BNL Home
  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Neutrinos

    LBNE and the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiments seek to understand the subtle oscillations of neutrinos, ghost-like particles formed in the heart of stars

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

The nuclear theory group conducts research in all areas of QCD, including structure of hadrons and nuclei at high energies, the QCD phase diagram and the properties of quark-gluon matter.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Physics Application

Develops physics applications software for the LHC ATLAS experiment.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

BOSS studies dark energy—the force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

MicroBooNE

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

Mu2e

Experiment which directly probes the Intensity Frontier and aids research on the Energy and Cosmic frontiers with precision measurements to characterize properties of new particles.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. JAN

    16

    Today

    Physics Colloquium

    "Nuclear nonproliferation: the role of Brookhaven, and the nuclear agreement with Iran"

    Presented by Susan Pepper & Leslie Fishbone, BNL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, January 16, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''''Rob Pisarski''''

  2. JAN

    23

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Cold Atom Sensing: Gravity, Tomography, and Gyroscopes"

    Presented by Steve Libby, LLNL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Rob Pisarski'

    The ability to use lasers to cool atoms to micro-kelvin temperatures and to subsequently control their quantum mechanical behavior1 has led to the development of exquisitely precise 'quantum' sensors.2 Applications of these sensors include the measurement of local gravitational anomalies to unprecedented accuracy and very accurate, highly stable gyroscopes. Our LLNL - AOSense, Inc. collaboration is pursuing diverse applications of these sensors that directly exploit their extraordinary scale factor stability, low noise and bias drift characteristics. These applications include shielded threat detection in passing vehicles, emergency response, and treaty verification, all of which require rapid, passive methods to determine hidden mass configurations precisely and/or verify the masses present in containers. Such dense, localized objects can in principle be discovered and accurately measured by their effect on the local gravitational field.3 Furthermore, near field measurements of these gravitational perturbations from multiple vantage points allow for a kind of gravitational 'tomography,' leading to the real-time determination of the hidden mass distribution. Additionally, we are interested in the potential of atom interferometer Sagnac gyroscopes to do accurate 'dead reckoning' navigation without the aid of GPS.4 After reviewing the physics of atom interferometry in atomic fountain-Mach-Zehnder and Sagnac configurations, I will describe the development of a 'gravity tomography' signal analysis system for vehicle portals, including the optimal synthesis of the gravitational sensor signals with complementary radiation detection.

  3. JAN

    30

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Science policy in DC - How we got the government we have, and why scientists should care"

    Presented by Benn Tannenbaum, Sandia

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, January 30, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  4. FEB

    13

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Social Life of Heavy Quarks"

    Presented by Marek Karliner, Tel Aviv University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 13, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Peter Petreczky'

    I will discuss recent developments regarding new types of hadrons involving heavy quarks: hadronic molecules, doubly heavy baryons, stable tetraquarks and others. I will also explain how the discovery of the doubly heavy baryon leads to quark-level analogue of nuclear fusion, with energy release per reaction an order of magnitude greater than in ordinary fusion.

  5. FEB

    27

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Multi-Messenger Picture of a Neutron Star Merger"

    Presented by Brian Metzger, Columbia University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 27, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Peter Petreczky''

    On August 17 the LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave observatories detected the first binary neutron star merger event (GW170817), a discovery followed by the most ambitious electromagnetic (EM) follow-up campaign ever conducted. A gamma-ray burst (GRB) of short duration and very low luminosity was discovered by the Fermi and INTEGRAL satellites within 2 seconds of the merger. Within 11 hours, a bright but rapidly-fading thermal optical counterpart was discovered in the galaxy NGC 4993 at a distance of only 40 Mpc. The properties of the optical transient match remarkably well predictions for kilonova emission powered by the radioactive decay of heavy nuclei synthesized in the expanding merger ejecta by the r-process. The rapid spectral evolution of the kilonova emission to near-infrared wavelengths demonstrates that a portion of the ejecta contains heavy lanthanide nuclei. Two weeks after the merger, rising non-thermal X-ray and radio emission were detected from the position of the optical transient, consistent with delayed synchrotron afterglow radiation from an initially off-axis relativistic jet with the properties consistent with those of (on-axis) cosmological short GRB. I will describe a unified scenario for the range of EM counterparts from GW170817 and their implications for the astrophysical origin of the r-process and the properties of neutron stars. I will preview the upcoming era of multi-messenger astronomy, once Advanced LIGO/Virgo reach design sensitivity and a neutron star merger is detected every few weeks.

