BNL Home
  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Neutrinos

    LBNE and the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiments seek to understand the subtle oscillations of neutrinos, ghost-like particles formed in the heart of stars

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

The nuclear theory group conducts research in all areas of QCD, including structure of hadrons and nuclei at high energies, the QCD phase diagram and the properties of quark-gluon matter.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Physics Application

Develops physics applications software for the LHC ATLAS experiment.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

BOSS studies dark energy—the force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

MicroBooNE

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

Mu2e

Experiment which directly probes the Intensity Frontier and aids research on the Energy and Cosmic frontiers with precision measurements to characterize properties of new particles.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. SEP

    19

    Today

    Special Physics Colloquium

    "Mega-linear versus Giant-circular. The next big machine for HEP"

    Presented by Franco Bedeschi, INFN

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 19, 2019, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Dmitri Denisov

    Time is coming for a decision on the next particle accelerator at the energy frontier. As Europe is updating its strategy for particle physics, e+e- colliders are standing out as the preferred choice. The physics case for these future colliders and the comparison between the linear and circular option will be reviewed. The status of these projects and the R&D on the detectors required for these machines will also be discussed.

  2. NOV

    5

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Changing Flavor: the Universe's Weirdest Particle"

    Presented by Kirsty Duffy - Leona Woods Award Winner, FNAL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, November 5, 2019, 3:30 pm

    Neutrinos are some of the most abundant–but elusive–constituents of matter in the universe. It has been firmly established that neutrinos can change flavor (or "oscillate"), as recognized by the 2015 Nobel Prize, and in recent years the field has moved beyond the "discovery" phase to focus on precise measurements of the parameters that determine neutrino oscillation. As our understanding improves, it opens doors to new discoveries about the nature of this little-understood particle. This is a very exciting time in neutrino physics there exists a wealth of fascinating questions to investigate, including recent tantalizing hints of large neutrino-sector CP violation, and we are rapidly developing the tools to answer them. As the United States HEP community leads the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments, I will give an overview of the field: from the initial discovery of the neutrino, to the first evidence for oscillation, to the most recent results from current long-baseline oscillation experiments such as T2K and NOvA. I will finish by discussing the exciting future prospect of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment and the liquid argon time projection chamber technology that makes it possible, including recent results and examples from my own work on MicroBooNE, a liquid argon neutrino detector currently taking data at Fermilab

  1. SEP

    27

    Friday

    NT/RIKEN Seminar

    "Observing the deformation of nuclei with relativistic nuclear collisions"

    Presented by Giuliano Giacalone, IPhT - Saclay

    2 pm, Building 510, CFNS Seminar Room 2-38

    Friday, September 27, 2019, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Niklas Mueller

    The geometry of overlap between two nuclei interacting at high energy determines many of the observables typically investigated in heavy-ion-collision analyses, such as average transverse momenta () and azimuthal anisotropies of the emitted particle distributions. If the colliding nuclei are non-spherical, e.g., if they present a quadrupole deformation and look like ellipsoids, the geometry of interaction experiences nontrivial fluctuations due to the random orientation of the colliding bodies. I introduce an 'event-shape engineering' procedure that allows one to probe the quadrupole deformation of the colliding ions. The method is straightforward. One selects a batch of high-multiplicity (ultracentral) collisions, and within this batch looks at events that present an abnormally large or small of the produced hadrons. I show that these events correspond to configurations in which the colliding nuclei are overlapping along the longer (shorter) side of the prolate (oblate) ellipsoids. In these events, the interaction region has an elliptical shape, whose eccentricity is closely related to the quadrupole deformation of the considered nuclei. Therefore, for collisions of nuclei that are significantly deformed (e.g. 238U and 129Xe nuclei collided at RHIC and LHC) I predict a strong enhancement of elliptic flow in the tails of the distributions of ultracentral events. If validated by experimental data, this method would provide a robust tool to observe the deformations of nuclear ground states at particle colliders (in particular at RHIC).

