BNL Home
  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Neutrinos

    LBNE and the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiments seek to understand the subtle oscillations of neutrinos, ghost-like particles formed in the heart of stars

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

The nuclear theory group conducts research in all areas of QCD, including structure of hadrons and nuclei at high energies, the QCD phase diagram and the properties of quark-gluon matter.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Physics Application

Develops physics applications software for the LHC ATLAS experiment.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

BOSS studies dark energy—the force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

MicroBooNE

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

Mu2e

Experiment which directly probes the Intensity Frontier and aids research on the Energy and Cosmic frontiers with precision measurements to characterize properties of new particles.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. NOV

    14

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Christoph Lehner, BNL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, November 14, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Rob Pisarski''

  1. SEP

    29

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "QCD on a small circle"

    Presented by Aleksey Cherman, University of Washington

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 29, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    Recent developments have shown that QCD-like theories can be engineered to remain in a confined phase when compactified on an arbitrarily small circle, where their features may be studied quantitatively in a controlled fashion. I'll explain how a non-perturbative mass gap and chiral symmetry breaking, which are both historically viewed as prototypical strong coupling effects, appear from systematic weak-coupling calculations. Then I'll describe the rich spectrum of hadronic states, including glueball, meson, and baryon resonances in the calculable small-circle context.

  1. SEP

    28

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Beauty and charm decays and physics beyond the Standard Model: an experimentalist perspective"

    Presented by Marina Artuso, Syracuse University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 28, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Alessandro Tricoli'

    The Standard Model provides a comprehensive explanation for a vast array of data collected at different experiments. Nonetheless fundamental questions remain unanswered and the search for a more complete theory is still a coveted goal of particle physics. Recently, tensions with standard model predictions have been uncovered in several experimental observables in b-hadron decays at LHCb. I will discuss the data, possible implications, and the connection with other experimental programs such as study of kaon rare decays and neutrino mixing and CP violation

  2. SEP

    29

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Latest Results from the T2K Experiment"

    Presented by Kendall Mahn, Michigan State University

    3:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 29, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    One of the most promising investigations of beyond-the-Standard-Model physics has been the study of neutrino oscillation, that is, the conversion of neutrinos from one flavor to another as they propagate. While neutrino oscillation is studied in a wide variety of experiments, accelerator based experiments, such as T2K, use a muon neutrino or antineutrino beam as a source to look for electron (anti)neutrino appearance, muon neutrino disappearance. The source also is used to make measurements of neutrino interactions and search for exotic physics. This talk will describe a recent analysis of both neutrino and antineutrino beam data from T2K. Comparisons between neutrino and antineutrino event rates provide a tantalizing window on possible CP violation in the neutrino sector. The talk will also highlight the increasingly important role of systematic uncertainty assessment for T2K and other future measurements of CP violation with accelerator beams.

  3. OCT

    11

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar (at Stony Brook)"

    Presented by Chang Feng, UC Irvine

    1:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, October 11, 2017, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Neelima Sehgal'

  4. OCT

    16

    Monday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "The R&D and Mass Production of 20"MCP-PMT for Neutrino Detection"

    Presented by Dr. Sen Qian, IHEP China

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, October 16, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Researchers at IHEP, Beijing have conceived a new concept of MCP-PMT several years ago. The small MCP (Microchannel Plate) units replace the bulky Dynode chain in the tranditional large PMTs for better photoelectron detection. After three years R&D, a number of 8 inch prototypes were produced and their performance was carefully tested at IHEP in 2013 by using the MCP-PMT evaluation system built at IHEP. The 20 inch prototypes were followed in 2014, and its' performance were improving a lot in 2015. Compensating the PMT performances with fiducially volume convert all specifications to cost, radioactivity, dark noise, TTS, the JUNO ordered 15000 pic 20-inch MCP-PMT from the NNVT in Dec.2015. In 2016, the MCP-PMT collaboration group finished to build the mass production line in Nanjing at the end of 2016, and finished the batch test system in the same place within 100 days at the beginning of 2017. From 2017 to 2019, all the 20-inch MCP-PMT will be produced and tested one by one in NNVT for JUNO. This presentation will talk about the R&D process and mass production, batch test result of the first 2K pieces of MCP-PMT prototypes for JUNO.

  5. OCT

    26

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Observation of Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering by COHERENT"

    Presented by Kate Scholberg, Duke University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 26, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) is a process in which a neutrino scatters off an entire nucleus at low momentum transfer, and for which the observable signature is a low-energy nuclear recoil. It represents a background for direct dark matter detection experiments, as well as a possible signal for astrophysical neutrinos. Furthermore, because the process is cleanly predicted in the Standard Model, a measurement is sensitive to beyond-the-Standard-Model physics, such as non-standard interactions of neutrinos. The process was first predicted in 1973. It was measured for the first time by the COHERENT collaboration using the high-quality source of pion-decay-at-rest neutrinos from the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and a CsI[Na] scintillator detector. This talk will describe COHERENT's recent 6.7-sigma measurement of CEvNS, the status and plans of COHERENT's suite of detectors at the SNS, and future physics reach.

  6. OCT

    27

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search for dark matter at the CMS experiment"

    Presented by Adish Vartak, University of California San Diego

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, October 27, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Alessandro Tricoli''

    There is an extensive, on-going dark matter search program at the LHC that explores several different types of possible interactions between WIMP-like dark matter and standard model particles. The dark matter searches at the LHC are complementary, and in case of certain models, significantly more sensitive than the direct and indirect dark matter searches. In this talk I will discuss several key dark matter searches being pursued by the CMS collaboration. These cover a wide variety of final states in which dark matter particles are produced in association with one or more energetic, visible objects in the detector resulting in 'MET+X' signatures. Furthermore, I will also discuss the constraints set on dark matter interactions by certain resonance searches.

  7. NOV

    2

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "UCNtau: A magneto-gravitational trap measurement of the free neutron lifetime"

    Presented by Robert Pattie, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 2, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    The neutron is the simplest nuclear system that can be used to probe the structure of the weak interaction and search for physics Beyond the Standard Model. Measurements of neutron ?-decay observables are sensitive to scalar and tensor interactions in the weak force which are not present in the Standard Model. The lifetime of the neutron ?n is an important parameter for Big-Bang Nucleo-synthesis models, solar fusion models, and absolute neutrino scattering cross-sections, and can be used to test the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix. Presently, the two typical methods used to measure the neutron lifetime, cold neutron beam measurements and stored ultracold neutron (UCN) measurements, disagree by roughly 4?. This discrepancy motivates the need for new measurements with complementary systematic uncertainties to previous efforts. The UCN? experiment uses an asymmetric magneto-gravitational UCN trap with in situ counting of surviving neutrons to measure the neutron lifetime. Previous bottle experiments confined UCN in a material storage vessel creating a significant correction due to losses resulting from the material UCN interactions. The magnetic and gravitational confinement of the UCN minimizes losses due to material interactions. Additionally, UCN? uses a detection system that is lowered into the storage volume which avoids emptying the surviving UCN into an external detector. This minimizes any possible transport related systematics. This in situ detector also enables counting at various heights in the vessel, which provides information on the trapped UCN energy spectrum, quasi-bound orbits, and possible phase space evolution. I will present the physics motivation for precision neutron physics, a description of the UCN? experiment, the results of data collected during the 2016-2017 accelerator cycle which resulted in a value of τn=877.7±(0.7) stat (+0.3/−0.1) sys in agreement with previous material bottle

  8. NOV

    9

    Thursday

    Particle Physics - SB/BNL Joint Cosmo seminar (at BNL)

    "Dark Matter Searches with CCDs and the Sensei Experiment"

    Presented by Dr. Javier Tiffenberg, FNAL

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 9, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Erin Sheldon''