrated topology of the spin lattice. Remarkably, frustration-mediated structural complexity in this manganite goes beyond the limitations of the bulk symmetry and magnetoelectricity is unveiled in an otherwise collinear magnetic system. [1] M. Giot, L.C. Chapon, J. Androulakis, M.A. Green, P.G. Radaelli, and A. Lappas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2007, 99, 247211. [2] C. Stock, L.C. Chapon, O. Adamopoulos, A. Lappas, M. Giot, J.W. Taylor, M.A. Green, C.M. Brown, and P.G. Radaelli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2009, 103, 077202. [3] A. Zorko, O. Adamopoulos, M. Komelj, D. Arcon, and A. Lappas, Nat. Commun. 2014, 5:3222 doi: 10.1038/ncomms4222.

  52. JUN

    17

    Tuesday

    RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting

    "2014 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, June 17, 2014, 9:00 am

  53. JUN

    17

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Alexander Kusenko, UCLA

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 17, 2014, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

  54. JUN

    18

    Wednesday

    RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting

    "2014 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Bldg.555/Physics Large Seminar Bl

    Wednesday, June 18, 2014, 9:00 am

  55. JUN

    18

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Play Group"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 18, 2014, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/1438521623060022/ and open Brookhaven Lab Hospitality & Play Group and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  56. JUN

    18

    Wednesday

    High-Energy Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Thomas Hamby, UCL, Brussel

    2 pm, Physics, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Wednesday, June 18, 2014, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  57. JUN

    19

    Thursday

    RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting

    "2014 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    9 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, June 19, 2014, 9:00 am

  58. JUN

    20

    Friday

    RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting

    "2014 RHIC/AGS Annual Users' Meeting"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 20, 2014, 9:00 am

  59. AUG

    6

    Wednesday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "DOE Summer Intern Poster Session"

    9 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, August 6, 2014, 9:00 am

  60. AUG

    7

    Thursday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "DOE Summer Intern Poster Session"

    9 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, August 7, 2014, 9:00 am