  2. OCT

    28

    Monday

    Chemistry Department Colloquium

    "Electronic Cooperativity in Supported Single and Multinuclear-Sites for Catalytic C-C and C-H Bond Functionalization"

    Presented by Dr. Massimiliano Delferro, Argonne National Laboratory

    11 am, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555

    Monday, October 28, 2019, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Sanjaya Senanayake

    Systematic study of the interactions between organometallic catalysts and metal oxide support materials is essential for the realization of rational design in heterogeneous catalysis. In this talk, I will describe the stoichiometric and catalytic chemistry of a series of organometallic complex chemisorbed on a variety of metal oxides as a multifaceted probe for stereoelectronic communication between the support and organometallic center. Electrophilic bond activation was explored in the context of stoichiometric hydrogenolysis as well as catalytic hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, and H/D exchange. Strongly acidic modified metal oxides such as sulfated zirconia engender high levels of activity toward electrophilic bond activation of both sp2 and sp3 C–H bonds, including the rapid activation of methane at room temperature; however, the global trend for the supports studied here does not suggest a direct correlation between activity and surface Brønsted acidity, and more complex metal surface interactions are at play.

  3. NOV

    20

    Wednesday

    High Energy / Nuclear Theory / RIKEN Seminars

    "TBA"

    Presented by Graham White, TRIUMF

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 20, 2019, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

  1. SEP

    26

    Thursday

    Cosmology Seminar

    "TBD"

    3:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 26, 2019, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas McClintock

  2. NOV

    5

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Changing Flavor: the Universe's Weirdest Particle"

    Presented by Kirsty Duffy - Leona Woods Award Winner, FNAL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, November 5, 2019, 3:30 pm

    Neutrinos are some of the most abundant–but elusive–constituents of matter in the universe. It has been firmly established that neutrinos can change flavor (or "oscillate"), as recognized by the 2015 Nobel Prize, and in recent years the field has moved beyond the "discovery" phase to focus on precise measurements of the parameters that determine neutrino oscillation. As our understanding improves, it opens doors to new discoveries about the nature of this little-understood particle. This is a very exciting time in neutrino physics there exists a wealth of fascinating questions to investigate, including recent tantalizing hints of large neutrino-sector CP violation, and we are rapidly developing the tools to answer them. As the United States HEP community leads the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments, I will give an overview of the field: from the initial discovery of the neutrino, to the first evidence for oscillation, to the most recent results from current long-baseline oscillation experiments such as T2K and NOvA. I will finish by discussing the exciting future prospect of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment and the liquid argon time projection chamber technology that makes it possible, including recent results and examples from my own work on MicroBooNE, a liquid argon neutrino detector currently taking data at Fermilab

  3. NOV

    7

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Latest neutrino cross-section results from MicroBooNE"

    Presented by Dr. Kirsty Duffy, FNAL

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 7, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Xin Qian

    MicroBooNE, the Micro Booster Neutrino Experiment at Fermilab, is an 85-ton active mass liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) located in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. The LArTPC technology with 3mm wire spacing enables high-precision imaging of neutrino interactions, which leads to high-efficiency, low-threshold measurements with full angular coverage. As the largest liquid argon detector worldwide taking neutrino beam data, MicroBooNE provides a unique opportunity to investigate neutrino interactions in neutrino-argon scattering at O(1 GeV) energies. These measurements are of broad interest to neutrino physicists because of their application to Fermilab Short Baseline Neutrino program and the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (which will both rely on LArTPC technology), as well as the possibility for new insights into A-dependent effects in neutrino scattering on heavier targets such as argon. In this seminar I will present the most recent cross-section results from MicroBooNE, including measurements of inclusive charged-current neutrino scattering, neutral pion production, and low-energy protons. Many of the results I will show represent the first measurements of these interactions on argon nuclei, as well as an exciting demonstration of the potential of LArTPC detector technology to improve our current understanding of neutrino scattering physics.

  4. NOV

    14

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Cosmology: Halo splashback detection"

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 14, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas McClintock

  5. NOV

    14

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "NA 62"

    Presented by Dr Evgueni Goudzovski

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 14, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chao Zhang

  6. NOV

    20

    Wednesday

    High Energy / Nuclear Theory / RIKEN Seminars

    "TBA"

    Presented by Graham White, TRIUMF

    2:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, November 20, 2019, 2:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski