BNL Home
  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Neutrinos

    LBNE and the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiments seek to understand the subtle oscillations of neutrinos, ghost-like particles formed in the heart of stars

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

Conducts research to understand many body aspects of QCD, including the properties of hot and dense matter as well high gluon density matter.  

Lattice Gauge Theory

Studies properties of hot and dense matter using lattice QCD methods.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Physics Application

Develops physics applications software for the LHC ATLAS experiment.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

BOSS studies dark energy—the force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

MicroBooNE

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

Mu2e

Experiment which directly probes the Intensity Frontier and aids research on the Energy and Cosmic frontiers with precision measurements to characterize properties of new particles.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. No events scheduled

  1. JUL

    29

    Friday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Azimuthal anisotropy and the distribution of linearly polarized gluons in DIS dijet production at high energy"

    Presented by Adrian Dumitru, Baruch College

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, July 29, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Matthew Sievert'

    High Pt Dijet production in ep/eA DIS at small x (high energy) involves the expectation value of a trace of four Wilson lines, i.e. the quadrupole. At leading power the isotropic part can be expressed as the conventional Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution. On the other hand, the distribution of linearly polarized gluons determines the amplitude of the ~ cos(2phi) anisotropy of the transverse momentum imbalance. I shall also discuss the operator that determines the next-to-leading power correction, its expectation value in a Gaussian theory (at large Nc), and the resulting .

  1. JUL

    28

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Modeling electron- and neutrino-nucleus scattering in kinematics"

    Presented by Vishvas Pandey, Ghent University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, July 28, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Thomas Ullrich''

    The accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program, aimed for the measurement of oscillation parameters and observing the leptonic CP violation, is moving full steam ahead. However, the recent measurements have revealed unexpected and interesting neutrino interaction physics, and exposed the inadequacy of the relativistic Fermi gas (RFG) based Monte-Carlo generators (in describing neutrino-nucleus scatterings) resulting in large systematic uncertainties. A more detailed and careful neutrino-nucleus modeling, covering the whole experimental kinematical space, is inevitable in order to achieve the unprecedented precision goal of the present and future accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation experiments. In this talk, I will present a microscopic Hartree-Fock (HF) and continuum random phase approximation (CRPA) approach to electroweak scattering off nuclei from low energy (threshold) to the intermediate energy region. As a necessary check to test the reliability of this approach, I will first present a electron-nucleus (^12 C, ^16 O, ^40 Ca) cross section comparison (in the kinematics range of interest) with the data to validate the model. Then, I will present flux-folded (anti)neutrino cross section calculations and comparison with the measurements of MiniBooNE and T2K experiments. I will draw special attention to the contribution emerging from the low-energy nuclear excitations, at the most forward scattering bins, in the signal of MiniBooNE and T2K experiments and their impact on the non-trivial differences between muon-neutrino and electron-neutrino cross sections. These effects remain inaccessible in the (current) relativistic Fermi-gas (RFG) based Monte-Carlo generators.

  2. JUL

    29

    Friday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Azimuthal anisotropy and the distribution of linearly polarized gluons in DIS dijet production at high energy"

    Presented by Adrian Dumitru, Baruch College

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, July 29, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Matthew Sievert'

    High Pt Dijet production in ep/eA DIS at small x (high energy) involves the expectation value of a trace of four Wilson lines, i.e. the quadrupole. At leading power the isotropic part can be expressed as the conventional Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution. On the other hand, the distribution of linearly polarized gluons determines the amplitude of the ~ cos(2phi) anisotropy of the transverse momentum imbalance. I shall also discuss the operator that determines the next-to-leading power correction, its expectation value in a Gaussian theory (at large Nc), and the resulting .

  3. AUG

    5

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Study of the detection of supernova neutrinos"

    Presented by Hanyu Wei, Tsinghua University

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, August 5, 2016, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    A core-collapse supernova explosion would release an enormous amount of neutrinos, the detection of which could yield answers to many questions of supernova dynamics and neutrino physics. The collective neutrinos from all the past supernovae all over the universe (supernova relic neutrinos) are also observable, and their detection would provide us an insight of the stellar evolution and cosmology. In this talk, I will first introduce the supernova burst neutrinos as well as supernova relic neutrinos. Then, i will present the design, characteristics, and sensitivity of an online trigger system of supernova burst neutrinos at Daya Bay. I will also present a search for supernova burst neutrinos at Daya Bay using about 600 days of data. At last, a sensitivity study of the discovery potential for supernova relic neutrinos with a slow liquid scintillator will be presented, which is highly recommended to kilo-ton-scale detectors.

  4. OCT

    6

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Dark Interactions: perspective from theory and experiment"

    9 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 6, 2016, 9:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'