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March 2015
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

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  1. No events scheduled

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  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. HET/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Building 510 SSR

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

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7

  1. Office of Educational Programs Event

    9 am, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Catherine Osiecki

  2. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    9:30 am, Stony Brook University

    Invited speakers: Dr. Nancy Goroff and Dr. Ágnes Mócsy Panelists: Nathalie Bouet, Betsy Dowd, Kathleen Flint Elm, Deena Ghoul, Arnavi Varshney,Glenda Denicolo, Marci Lobel, Jennifer McDermott, Evgeniya Rubin, Megan Russ, Eva Songcuan Speed date a Scientist: selected panelists will be available for a one on one Q&A

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10

  1. Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    8:30 am, Brookhaven Center

    Hosted by: Christina Swinson

    Open to Stony Brook and BNL early career scientists and Postdocs, CARE 2015 will focus on career development. The workshop will explore the options available to early-career scientists in addition to the traditional R&D and academic pathways. Invited speakers will describe their career paths and discuss the special requirements and planning involved in achieving their goals. An interactive session will guide participants in developing prototype Individual Development Plans (IDPs).

  2. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Colloquium

    11 am, Bldg 735, Seminar Room 2nd Floor

    Hosted by: Deyu Lu

    Solar energy is the most promising source of renewable, clean energy to replace the current reliance on fossil fuels. Ferroelectric (FE) materials have recently attracted increased attention as a candidate class of materials for use in photovoltaic devices. Their strong inversion symmetry breaking due to spontaneous polarization allows for excited carrier separation by the bulk of the material and voltages higher than the band gap (Eg), which may allow efficiencies beyond the Shockley-Queisser limit. Ferroelectric oxides are also robust and can be fabricated using low cost methods such as sol-gel thin film deposition and sputtering. Recent work has shown how a decrease in ferroelectric layer thickness and judicious engineering of domain structures and FE-electrode interfaces can dramatically increase the current harvested from FE absorber materials. Further improvements have been blocked by the wide band gaps (Eg =2.7-4 eV) of FE oxides, which allow the use of only 8-20% of the solar spectrum and drastically reduce the upper limit of photovoltaic efficiency. In this talk, I will discuss new insight into the bulk photovoltaic effect, and materials design to enhance the photovoltaic efficiency. We calculate from first principles the current arising from the "shift current" mechanism, and demonstrate that it quantitatively explains the observed current. Then, we analyze the electronic features that lead to strong photovoltaic effects. Finally, we present new oxides that are strongly polar yet have band gaps in the visible range, offering prospects for greatly enhanced bulk photovoltaic effects. Please note: If anyone would like to schedule a meeting with Dr. Rappe, please contact Deyu Lu (dlu@bnl.gov)

  3. Sustainable Energy Technologies Seminar

    2 pm, ISB 734 2nd Floor Seminar Room 201

    Hosted by: Matthew Eisaman

    The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), arising due to the collective oscillation of free electrons in metal nanoparticles, is a sensitive probe of the nanostructure and its surrounding dielectric medium. Synthetic strategies for developing surfactant free nanoparticles providing direct access to the metallic surface that harvest the localized surface plasmons will be discussed first followed by the applications. It is well known that the hot carriers generated as a result of plasmonic excitation can participate and catalyze chemical reactions. One such reaction is the dissociation of hydrogen. By the virtue of plasmonic excitation, an inert metal like Au can become reactive enough to support the dissociation of hydrogen at room temperature, thereby making it possible to optically detect this explosive gas.1 The mechanism of sensing is still not well understood. However, a potential hypothesis is that the dissociation of hydrogen may lead to the formation of a metastable gold hydride with optical properties distinct from the initial Au nanostructures, causing a reversible increase in transmission and blue shift in LSPR. It will also be shown that by tracking the LSPR of bare Au nanoparticles grown on a substrate, the adsorption of halide ions on Au can be detected exclusively. The shift in LSPR frequency is attributed to changes in electron density rather than the morphology of the nanostructures, which is often the case.

  4. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    The question of whether or not neutrinos are Majorana particles and, if so, what is their average mass remains one of the most fundamental problems in physics today. The average neutrino mass can be obtained from neutrinoless double beta decay. The inverse half-life for this process is given by the product of a phase space factor (PSF), a nuclear matrix element (NME) and whatever physics there is beyond the standard model. In this talk, the theory of double beta decay, both with and without the emission of neutrinos, will be reviewed, and recent calculations of the PSF and NME will be presented. From these and from experimental limits on the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay, one can extract limits on the neutrino mass, both for the exchange of light (mνá1keV) and heavy (mνà1GeV) neutrinos. Current limits will be discussed. Finally, the question of how many neutrino species there are will be briefly addressed, including the possibility of sterile neutrinos with masses in the intermediate range keV-GeV.

11

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, CFN, Bldg. 735, conference room A, 1st fl.

    Hosted by: Kevin Yager

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar Wednesday, March 11, 2015 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Conference Room A, 1st floor Development and Implementation of Diffraction Imaging Techniques using Coherent Beams Shashidhara Marathe, PhD This presentation describes development of two different diffraction imaging techniques using coherent beams. At first, I will elucidate the Coherent Diffraction Imaging (CDI) technique implemented in reflection geometry for surface image reconstruction. It will be shown that the reflected intensity from the sample surface, measured in the Fraunhofer region, can be used to retrieve the exit wave phase information, quantitatively, without a priori knowledge of the object [1]. For practical applications, where objected to be reconstructed is laying on a substrate, it is much more desirable to use the reflection based CDI rather than the conventional CDI in transmission mode. Efforts in developing CDI techniques using hard x-ray sources at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA, and the Pohang Light Source (PLS), South Korea, will also be discussed. Next, I will talk about development and implementation of X-ray Grating Talbot Interferometer (XGTI) at the APS, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), IL, USA. This is a tri-modal, non-destructive x-ray imaging technique which not only generates the radiograph of the object under investigation but also the differential phase and the dark-field (SAXS) images, simultaneously, from a single interferogram. In particular, I will talk about developing the single-grating x-ray Talbot Interferometer. A single-grating x-ray Talbot interferometer makes full use of the beam coherence available with synchrotron source compared to other laboratory based x-ray sources. This simplifies the setup and the alignment. Moreover, this technique is very useful for in-situ, time-resolved, measur

  2. BSA Noon Recital

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: John Trunk

  3. BSA Noon Recital

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: BSA

    Pianist Di Wu and violinist Solomiya Ivakhiv will perform in concert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory on Wednesday, March 11, at noon in Berkner Hall. Sponsored by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA), the event is free and open to the public. All visitors to the Laboratory 16 and older must bring a photo I.D.