  1. JAN

    16

    Today

    Physics Colloquium

    "Nuclear nonproliferation: the role of Brookhaven, and the nuclear agreement with Iran"

    Presented by Susan Pepper & Leslie Fishbone, BNL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, January 16, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''''Rob Pisarski''''

  2. JAN

    19

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Felix Ringer, LBL

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, January 19, 2018, 2:00 pm

  3. FEB

    2

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Mohamed Anber, Lewis & Clark College

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 2, 2018, 2:00 pm

  4. FEB

    2

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "New nonperturbative scales and glueballs in confining gauge theories"

    Presented by Mohamed Anber, Lewis & Clark College

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 2, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Chun Shen'

    Studying confining gauge theories on a circle can provide answers to some of the deepest questions about QCD. In this talk, I start by summarizing the main characteristics shared by the compactified theories and their four dimensional cousins. Next, I show that the glueball spectrum of the compactified theories is much richer than what have been thought before. In particular, new nonperturbative scales and glueballs emerge in the deep IR regime of the theory. I discuss the spectrum in the context of super Yang-Mills and show that the lightest glueball states fill a chiral supermultiplet with doubly nonperturbative binding energy. I end with possible implications of these findings for the four dimensional gauge theories.

  5. FEB

    9

    Friday

    Joint Nuclear Theory and HET Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Michael Ramsey-Musolf, U. Mass. Amherst

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 9, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Chun Shen'

  6. FEB

    23

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Yi Yin, MIT

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 23, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Chun Shen'

  7. APR

    13

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Andreas Schmitt, University of Southampton

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 13, 2018, 2:00 pm

  1. JAN

    16

    Today

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Improved Point Source Detection in Crowded Fields using Probabilistic Cataloguing"

    Presented by Stephen Portillo, Harvard University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, January 16, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Erin Sheldon'

    Cataloging is challenging in crowded fields because sources are extremely covariant with their neighbors and blending makes even the number of sources ambiguous. We present the first optical probabilistic stellar catalogue, cataloguing a crowded (~0.1 sources per pixel) SDSS r band image from M2. We show that our probabilistic catalogue goes more than a magnitude deeper than the DAOPHOT while having a lower false discovery rate brighter than 20th magnitude. We detail our efforts to speed up the method and extend it to galaxies, making probabilistic cataloguing applicable to the data that will be collected in the LSST era.

  2. JAN

    18

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search for the Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks and decaying into a b quark pair with the ATLAS detector at LHC"

    Presented by Thomas Calvet, Stony Brook University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, January 18, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Alessandro Tricoli'

    The discovery of a particle compatible with the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at LHC is a milestone in particle physics. In order to assess whether or not this Higgs boson belongs to the SM, it is necessary to measure its properties, in particular its coupling to the top quark (the strongest Yukawa coupling in the SM). The associated production of a Higgs boson with a pair of top quarks, ttH gives the most favorable direct access to the top quark Yukawa coupling and is accessible for the first time in LHC Run 2. A search for the ttH production with the Higgs boson decaying into a b quark pair, ttH(bb), will be presented. It uses the 36.1 fb^-1 of data recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2015 and 2016. The main limitation to the search of ttH(bb) events is the tt+jets background and its systematic uncertainties. To achieve sufficient sensitivity, this complex analysis relies on several advanced tools to separate the leading background tt+jets from the signal, and to extract both of these processes from data (multi-variate analysis, profile likelihood fit, etc.). All these key aspects of the analysis will be discussed. The combination of the ttH(bb) channel with the other decay modes is necessary to improve the sensitivity to the ttH production mode. This combination leads to 4.2 sigma evidence of the ttH production and will be also presented.

  3. JAN

    25

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "A Tale of Two Higgs"

    Presented by Baojia Tong, Harvard University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, January 25, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Alessandro Tricoli'

    An enhanced production of double Higgs bosons at the LHC would be a clear sign of beyond Standard Model physics. An ATLAS search is performed for resonant and non-resonant production, where the two Higgs bosons both decay to a pair of Bottom quarks. The analyses use up to ~13/36 fb−1 of p-p collision data collected at 13 TeV. The talk will focus on the boosted analysis, with the resolved analysis introduced as well. Other RunII double Higgs search results and future prospect will also be discussed.

  4. FEB

    15

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "21-cm cosmology topics"

    Presented by Dr. Francisco Villaescusa-Navarro, Center for Computational Astrophysics, Flatiron Institute

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, February 15, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Chris Sheehy'