General Information

Top of Page
May 2015
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, CFN, Bldg. 735, Conf. Rm. A - 1st floor

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Programmed Self-Assembly of Complex DNA Nanostructures and Applications in DNA Nanofabrication Cheng Tian Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh Friday, May 1, 2015 10:00 a.m. Bldg. 735 " Conference Room A This presentation focuses on the design and synthesis of complex DNA nanostructures and their applications in DNA nanofabrication. DNA has served as a superb building block to self-assemble into a wide range of predictable and robust nanostructures with the bottom-up method. Synthesized DNA nanostructures have been applied as templates for the organization of guest molecules and molecular lithography, biosensors for the genetic diagnosis and environmental detection, nanocarriers for the drug delivery therapy, and logic units for the DNA computation. My research focuses on the development of novel DNA building blocks, assembly strategies and simplified design systems to design and synthesize DNA nanostructures with a higher diversity and complexity, and applied DNA nanostructures as scaffolds to organize guest molecules and as templates for the nanopatterning.

  2. Biological, Environmental, & Climate Sciences (BECS) Department Seminar

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Huilin Li

    Ca2+ is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger that regulates cellular activities in plants, animals and humans. Cytosolic Ca2+ is kept at a low level, but subcellular organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) maintain Ca2+ stores. Under resting conditions, Ca2+ homeostasis is dynamically regulated to equilibrate between active calcium uptake and passive calcium leak. Ca2+ homeostasis is cytoprotective. An overloaded ER Ca2+ content promotes cell death. We determined crystal structures of a Ca2+ leak channel and characterized its biochemical functions. The structure has a novel seven-transmembrane-helix fold consisting of a centralized C-terminal helix wrapped by two triple-helix sandwiches. Lateral displacement of transmembrane helix TM2 by change of pH leaves a transmembrane pore, allowing a leak of Ca2+ across membranes. The leak is regulated by a di-aspartyl pH sensor consisting of two conserved aspartate residues. The leak is intrinsic to all kinds of cells and is cytoprotective for life.

  3. HET Lunch Seminar

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  4. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Effective field theory (EFT) is a powerful framework based on exploiting symmetries and controlled expansions for problems with a natural separation of energy or distance scales. EFTs are particularly important in QCD and nuclear physics. An effective theory of QCD, ideally suited to jet applications, is Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). Recently, first steps were taken to extend SCET and describe jet evolution in strongly-interacting matter. In this talk I will demonstrate that the newly constructed theory, called SCETG, allows us to go beyond the traditional energy loss approximation in heavy ion collisions and unify the treatment of vacuum and medium-induced parton showers. It provides quantitative control over the uncertainties associated with the implementation of the in-medim modification of hadron production cross sections and allows us to accurately constrain the coupling between the jet and the medium. I will further show how SCET and SCETG can be implemented to evaluate reconstructed jet observables, such as jet shapes.

2

  1. No events scheduled

3

  1. No events scheduled

4

  1. No events scheduled

5

  1. No events scheduled

6

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

7

  1. RIKEN Lunch Talk

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

8

  1. HET / Riken Lunch Seminar

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  2. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    We present results from a numerical solution of the next-to-leading order (NLO) Balitsky-Kovchegov (BK) equation in coordinate space in the large Nc limit. We show that the solution is not stable for initial conditions that are close to those used in phenomenological applications of the leading order equation. We identify the problematic terms in the NLO kernel as being related to large logarithms of a small parent dipole size, and also show that rewriting the equation in terms of the "conformal dipole" does not remove the problem. Our results qualitatively agree with expectations based on the behavior of the linear BFKL equation.

9

  1. No events scheduled

10

  1. No events scheduled

11

  1. Biological, Environmental, & Climate Sciences (BECS) Department Seminar

    1:30 pm, Conference Room, Bldg 815E

    Hosted by: Stephen Schwartz

    Fractional cloudiness in climate models is parameterised in terms of the subgrid-scale variability of humidity. This variability is expressed explicitly or implicitly as the probability density function (PDF) of the total-water specific humidity. No large-scale high-resolved observations of water vapour exist. I will present four approaches to evaluate the humidity PDF despite this observational shortcoming, and show their application to evaluate different cloud schemes. I will then discuss the implications for other cloud processes, and the subsequent improvements within the ECHAM climate model. If time permits, I will also briefly summarise one recent study on an observational constraint on the aerosol radiative forcing.

12

  1. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Peter Yamin

    We believe that approximately half of all the light from stars is absorbed and reprocessed by dust. The resulting emission is grey body with a temperature near 30 Kelvin. The COBE satellite made the first measurements of the resulting Far Infrared Background (FIRB), but since that time, we have been unable to resolve the background into individual galaxies. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) was designed to do this job. Its three bands at 250, 350, and 500 microns span the peak in emission for galaxies at z=1. I will discuss the BLAST experiment and present results from our measurements of resolved and unresolved galaxies. I will also discuss the implications for star formation in our own galaxy and how dust is changing the way we look at current and future searches for primordial gravity waves with the Cosmic Microwave Background.