12

  1. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    12 pm, Chemistry Building 555, 3rd Floor, Room 300

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

  2. Community Advisory Council Meeting

    6:30 pm, Berkner Hall, Room B

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16

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, CFN - Bldg. 735 Second Floor Conference Room B

    Hosted by: Charles Black

    Mixtures of salts and nanostructured block copolymers are promising solid electrolytes for rechargeable batteries with lithium metal anodes. For my doctoral research, I studied the evolution of microstructure in block copolymer/lithium salt mixtures on both nano- and micro- scales under various thermal conditions. My talk concerns the block copolymer/lithium salt mixture, polystyrene-b-polyethylene/lithium bis (trifluoromethane sulphone) imide (SEO/LiTFSI for short), primarily studied through depolarized light scattering (DPLS), to obtain the microstructural information about SEO/LiTFSI mixtures with different concentrations and molecular weights at different temperatures. The results indicated the addition of salt strongly affects the thermodynamics and kinetics of the microstructure of the mixture. We confirmed the presence of a coexistence temperature window for low molecular weight block copolymer/salt mixtures predicted by theory (the coexistence of ordered and disordered phases in equilibrium). For high molecular weight mixtures, a hypothesis has been proposed to explain the discrepancy between the results of SAXS and DPLS on identical mixtures. A high defect density increased the conductivity of block copolymer electrolytes.

  2. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Ketevi Assamagan

    The results of a search for direct pair production of the scalar partner to the top quark using an integrated luminosity of 20/fb of proton-proton collision data at 8 TeV, recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, are reported. The top squark is assumed to decay via stop -> top+LSP where LSP denotes the lightest neutralino in supersymmetric models. The search targets a fully hadronic final state in events with four or more jets and large missing transverse momentum. No significant excess over the Standard Model background prediction is observed, and exclusion limits are reported in terms of the top squark and LSP masses. In addition to the current results, prospects and plans for stop searches in the LHC Run 2 will be discussed.

17

  1. Physical Therapy

    10 am, Berkner Lobby

    Hosted by: Physical Therapy

    Dr. Gary Welch will be performing Balance screenings using the Biodex balance system. You will see how your balance compares the norms for your age group and if there is a deficit with your balance. Dr, Gary Welch will provide you with exercises and hand-outs to help improve your balance. Balance Therapy is also available at our onsite Physical therapy department. Please call extension 3328 to reserve your time. See Balance Screening flyer and posters.

  2. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Oleg Eyser

    Although the next-to-leading order NRQCD calculation can solve many puzzles of heavy quarkonium production phenomena, it can neither describe data at very high nor very low transverse momentum (pT) region. At very high pT region, a double parton fragmentation formalism was proposed recently, which can systematically reorganize the expansion and resum large logarithms; while at very low pT region, a NRQCD+CGC framework was proposed to take into account the intrinsic transverse momentum and gluon saturation effects. I will talk about these theories and their application on p+p and p+A collisions from RHIC to LHC.

  3. Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    Gravitational lensing is the bending of light as it passes massive bodies. The amount of deflection is directly related to the mass of the lensing body and the geometrical configuration of the lens-source system. Typical lens configurations involve a distant background galaxy lensed by a much closer foreground galaxy, or cluster of galaxies. The lensing effect can be used to infer the mass of the lens, both luminous and dark matter. Lensing, as a purely geometrical phenomenon has become the most important way to measure the distribution of dark matter in the universe. I will discuss measurements I have made of the dark matter distribution in galaxies and clusters of galaxies using the lensing phenomenon. These measurements, the most precise to date, are consistent with the predictions of the cold dark matter model. Dark energy has accelerated the expansion of the universe at late times, and thus alters the relationship between the observed redshift of galaxies and their true distance from us. Lensing is sensitive to this redshift-distance relationship, and thus dark energy, since the amount of light deflection depends on the relative distances of lens and source. I will discuss the Dark Energy Survey (DES), a survey of the southern sky, now ending our second year of data taking. DES surveys larger volumes of the universe, and probes farther back in time than previous lensing surveys. With DES we will establish lensing as a competitive method to study dark energy. I will discuss preliminary results from DES using galaxy clusters as lenses and distant background galaxies as sources. I will end with a discussion of the new Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) survey, of which BNL is a member. LSST is a successor of DES, now entering the construction phase. With LSST we will bring lensing to maturity as a probe of dark energy.

18

  1. Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  2. RIKEN BNL

    2 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Samuel Aronson

    Relativistic heavy ion collisions can reproduce the conditions necessary to form a hot and dense medium known as the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), the state of the universe immediately following the Big Bang, in which quarks and gluons are deconfined. Results from experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which study the properties of the QGP, will be presented. This seminar will focus on two particle correlations and jet physics results in Pb-Pb and Au-Au collisions at the LHC and RHIC respectively and the prospects for such measurements at the proposed sPHENIX detector. In addition, the implications of using p-p or p-A systems as a reference for these A-A measurements will be discussed. Jets are the result of a hard scattering, which occurs early in the collision process, and probe how partons interact and lose energy in the medium. Two particle correlations are used to study jet physics and energy loss, as well as the underlying event. The interplay between the two is important for understanding how high momentum particles lose energy and for finding where that lost energy goes. To quantify the influence of the QGP on these measurements, it is important to have a good baseline measurement. A-A measurements are typically compared to expectations based on p-p collisions. Recent results from p-A collisions are used to quantify cold nuclear matter effects not captured in p-p collisions. However, p-A measurements have proven to be interesting in their own unexpected way which has implications for physics measurements at the future Electron Ion Collider.

  3. HET/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

19

  1. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    12 pm, Chemistry Building 555, 3rd Floor, Room 300

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

  2. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    1:30 pm, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Hosted by: Tonica Valla

    Experimental and theoretical study of Cs and Eu atoms adsorption on graphene on Ir(111) will be presented [1,2]. Graphene on Ir(111) surface is an interesting system because graphene has almost pristine electronic structure in it due to its weak bonding character to iridum surface. The bonding is almost exclusively of the van der Waals type. However adding Cs or Eu atoms graphene gets doped and and nature of binding changes - especially in the case when the atoms intercalate. Density Functional Theory calculations with standard semilocal functionals (GGA) - fail to reproduce experimental findings even qualitatively. Only when the newly developed nonlocal correlation functional is used (vdW-DF) which includes van der Waals interactions, are the calculations in agreement with experiment, revelaing the mechanism of graphene delamination and relamination which is crucial for intercalation and trapping of atoms under the graphene. [1] M. Petrovic et al., Nat. Commun. 4, 2772 (2013). [2] S. Schumacher et al., Nano Lett. 13, 5013 (2013).

20

  1. English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Event

    12 pm, CAD Building 911, 2nd Floor Large Conference Room.

    Hosted by: T. Sampieri

  2. Joint NT/RIKEN Seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Collectivity in high multiplicity pp and p-Pb collisions is the most unexpected discovery at the LHC, its origin is still an open question. In heavy ion collisions, collectivity is attributed to final state effects due to the presence of a hot and dense QCD medium, and it is well described by viscous hydrodynamical calculations with fluctuating initial state geometries. Surprisingly, calculations which employ hydrodynamics reproduce qualitatively well the features of p-Pb data, but, the applicability of hydro in small systems faces conceptual problems. This is not the case of other approaches which do not require a medium to be formed and also are able to reproduce qualitatively well some features of data. In this talk it will be shown that multi-parton interactions and color reconnection (CR) produce flow-like effects in high multiplicity pp collisions. A study of the transverse momentum (pT) distribution of identified hadrons as a function of the event multiplicity will be presented. This comprises studies of the average pT vs hadron mass and number of constituent quarks, and a pT differential study using the Boltzmann-Gibbs Blast-Wave model. A comparison between hydro and color reconnection calculations will be presented. In this context, the results from the same study using LHC data (pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions) will be discussed.

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24

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, CFN - Bldg. 735 - First Floor Conference Room A

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    Silicon nanocrystals or quantum dots combine the abundance and nontoxicity of silicon with quantized and size-tunable energy band structure of quantum dots to form a new type of functional material that could find applications in biomedical fluorescence imaging, photodynamic therapy, light-emitting devices, and solar cells. Surface of silicon nanocrystals is a major concern for using them in bio-related applications. Room temperature hydrosilylation is introduced to functionalize silicon nanocrystals in darkness to minimize temperature/photon-induced side reactions which can potentially damage the capping ligands or nanocrystal surface. As a proof of concept, silicon nanocrystals are passivated with styrene at room temperature, without styrene polymerization. Silicon nanocrystals are also conjugated to iron oxide nanocrystals to generate a fluorescent/magnetic cell labeling probe. Thermally-induced thiolation is discovered to generate silicon nanocrystals passivated with silicon-sulfur bonds which are metastable and can be turn to silicon-carbon bonds through ligand exchange. The band gap and emission color of silicon nanocrystals are determined by their sizes. Monodisperse silicon nanocrystals and self-assembly of those nanocrystals are of great importance for their applications in light-emitting devices and solar cells. Silicon nanocrystals are size-selected through a modified size-selective precipitation, in which aggregation and precipitation are allowed to take place simultaneously. Face-centered cubic superlattices are assembled with size-selected silicon nanocrystals, and characterized by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering. The structure of silicon nanocrystal superlattice is found to be stable at temperature as high as 375oC. Simple hexagonal AlB2 binary superlattice is also formed with silicon and gold nanocrystals

  2. Physics Colloquium

    11 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Doon Gibbs

    From the discovery of the neutron (1932) to the first demonstration of controlled fission (1942) was just ten years; a period that took physics from an occupation of a small number of eccentric gentlemen and (even fewer) ladies to something of concern to, and funding decisions of, Governments all over the world. The shadows of those tumultuous years are still with us, for better or worse. This talk will recount those ten years through the lives of James Chadwick (1891-1974) and Lise Meitner (1878-1968), contemporaries who played pivotal roles in the events, even though, partly because of their retiring personalities, they are often over-shadowed by "larger" figures.

25

  1. HET/RIKEN seminar

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

    All matter in the Standard Model appears in three generations, with an intricate flavor structure the origin of which is not well understood. This motivates the question whether distinct phenomenological features arise if dark matter (DM) also has a non-trivial flavor structure. In this talk I will review the experimental signatures of this scenario. In the case of lepton-flavored DM, I will argue that the generation of a lepton asymmetry at a high energy scale can also produce a DM asymmetry, which can strongly affect the sensitivity of direct detection experiments, and I will present novel signatures that can appear at colliders and in indirect detection experiments. I will also review the case of top quark-flavored DM with a distinct collider phenomenology including final states of top pairs and missing energy as well the possibility of displaced decays.

  2. Brookhaven Lecture

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

    O'Connor will discuss will how the technological challenges involved in achieving the Large Synoptic Space Telescope's ambitious performance goals were met as well as proposals for a new generation of sensor technology for future astrophysical programs.

26

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10:30 am, CFN - Bldg. 735 First Floor Conference Room A

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    Rational, de novo design of RNA nanostructures can potentially integrate a wide array of structural and functional diversities. Such nanostructures have great promises in biomedical applications. Despite of impressive progress in this field, all RNA nanomotifs (tiles or building blocks) reported so far are not geometrically well-defined. They are generally flexible and can only assemble into a mixture of complexes with different sizes. To achieve defined structures, multiple tiles with different sequences are needed. In our study, we have de nova designed a RNA nanomotif that can homo-oligomerize into a uniform RNA nanostructure. We use PAGE, AFM and Cryo-EM to analyze our data. Based on this work, we further developed single stranded RNA tiles. These artificial single stranded RNA tiles can self-assemble into well-defined 1D, 2D and 3D structures. We believe that development along this line would help RNA nanotechnology to reach the structural control that currently associates with DNA nanotechnology.

  2. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    2 pm, Bldg 911B, Large Conf. Rm. Rm. A202

    Hosted by: Wolfram Fischer

    "The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a high-energy circular hadron collider designed to provide a maximum center of mass energy of 14 TeV and a peak luminosity of L = 1e34-1e35 cm'2 s'1 . The LHC 2012 RUN has shown strong coherent transverse instabilities developing at top energy (4TeV) which where causing large particle losses and in many cases also beam dumps. Coherent modes driven by the machine impedance are normally Landau damped by the use of octupole magnets which are regularly powered to ensure enough detuning with amplitude. Also beam-beam effects contribute to the detuning with amplitude and they could therefore increase or decrease the Landau damping range of frequencies depending on the spread obtained from the octupoles. The interplay between impedance, Landau octupoles and beam-beam interactions defines the stability limits of the accelerator that can be evaluated by the so called stability diagrams. In the tune spread analysis there is no information on possible mechanisms which modify the particle distribution, second fundamental ingredient of the Landau damping. Therefore it is fundamental to explore experimentally, through Beam Transfer Function measurements, and with simulations the effects of different distributions to the stability diagrams. The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) projects aims to extend the LHC discovery potential and it is designed to operate with beams of much higher brightness resulting in much stronger beam-beam interactions. Landau damping properties for this scenario are also presented."

  3. Particle Physics Seminar

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worcester

    The NOvA experiment is a long base-line accelerator based neutrino oscillation experiment. It uses the upgraded NuMI beam from Fermilab and measures electron neutrino appearance and muon neutrino disappearance at its far detector in Ash River, Minnesota. Goals of the experiment include measurements of theta13, mass hierarchy and the CP violating phase. NOvA has begun to take neutrino data and first neutrino candidates are observed in its far detector. This talk provides an introduction to the scientific reach of the experiment, the detector construction and the nue appearance analysis, as well as the first data in near and far detectors.

27

  1. HET/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  2. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    4 pm, Bldg 911B, Large Conf. Rm. Rm. A202

    "The AGS provides a polarized proton beam to RHIC. The beam is accelerated in the AGS from Gγ = 4.5 to Gγ = 45.5 and the polarization transmission is critical to the RHIC spin program. In the recent years, various systems were implemented to improve the AGS polarization transmission. These upgrades include the double partial snakes configuration and the tune jumps system. However, 100 % polarization transmission through the AGS acceleration cycle is not yet reached. Understanding the sources of depolarization in the AGS is critical to improve the AGS polarized proton performances. The complexity of beam and spin dynamics, which is in part due to the specialized Siberian snake magnets, drove a strong interest for original methods of simulations. For that, the Zgoubi code, capable of direct particle and spin tracking through field maps, was used to model the AGS. The Zgoubi model of the AGS will be introduced and recent results obtained through multiturn tracking will be shown. Selected example will highlight the relevance of the Zgoubi simulations to improve the polarization transmission in the AGS."

28

  1. Office of Educational Programs Event

    9 am, Science Learning Center

    Hosted by: Susan Frank

29

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30

  1. Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room, Building 480

    Hosted by: Yimei Zhu

    I will give an overview of the metacapacitors project, an ARPA-E sponsored project that aims to improve efficiency, functionality and form factor of off-line power converters suitable for LED solid-state lighting, with a view to developing an attractive technology platform for load management and power conversion across a broad range of applications. Based on integrated switched-capacitor (SC) topologies, the project adopts an integrated approach from materials to devices to circuits. We designed capacitors based on high-dielectric nanocrystals, that can be prepared using high throughput microfabrication/nanotechnology techniques, ink deposition and multilayering. The capacitor dielectric, a nanocomposite composed of (Ba,Sr)TiO3 nanocrystals in polyfurfuryl alcohol (BST/PFA, _ > 20 , 100Hz - 1 MHz , loss < 0:01 , 20 kHz ), targets a high volumetric capacitance density and ripple current capability. The capacitors were board-integrated with a custom hybrid-switched-capacitor resonant (HSCR) DC-DC converter, tested and demonstrated to operate with high efficiency. The methodology for preparing the capacitor dielectric films relies on a novel method to prepare complex oxides, followed by evaporatively driven self-assembly into thin films. I'll review rational synthetic design, multigram scaling, and dispersion formulation design, as well as recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of novel multiferroic and ferroelectric complex oxides. STEPHEN O'BRIEN is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at City College New York and a member of the CUNY Energy Institute. He holds appointments on the Doctoral Faculty of the CUNY Graduate Center and Grove School of Engineering. Steve is a researcher in nanomaterials synthesis, properties and structural characterization: nanoparticle synthesis and self-assembly into superlattices, transition metal oxide nanomaterials, high k dielectrics/memory materials. He is published in over

  2. Joint Department Seminar: Biological, Environmental and Climate Sciences & Sustainable Energy Technologies

    11 am, Bldgh. 734, Room 201

    Hosted by: J. P. Looney

    Pacific Gas and Electric has piloted the use of 6MWs of Sodium Sulfur batteries on their distribution system. These projects have tested the bulk system use of energy storage on a variety of applications including renewable smoothing, load shifting, local islanding and frequency regulation. In the case of the frequency regulation the projects are the first energy storage device to participate in the California Independent System Operator (CAISO).

  3. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    4 pm, Bldg 911B, Large Conf. Rm. Rm.A202

    Hosted by: John Skaritka

    "In this talk, I will present a description of high-power fiber lasers and beam shaping systems that have been used to achieve low emittance and record high beam current in the Cornell energy recovery LINAC injector. Design, limitation, as well as power scaling of fiber lasers for the future accelerators will be discussed. "

31

  1. MAR

    31

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 31, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    Current nuclear powerplants use almost exclusively highly pressurized water as reactor coolant and heat transfer medium. This limits their operation to relatively low temperatures. Molten alkali-halide salts allow low pressure operation at high temperatures, improving thermal efficiency and operational safety. The talk will cover the history of molten salt reactor development, reasons for the renewed interest, and focus on recent developments of molten salt nuclear technologies in the U.S. and abroad.

  2. MAR

    31

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 31, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    Hot Jupiters, a class of exoplanets orbiting in the proximity of their parent stars, are subjected to a strong irradiating flux that governs their radiative and dynamical properties. It is a regime which is not observed in the giant planets of our solar system. In this talk, I will describe current efforts to understand their radiative and dynamical properties, characterize their atmospheres by means of a variety of techniques, study the interaction of their fast, weakly ionized winds with the planetary magnetic field, and shed light on an evolutionary puzzle known as the problem of inflated radii.

  1. MAR

    31

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Molten salt: towards the next generation of nuclear energy"

    Presented by Dr. Ondrej Chvala, University of Tennessee

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 31, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    Current nuclear powerplants use almost exclusively highly pressurized water as reactor coolant and heat transfer medium. This limits their operation to relatively low temperatures. Molten alkali-halide salts allow low pressure operation at high temperatures, improving thermal efficiency and operational safety. The talk will cover the history of molten salt reactor development, reasons for the renewed interest, and focus on recent developments of molten salt nuclear technologies in the U.S. and abroad.

  2. MAR

    31

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Hot Jupiters: astrophysical laboratories for extreme weather"

    Presented by Rosalba Perna, Stony Brook University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 31, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    Hot Jupiters, a class of exoplanets orbiting in the proximity of their parent stars, are subjected to a strong irradiating flux that governs their radiative and dynamical properties. It is a regime which is not observed in the giant planets of our solar system. In this talk, I will describe current efforts to understand their radiative and dynamical properties, characterize their atmospheres by means of a variety of techniques, study the interaction of their fast, weakly ionized winds with the planetary magnetic field, and shed light on an evolutionary puzzle known as the problem of inflated radii.

  3. APR

    1

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, April 1, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  4. APR

    1

    Wednesday

    HET Seminar

    "A Global Approach to Top-quark FCNCs"

    Presented by Gauthier Durieux, Cornell University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 1, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chien-Yi Chen

  5. APR

    2

    Thursday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Reconstruction of Hilical Bio-Structure Using X-ray Diffraction Experiment"

    Presented by Dr. Miraj Uddin, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Physics Department

    9:45 am, CFN Bldg. 735 - Second Floor Conference Room B

    Thursday, April 2, 2015, 9:45 am

    Hosted by: Kevin Yager

    Recovery of three-dimensional structure from single particle X-ray scattering of completely randomly oriented diffraction patterns as predicted few decades back has been real due to advent of the new emerging XFEL (X-ray free electron laser) technology. Some of the best-known structure determination of helical objects such as helical viruses or deoxyribonucleic acid has been done by fiber diffraction. Layer line intensities of fiber diffraction pattern as expressed by cylindrical harmonics can be transformed into equivalent spherical harmonic expansion leaving the clue behind that structure of helical objects may be recovered from single particle scattering of randomly oriented helical molecules thus avoiding the tedious challenge of single axis alignment. In this work we have solved the structure of TMV (tobacco mosaic virus) helices from a set of randomly oriented simulated diffraction patterns exploiting symmetry and internal constraint of the diffraction volume thus proving the above claim on step ahead. As the world's first XFEL is in operation starting from June 2009 at SLAC National Lab at Stanford, the very first few experiments being conducted on larger objects such as viruses. We have analyzed a set of experimental diffraction patterns of chlorella virus deposited on cxidb.org and recovered a quadratic coefficients of Fourier shell correlation whose angular momentum selection rule proves that the collected data is primarily from an icosahedral object.

  6. APR

    2

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Unpolarized Heavy Nucleus"

    Presented by Matt Sievert, BNL

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, April 2, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    The next-generation Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) will make high precision measurements of spin-dependent observables at high energies on nuclear targets. This unique nuclear physics laboratory will bring together access to the multitude of spin-spin and spin-orbit structures which can exist in hadronic targets, and the high color-charge densities which generate the most intense gluon fields permitted by quantum mechanics. The interplay between those two features gives rise to new physical mechanisms which translate these spin-orbit structures into the observed cross-sections, and it makes these mechanisms amenable to first-principles calculation. In this talk, I will discuss the spin-orbit structure of quarks within an unpolarized heavy nucleus in the quasi-classical approximation. The possibility of polarized nucleons with orbital motion inside the unpolarized nucleus generates nontrivial mixing between the spin-orbit structures of the nucleons, and the corresponding structures in the nucleus. This generic feature of a dense quasi-classical system leads to direct predictions testable at an EIC, and in principle allows direct access to the orbital angular momentum in the nucleus.

  7. APR

    2

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Neutrino Oscillations with IceCube"

    Presented by Tyce DeYoung, Michigan State University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 2, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worcester

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is the world's largest neutrino detector. Although designed to detect TeV " PeV scale neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators, IceCube's DeepCore infill array permits searches for dark matter and measurements of neutrino oscillations in the 10-100 GeV range. The most recent measurements of muon neutrino disappearance with IceCube DeepCore will be presented, and prospects for future neutrino physics measurements with IceCube and the proposed PINGU array will be discussed

  8. APR

    3

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Measurement of the pion polarizability at COMPASS"

    Presented by Jan Friedrich, Technische Universität München, Germany

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 3, 2015, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    For more than a decade, the COMPASS experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has been tackling the measurement of the electromagnetic polarizability of the charged pion, which describes the stiffness of the pion against deformation in electromagnetic fields. Previous experiments date back to the 1980's in Serpukhov (Russia), where the Primakoff method to study charged-pion interactions with quasi-real photons was first employed. Later also other techniques in photon-nucleon and photon-photon collisions were carried out at different machines. The COMPASS measurement demonstrates that the charged-pion polarizability is significantly smaller than the previous dedicated measurements, roughly by a factor two, with the smallest uncertainties realized so far. The pion polarisability is of fundamental interest in the low-energy sector of quantum chromodynamics. It is directly linked to the quark-gluon substructure and its dynamics in the lightest bound system of strong interaction.

  9. APR

    3

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Gravitational collapse, holography and hydrodynamics in extreme conditions"

    Presented by Paul Chesler, Harvard University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 3, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    A remarkable observation from RHIC and the LHC is that the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy-ion collisions behaves as a strongly coupled and nearly ideal liquid. Data also suggests that the debris produced by proton-nucleus collisions can also behave as a liquid. Understanding the dynamics responsible for the rapid equilibration of such tiny droplets is an outstanding problem. In recent years holography has emerged as a powerful tool to study non-equilibrium phenomena, mapping challenging quantum dynamics onto the classical dynamics of gravitational fields in one higher dimension. In the dual gravitational description the process of quark-gluon plasma formation and equilibration maps onto the process of gravitational collapse and black hole formation. I will describe how one can apply techniques and lessons learned from numerical relativity to holography and present recent work on holographic models of high energy collisions and the applicability of hydrodynamics to tiny droplets of quark-gluon plasma.

  10. APR

    7

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "New Studies of Elastic Nucleon Form Factors"

    Presented by Dr. Seamus Riordan, Stony Brook University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    The electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon provide experimental access to the underlying charge and magnetic moment distributions arranged by the strong nuclear force. These form factors provide excellent testing grounds for QCD and QCD-inspired models and are fundamentally important in understanding non-perturbative strong force physics. By studying them over a broad range of momentum transfers, they provide insight into the underlying mechanisms relevant to the generation of nucleon structure. At low Q2 there is presently a controversy regarding the charge radius measurements of the proton. At high Q2, scaling of the form factors are presently being studied in the context of a transition from soft QCD interactions. In this talk I will provide an overview of our present experimental of elastic nucleon form factors, review their context within current theoretical models, discuss upcoming future measurements at Jefferson Lab, in particular the Super Bigbite program.

  11. APR

    7

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Proton and the Future of Particle Physics"

    Presented by Richard Hill, Univ. Chicago

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Petrecky

    The venerable proton continues to play a central role in fundamental particle physics. Neutrinos scatter from protons in neutrino oscillation experiments, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are expected to scatter from protons in dark matter searches, and electrons or muons are bound by protons in precision atomic spectroscopy. Our understanding of the proton is an obstacle to the success of next generation experiments hoping to discover CP violation in the lepton sector and determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, discover the particle nature of dark matter, or reveal new interactions such as those that violate lepton universality. In this talk I present (i) an overview of the current state of knowledge in the neutrino sector, and theoretical advances that will determine a crucial missing ingredient in the predicted signal process of neutrino-nucleus scattering at a Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (ii) the first complete calculation of the scattering cross section of a proton on a static electroweak source, which determines WIMP-nucleus scattering rates at underground direct detection experiments and (iii) the status of the proton radius puzzle, whose most "mundane" resolution requires a 5 standard deviation shift in the value of the Rydberg constant. I describe how each of these problems has spurred the development of powerful new methods in effective quantum field theory.

  12. APR

    7

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  13. APR

    8

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Tongyan Lin, University of Chicago

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 8, 2015, 2:00 pm

  14. APR

    9

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Yuji Hirono, Stony Brook

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, April 9, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

  15. APR

    10

    Friday

    HET Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Michael Savastio, Cornell

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-95

    Friday, April 10, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  16. APR

    10

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Hydrodynamics Beyond the Gradient Expansion: Resurgence and Resummation"

    Presented by Michael Heller, Perimeter Institute

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 10, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Consistent formulations of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics involve short lived modes, leading to asymptotic rather than convergent gradient expansions. In this talk I will consider the Mueller-Israel-Stewart theory applied to a longitudinally expanding quark-gluon plasma system and identify hydrodynamics as a universal attractor without invoking the gradient expansion. I will give strong evidence for the existence of this attractor and then show that it can be recovered from the divergent gradient expansion by Borel summation. This requires careful accounting for the short-lived modes which leads to an intricate mathematical structure known from the theory of resurgence.

  17. APR

    14

    Tuesday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Colloquium

    "The bulk photovoltaic effect in polar oxides for robust and efficient solar energy harvesting"

    Presented by Boris I. Yakobson, Rice University, Houston, Texas, USA

    11 am, Bldg 735, CFN 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Tuesday, April 14, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Dimitri Zakharov

    Connecting the underlying chemical processes with the growth and emergent form remains unsurmountable problem in life sciences [1]. In materials research, the current outlook is more optimistic: establishing such connection, from the basic interatomic forces to growing nanostructure shape and properties becomes a real possibility. We will discuss several important examples, focusing on two recent results. First one concerns the nanotubes, where it took two decades to derive a kinetic formula [2] R ~ sin x (growth rate R, helical angle x). Further analysis of the subtle balance between the kinetic and thermodynamic views reveals sharply peaked abundance distribution A ~ x exp (-x) [3]. This explains the puzzling (n, n-1) types observed in many experiments. In the second example, a combination of DFT and Monte Carlo models explains the low symmetry shapes of graphene on substrates. In equilibrium, edge energy variation dE manifests in slightly distorted hexagons. In growth, it enters as ~exp(-dE/kT), amplifying the symmetry breaking to triangle, ribbon, rhomb [4]. Third example concerns 2D materials of more complex chemistry, h-BN and MX2 among them, and how their defects, dislocations and grain boundaries, predicted from the first principles, find remarkable experimental confirmations [5]. [1] On Growth and Form, by D'Arcy W. Thompson (Cambridge U, 1917). [2] F. Ding et al. PNAS 106, 2506 (2009); R. Rao et al. Nature Mater. 11, 213 (2012). [3] V. Artyukhov - E. Penev et al. Nature Comm. 5, 489 (2014). [4] Y. Liu et al. PRL 105, 235502 (2010); V. Artyukhov et al. PNAS 109, 15136 (2012); Y. Hao et al. Science, 342, 720 (2013); V. Artyukhov et al. PRL 114, 115502 (2015). [5] X. Zou, et al. Nano Lett., 13, 253 (2013); S. Najmaei et al. Nature Materials, 12, 754 (2013); A. Aziz et al. Nature Comm., 5, 4867 (2014). *** Boris I. Yakobson is an expert in theory and computational modeling of materials na

  18. APR

    15

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, April 15, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  19. APR

    15

    Wednesday

    High-Energy Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "CKM physics with lattice QCD"

    Presented by Aida El-Khadra, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 15, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chris Kelly

  20. APR

    16

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Yuji Hirono, Stony Brook

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, April 16, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

  21. APR

    16

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Cosmology with Strong Gravitational Lenses"

    Presented by Phil Marshall, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 16, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Anze Slosar

    Strong gravitational lenses have become an important astronomical tool: they allow us to make accurate measurements of galaxy masses, they provide a magnified view of the distant universe, and they allow us to constrain cosmological parameters. In particular, the time delays in multiply-imaged quasar systems enable measurements of distance in the Universe each with around 5% precision. I will present our recent measurement of time delay distance in two galaxy-scale lens systems. For us to realize the potential of this cosmological probe, we need to increase the size of our lens sample, and continue to improve the accuracy of its analysis. I will discuss the potential of LSST to provide a sample of several hundred lensed quasars with well-measured time delays that would enable competitive and complementary constraints on Dark Energy, and describe our ongoing investigations of how to find lenses, infer their time delays and model their mass distributions accurately, and account for weak lensing effects from external mass structures.

  22. APR

    17

    Friday

    HET/ATLAS JOINT LUNCH SEMINAR

    "TBA"

    Presented by Ketevi Assamagan, BNL

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, April 17, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  23. APR

    21

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Neutrinos and friends in the past and present universe"

    Presented by Alex Kusenko, UCLA

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 21, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    Neutrinos play a role in various aspects of cosmology, including production of light elements, and the rate of expansion of the universe. Furthermore, the neutrino masses imply the likely existence of right-handed neutrinos, which can exist in the form of dark matter, and which can explain the matterantimatter asymmetry of the universe. I will discuss the many faces ordinary and hypothetical neutrinos in cosmology.

  24. APR

    22

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, April 22, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  25. APR

    22

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Stony Brook Opera: Lucia di Lammermoor"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, April 22, 2015, 12:00 pm

  26. APR

    22

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Implications of Cosmological Observations for History of Early Universe"

    Presented by Ghazal Geshnizjani, University of Waterloo/ Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 22, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    I will argue that any theory of early universe that matches cosmological observations should include a phase of accelerated expansion (i.e. inflation) or it has to break at least one of the following tenets of classical general relativity: Null Energy Conditions (NEC), sub-luminal signal propagation, or sub-Planckian energy densities. This proof extends to a large class of theories with higher (spatial) derivative or non-local terms in the action as well. Interestingly, only theories in the neighbourhood of Lifshitz points with ω ∝ k^0 and k^3 are excluded from the proof. I will also discuss in what sense detecting primordial gravitational waves is a smoking gun for inflation.

  27. APR

    23

    Thursday

    Brookhaven Women In Science (BWIS) Event

    "Chasman Scholarship Reception"

    12 pm, Physics Seminar Lounge Bldg. 510B

    Thursday, April 23, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Brookhaven Women in Science (BWIS) is presenting the 2015 Renate W. Chasman Scholarship to Kristine Horvat Thursday, April 23, from 12:00 to 1:00 pm in the Physics Seminar Lounge, Bldg. 510B. Named after Renate Chasman, a renowned physicist who worked at Brookhaven, the $1,000 scholarship is awarded each year to a woman are are undergraduate seniors or gradate students doing research at BNL in the STEM disciplines (e in science, engineering, or mathematics. Refreshments will be served at the reception.

  28. APR

    23

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "(Real) Early Universe Cosmology with Quark Gluon Plasma"

    Presented by Niayesh Afshordi, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 23, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    An intriguing possibility that can address pathologies in both early universe cosmology (i.e. the horizon problem) and quantum gravity (i.e. non-renormalizability), is that particles at very high energies and/or temperatures could propagate arbitrarily fast. In this talk, I introduce Thermal Tachyacoustic Cosmology (TTC), i.e. this scenario with thermal initial conditions. We find that a phase transition in the early universe, around the scale of Grand Unified Theories (GUT scale; T∼10^{15} GeV), during which the speed of sound drops by several orders of magnitude within a Hubble time, can fit current CMB observations. However, I will then argue that cosmological bounds on the density of primordial black holes suggest that Lorentz invariance in the primordial thermal plasma may not recover until much lower temperatures, close to the QCD phase transition. This presents the exciting possibility of testing this scenario in the thermal plasma produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  29. APR

    24

    Friday

    HET/BNL Lunch Time Talk

    "TBA"

    Presented by Bhupal Dev, Manchester

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, April 24, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  30. APR

    24

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Heavy Hadrons under Extreme Conditions"

    Presented by Laura Tolos, Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (IEEC-CSIC)

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 24, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Hadrons under extreme conditions of density and temperature have captured the interest of particle and nuclear physicists as well as astrophysicists over the years in connection with an extensive variety of physical phenomena in the laboratory as well as in the interior of stellar objects, such as neutron stars. One of the physics goals is to understand the origin of hadron masses in the context of the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at low energies in the non-perturbative regime and to analyze the change of the hadron masses due to partial restoration of this symmetry under extreme conditions. Lately other proper QCD symmetries have also become a matter of high interest, such as heavy-quark flavor and spin symmetries. These symmetries appear when the quark masses become larger than the typical confinement scale and they are crucial for characterizing hadrons with heavy degrees of freedom. In this talk I will address the properties of heavy hadrons under extreme conditions based on effective theories that incorporate the most appropriate scales and symmetries of QCD in each case. With the on-going and upcoming research facilities, the aim is to move from the light-quark to the heavy-quark sector and to face new challenges where heavy hadrons and new QCD symmetries will play a dominant role.

  31. APR

    28

    Tuesday

    BSA Distinguished Lecture

    "Topic: Climate Change"

    Presented by Gavin Schmidt, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Tuesday, April 28, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Wanderer

  32. APR

    29

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  33. MAY

    1

    Friday

    HET Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Michael Geller, Technion

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, May 1, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  34. MAY

    1

    Friday

    Nuclear Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Ivan Vitev, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 1, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  35. MAY

    5

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, May 5, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  36. MAY

    6

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 6, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  37. MAY

    7

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Talk

    "TBA"

    Presented by Hongxi Xing, Los Alamos National Lab

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, May 7, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

  38. MAY

    8

    Friday

    HET / Riken Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Ethan Neil, RBRC/Colorado

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-95

    Friday, May 8, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  39. MAY

    12

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Where Did Half the Starlight in the Universe Go"

    Presented by Mark Devlin, University of Pennsylvania

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 12, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    We believe that approximately half of all the light from stars is absorbed and reprocessed by dust. The resulting emission is grey body with a temperature near 30 Kelvin. The COBE satellite made the first measurements of the resulting Far Infrared Background (FIRB), but since that time, we have been unable to resolve the background into individual galaxies. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) was designed to do this job. Its three bands at 250, 350, and 500 microns span the peak in emission for galaxies at z=1. I will discuss the BLAST experiment and present results from our measurements of resolved and unresolved galaxies. I will also discuss the implications for star formation in our own galaxy and how dust is changing the way we look at current and future searches for primordial gravity waves with the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  40. MAY

    13

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 13, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  41. MAY

    13

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Gustavo Burdman, IAS/University of São Paulo

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, May 13, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: CheinYi Chen

  42. MAY

    19

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, May 19, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  43. MAY

    20

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 20, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  44. MAY

    22

    Friday

    HET / Riken Lunch Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Fedor Besrukov, RBRC/Connecticut

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, May 22, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  45. MAY

    27

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  46. MAY

    29

    Friday

    HET

    "TBA"

    Presented by Sam McDermott, YITP

    12 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Friday, May 29, 2015, 12:00 pm

    Hosted by: Amarjit Soni

  47. MAY

    31

    Sunday

    CFN Proposal Deadline

    "CFN Proposal Deadline for September-December Cycle 2015"

    11:45 pm, CFN

    Sunday, May 31, 2015, 11:45 pm

  48. JUN

    2

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, June 2, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  49. JUN

    3

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 3, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  50. JUN

    10

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  51. JUN

    10

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Daedalus String Quartet"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, June 10, 2015, 12:00 pm

  52. JUN

    16

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, June 16, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  53. JUN

    17

    Wednesday

    Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup Event

    "Hospitality Coffee & Playgroup"

    10 am, Recreation Hall, Bldg. 317

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015, 10:00 am

    Play group will sometimes schedule different types of play dates at various venues. To see the schedule and join, please use https://www.facebook.com/groups/241354149387588/#!/groups/241354149387588/ and open 'BNL Spouses and Kids' and sign in. You do need an established Facebook account in order to do so.

  54. JUN

    24

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Pianofest- I"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, June 24, 2015, 12:00 pm

  55. JUL

    7

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, July 7, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  56. JUL

    13

    Monday

    CMX Workshop

    "Complementary Methods in X-ray Spectroscopic, Structural, and Imaging Techniques"

    8:30 am, Stony Brook University

    Monday, July 13, 2015, 8:30 am

  57. JUL

    14

    Tuesday

    CMX Workshop

    "Complementary Methods in X-ray Spectroscopic, Structural, and Imaging Techniques"

    8:30 am, Stony Brook University

    Tuesday, July 14, 2015, 8:30 am

  58. JUL

    21

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, July 21, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  59. JUL

    29

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Pianofest- II"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 12:00 pm

  60. JUL

    30

    Thursday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Thursday, July 30, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  61. JUL

    31

    Friday

    Colloquium

    "Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS XII)"

    8 am, Berkner Hall, Room B

    Friday, July 31, 2015, 8:00 am

    Hosted by: Ernie Lewis

  62. AUG

    4

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, August 4, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  63. AUG

    18

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, August 18, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  64. SEP

    1

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, September 1, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  65. SEP

    15

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, September 15, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  66. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    BSA Noon Recital

    "Enso String Quartet: Salonen, Sibelius"

    12 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 12:00 pm

  67. SEP

    30

    Wednesday

    CFN Proposal Deadline

    "CFN Proposal Deadline for January-April Cycle 2016"

    11:45 pm, CFN

    Wednesday, September 30, 2015, 11:45 pm

  68. OCT

    6

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, October 6, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  69. OCT

    12

    Monday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, October 12, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  70. OCT

    13

    Tuesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Tuesday, October 13, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  71. OCT

    14

    Wednesday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 14, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  72. OCT

    15

    Thursday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 15, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  73. OCT

    16

    Friday

    Workshop

    "HEPIX"

    9 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, October 16, 2015, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: Tony Wong

  74. OCT

    20

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, October 20, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  75. NOV

    3

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, November 3, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  76. NOV

    17

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, November 17, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  77. DEC

    1

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Tuesday, December 1, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club

  78. DEC

    15

    Tuesday

    Toastmasters meeting

    "PublicSpeaking and Communication Skills"

    5:45 pm, room 160, Building 463

    Tuesday, December 15, 2015, 5:45 pm

    Hosted by: BNL Toastmasters club