BNL Home
  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Neutrinos

    LBNE and the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiments seek to understand the subtle oscillations of neutrinos, ghost-like particles formed in the heart of stars

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

The nuclear theory group conducts research in all areas of QCD, including structure of hadrons and nuclei at high energies, the QCD phase diagram and the properties of quark-gluon matter.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Physics Application

Develops physics applications software for the LHC ATLAS experiment.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

BOSS studies dark energy—the force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

MicroBooNE

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

Mu2e

Experiment which directly probes the Intensity Frontier and aids research on the Energy and Cosmic frontiers with precision measurements to characterize properties of new particles.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. FEB

    28

    Today

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Experimental Challenge of 21 cm Cosmology"

    Presented by Miguel Morales, University of Washington

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 28, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Andrei Nomerotski''

  2. MAR

    14

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Bob McKeown, Jefferson Lab

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Andrei Nomerotski'

  3. MAR

    28

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Physics in the complex domain"

    Presented by Carl Bender, Washington University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Robert Pisarski''

    The theory of complex variables is extremely useful because it helps to explain the mathematical behavior of functions of a real variable. Complex variable theory also provides insight into the nature of physical theories. For example, it provides a simple and beautiful picture of quantization and it explains the underlying reason for the divergence of perturbation theory. By using complex-variable methods one can generalize conventional Hermitian quantum theories into the complex domain. The result is a new class of parity-time-symmetric (PT-symmetric) theories whose remarkable physical properties have been studied and verified in many recent laboratory experiments.

  1. MAR

    1

    Wednesday

    HET/RIKEN Seminars

    "The Road to Nuclear Physics from Standard Model"

    Presented by Zohreh Davoudi, MIT

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 1, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Mattia Bruno'

  2. MAR

    3

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Finite-Temperature Perturbative QCD confronts Lattice"

    Presented by Thorben Graf, University of Frankfurt

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 3, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Heikki Mantysaari''

    Since decades expressions for the thermodynamic potential were calculated perturbatively at finite temperature (and density) and pushed to higher orders. I review the current status of these efforts including resummation techniques and compare them to results of lattice Monte Carlo simulations and address unanswered questions. Finally, I present results for several thermodynamic quantities within the next-to-leading order calculation of the thermodynamic potential at finite T and \mu including non-vanishing quark masses.

  3. MAR

    10

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory Seminar

    "Nuclear Matter EoS and thermodynamic Properties of Skyrme models"

    Presented by Mareike Haberichter, Amherst

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 10, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    The Skyrme model is a candidate to describe the low energy regime of QCD where baryons and nuclei are topological excitations in a low-energy effective field theory of pions. The Skyrme model and its BPS variant (Skyrme model with a lower topological energy bound which is saturated) have been applied to the description of nuclei with notable recent success, e.g. quantitative description of Carbon-12 (including the Holye state and its rotational band) and of the low-lying energy spectrum of Oxygen-16. In this talk, we test Skyrme theories as models for nuclear matter at high densities and explore the thermodynamical properties of skyrmionic matter at zero temperature. We compute analytically the mean-field equation of state in the high and medium pressure regimes by applying topological bounds on compact domains. We identify which term in a generalised Skyrme model is responsible for which part in the equation of state and compare our findings with the corresponding results in the Walecka model. We find that the BPS submodel plays the dominant role at large densities. The BPS Skyrme model even allows us to derive thermodynamical variables and densities directly from the theory without having to perform a mean-field limit. This distinguishes the BPS Skyrme model from other models of nuclear matter where usually a mean-field limit has to be performed. Note that this is the first of two talks on Skyrme models and their predictions for nuclear matter at high densities. The second part on the description of neutron stars as Skyrme solitons will be given by Carlos Naya (Durham) on March, 24th at BNL.

  4. MAR

    14

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "The sPHENIX Calorimeters: a proto-type story"

    Presented by Megan Connors, Georgia State University and RBRC

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Jin Huang'

    sPHENIX, scheduled to start taking data in 2022 at RHIC, is a detector designed to probe the inner workings of the quark gluon plasma by measuring jets and their substructure, heavy flavor tagged jets and quarkonia. The design includes tracking systems, a solenoid magnet and calorimeter system. The calorimeter system, designed to measure the energy of jets, is comprised of an electromagnetic calorimeter, an inner hadronic calorimeter and and outer hadronic calorimeter. Prototypes of these detectors were built and tested in 2016. The results of the test beam show that the performance is well within the requirements set by the sPHENIX program. In addition, the results validate the GEANT4 simulation studies. The design of the sPHENIX calorimeter system, the test beam results from the calorimeter prototypes and additional studies will be presented

  5. MAR

    24

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "A solitonic approach to neutron stars: The (BPS) Skyrme model"

    Presented by Carlos Naya, Durham

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 24, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    The Skyrme model is a low energy effective field theory of strong interactions where nuclei and baryons appear as collective excitations of pionic degrees of freedom. Proposed by Tony Skyrme in the sixties, his ideas received further support when it was discovered that in the limit of the large number of colours of QCD, an effective theory of mesons arises. In the last years, there has been a revival of Skyrme's ideas and new related models, some of them with BPS bounds (topological lower energy bounds), have been proposed. It is the aim of this talk to focus on the one known as BPS Skyrme model. After a brief introduction to this BPS limit we study its application to neutron stars where we will find that high maximal masses are supported. In addition, the BPS Skyrme model allow us to perform both mean-field and exact calculations and a comparison between both approaches will be presented.

  6. MAR

    31

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "neutrinoless double beta decay and nuclear structure theory"

    Presented by Professor Petr Vogel, Caltech

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 31, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Search for the neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the main goals of nuclear physics community worldwide. If observed, it would be an example of "physics beyond the Standard Model", showing that the lepton number is not a conserved quantity and that neutrinos are massive Majorana fermions. After introducing the subject and its particle physics consequences I will concentrate on the issue of evaluation of the nuclear matrix elements. Despite decades of effort and hundreds of publications, different approaches give results that differ by roughly a factor of three, and it is difficult to decide which of them is the most realistic. I will describe the strengths and weaknesses of the nuclear models used. In addition, I will discuss the problem of "quenching", i.e. of reduction of the matrix elements of weak axial current in complex nuclei, that potentially affects the neutrinoless double beta decay matrix element values signiffcantly

  7. APR

    7

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Dirk Rischke, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitat

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 7, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

  8. APR

    14

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Effect of magnetic field on flow fluctuations in"

    Presented by Ajit M. Srivvastava

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 14, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    Very strong magnetic fields can arise in non-central heavy-ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies, which may not decay quickly in a conducting plasma. We carry out magnetohydrodynamics simulations to study the effects of this magnetic field on the evolution of the plasma and on resulting flow fluctuations. Our results show that magnetic field leads to enhancement in elliptic flow, while flow fluctuations lead to reorganization of magnetic flux resulting in a transient increase in the local magnetic field. We also show generation of vorticity arising from nontrivial dependence of magnetosonic waves on pressure gradients and magnetic field direction. Magnetic field from collision of deformed nuclei shows very nontrivial features and can lead to qualitatively new effects on plasma evolutions. We discuss possibility of dynamo effect in the presence of vortices if any exotic high baryon density QCD phases are achieved in heavy-ion collisions.

  1. FEB

    28

    Today

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Experimental Challenge of 21 cm Cosmology"

    Presented by Miguel Morales, University of Washington

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 28, 2017, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: ''Andrei Nomerotski''

  2. MAR

    1

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Semiar SB/BNL Joint Cosmo Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Will Farr, Birmingham

    1:30 pm, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, March 1, 2017, 1:30 pm

  3. MAR

    8

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Electroweak Physics at ATLAS"

    Presented by Jake Searcy, Michigan

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

    Electroweak symmetry breaking is a central pillar of the standard model, and experimentally one of the least understood. Many physics scenarios predict modifications to this mechanism resulting in new particles or interactions. This talk will summarize our knowledge of the electroweak sector with a particular focus on the interactions between W-bosons.

  4. MAR

    9

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "WW measurements at CMS and perspectives for the HL-LHC"

    Presented by Rafael Coelho Lopes de Sa, FNAL

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 9, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'

    We will review recent diboson measurements and searches in the WW final state performed with the CMS detector. We will discuss the perspectives for some of these measurements with the full HL-LHC dataset. We will briefly describe some of the upgrades being designed for the CMS Silicon Tracker in order to operate in the high pileup environment of the HL-LHC while maintaining excellent performance for the final states discussed in this talk.

  5. MAR

    16

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search for physics beyond the SM using multijet events with the ATLAS detector at the LHC"

    Presented by Haichen Wang, LBL

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 16, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Michael Begel''

    Search for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) has been one of the most important goals of the physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).Among all the final states, the multijet final state has long been considered as a challenging one for the search of physics beyond the SM due to its large background. Though, exciting new physics phenomena, such as the production of black hole as well as massive supersymmetric (SUSY) particles, may well result in signals in multijet final state. I present searches for physics beyond the SM using multijet events from 13 TeV collision data taken in 2015 and the first half of 2016 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. I focus on a search for the production of black hole and a search for massive supersymmetric particles decaying to many jets via R-Parity Violating (RPV) couplings. The two examples represent searches targeting physics beyond the SM at different mass scales, and therefore different analysis strategies are employed. These searches have greatly improved the sensitivity of the LHC to the black hole production and RPV SUSY scenarios, and they are complementary to searches using events of leptons, photons and missing transverse energy.

  6. MAR

    22

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Heavy bosons: a probe into the unknown"

    Presented by Viviana Cavaliere, University of Illinois Champaign/Urbana

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 22, 2017, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Michael Begel''

    The large amount of high-energy proton-proton collision data at the LHC provides an unprecedented opportunity to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model at the TeV scale. The 2012 discovery of a 125 GeV Higgs boson opened a new door to understanding the universe, providing an exciting new tool to use in these searches, given it is now produced about once per second at the current collision rate. The talk will review recent ATLAS searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, focusing on the central role of processes with heavy bosons, including the Higgs, and the corresponding new possible signatures that range from spectacular new resonances to subtle changes in kinematic distributions.

  7. MAR

    24

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Neutrino Interactions with Nuclei and Long-Baseline Experiments"

    Presented by Professor Ulrich Mosel, Giessen University

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 24, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: ''Xin Qian''

    The extraction of neutrino mixing parameters and the CP-violating phase requires knowledge of the neutrino energy. This energy must be reconstructed from the final state of a neutrino-nucleus reaction since all long-baseline experiments use nuclear targets. This reconstruction requires detailed knowledge of the neutrino reactions with bound nucleons and of the final state interactions of hadrons with the nuclear environment. Quantum-kinetic transport theory can be used to build an event generator for this reconstruction that takes basic nuclear properties, such as binding, into account. Some examples are discussed that show the effects of nuclear interactions on observables in long-baseline experiments.

  8. MAR

    30

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Evaluation of reactor neutrino flux: issues and uncertainties"

    Presented by Professor Petr Vogel, Caltech

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 30, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Evaluation of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum is an essential ingredient of their application in the neutrino oscillation studies. Two anomalies, i.e. discrepancies between the observed and expected count rates, are widely discussed at the present time. The total rate is about 6% lower than the expectation at all distances > 10 m from the reactor. And there is a shoulder (often referred to as "bump") at neutrino energies 5-7 MeV, not predicted in the calculated spectrum. I review the ways the flux and spectrum is evaluated. I argue that far reaching conclusions based on these anomalies should await a thorough understanding of the uncertainties of the spectrum, and point out possible standard physics sources of the anomalies.

  9. MAR

    31

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "neutrinoless double beta decay and nuclear structure theory"

    Presented by Professor Petr Vogel, Caltech

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 31, 2017, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Search for the neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the main goals of nuclear physics community worldwide. If observed, it would be an example of "physics beyond the Standard Model", showing that the lepton number is not a conserved quantity and that neutrinos are massive Majorana fermions. After introducing the subject and its particle physics consequences I will concentrate on the issue of evaluation of the nuclear matrix elements. Despite decades of effort and hundreds of publications, different approaches give results that differ by roughly a factor of three, and it is difficult to decide which of them is the most realistic. I will describe the strengths and weaknesses of the nuclear models used. In addition, I will discuss the problem of "quenching", i.e. of reduction of the matrix elements of weak axial current in complex nuclei, that potentially affects the neutrinoless double beta decay matrix element values signiffcantly

  10. APR

    13

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Natural Seesaw in Warped/Composite Higgs framework and its LHC Signals"

    Presented by Kaustubh Agashe, University of Maryland

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 13, 2017, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Christoph Lehner''

    I will show how a natural seesaw model for SM neutrino mass arises within the general framework of a warped extra dimension (dual to composite Higgs in 4D). It starts out as an attempt at implementing the high-scale seesaw mechanism. I will first carefully determine what the underlying dynamical picture really is. Motivated by this physical understanding, LHC signals of TeV-mass SM singlet neutrinos within a specific model for the electroweak gauge sector will be discussed. Some of these channels are similar to those studied in 4D left-right (LR) symmetric models, but nonetheless the two can be distinguished. While other signals are more characteristic of the 5D/composite framework, i.e., are absent in 4D LR models.

  11. JUL

    10

    Monday

    Office of Educational Programs Event

    "High School Research Program Begins"

    8:30 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Monday, July 10, 2017, 8:30 am