13

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    12 pm, Bldg. 400, RSB Rm #1

    Hosted by: Christina Swinson

    BWIS board meting - all members welcome Preliminary Agenda Financial reports (CARE workshop, High-school career day, seminars) Events organization (super salad, tech transfer talk, presentation skills workshop, diversity meeting report) Goldhaber prize progress

  3. HET/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: CheinYi Chen

  4. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: Theodore Sampieri

14

  1. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    Geometrical is a consequence of a traveling wave solution of the non-linear QCD evolution equation, so called Balitski-Kovchegov equation. We shall demonstrate the existence of GS in various high energy reactions. Among different consequences of GS there is a linear rise of charged particle multiplicity (Nch) and mean transverse momentum (pT) with scattering energy. Furthermore, a correlation of meant pT and Nch is predicted to scale in a way that depends on the the way particles are produced from the volume excited in a hadron-hadron scattering. This is mostly visible in heavy ion collisions at different centralities.

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worcester

    The dark matter is a leading candidate to explain gravitational effects observed in galactic rotational curves, galaxy clusters, and the large scale structure formation, etc. The nature of dark matter is one of the most fundamental problems in physics. Proposals of dark matter candidates usually involve new physics and new particles. Among the various candidates, one compelling class of particles are WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles). WIMPs are being studied in colliders, indirect and direct detection experiments. In recent years, new techniques in WIMP direct detection using noble liquids (xenon, argon) have shown exceptional potential due to the capability of background suppression and discrimination, and scalability to large target masses. PandaX is a low threshold dual-phase xenon dark matter experiment operating at the China Jin-Ping Underground Laboratory (CJPL). The PandaX detector is staged. We released the first dark matter search data for PandaX-I on August 2014. In this talk, I will give an introduction to the PandaX-I detector, and then followed by the details of the physics analysis as well as the latest results.

  3. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    4 pm, Large Conf. Rm. Bldg. 911B, Rm. A202

    Hosted by: Wolfram Fischer

    "The beam lifetime in electron storage rings concerns machines running in decay mode as well as machines doing top-up. A standard procedure to increase the lifetime is via bunch lengthening as the lifetime depends on the electron density in the bunch. Bunch lengthening is typically achieved with higher harmonic (Landau) cavities. There are several advantages in using a different approach: it is possible to increase the bunch length by installing a transverse gradient (Robinson) Wiggler, which allows to transfer damping between the horizontal and the longitudinal plane. While increasing the bunch length, the horizontal emittance is being reduced yielding advantages regarding the source size depending on the magnet optics. At the Metrology Light Source, a primary source standard used by Germanys national metrology institute (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt), such a scheme is being investigated. The prospects are higher brilliance for the important beamlines together with a lifetime improvement in the order of 100 %."

  4. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

15

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN - Bldg. 735 First Floor Conference Room A

    Hosted by: Matthew Sfeir

    Solar energy can be directly harvested to power thermodynamically uphill reactions that produce energetic chemicals, promising a large-scale energy storage and redistribution solution. To enable these reactions, we need materials that can absorb light, separate charges, and catalyze specific chemistries. The materials should be made of earth-abundant elements to allow for large-scale implementations. They also need to be resistant against photo corrosion. To date, a low-cost, long-lasting material that can produce solar fuels with an economically meaningful efficiency remains elusive. In this talk, we present our efforts aimed at understanding what limits the development of this important field. Within the context of photoanode and photocathode, we show how the photoelectrode properties are changed by introducing material components designed for improving charge transport, surface potential accumulation, and interface kinetics, respectively. We also demonstrate that highly complex organic molecules can be produced by photoreduction of CO2, in a fashion similar to the dark reactions in natural photosynthesis. Our results highlight the importance of separately understanding thermodynamic and kinetic factors in complex systems such as that for solar fuel production. Detailed knowledge generated by our research contributes to the goal of realizing low-cost, high-efficiency artificial photosynthesis.

  2. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

16

  1. No events scheduled

17

  1. No events scheduled

18

  1. No events scheduled

19

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    Low pT direct photons in Au+Au collisions are produced in excess of the TAA-scaled p+p yields and with a large azimuthal anisotropy, v2. This talk considers that these low pT direct photons are produced by radially boosted quarks undergoing soft-gluon mediated quark-anti-quark interactions as the system becomes color-neutral. A Monte Carlo simulation of direct photons and Chi-squared comparisons of the published PHENIX direct photon and identified particle v2 data are used to test this description. The Monte Carlo simulation reproduces the shape of the direct photon pT excess and the resulting direct photon v2 agrees, despite being systematically low, with the published 0-20% and 20-40% Au+Au low pT direct photon v2 in both centralities. Comparisons to recent preliminary direct photon results will also be shown.

20

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Bldg 735, Con

    Hosted by: Chuck Black

    The directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCPs) has attracted significant interest as an extension to lithography by enhancing resolution and improving dimensional uniformity. Typically, DSA offers a limited set of dense and highly periodic patterns; on the other hand, integrated circuit fabrication require more complex patterns customized according to design. This talk will discuss recent advances toward customizable nanoscale fabrication based on the DSA of lamellae-forming polystyrene-block-poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films using underlying, partially inorganic chemical guiding patterns. As the foundation of these advances, a new route to create customized BCP patterns is introduced by encoding chemical patterns with inorganic guiding lines and non-guiding "masking" features. Subsequent DSA and pattern transfer results in line-space gratings with gaps between lines and trim across lines dictated by the placement of guiding lines and masking features, respectively. Thermodynamic analysis reveals the rules governing chemical pattern and process design in order to achieve defect-free BCP assembly with pattern customization over large areas. Furthermore, designing these "hybrid" organic-inorganic chemical patterns in an opposite pattern tone with guiding trenches in place of guiding lines affords greater design flexibility and illustrates a path to integrate BCP DSA into high-volume integrated circuit manufacturing. These self-aligned, bidirectional customization schemes create new opportunities for high-resolution, circuit-relevant patterning using DSA.

  3. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    4 pm, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

21

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN - Bldg. 735, Conf. Rm. A - 1st floor

    Hosted by: Deyu Lu

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar David Prendergast Dynamics in materials evident through first-principles interpretation of X-ray spectroscopy The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Thursday, May 21, 2015 11:00 a.m. Bldg. 735 " Conf. Rm. A The intrinsic ultrafast time scale of core-level excitations permits the use of X-ray spectroscopy to sample energy-relevant dynamics in materials. With the advent of X-ray free electron lasers, and even table-top X-ray sources, pump-probe measurements allow us to drive particular excitations externally and follow a given system response. Examples will be presented relevant to solar harvesting and the fundamental interactions that thermalize excited electron-hole distributions. Additionally, the intrinsic dynamics of materials around their thermodynamic equilibria are continually being sampled using typical synchrotron X-ray sources. In fact, without sampling the thermodynamic distribution, simulated spectra may lack particular features related to defect populations, interconversion of chemical species, momentary broken symmetry, etc. Through a combination of theoretical predictions and interpretation of experiment, it is possible to begin to disentangle the wealth of information in X-ray spectroscopy. Examples will be given from recent work in the context of electrochemical energy storage. Host: Deyu Lu Joann Tesoriero Center for Functional Nanomaterials P.O. Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973 631-344-7791 631-344-7769 tesoriero@bnl.gov

  2. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

    I will present a study of the time evolution of Ginibre matrices whose elements undergo Brownian motion. The non-Hermitian character of the Ginibre ensemble binds the dynamics of eigenvalues to the evolution of eigenvectors in a non-trivial way, leading to a system of coupled nonlinear equations resembling those for turbulent systems. We will formulate a mathematical framework allowing simultaneous description of the flow of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and unravel a hidden dynamics as a function of new complex variable, which in the standard description is treated as a regulator only. We shall solve the evolution equations for large matrices and demonstrate that the non-analytic behavior of the Green's functions is associated with a shock wave stemming from a Burgers-like equation describing correlations of eigenvectors. I will start by reviewing similar notions in a simpler, Hermitian setting. Joint work with Zdzislaw Burda, Jacek Grela, Maciej A. Nowak and Wojtek Tarnowski (Phys.Rev.Lett. 113 (2014) 104102).

  3. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    1:30 pm, CFN, Bldg. 735 - conf. rm. A

    Hosted by: Alexei Tkachenko

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Multiscale Modeling of Self-assembly of Nanostructures, Nanomedicines, and Functionalized Graphenes Niladri Patra Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Thursday, May 21, 2015 1:30 p.m. Bldg. 735 " Conference Room A We study by multiscale computational methods the self-assembly of complex nanostructures from atomic and molecular components. First, we demonstrate by classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations how water nanodroplets and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can activate and guide bending, folding, sliding, and rolling of planar graphene nanostructures. Next, we show by coarse-grained MD simulations that hydrated lipid micelles of preferred sizes and amounts of filling with hydrophobic molecules can be self-assembled on the surfaces of CNTs. Then, we model in collaboration with experimentalists nanomedicines based on self-assembled micelles, formed by highly PEGylated linear and branched (dendron-based) polymers. We also investigate the quantum dynamics of ion binding to graphene nanostructures using quantum MD simulations. We show that anions are either physisorbed onto the nanostructures or covalently bound at their selected regions, depending on the initial conditions, while cations only physisorb onto the nanostructures. Then, we describe the nucleation of long chains, large clusters, and complex cage structures in carbon and hydrogen rich interstellar gas phases by reactive MD simulations. Finally, we show how the H-atom of hydroxyl group of the catecholate ion (inhibitor) flipping changes the active site structure of the enzyme and the presence of double potential well in catechol-o-methyl transferase inhibitor complex by free energy calculations. Host: Alexei Tkachenko

  4. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    1:30 pm, CFN, Bldg. 735 - conf. rm. A

    Hosted by: Alexei Tkachenko

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Multiscale Modeling of Self-assembly of Nanostructures, Nanomedicines, and Functionalized Graphenes Niladri Patra Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Thursday, May 21, 2015 1:30 p.m. Bldg. 735 " Conference Room A We study by multiscale computational methods the self-assembly of complex nanostructures from atomic and molecular components. First, we demonstrate by classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations how water nanodroplets and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can activate and guide bending, folding, sliding, and rolling of planar graphene nanostructures. Next, we show by coarse-grained MD simulations that hydrated lipid micelles of preferred sizes and amounts of filling with hydrophobic molecules can be self-assembled on the surfaces of CNTs. We also show that porous carbon nanotubes can be used in a selective molecular absorption, transport, and separation. Then, we model in collaboration with experimentalists nanomedicines based on self-assembled micelles, formed by highly PEGylated linear and branched (dendron-based) polymers. We also investigate the quantum dynamics of ion binding to graphene nanostructures using quantum MD simulations. We show that anions are either physisorbed onto the nanostructures or covalently bound at their selected regions, depending on the initial conditions, while cations only physisorb onto the nanostructures. Finally, we describe the nucleation of long chains, large clusters, and complex cage structures in carbon and hydrogen rich interstellar gas phases by reactive MD simulations. Host: Alexei Tkachenko

  5. Brookhaven Women in Science (BWIS) Colloquia

    4:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    Women have played key roles in Astronomy since the ancient times of Babylon and Alexandria. Nonetheless, if you ask the public to name some astronomers throughout history, they will most likely list men. In this talk, we will look into the rich history of contributions of women to astronomy. More time will be dedicated to important discoveries made by Henrietta Swan Leavitt, Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, Vera Cooper Rubin, Susan Jocelyn Bell Burnell, and Carolyn Porco. All of them have sometimes struggled with society's ideas of women's "appropriate roles". Each woman's challenges were different and met in their own way.

22

  1. No events scheduled

23

  1. No events scheduled

24

  1. No events scheduled

25

  1. No events scheduled

26

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, Bldg 735, Conference Room A

    Hosted by: Chuck Black

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (bcp) is a leading strategy to pattern at sub-lithographic resolution in the technology roadmap for semiconductors, and is the only known solution to fabricate nano-imprint templates for the production of bit pattern media. Integration of DSA with traditional top-down processes is a principal challenge, particularly with respect to the process used to anneal the polymer thin films. Thermal annealing is the most developed method, resembling track processing of photoresists on hotplates, and has been used in demonstrations of DSA closest to commercial applications. Solvent annealing is a more complicated process and is less manufacturing friendly, but offers advantages in terms of diversity of materials and domain structures that can be assembled, and has resulted in the DSA of the highest resolution features demonstrated to date. Here we report a DSA process based on lithographically defined chemical templates and solvent annealing to pattern and pattern transfer 8 nm features on a 16 nm pitch with precise controllable variation in pattern dimensions (± 5 percent) required for arranging bits of patterned media in circular tracks. Key innovations include: 1) implementing a quasi-equilibrium process using solvents in which the polymer assembles in the solvated state, 2) delineating and taking advantage of the thermodynamic properties of tri-block copolymer/solvent mixtures to allow for sub 10 nm features, and 3) optimizing a pattern transfer technology using reactive vapor phase precursors to selectively transform block copolymer domains into inorganic hard masks.

  2. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Oleg Eyser

    At leading twist, a complete picture of the one-dimensional momentum structure of the nucleon requires knowledge of three types of parton distribution functions (PDFs): the unpolarized PDFs; the helicity PDFs; and the transversity PDF, related to the transverse polarization of quarks within a transversely polarized nucleon. Current global extractions of transversity are limited by the kinematic reach of existing semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) experiments. Beyond the open questions of one-dimensional nucleon structure, myriad opportunities abound in exploring the multi-dimensional structure of the nucleon. A step toward this goal is to investigate the nature of the transverse momentum dependence (TMD) of nucleon parton densities and their relation to nucleon spin polarization. The STAR experiment at RHIC proposes to investigate these and other spin-related phenomena through the interaction of high-energy collisions between spin-polarized protons. In preliminary results from data collected in 2011 at $\sqrt{s}=500$ GeV and in 2012 at $\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV, STAR has observed the first non-zero spin asymmetries due to the effects of transversity in proton-proton collisions. Studying these effects through both jet+hadron and di-hadron production channels and across a range of collision energy yields the potential not only to extend understanding of transversity beyond the current kinematic reach but also to address longstanding theoretical questions concerning the universality and evolution of transversity and polarized fragmentation functions. From the 2011 dataset STAR has also released the first preliminary measurements sensitive to the Sivers TMD PDF in weak-boson production. Weak boson production provides an ideal tool for isolating the unconstrained sea-quark Sivers PDF and may provide sensitivity to the expected modified universality of the Sivers PDF when compared to SIDIS. These exploratory measurements pave the way for future higher precision inv

27

  1. MAY

    27

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. MAY

    27

    Wednesday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, CFN, Bldg. 735, conference A, 1st floor

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Anibal Boscoboinik

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Effect of pH on polyelectrolyte multilayer formation and growth factor release for orthopedic applications Amy M. Peterson Leonard P. Kinnicutt Assistant Professor Department of Chemical Engineering Worcester Polytechnic Institute Wednesday, May 27, 2015 10:00 a.m. Bldg. 735 " Conference Room A Abstract: Because of its strength, durability, and biocompatibility, titanium is a widely used material for orthopedic implants. However, its insufficient integration with the surrounding bone tissue regularly leads to implant loosening and premature implant revision. A promising solution to improve integration is to modify the implant surface chemistry and topography by coating it with a protein-eluting polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) coating. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), a potent osteoconductive growth factor, was adsorbed onto the surface of anodized titanium, and PEM coatings prepared from solutions of poly-L-histidine (PLH) and poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) were built on the BMP-2 layer. The effect of the solutions' pH during the deposition process was investigated. High levels of BMP-2 released over several months were achieved. Approximately 2 μg/cm² of BMP-2 were initially adsorbed on the anodized titanium and a deposition pH-dependent release behavior was observed under physiological conditions. More stable coatings were assembled at pH values corresponding to the closed state of the polyelectrolyte complex. Three different diffusion regimes could be determined from the release profiles: an initial burst release, a sustained release regime and a depletion regime. Mass adsorption monitoring using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) showed that PLH was adsorbed in greater quantities than PMAA

  3. MAY

    27

    Wednesday

    Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Event

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Asian Pacific American Association

    In celebration of "Asian Pacific American Heritage Month" (APAHM), the APAA is hosting a lunchtime cultural event on Wednesday, May 27th at the Berkner Hall auditorium for lab employees and the community. The event will include Asian singing/dancing/musical performances that comprise of employees, spouses of employees, and members of the local community. All are welcome.

  4. MAY

    27

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 2:30 pm

    sPHENIX will be a large acceptance, high data-rate experiment containing hadronic and electromagnetic calorimetry. It will utilize the superconducting solenoid magnet from the decommissioned BaBar experiment and replace the existing PHENIX detector at RHIC. sPHENIX will be operating at the beginning of the next decade. The new detector will be optimized to measure jet and heavy quark production in AA, pA and pp collisions, and will be able investigate QGP dynamics in the RHIC-produced medium over key length and momentum scales. The detector design, physics program and project status will be described.

  5. MAY

    27

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

28

  1. MAY

    28

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    11 am, Bldg.480 Conf. Rm

    Thursday, May 28, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Qiang Li

    Thermoelectric materials can recover waste industrial heat and convert it to electricity as well as provide efficient local cooling of electronic devices. The efficiency (determined by the dimensionless figure-of-merit ZT) of such environmentally responsible and exceptionally reliable solid state energy conversion can be enhanced through (i) electronic band engineering (n-type Mg2Si-Mg2Sn solid solutions and p-type SnTe) and (ii) thermal conductivity reduction (Ge/Te double substituted CoSb3). Detailed transport and structure studies of Bi2Te3-based single crystals demonstrate that a bulk (semi-)insulating state for such a topological insulator can be achieved via group III (Tl or In) elemental doping, which opens an avenue for further investigations of transport phenomena related to surface states. Further systematic study in Bi2Te3-based molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) thin films grown on sapphire (0001) and/or BaF2 (111) substrates, reveal that the peak of phonon drag can be tuned by the choice of substrates with different Debye temperatures.

  2. MAY

    28

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 28, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The LHCb detector is a forward arm spectrometer on the Large Hadron Collider, designed for the study of particles containing b or c quarks. A variety of recent results from the Run I dataset, taken from 2010 - 2013, will be presented, emphasizing the scope of the LHCb physics program. These areas include central exlusive production of quarkonia, exotic particle searches, precision electroweak cross-sections, CKM measurements, and more. Prospects for Run II measurements will be outlined.

29

  1. MAY

    29

    Friday

    HET/ATLAS JOINT LUNCH SEMINAR

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, May 29, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

    "A search for Higgs bosons decays to four leptons via one or two light exotic vector bosons, Zdark, H -> Z Zdark -> 4l and H -> Zdark Zdark -> 4l (l=electron or muon), is presented. The search is performed using proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 20/fb at the center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The observed data are well described by the Standard Model prediction. Upper bounds at 95% confidence level are set on the relative branching ratios BR(H -> ZZdark -> 4l to BR(H -> 4l for the exotic vector boson masses between 15 and 55 GeV, and on BR(H -> Zdark Zdark -> 4l to BR(H -> ZZ^* -> 4l for the exotic vector boson masses between 15 and 60 GeV. The results are interpreted in benchmark models where a dark gauge symmetry is mediated by a dark vector boson."

30

  1. No events scheduled

31

  1. MAY

    31

    Sunday

    CFN Proposal Deadline

    11:45 pm, CFN

    Sunday, May 31, 2015, 11:45 pm

  1. MAY

    27

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. MAY

    27

    Wednesday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Effect of pH on polyelectrolyte multilayer formation and growth factor release for orthopedic applications"

    Presented by Amy M. Peterson, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

    10 am, CFN, Bldg. 735, conference A, 1st floor

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Anibal Boscoboinik

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Effect of pH on polyelectrolyte multilayer formation and growth factor release for orthopedic applications Amy M. Peterson Leonard P. Kinnicutt Assistant Professor Department of Chemical Engineering Worcester Polytechnic Institute Wednesday, May 27, 2015 10:00 a.m. Bldg. 735 " Conference Room A Abstract: Because of its strength, durability, and biocompatibility, titanium is a widely used material for orthopedic implants. However, its insufficient integration with the surrounding bone tissue regularly leads to implant loosening and premature implant revision. A promising solution to improve integration is to modify the implant surface chemistry and topography by coating it with a protein-eluting polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) coating. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), a potent osteoconductive growth factor, was adsorbed onto the surface of anodized titanium, and PEM coatings prepared from solutions of poly-L-histidine (PLH) and poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) were built on the BMP-2 layer. The effect of the solutions' pH during the deposition process was investigated. High levels of BMP-2 released over several months were achieved. Approximately 2 μg/cm² of BMP-2 were initially adsorbed on the anodized titanium and a deposition pH-dependent release behavior was observed under physiological conditions. More stable coatings were assembled at pH values corresponding to the closed state of the polyelectrolyte complex. Three different diffusion regimes could be determined from the release profiles: an initial burst release, a sustained release regime and a depletion regime. Mass adsorption monitoring using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) showed that PLH was adsorbed in greater quantities than PMAA

  3. MAY

    27

    Wednesday

    Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Event

    "Asian Culture Through Music and Dance"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Asian Pacific American Association

    In celebration of "Asian Pacific American Heritage Month" (APAHM), the APAA is hosting a lunchtime cultural event on Wednesday, May 27th at the Berkner Hall auditorium for lab employees and the community. The event will include Asian singing/dancing/musical performances that comprise of employees, spouses of employees, and members of the local community. All are welcome.

  4. MAY

    27

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "The Future sPHENIX Detector at RHIC"

    Presented by Edward O'Brien, BNL

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 2:30 pm

    sPHENIX will be a large acceptance, high data-rate experiment containing hadronic and electromagnetic calorimetry. It will utilize the superconducting solenoid magnet from the decommissioned BaBar experiment and replace the existing PHENIX detector at RHIC. sPHENIX will be operating at the beginning of the next decade. The new detector will be optimized to measure jet and heavy quark production in AA, pA and pp collisions, and will be able investigate QGP dynamics in the RHIC-produced medium over key length and momentum scales. The detector design, physics program and project status will be described.

  5. MAY

    27

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "505th Brookhaven Lecture: 'Scanning the Structure of Steel From Nuclear Reactor Vessels'"

    Presented by Lynne Ecker, Nuclear Science & Technology Department

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

  6. MAY

    28

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Transport properties of novel thermoelectric materials"

    Presented by Hang Chi, Department of Physics, University of Michigan

    11 am, Bldg.480 Conf. Rm

    Thursday, May 28, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Qiang Li

    Thermoelectric materials can recover waste industrial heat and convert it to electricity as well as provide efficient local cooling of electronic devices. The efficiency (determined by the dimensionless figure-of-merit ZT) of such environmentally responsible and exceptionally reliable solid state energy conversion can be enhanced through (i) electronic band engineering (n-type Mg2Si-Mg2Sn solid solutions and p-type SnTe) and (ii) thermal conductivity reduction (Ge/Te double substituted CoSb3). Detailed transport and structure studies of Bi2Te3-based single crystals demonstrate that a bulk (semi-)insulating state for such a topological insulator can be achieved via group III (Tl or In) elemental doping, which opens an avenue for further investigations of transport phenomena related to surface states. Further systematic study in Bi2Te3-based molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) thin films grown on sapphire (0001) and/or BaF2 (111) substrates, reveal that the peak of phonon drag can be tuned by the choice of substrates with different Debye temperatures.

  7. MAY

    28

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "LHCb Run I Results and Run II Prospects"

    Presented by Philip Ilten, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 28, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The LHCb detector is a forward arm spectrometer on the Large Hadron Collider, designed for the study of particles containing b or c quarks. A variety of recent results from the Run I dataset, taken from 2010 - 2013, will be presented, emphasizing the scope of the LHCb physics program. These areas include central exlusive production of quarkonia, exotic particle searches, precision electroweak cross-sections, CKM measurements, and more. Prospects for Run II measurements will be outlined.

  8. MAY

    29

    Friday

    HET/ATLAS JOINT LUNCH SEMINAR

    "Search for new light gauge bosons in Higgs boson decays to four-lepton final states in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC"

    Presented by Ketevi Assamagan, BNL

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, May 29, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

    "A search for Higgs bosons decays to four leptons via one or two light exotic vector bosons, Zdark, H -> Z Zdark -> 4l and H -> Zdark Zdark -> 4l (l=electron or muon), is presented. The search is performed using proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 20/fb at the center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The observed data are well described by the Standard Model prediction. Upper bounds at 95% confidence level are set on the relative branching ratios BR(H -> ZZdark -> 4l to BR(H -> 4l for the exotic vector boson masses between 15 and 55 GeV, and on BR(H -> Zdark Zdark -> 4l to BR(H -> ZZ^* -> 4l for the exotic vector boson masses between 15 and 60 GeV. The results are interpreted in benchmark models where a dark gauge symmetry is mediated by a dark vector boson."

  9. MAY

    31

    Sunday

    CFN Proposal Deadline

    "CFN Proposal Deadline for September-December Cycle 2015"

    11:45 pm, CFN

    Sunday, May 31, 2015, 11:45 pm

  10. JUN

    2

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Elliptic flow from anisotropic escape"

    Presented by Denes Molnar, Purdue University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 2, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    While hydrodynamics is regarded as the dominant paradigm for describing heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies, its applicability to nuclear reactions is not very well understood. Open question remain about the mechanism of rapid thermalization, initial conditions, treatment of decoupling (conversion of the fluid to particles), finite system effects, and quantum corrections in very small systems, for example. In a recent work (arXiv:1502.05572) we showed that in the AMPT transport model elliptic flow is generated quite differently from hydrodynamics, mainly through anisotropic escape from the collision zone. I will demonstrate that this is, in fact, a general feature of kinetic theory, originating in the modest opacities <Ncoll> \sim 4-5 in AMPT calculations. Implications of the escape effect will be discussed together with connections to other hydro related problems such as proper particle distributions (arXiv:1404.8750) and anisotropic flow from quantum mechanics (arXiv:1404.4119).

  11. JUN

    3

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 3, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  12. JUN

    4

    Thursday

    Chemistry Department Seminar

    "Measurements of Order and Structure in Semiconducting Polymers"

    Presented by Hyun Wook Ro, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    10 am, Bldg 735, CFN Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Thursday, June 4, 2015, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Chuck Black

    emiconducting polymers are central to emerging optoelectronic applications and tremendous efforts have gone towards establishing reliable structure-property-performance relationships. Among the essential structural parameters that have a direct impact on device performance, the degree of order of the semiconducting polymer is the most crucial, yet least characterized parameter, which makes designs and improvements towards next-generation materials difficult. In this presentation, recent successes in our laboratory towards quantifying semi-crystalline order of semiconducting polymers will be presented. We determine what correlations exist, if any, between X-ray, DSC, and optical measures of order in P3HT and its PCBM-61 blends. Additionally, we employ energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM) in combination with the measured degrees of crystallinity to see whether any insight can be gained into the structure of the P3HT amorphous phase in the BHJ, and discuss whether any of these measures provides insight into OPV device performance.

  13. JUN

    4

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "tba"

    Presented by Garry Goldstein, Rutgers

    12:30 pm, 2nd Fl Lecture Room ISB

    Thursday, June 4, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Konik

    tba

  14. JUN

    4

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Non-relativistic particles in a thermal bath"

    Presented by Antonio Vairo, Munich Technical University

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, June 4, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

  15. JUN

    5

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Novel mechanisms of charmonium suppression/enhancement in pA and AA collisions"

    Presented by Boris Kopeliovich, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 5, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  16. JUN

    5

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Novel mechanisms of charmonium suppression/enhancement in pA and AA collisions"

    Presented by Boris Kopeliovich, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 5, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Charmonium production in pA collisions is known to be suppressed by shadowing and absorption. There are however nuclear effects, which enhance charmonium yield. They steeply rise with energy and seem to show up in LHC data for J/psi production in pA collisions. In the case of heavy ion collisions produced charmonia are additionally suppressed by final state interaction in the created dense medium. On the contrary to current evaluations of the melting effects caused by Debye screening, a charmonium produced with a large pT easily survives even at high temperatures. Another source of charmonium suppression, missed in previous calculations, color-exchange interactions with the medium, leads to suppression of a comparable magnitude. A quantitative comparison is performed.

  17. JUN

    8

    Monday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Kinetic study of the oxygen reduction reaction on a-Ni(OH)2 and a-Ni(OH)2 supported on graphene oxide"

    Presented by Prof. L Jay Deiner, CUNY

    2 pm, CFN Bldg. 735 Second Floor Conference Room B

    Monday, June 8, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Mingzhao Liu

    Identification of active non-noble metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction remains a critical materials challenge in the development of electrochemical energy storage and conversion technologies. Recently, we have demonstrated that alpha nickel hydroxide supported on graphene oxide (-Ni(OH)2/GO) displays a surprising activity for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline media. In comparison to -Ni(OH)2 alone or graphene oxide alone, the -Ni(OH)2/GO material displays a lower onset potential and higher peak current density, suggesting a synergy between the GO support and the -Ni(OH)2 material. In order to gain insight into the mechanistic origin of the synergy between the -Ni(OH)2 particles and the GO support, we present a comprehensive kinetic analysis of the supported and unsupported -Ni(OH)2 catalyst. Electron transfer numbers, kinetic rate constants, and reaction orders determined through rotating disk electrode linear sweep voltammetry provide preliminary evidence for similar elementary steps occurring on supported and unsupported -Ni(OH)2, but modifications in activity arising from differences in the activation energy for adsorption of O2 and of reaction intermediates.

  18. JUN

    10

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  19. JUN

    10

    Wednesday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    "BWIS Monthly Meeting"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall, Room D

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Christina Swinson

    Monthly BWIS monthly meeting - all members welcome to attend

  20. JUN

    10

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Daedalus String Quartet"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015, 12:00 pm

  21. JUN

    10

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Wolfgang Altmannshofer, Perimeter Institute

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  22. JUN

    11

    Thursday

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "Advancing Science"

    Presented by Dr. Rush Holt, American Association for the Advancement of Science

    1:30 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Thursday, June 11, 2015, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

  23. JUN

    11

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search for dark sector particles at Belle and Belle II"

    Presented by Igal Jaegle, University of Hawai`i at Mānoa

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, June 11, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The dark photon, A′,, and the dark Higgs boson, h′, are hypothetical constituents featured in a number of recently proposed Dark Sector Models. We will present a search for these particles in the so-called Higgs-strahlung channel, e+e''A′h′, with h′'A′A′. We investigated ten exclusive final-states with A′'e+e', μ+μ', or π+π', in the mass ranges 0.1 GeV/c2 <mA′<3.5 GeV/c2 and 0.2 GeV/c2 <mh′<10.5 GeV/c2. We also investigated three inclusive final-states, 2(e+e')X, 2(μ+μ')X, and (e+e')(μ+μ')X, where X denotes a dark photon candidate detected via missing mass, in the mass ranges 1.1 GeV/c2 <mA′<3.5 GeV/c2 and 2.2 GeV/c2 <mh′<10.5 GeV/c2. Using the entire 977fb'1 data set collected by Belle, we observed no significant signal. We will also discuss prospects for searches for light dark matter and the dark photon in the radiative decay process at Belle and Belle II.

  24. JUN

    11

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, June 11, 2015, 6:30 pm

  25. JUN

    12

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Constraining the Standard Model and new physics with LHC data"

    Presented by Alessandro Tricoli, CERN

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 12, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Ketevi Assamagan

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN Laboratory in Geneva has achieved one of its primary goals, i.e. the discovery of the Higgs boson particle, which completes the Standard Model of particle physics. However, no signatures of new physics beyond the Standard Model have been observed yet, despite thorough searches. Nature turns out to be subtle. The direct search will continue in the upcoming LHC runs, however new physics can also be pursued indirectly by looking for deviations of experimental results from predictions in measurements of Standard Model processes. The LHC has provided a large data set during its first years of operations. This has been used to perform measurements of Standard Model processes that constrain predictions in the strong and electro-weak sectors and are sensitive to new physics in a model-independent way, thanks to the high level of precision and the extent of their kinematic reach. A good understanding of these processes is of paramount importance for precision Higgs physics, as well as for searches for new physics, as they constitute irreducible backgrounds. After presenting a selection of highlights of recent Standard Model measurements from the LHC, I will discuss how the precision and phase space reach of these measurements will improve in future LHC runs, given the increase of centre-of-mass energy and integrated luminosity, emphasising some of the experimental challenges ahead.

  26. JUN

    17

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  27. JUN

    17

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Enrico Lunghi, Indiana

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  28. JUN

    18

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Detection of Lensing of the CMB by Dark Matter Halos"

    Presented by Mathew S Madhavacheril, Stony Brook University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, June 18, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    I will report on the first detection of lensing of the cosmic microwave background by dark matter halos. Halo lensing of the CMB provides a method for constraining cluster masses complementary to optical weak lensing, with the advantage that the source plane has a very well determined redshift and statistical properties. In this work, the lensing field was reconstructed from CMB temperature observations using the ACTPol telescope and stacked at the location of CMASS galaxies which trace dark matter halos of ~10^13 M_solar galaxy groups, providing a 3.2 sigma detection and a ~35% mass constraint. I will also briefly touch on the capabilities of future CMB experiments to use this method to constrain dark energy parameters.

  29. JUN

    24

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Pianofest- I"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, June 24, 2015, 12:00 pm

  30. JUN

    25

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jacobus Verbaarschot, Stony Brook University

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, June 25, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

  31. JUN

    26

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jacobus Verbaarschot, Stonybrook University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 26, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  32. JUL

    21

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Seeking the Origin of Asymmetry"

    Presented by Xin Qian, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, July 21, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Laurence Littenberg

    Why are we made of matter, not antimatter? Where such asymmetry comes from remains one of the biggest mysteries in physics. In this talk, the speaker will take you through the process how physicists design a scientific experiment aiming to address this important question. We will examine the thinking behind, review the current progress, and discuss the challenges in the future.

  33. JUL

    29

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Pianofest- II"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 12:00 pm

  34. JUL

    30

    Thursday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, July 30, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  35. JUL

    31

    Friday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Friday, July 31, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  36. AUG

    1

    Saturday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Saturday, August 1, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  37. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Enso String Quartet: Salonen, Sibelius"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 12:00 pm

  38. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    CFN Proposal Deadline

    "CFN Proposal Deadline for January-April Cycle 2016"

    11:45 pm, CFN

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 11:45 pm

  39. OCT

    1

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Top Quark Precision Physics and the Fate of the Universe"

    Presented by Andreas Jung, Fermilab

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 1, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The talk will discuss recent measurements in the top quark sector, the heaviest known elementary particle known so far, performed at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and at the LHC. I will highlight Tevatron results that are competitive to those at the LHC, especially regarding the top quark mass and production asymmetry. The talk will also present CMS results on the top quark mass and Yukawa coupling. I will discuss the implications for the standard model electroweak sector regarding the vacuum stability. I will conclude with an outlook towards the high luminosity phase of the LHC and the CMS silicon detector upgrades required for the high luminosity phase.

  40. OCT

    12

    Monday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, October 12, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  41. OCT

    13

    Tuesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, October 13, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  42. OCT

    14

    Wednesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  43. OCT

    15

    Thursday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 15, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  44. OCT

    16

    Friday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, October 16, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong