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April 2015
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1

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

2

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    9:45 am, CFN Bldg. 735 - Second Floor Conference Room B

    Hosted by: Kevin Yager

    Recovery of three-dimensional structure from single particle X-ray scattering of completely randomly oriented diffraction patterns as predicted few decades back has been real due to advent of the new emerging XFEL (X-ray free electron laser) technology. Some of the best-known structure determination of helical objects such as helical viruses or deoxyribonucleic acid has been done by fiber diffraction. Layer line intensities of fiber diffraction pattern as expressed by cylindrical harmonics can be transformed into equivalent spherical harmonic expansion leaving the clue behind that structure of helical objects may be recovered from single particle scattering of randomly oriented helical molecules thus avoiding the tedious challenge of single axis alignment. In this work we have solved the structure of TMV (tobacco mosaic virus) helices from a set of randomly oriented simulated diffraction patterns exploiting symmetry and internal constraint of the diffraction volume thus proving the above claim on step ahead. As the world's first XFEL is in operation starting from June 2009 at SLAC National Lab at Stanford, the very first few experiments being conducted on larger objects such as viruses. We have analyzed a set of experimental diffraction patterns of chlorella virus deposited on cxidb.org and recovered a quadratic coefficients of Fourier shell correlation whose angular momentum selection rule proves that the collected data is primarily from an icosahedral object.

  2. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    The next-generation Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) will make high precision measurements of spin-dependent observables at high energies on nuclear targets. This unique nuclear physics laboratory will bring together access to the multitude of spin-spin and spin-orbit structures which can exist in hadronic targets, and the high color-charge densities which generate the most intense gluon fields permitted by quantum mechanics. The interplay between those two features gives rise to new physical mechanisms which translate these spin-orbit structures into the observed cross-sections, and it makes these mechanisms amenable to first-principles calculation. In this talk, I will discuss the spin-orbit structure of quarks within an unpolarized heavy nucleus in the quasi-classical approximation. The possibility of polarized nucleons with orbital motion inside the unpolarized nucleus generates nontrivial mixing between the spin-orbit structures of the nucleons, and the corresponding structures in the nucleus. This generic feature of a dense quasi-classical system leads to direct predictions testable at an EIC, and in principle allows direct access to the orbital angular momentum in the nucleus.

  3. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worcester

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is the world's largest neutrino detector. Although designed to detect TeV " PeV scale neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators, IceCube's DeepCore infill array permits searches for dark matter and measurements of neutrino oscillations in the 10-100 GeV range. The most recent measurements of muon neutrino disappearance with IceCube DeepCore will be presented, and prospects for future neutrino physics measurements with IceCube and the proposed PINGU array will be discussed

3

  1. Particle Physics Seminar

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    For more than a decade, the COMPASS experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has been tackling the measurement of the electromagnetic polarizability of the charged pion, which describes the stiffness of the pion against deformation in electromagnetic fields. Previous experiments date back to the 1980's in Serpukhov (Russia), where the Primakoff method to study charged-pion interactions with quasi-real photons was first employed. Later also other techniques in photon-nucleon and photon-photon collisions were carried out at different machines. The COMPASS measurement demonstrates that the charged-pion polarizability is significantly smaller than the previous dedicated measurements, roughly by a factor two, with the smallest uncertainties realized so far. The pion polarisability is of fundamental interest in the low-energy sector of quantum chromodynamics. It is directly linked to the quark-gluon substructure and its dynamics in the lightest bound system of strong interaction.

  2. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN Bldg. 735 - First Floor Conference Room A

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    One of the main goals of nanotechnology is developing methods for creation of designed nano-scaled systems with ability to control their structures, transformations and dynamic processes. Such full control over the material design will permit achieving the desired functional properties. Approaches based on DNA-driven assembly of nanosystems were recently demonstrated as a powerful route for regulated self-assembly at nanoscale. Metal nanoparticles or quantum dots, functionalized with oligonucleotides are envisioned in this approach to be precisely directed in targeted structures, in bulk, at surfaces or within a cluster. The Watson-Crick recognition between DNA grafted on particle surface allows for programming interparticle interactions with extreme richness and thermodynamical tunability. We extended DNA-assembly methodology for fabrication of dynamically responsive nanoclusters and nanocrystals using a linking particles 'i-motif', a DNA sequence that responds to pH stimulation. DNA double strands were also applied as an interparticle distance controller to self-assemble a series of clusters with core-shell architecture. The core, gold nanoparticle (AuNP) was surrounded by the shell of DNA-attached colloidal quantum dots (QD), forming AuNP-DNA-QD clusters with tunable optical (photoluminescence) responses, which mimics the architecture of light harvesting complex. A novel strategy for assembling 3D nanoparticle clusters was demonstrated: designing a molecular frame with encoded vertices for particles placement. Using a DNA origami octahedron as such frame, we positioned specific particles types at the octahedron vertices, which permitted a fabrication of clusters with different symmetries and particles composition. We applied the combination of cryo-EM technique and single particle method to uncover the structure of the DNA frame and to reveal that nanoparticles are spatially coordinated in the prescribed manner. We also proposed a ne

  3. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    A remarkable observation from RHIC and the LHC is that the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy-ion collisions behaves as a strongly coupled and nearly ideal liquid. Data also suggests that the debris produced by proton-nucleus collisions can also behave as a liquid. Understanding the dynamics responsible for the rapid equilibration of such tiny droplets is an outstanding problem. In recent years holography has emerged as a powerful tool to study non-equilibrium phenomena, mapping challenging quantum dynamics onto the classical dynamics of gravitational fields in one higher dimension. In the dual gravitational description the process of quark-gluon plasma formation and equilibration maps onto the process of gravitational collapse and black hole formation. I will describe how one can apply techniques and lessons learned from numerical relativity to holography and present recent work on holographic models of high energy collisions and the applicability of hydrodynamics to tiny droplets of quark-gluon plasma.

  4. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    4 pm, Bldg 911B., Large Conf.Rm., Rm. A202

    "Solid-state laser concepts for ICF laser system applications including master oscillator, regenerative amplifier, OPO, and fiber-based front-end are discussed. Applications for the ICF laser system front-end, laser temporal diagnostics testing, laser damage testing, ASE suppression for OPCPA pump, energetic picosecond pulse generation without mode locking, cryogenic target layering, complex multi-FM pulses generation are described."

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7

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    The electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon provide experimental access to the underlying charge and magnetic moment distributions arranged by the strong nuclear force. These form factors provide excellent testing grounds for QCD and QCD-inspired models and are fundamentally important in understanding non-perturbative strong force physics. By studying them over a broad range of momentum transfers, they provide insight into the underlying mechanisms relevant to the generation of nucleon structure. At low Q2 there is presently a controversy regarding the charge radius measurements of the proton. At high Q2, scaling of the form factors are presently being studied in the context of a transition from soft QCD interactions. In this talk I will provide an overview of our present experimental of elastic nucleon form factors, review their context within current theoretical models, discuss upcoming future measurements at Jefferson Lab, in particular the Super Bigbite program.

  2. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: Ivan Bozovic

    The interface between LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, two good band insulators, which was found in 2004 to be conducting [1], and, in some doping range, superconducting with a maximum critical temperature of about 200 mK [2] is attracting of lot of attention. The electronic structure of the system displays signatures of confinement and of the d-character of the carriers. This electron liquid has a thickness of a few nanometers at low temperatures and a low electronic density. Being naturally sandwiched between two insulators, it is ideal for performing electric field effect experiments that allow the carrier density to be tuned and the phase diagram of the system to be determined [3]. I will discuss in this presentation superconductivity, the phase diagram of the system and the link with bulk doped SrTiO3, spin orbit [4], and an approach that allows superconducting coupling between different gases to be studied. I will also discuss recent thermopower measurements that allow access to localized electronic states [5]. [1] A. Ohtomo, H. Y. Hwang, Nature 427, 423 (2004). [2] N. Reyren, S. Thiel, A. D. Caviglia, L. Fitting Kourkoutis, G. Hammerl, C. Richter, C. W. Schneider, T. Kopp, A.-S. Ruetschi, D. Jaccard, M. Gabay, D. A. Muller, J.-M. Triscone and J. Mannhart, Science 317, 1196 (2007). [3] A. Caviglia, S. Gariglio, N. Reyren, D. Jaccard, T. Schneider, M. Gabay, S. Thiel, G. Hammerl, J. Mannhart, and J.-M. Triscone, Nature 456, 624 (2008). [4] A.D. Caviglia, M. Gabay, S. Gariglio, N. Reyren, C. Cancellieri, and J.-M. Triscone, Physical Review 104, 126803 (2010). [5] I. Pallecchi, F. Telesio, D. Li, A. Fête, S. Gariglio, J.-M. Triscone, A. Filippetti, P. Delugas, V. Fiorentini, and D. Marré, to appear in Nature Communications.

  3. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    The venerable proton continues to play a central role in fundamental particle physics. Neutrinos scatter from protons in neutrino oscillation experiments, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are expected to scatter from protons in dark matter searches, and electrons or muons are bound by protons in precision atomic spectroscopy. Our understanding of the proton is an obstacle to the success of next generation experiments hoping to discover CP violation in the lepton sector and determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, discover the particle nature of dark matter, or reveal new interactions such as those that violate lepton universality. In this talk I present (i) an overview of the current state of knowledge in the neutrino sector, and theoretical advances that will determine a crucial missing ingredient in the predicted signal process of neutrino-nucleus scattering at a Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (ii) the first complete calculation of the scattering cross section of a proton on a static electroweak source, which determines WIMP-nucleus scattering rates at underground direct detection experiments and (iii) the status of the proton radius puzzle, whose most "mundane" resolution requires a 5 standard deviation shift in the value of the Rydberg constant. I describe how each of these problems has spurred the development of powerful new methods in effective quantum field theory.

8

  1. HET/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

9

  1. Biological, Environmental, & Climate Sciences (BECS) Department Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room, Bldg 815E

    Hosted by: Wei Wu

    Many think the timing and intensity Pleistocene Glaciations have been solved. There remain many problems explaining these grand events. This talk will review some past attempts and how they have failed. Energy balance climate models are useful in this class of problems. I will show some recent results that do not settle the case, but get part of the way there and may point the way to a satisfactory solution.

  2. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

10

  1. HET Lunch Seminar

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-95

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  2. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Consistent formulations of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics involve short lived modes, leading to asymptotic rather than convergent gradient expansions. In this talk I will consider the Mueller-Israel-Stewart theory applied to a longitudinally expanding quark-gluon plasma system and identify hydrodynamics as a universal attractor without invoking the gradient expansion. I will give strong evidence for the existence of this attractor and then show that it can be recovered from the divergent gradient expansion by Borel summation. This requires careful accounting for the short-lived modes which leads to an intricate mathematical structure known from the theory of resurgence.

11

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14

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Colloquium

    11 am, Bldg 735, CFN 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Hosted by: Eric Stach

    Connecting the underlying chemical processes with the growth and emergent form remains unsurmountable problem in life sciences [1]. In materials research, the current outlook is more optimistic: establishing such connection, from the basic interatomic forces to growing nanostructure shape and properties becomes a real possibility. We will discuss several important examples, focusing on two recent results. First one concerns the nanotubes, where it took two decades to derive a kinetic formula [2] R ~ sin x (growth rate R, helical angle x). Further analysis of the subtle balance between the kinetic and thermodynamic views reveals sharply peaked abundance distribution A ~ x exp (-x) [3]. This explains the puzzling (n, n-1) types observed in many experiments. In the second example, a combination of DFT and Monte Carlo models explains the low symmetry shapes of graphene on substrates. In equilibrium, edge energy variation dE manifests in slightly distorted hexagons. In growth, it enters as ~exp(-dE/kT), amplifying the symmetry breaking to triangle, ribbon, rhomb [4]. Third example concerns 2D materials of more complex chemistry, h-BN and MX2 among them, and how their defects, dislocations and grain boundaries, predicted from the first principles, find remarkable experimental confirmations [5]. [1] On Growth and Form, by D'Arcy W. Thompson (Cambridge U, 1917). [2] F. Ding et al. PNAS 106, 2506 (2009); R. Rao et al. Nature Mater. 11, 213 (2012). [3] V. Artyukhov - E. Penev et al. Nature Comm. 5, 489 (2014). [4] Y. Liu et al. PRL 105, 235502 (2010); V. Artyukhov et al. PNAS 109, 15136 (2012); Y. Hao et al. Science, 342, 720 (2013); V. Artyukhov et al. PRL 114, 115502 (2015). [5] X. Zou, et al. Nano Lett., 13, 253 (2013); S. Najmaei et al. Nature Materials, 12, 754 (2013); A. Aziz et al. Nature Comm., 5, 4867 (2014). *** Boris I. Yakobson is an expert in theory and computational modeling of materials na

15

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. High-Energy Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chris Kelly

16

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, CFN Bldg. 735 - Second Floor Conference Room B

    Hosted by: Kevin Yager

    Xray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) allows the measurement of dynamics on small length scales through the fluctuations of a far field diffraction pattern produced by micron sized partially coherent xray beams. I will describe the analysis of systems containing directed motion through two main topics. The first will be the measurement of velocity fields using a heterodyne technique. The second will be the use of a spatial extension to XPCS to probe flow gradients or strain fields. The deformation of a rubber polymer with Angstrom resolution over the course of a few seconds is measured. The experimental setup, data analysis and initial results will be presented, along with some discussion of the limitations and capabilities.

  2. RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

  3. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Anze Slosar

    Strong gravitational lenses have become an important astronomical tool: they allow us to make accurate measurements of galaxy masses, they provide a magnified view of the distant universe, and they allow us to constrain cosmological parameters. In particular, the time delays in multiply-imaged quasar systems enable measurements of distance in the Universe each with around 5% precision. I will present our recent measurement of time delay distance in two galaxy-scale lens systems. For us to realize the potential of this cosmological probe, we need to increase the size of our lens sample, and continue to improve the accuracy of its analysis. I will discuss the potential of LSST to provide a sample of several hundred lensed quasars with well-measured time delays that would enable competitive and complementary constraints on Dark Energy, and describe our ongoing investigations of how to find lenses, infer their time delays and model their mass distributions accurately, and account for weak lensing effects from external mass structures.

17

  1. Computational Science Center Seminar

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Robert Harrison

    Multiparadigm methods to span the scales from quantum mechanics to practical issues of functional nanoassembly and nanofabrication are enabling first principles predictions to guide and complement the experimental developments by designing and optimizing computationally the materials compositions and structures to assemble nanoscale systems with the requisite properties. Graphene derivatives have created an enormous impact on next generation nano devices owing to remarkable optical properties. The reduced dimensionality results in fairly strong electron-electron Coulomb interaction which influences the behavior of exciton in such low dimensional systems. In this talk, we employ multi-paradigm approaches to investigate functional graphene derivatives and related layer materials to unravel the versatile character in optical properties.

  2. Biological, Environmental, & Climate Sciences (BECS) Department Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room, Bldg 815E

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

    Ice formation represents one of the biggest challenges in atmospheric sciences for prediction of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds with subsequent consequences for the global radiative budget and hydrological cycle. The reasons for this are manifold: ice nucleation can occur via different pathways with each mechanism depending on the ambient thermodynamic conditions such as temperature and relative humidity; only a small fraction of particles nucleates ice as low as one in a million; the physicochemical complexity of ice nucleating particles (INPs); the ice nucleation efficiency of ambient particles. This seminar will introduce a multi-modal methodology approach allowing optical, micro-spectroscopy, and chemical imaging of individual identified field-collected and laboratory generated INPs active in immersion freezing and deposition ice nucleation. Ice formation pathways are studied for temperatures as low as 200 K covering typical atmospheric conditions. In the first part of this presentation a new model of immersion freezing will be presented. It is based on droplet water activity and accounts for INP surface area and nucleation time. Its application and implications for cloud modeling will be discussed. The second part is concerned with the unique ability to quantitatively characterize the individual INP among hundred thousands of particles not nucleating ice. These findings raise a new perspective on the parameters governing atmospheric ice nucleation. The data demonstrates that the INPs are not necessarily exceptional particles in comparison to the ambient population with regard to composition and mixing state. However, particle surface area, besides ice nucleation kinetics, may also constitute a crucial factor for our predictive understanding of the ice nucleation process. Lastly, a stochastic model is applied to re-analyze laboratory immersion freezing data demonstrating that statistically insufficient freezing experiment numbers and inaccurate estimates of INP s

  3. HET Lunch Seminar

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  4. Nuclear Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Abstract: We utilize a new framework, CUJET3.0, to deduce the energy and temperature dependence of jet transport parameter, q^(E>10GeV,T), from a combined analysis of available data on nuclear modification factor and azimuthal asymmetries from RHIC/BNL and LHC/CERN on high energy nuclear collisions. Extending a previous perturbative-QCD based jet energy loss model (known as CUJET2.0) with (2+1)D viscous hydrodynamic bulk evolution, this new framework includes three novel features of nonperturbative physics origin: (1) the Polyakov loop suppression of color-electric scattering (aka "semi-QGP" of Pisarski et al) and (2) the enhancement of jet scattering due to emergent magnetic monopoles near Tc (aka "magnetic scenario" of Liao and Shuryak) and (3) thermodynamic properties constrained by lattice QCD data. CUJET3.0 reduces to v2.0 at high temperatures T>400 MeV, but greatly enhances q^ near the QCD deconfinement transition temperature range. This enhancement accounts well for the observed elliptic harmonics of jets with pT>10 GeV. Extrapolating our data-constrained q^ down to thermal energy scales, E∼2 GeV, we find for the first time a remarkable consistency between high energy jet quenching and bulk perfect fluidity with η/s∼T3/q^∼0.1 near Tc.

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20

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: Simon Billinge/Emil Bozin

    Double perovskites, A2BB'O6, containing mixed transition metal ions have exhibited numerous desirable properties such as colossal magnetoresistance, half metallic transport, and high temperature ferrimagnetism. However, a predictive understanding of the superexchange mechanisms which control the magnetism of these materials when they are insulating and B is 3d transition metal and B' is a 4d or 5d transition metal has remained elusive. In this work, a number of insulating double perovskite osmates, A2BOsO6 (A=Sr,Ca,La; B=Cr,Fe,Co,Ni) have been chosen and studied using magnetometry, specific heat, XMCD, and neutron powder diffraction techniques in order to systematically probe the effects of electronic configuration and bonding geometry on the magnetic ground state. It is concluded that the magnetic properties of these materials are controlled by a competition between short range B��'O��'Os and long range superexchange interactions which are sensitive to bonding geometry resulting in tunability of the magnetic ground state.

21

  1. Center for Data-Driven Discovery C3D

    2 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Robert Harrison

    Cosmology is a branch of physics that studies the whole universe as a single physical system. Computing intensive methods are used throughout, both for data analysis and for theoretical modeling. The computational difficulties are in most cases due to existence of gravitational force which is important at all scales. This makes problems fundamentally different from problems in particle physics where each collision event can be considered to be statistically independent. In simulations, it is necessary to take into account the force contribution of any particle to any other and in data analysis the correlations between any two measurements. I will overview problems, solutions and current limitations. Time permitting, I will describe more technical aspects of the code we are developing to analyze data from the spectroscopic datasets.

  2. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    Neutrinos play a role in various aspects of cosmology, including production of light elements, and the rate of expansion of the universe. Furthermore, the neutrino masses imply the likely existence of right-handed neutrinos, which can exist in the form of dark matter, and which can explain the matterantimatter asymmetry of the universe. I will discuss the many faces ordinary and hypothetical neutrinos in cosmology.

22

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. BSA Noon Recital

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

  3. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: Simon Billinge/Emil Bozin

    Selective adsorption and sequestration of carbon dioxide from sources of anthropogenic emissions is important to mitigate the growing level of the atmospheric CO2. Solid state adsorbents, such as metal organic frameworks (MOFs), are proposed as an alternative to the currently used toxic and corrosive alkanolamine solutions. Experimental gas sorption studies of MOFs usually focus on gas isotherms measurements that, while providing the necessary information on the overall gas uptake and framework behavior upon gas loading, yield limited information on the mechanism of the gas adsorption. Molecular level understanding of gas adsorption in MOFs is an important problem and the most detailed structural models necessary to elucidate the adsorbate-adsorbent interaction can be obtained with the crystallographic techniques. This talk will present the recent exciting discoveries of CO2 and hydrocarbon adsorption in MOFs. In contrast to current trends in the design of MOFs, we discovered the unique mechanism responsible for a high CO2/N2 adsorption selectivity in a Ca-based MOF: Ca(sdb), (sdb: 4,4'-sulfonyldibenzoate), even in the presence of water in the gas stream. Single crystal XRD (SCXRD) experiments of gas loaded samples revealed that the v-shaped linker provides a "pi-pocket" formed by two phenyl rings, and that CO2 locate between the rings, resulting in a high heat of adsorption. To determine the gas adsorption performance in situ in the presence of water, we used differential scanning calorimetry technique (XRD-DSC) that allows for measuring enthalpy while collecting X-ray diffraction patterns, to evaluate the structural response during the gas adsorption. The XRD-DSC technique and single crystal diffraction were further used to evaluate the CO2 adsorption in a Cd-analog of Ca(sdb), hydrocarbon adsorption in two Ca-based MOFs and gate opening mechanism in a Mn-based MOF. The knowledge acquired can promote the directed synthetic search for novel

  4. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    I will argue that any theory of early universe that matches cosmological observations should include a phase of accelerated expansion (i.e. inflation) or it has to break at least one of the following tenets of classical general relativity: Null Energy Conditions (NEC), sub-luminal signal propagation, or sub-Planckian energy densities. This proof extends to a large class of theories with higher (spatial) derivative or non-local terms in the action as well. Interestingly, only theories in the neighbourhood of Lifshitz points with ω ∝ k^0 and k^3 are excluded from the proof. I will also discuss in what sense detecting primordial gravitational waves is a smoking gun for inflation.

23

  1. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    12 pm, Physics Seminar Lounge Bldg. 510B

    Brookhaven Women in Science (BWIS) is presenting the 2015 Renate W. Chasman Scholarship to Kristine Horvat Thursday, April 23, from 12:00 to 1:00 pm in the Physics Seminar Lounge, Bldg. 510B. Named after Renate Chasman, a renowned physicist who worked at Brookhaven, the $1,000 scholarship is awarded each year to a woman are are undergraduate seniors or gradate students doing research at BNL in the STEM disciplines (e in science, engineering, or mathematics. Refreshments will be served at the reception.

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    An intriguing possibility that can address pathologies in both early universe cosmology (i.e. the horizon problem) and quantum gravity (i.e. non-renormalizability), is that particles at very high energies and/or temperatures could propagate arbitrarily fast. In this talk, I introduce Thermal Tachyacoustic Cosmology (TTC), i.e. this scenario with thermal initial conditions. We find that a phase transition in the early universe, around the scale of Grand Unified Theories (GUT scale; T∼10^{15} GeV), during which the speed of sound drops by several orders of magnitude within a Hubble time, can fit current CMB observations. However, I will then argue that cosmological bounds on the density of primordial black holes suggest that Lorentz invariance in the primordial thermal plasma may not recover until much lower temperatures, close to the QCD phase transition. This presents the exciting possibility of testing this scenario in the thermal plasma produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

24

  1. Biological, Environmental, & Climate Sciences (BECS) Department Seminar

    10 am, Conference Room, Bldg 815E

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

    In our continued effort to understand the climate system and improve its representation in general circulation models (GCMs) it is crucial to develop new methods to evaluate these models. This is certainly true as the GCM community advances towards high horizontal resolutions (i.e., grid spacing less than 50 km), which will require interpreting and improving the performance of many model components. Idealized, or reduced complexity, frameworks can be used to investigate how model assumptions impact behavior across scales. This work makes use of a range of National Center for Atmospheric Research and Department of Energy Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) simulations, ranging from simplified global radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE) simulations to full decadal simulations of present-day and future climate. The various CAM5 configurations provide useful insights into the model's ability to simulate extreme precipitation events and tropical cyclones. Furthermore, the impact of horizontal resolution and the choice of CAM5 dynamical core on the simulation of extreme events will be explored. Finally, time slice experiments using the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 scenario for greenhouse gas concentrations are assessed and compared to present-day simulations. Overall, this work is part of a continued effort to understand how weather extremes may vary in a changing climate using next-generation high-resolution climate models.

  2. Biological, Environmental, & Climate Sciences (BECS) Department Seminar

    11 am, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Though management of essential macronutrients, including nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium and water is crucial in any cropping system, it is of particular concern for sustaining future bioenergy crops that will be grown on sub-optimal soils lacking these essential resources. Use of fertilizers and applied irrigation will improve upon this, but at a significant increase in the net cost for energy derived from bioenergy fuels. In recent years, an increasing number of reports have appeared documenting healthy plant growth under nutrient limitation and drought conditions by applying plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPB). Even so, most aspects of these unique plant-microorganism associations have been little studied at a systems-level and from a detailed mechanistic perspective. Knowledge gained from more intensive research on PGPB and their effects should increase their utility and field application in future bioenergy cropping systems. What is lacking is a genetically tractable, model system that can be employed to make more rapid progress toward understanding PGPB function. Our recent work in Setaria viridis (Pankievicz et al., The Plant Journal, 2015) using Azospirillum brasilense and Herbaspirillum seropedicae bacteria, has shown that it is a robust model C4 grass system for studying PGPB attributable to biological nitrogen fixation and other phytostimulatory actions. Leveraging several imaging approaches, including radioluminescence, optical and nanoSIMS in combination with radiotracer metabolic fluxomics and proteomics, we are beginning to get a clearer picture into the physiological and metabolic basis for plant growth promotion via these microbial associations - and with a sequenced genome for S. viridis and plant transformation efforts underway, this system promises to provide even greater insight that should help accelerate translation and deployment of new strategies for future bioenergy crop sustainability.

  3. HET/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

    The current LHC Higgs data provide strong constraints on possible deviations of the couplings of the observed 125 GeV Higgs boson from the Standard Model (SM) expectations. Therefore, it now becomes compelling that any extended Higgs sector should comply with the so-called SM alignment limit. In the context of the Two Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM), this alignment is often associated with either decoupling of the heavy Higgs sector or accidental cancellations in the 2HDM potential. Here we present a new solution realizing natural alignment based on symmetries, without decoupling or fine-tuning. In particular, we show that in 2HDMs where both Higgs doublets acquire vacuum expectation values, there exist only three different symmetry realizations leading to natural alignment. We also discuss some interesting LHC phenomenology of the heavy Higgs sector in the alignment limit.

  4. Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Hadrons under extreme conditions of density and temperature have captured the interest of particle and nuclear physicists as well as astrophysicists over the years in connection with an extensive variety of physical phenomena in the laboratory as well as in the interior of stellar objects, such as neutron stars. One of the physics goals is to understand the origin of hadron masses in the context of the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at low energies in the non-perturbative regime and to analyze the change of the hadron masses due to partial restoration of this symmetry under extreme conditions. Lately other proper QCD symmetries have also become a matter of high interest, such as heavy-quark flavor and spin symmetries. These symmetries appear when the quark masses become larger than the typical confinement scale and they are crucial for characterizing hadrons with heavy degrees of freedom. In this talk I will address the properties of heavy hadrons under extreme conditions based on effective theories that incorporate the most appropriate scales and symmetries of QCD in each case. With the on-going and upcoming research facilities, the aim is to move from the light-quark to the heavy-quark sector and to face new challenges where heavy hadrons and new QCD symmetries will play a dominant role.

25

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26

  1. No events scheduled

27

  1. No events scheduled

28

  1. APR

    28

    Tuesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    4:30 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Tuesday, April 28, 2015, 4:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

    Climate simulations are fundamental for understanding the emergent patterns of the climate systems, attribution of past climate change and for projections of the future. But how are they constructed and how do we assess their skill and credibility? I will discuss the use and misuse of climate models and demonstrate that they are indeed good for something(s).

29

  1. APR

    29

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. APR

    29

    Wednesday

    504th Brookhaven Lecture: Dario Stacchiola

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

30

  1. APR

    30

    Thursday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, Bldg 735, Conference Room A

    Thursday, April 30, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: James Dickerson

    The theme of this presentation is the use of microstructural control to extend the favorable attributes of "Nano", and minimize the undesirable ones, in relation to lithium ion batteries (LIBs), sodium ion batteries (SIBs) and electrochemical supercapacitors. In this talk I will cover several examples where proper microstructural design provides substantial improvements: A) The use of nanoscale coatings to more than double the cycling capacity retention and achieve near 100% coulombic efficiency of Si nanowire and nanotube LIB anodes; B) Fabricating improved materials for Na ion battery anodes through tailored metal alloys and pseudographitic carbons; C) Converting a common livestock biowaste, in the form of chicken eggshell membranes and inedible egg whites, to electrodes with some of the highest specific capacitances and Li storage capacities reported in literature for any carbon; D) Creating carbons with electrochemical performance on par or even better than graphene for a range of energy storage devices, from hemp fibers, banana peels and peat moss. In all cases I will detail the key synthesis ��" microstructure features that transform the performance of these materials from mundane to remarkable. Recent media coverage: http://www.altmetric.com/details.php?citation_id=1462145&src=bookmarklet

  1. APR

    28

    Tuesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "What Are Climate Models Good For?"

    Presented by Gavin Schmidt, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies

    4:30 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Tuesday, April 28, 2015, 4:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

    Climate simulations are fundamental for understanding the emergent patterns of the climate systems, attribution of past climate change and for projections of the future. But how are they constructed and how do we assess their skill and credibility? I will discuss the use and misuse of climate models and demonstrate that they are indeed good for something(s).

  2. APR

    29

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  3. APR

    29

    Wednesday

    504th Brookhaven Lecture: Dario Stacchiola

    "Catching Catalysis in the Act: In Situ Studies With X-Rays and Electrons"

    Presented by Dario Stacchiola, Chemistry Department

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

  4. APR

    30

    Thursday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "David Mitlin: Design of Electrode Microstructures that Bridge Supercapacitors and Batteries"

    Presented by David Mitlin, Clarkson University, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering and Mechanical Engineering

    11 am, Bldg 735, Conference Room A

    Thursday, April 30, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: James Dickerson

    The theme of this presentation is the use of microstructural control to extend the favorable attributes of "Nano", and minimize the undesirable ones, in relation to lithium ion batteries (LIBs), sodium ion batteries (SIBs) and electrochemical supercapacitors. In this talk I will cover several examples where proper microstructural design provides substantial improvements: A) The use of nanoscale coatings to more than double the cycling capacity retention and achieve near 100% coulombic efficiency of Si nanowire and nanotube LIB anodes; B) Fabricating improved materials for Na ion battery anodes through tailored metal alloys and pseudographitic carbons; C) Converting a common livestock biowaste, in the form of chicken eggshell membranes and inedible egg whites, to electrodes with some of the highest specific capacitances and Li storage capacities reported in literature for any carbon; D) Creating carbons with electrochemical performance on par or even better than graphene for a range of energy storage devices, from hemp fibers, banana peels and peat moss. In all cases I will detail the key synthesis ��" microstructure features that transform the performance of these materials from mundane to remarkable. Recent media coverage: http://www.altmetric.com/details.php?citation_id=1462145&src=bookmarklet

  5. MAY

    1

    Friday

    HET Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Michael Geller, Technion

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, May 1, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  6. MAY

    1

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Applications of Soft-Collinear Effective theory to hadronic and nuclear collisions"

    Presented by Ivan Vitev, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 1, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Effective field theory (EFT) is a powerful framework based on exploiting symmetries and controlled expansions for problems with a natural separation of energy or distance scales. EFTs are particularly important in QCD and nuclear physics. An effective theory of QCD, ideally suited to jet applications, is Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). Recently, first steps were taken to extend SCET and describe jet evolution in strongly-interacting matter. In this talk I will demonstrate that the newly constructed theory, called SCETG, allows us to go beyond the traditional energy loss approximation in heavy ion collisions and unify the treatment of vacuum and medium-induced parton showers. It provides quantitative control over the uncertainties associated with the implementation of the in-medim modification of hadron production cross sections and allows us to accurately constrain the coupling between the jet and the medium. I will further show how SCET and SCETG can be implemented to evaluate reconstructed jet observables, such as jet shapes.

  7. MAY

    6

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 6, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  8. MAY

    7

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Talk

    "TBA"

    Presented by Hongxi Xing, Los Alamos National Lab

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, May 7, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

  9. MAY

    8

    Friday

    Adopt-a-Platoon Fundraiser - Plant Sale

    "Plant Sale - Adopt-a-Platoon Fundraiser"

    11 am, Berkner Hall Patio

    Friday, May 8, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Joyce Fortunato

  10. MAY

    8

    Friday

    HET / Riken Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Ethan Neil, RBRC/Colorado

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-95

    Friday, May 8, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  11. MAY

    8

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Tuomas Lappi, University of Jyvaskyla

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 8, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  12. MAY

    12

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Where Did Half the Starlight in the Universe Go"

    Presented by Mark Devlin, University of Pennsylvania

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 12, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Yamin

    We believe that approximately half of all the light from stars is absorbed and reprocessed by dust. The resulting emission is grey body with a temperature near 30 Kelvin. The COBE satellite made the first measurements of the resulting Far Infrared Background (FIRB), but since that time, we have been unable to resolve the background into individual galaxies. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) was designed to do this job. Its three bands at 250, 350, and 500 microns span the peak in emission for galaxies at z=1. I will discuss the BLAST experiment and present results from our measurements of resolved and unresolved galaxies. I will also discuss the implications for star formation in our own galaxy and how dust is changing the way we look at current and future searches for primordial gravity waves with the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  13. MAY

    13

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 13, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  14. MAY

    13

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Gustavo Burdman, IAS/University of São Paulo

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, May 13, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: CheinYi Chen

  15. MAY

    14

    Thursday

    Community Advisory Council Meeting

    "Open to the Public"

    6:30 pm, Brookhaven Center

    Thursday, May 14, 2015, 6:30 pm

  16. MAY

    15

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Off-shell amplitudes and their applications"

    Presented by Piotr Kotko, Pennsylvania State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 15, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  17. MAY

    20

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 20, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  18. MAY

    21

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Piotr Warchol, Jagiellonian University

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, May 21, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

  19. MAY

    22

    Friday

    HET / Riken Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Fedor Besrukov, RBRC/Connecticut

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, May 22, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  20. MAY

    27

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  21. MAY

    28

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "LHCb Run I Results and Run II Prospects"

    Presented by Philip Ilten, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 28, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The LHCb detector is a forward arm spectrometer on the Large Hadron Collider, designed for the study of particles containing b or c quarks. A variety of recent results from the Run I dataset, taken from 2010 - 2013, will be presented, emphasizing the scope of the LHCb physics program. These areas include central exlusive production of quarkonia, exotic particle searches, precision electroweak cross-sections, CKM measurements, and more. Prospects for Run II measurements will be outlined.

  22. MAY

    29

    Friday

    HET/ATLAS JOINT LUNCH SEMINAR

    "TBA"

    Presented by Ketevi Assamagan, BNL

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, May 29, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  23. MAY

    29

    Friday

    HET

    "TBA"

    Presented by Sam McDermott, YITP

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, May 29, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  24. MAY

    31

    Sunday

    CFN Proposal Deadline

    "CFN Proposal Deadline for September-December Cycle 2015"

    11:45 pm, CFN

    Sunday, May 31, 2015, 11:45 pm

  25. JUN

    3

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 3, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  26. JUN

    5

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Novel mechanisms of charmonium suppression/enhancement in pA and AA collisions"

    Presented by Boris Kopeliovich, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 5, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  27. JUN

    10

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  28. JUN

    10

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Daedalus String Quartet"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015, 12:00 pm

  29. JUN

    10

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Wolfgang Altmannshofer, Perimeter Institute

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  30. JUN

    10

    Wednesday

    Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Ultra Fast Laser Applications for Electron Beams"

    Presented by Triveni Rao, BNL

    2:30 pm, Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015, 2:30 pm

  31. JUN

    11

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search for dark sector particles at Belle and Belle II"

    Presented by Igal Jaegle, University of Hawai`i at Mānoa

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, June 11, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The dark photon, A′,, and the dark Higgs boson, h′, are hypothetical constituents featured in a number of recently proposed Dark Sector Models. We will present a search for these particles in the so-called Higgs-strahlung channel, e+e''A′h′, with h′'A′A′. We investigated ten exclusive final-states with A′'e+e', μ+μ', or π+π', in the mass ranges 0.1 GeV/c2 <mA′<3.5 GeV/c2 and 0.2 GeV/c2 <mh′<10.5 GeV/c2. We also investigated three inclusive final-states, 2(e+e')X, 2(μ+μ')X, and (e+e')(μ+μ')X, where X denotes a dark photon candidate detected via missing mass, in the mass ranges 1.1 GeV/c2 <mA′<3.5 GeV/c2 and 2.2 GeV/c2 <mh′<10.5 GeV/c2. Using the entire 977fb'1 data set collected by Belle, we observed no significant signal. We will also discuss prospects for searches for light dark matter and the dark photon in the radiative decay process at Belle and Belle II.

  32. JUN

    17

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  33. JUN

    24

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Pianofest- I"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, June 24, 2015, 12:00 pm

  34. JUN

    26

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jacobus Verbaarschot, Stonybrook University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 26, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  35. JUL

    13

    Monday

    CMX Workshop

    "Complementary Methods in X-ray Spectroscopic, Structural, and Imaging Techniques"

    8:30 am, Stony Brook University

    Monday, July 13, 2015, 8:30 am

  36. JUL

    14

    Tuesday

    CMX Workshop

    "Complementary Methods in X-ray Spectroscopic, Structural, and Imaging Techniques"

    8:30 am, Stony Brook University

    Tuesday, July 14, 2015, 8:30 am

  37. JUL

    29

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Pianofest- II"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 12:00 pm

  38. JUL

    30

    Thursday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, July 30, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  39. JUL

    31

    Friday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Friday, July 31, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  40. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Enso String Quartet: Salonen, Sibelius"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 12:00 pm

  41. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    CFN Proposal Deadline

    "CFN Proposal Deadline for January-April Cycle 2016"

    11:45 pm, CFN

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 11:45 pm

  42. OCT

    12

    Monday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, October 12, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  43. OCT

    13

    Tuesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, October 13, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  44. OCT

    14

    Wednesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  45. OCT

    15

    Thursday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 15, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  46. OCT

    16

    Friday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, October 16, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong