BNL Home
  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • DUNE

    After a rush to start up the first large prototype detector, stellar results show the technology for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment is ready to shine. Photo by CERN

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

The nuclear theory group conducts research in all areas of QCD, including structure of hadrons and nuclei at high energies, the QCD phase diagram and the properties of quark-gluon matter.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Nuclear and Particle Physics Software

Participates in experiments across BNL's nuclear and particle physics programs, providing software and expertise with a particular emphasis on common software solutions.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Belle II

An experiment at Japan’s SuperKEKB particle accelerator recording decay products from electron-positron collisisons. Brookhaven hosts a copy of the raw data and an archive of the detector’s conditions at the time of collision.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

Short-Baseline Neutrino Program

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

PROSPECT

Precision measurement of reactor antineutrino spectrum in searching for new oscillation signatures of neutrinos.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. NOV

    26

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "A High Energy High-Luminosity Electron-Positron Collider using Energy Recovery Linacs"

    Presented by Thomas Roser, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, November 26, 2019, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Dmitri Denisov / George Redlinger

    I will present an alternative approach for a high-energy high-luminosity electron-positron collider. Present designs for high-energy electron-positron colliders are either based on two storage rings with 100 km circumference with a maximum CM energy of 365 GeV or two large linear accelerators with a high energy reach but lower luminosity, especially at the lower initial CM energies. A collider based on storage rings has a high electric power consumption required to compensate for the beam energy losses from the 100 MW of synchrotron radiation power. Using an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) located in the same-size 100 km tunnel would greatly reduce the beam energy losses while providing higher luminosity in this high-energy collider. Furthermore, this approach could allow for colliding fully polarized electron and positron beams and for extending the CM energy to 600 GeV, which would enable double-Higgs production and the production and measurements of the top Yukawa coupling.

  2. DEC

    2

    Monday

    Special Physics Colloquium

    "FCC-ee at CERN: High Precision and High Luminosity at the Electroweak Scale"

    Presented by Alain Blondel, CERN and University of Geneva

    11 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, December 2, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: George Redlinger

    The discovery of the Higgs boson competed the Standard model. Particle physics enters a new era, in which new phenomena are required, but at unknown energy scale and coupling strength. This requires a broad program of searches. The broadest program is offered by the Future Circular Collider (FCC) project at CERN, with a ultimate goal of reaching > 100 TeV in pp collisions. The first step of this program is a circular e+e- collider, offering unprecedented levels or precision and sensitivity to feebly coupled particles.

  3. DEC

    3

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The First Stage of the International Linear Collider"

    Presented by James Brau, University of Oregon

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, December 3, 2019, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: George Redlinger

    The International Linear Collider is now proposed to begin with a first stage at 250 GeV with an initial integrated luminosity goal of 2 ab−1. I will review the plan for the collider and detectors, the key physics expectations, and recent international discussions. The key physics goal of the ILC250 is precision measurements of the Higgs boson couplings. The exceptional precision of model-independent measurements of all major decay modes makes this program sensitive to possible anomalies due to new physics beyond the Standard Model. Other physics goals will be addressed briefly. The ILC250 infrastructure will support an upgrade future of experiments with e+e− collisions at higher energy up to 1 TeV, building on the success of the first 250 GeV stage.

  4. JAN

    14

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Helio

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, January 14, 2020, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: George Redlinger

  5. MAR

    10

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Tae Min Hong, University of Pittsburgh

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 10, 2020, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: George Redlinger

  6. MAR

    24

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Francesco Forti, INFN

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 24, 2020, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Dmitri Denisov

  1. FEB

    12

    Wednesday

    High Energy / Nuclear Theory / RIKEN Seminars

    "TBA"

    Presented by Graham White, TRIUMF

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, February 12, 2020, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

  1. NOV

    21

    Today

    Particle Physics Seminar

    Presented by Stefano Zambito, Harvard University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 21, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Viviana Cavaliere

    "After the discovery of the Higgs Boson, the predictions of the Standard Model of particle physics can be extrapolated without inconsistencies all the way up to the Planck mass. Despite this tremendous success, we still remain in the dark about many open puzzles. Why is the weak interaction much stronger than gravity? What is the nature of Dark Matter? Are the strong, weak and electromagnetic forces a lower-energy manifestation of one single fundamental interaction? A possible solution to these questions is provided by Supersymmetry. The key assumption behind many natural supersymmetric models is that the masses of the gluinos, the top squarks and the higgsinos are near the TeV scale, thus within the LHC reach. In this presentation, I will introduce some of the theoretical and phenomenological arguments that motivate the quest for Supersymmetry. I will then outline how I searched for the above-mentioned particles using LHC Run-2 data collected by the ATLAS experiment. Finally, I will focus on my vision of the future and my research plans in high-energy experimental physics."

  2. NOV

    26

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "A High Energy High-Luminosity Electron-Positron Collider using Energy Recovery Linacs"

    Presented by Thomas Roser, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, November 26, 2019, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Dmitri Denisov / George Redlinger

    I will present an alternative approach for a high-energy high-luminosity electron-positron collider. Present designs for high-energy electron-positron colliders are either based on two storage rings with 100 km circumference with a maximum CM energy of 365 GeV or two large linear accelerators with a high energy reach but lower luminosity, especially at the lower initial CM energies. A collider based on storage rings has a high electric power consumption required to compensate for the beam energy losses from the 100 MW of synchrotron radiation power. Using an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) located in the same-size 100 km tunnel would greatly reduce the beam energy losses while providing higher luminosity in this high-energy collider. Furthermore, this approach could allow for colliding fully polarized electron and positron beams and for extending the CM energy to 600 GeV, which would enable double-Higgs production and the production and measurements of the top Yukawa coupling.

  3. DEC

    2

    Monday

    Special Physics Colloquium

    "FCC-ee at CERN: High Precision and High Luminosity at the Electroweak Scale"

    Presented by Alain Blondel, CERN and University of Geneva

    11 am, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, December 2, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: George Redlinger

    The discovery of the Higgs boson competed the Standard model. Particle physics enters a new era, in which new phenomena are required, but at unknown energy scale and coupling strength. This requires a broad program of searches. The broadest program is offered by the Future Circular Collider (FCC) project at CERN, with a ultimate goal of reaching > 100 TeV in pp collisions. The first step of this program is a circular e+e- collider, offering unprecedented levels or precision and sensitivity to feebly coupled particles.

  4. DEC

    5

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "A New Paradigm for Dark Matter Search at the LHC"

    Presented by Yangyang Cheng, Cornell University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, December 5, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi Assamagan

    The existence of dark matter (DM), through astrophysical and cosmological observations, presents some of the most striking evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model. Stringent limits have been placed on DM as a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) from direct and indirection detection as well as collider experiments. If instead of one type of DM particle, nature contains a complex dark sector, the new hidden particles can evade existing DM limits and most direct detection experiments, but may be produced at high-energy colliders like the LHC. Many dark sector models predict long-lived particles with striking collider signature, opening an exciting new paradigm for dark matter search. This talk overviews the landscape for dark matter search, and introduces the physics motivation for a complex dark sector with long-lived particles. It then describes two types of signature-driven dark sector searches at the CMS experiment, for a dark shower and for displaced lepton jets. Finally, the talk discusses prospects for dark sector searches at the High-Luminosity LHC with detector and trigger upgrades, in particular how the new forward detectors and enhanced timing capabilities can reach new phase spaces and sensitivities.

  5. FEB

    12

    Wednesday

    High Energy / Nuclear Theory / RIKEN Seminars

    "TBA"

    Presented by Graham White, TRIUMF

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, February 12, 2020, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski