BNL Home
  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Neutrinos

    LBNE and the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiments seek to understand the subtle oscillations of neutrinos, ghost-like particles formed in the heart of stars

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

Conducts research to understand many body aspects of QCD, including the properties of hot and dense matter as well high gluon density matter.  

Lattice Gauge Theory

Studies properties of hot and dense matter using lattice QCD methods.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Physics Application

Develops physics applications software for the LHC ATLAS experiment.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

BOSS studies dark energy—the force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

MicroBooNE

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

Mu2e

Experiment which directly probes the Intensity Frontier and aids research on the Energy and Cosmic frontiers with precision measurements to characterize properties of new particles.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. FEB

    16

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Physics opportunities at future circular colliders"

    Presented by LianTao Wang, University of Chicago

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson, there has been a lot discussion about the next step in high energy physics. Among different options, a couple of newly proposed next generation circular colliders, including FCC at CERN and CEPC/SPPC in China, have attracted a lot of attention. Through preliminary studies in the past couple of years, an exciting picture of their physics capabilities has emerged. In this talk, I will give an overview on this topic, focusing on some of the most important questions in high energy physics they can help addressing

  2. MAR

    22

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Guido Martinelli, Rome University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 22, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  3. MAR

    29

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jinfeng Liao, Indiana University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 29, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  4. APR

    5

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Xiangdong Ji, University of Maryland

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 5, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  5. APR

    19

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Dam Thanh Son, University of Chicago

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 19, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  6. APR

    26

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Marilena Loverde, Stony Brook University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 26, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  7. MAY

    3

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Thomas Roser, BNL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 3, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  8. MAY

    24

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Ralph James, BNL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  9. JUN

    21

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Mikhail Shaposhnikov, EPFL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 21, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  10. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Larry Weinstein, Old Dominion University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  1. FEB

    12

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Understanding the structure of hadrons through spin observables in hard-scattering processes"

    Presented by Daniel Pitonyak, BNL

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 12, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Almost all of the visible matter in the universe is built from hadrons, which are composed of quarks and gluons. One of the main challenges in nuclear physics is to understand this complex internal structure. In this talk, I will discuss how hard-scattering processes that involve the spin of hadrons give us insight into aspects of their inner-workings that otherwise would be inaccessible. I will focus on phenomena that arise when hadrons carry spin transverse to their direction of motion, which allow us to examine them in 3D and analyze correlations between their quarks and gluons. I will also consider a new attempt to resolve the so-called "spin crisis" of how the proton gets its spin by looking at how much spin can be carried by small-x quarks and gluons.

  2. FEB

    19

    Friday

    Nuclear/Riken Theory Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Marc Schlegel

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 19, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  3. FEB

    19

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Lattice QCD investigations of quark transverse momentum in hadrons"

    Presented by Michael Engelhardt, New Mexico State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 19, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    An ongoing program of evaluating transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) within lattice QCD is reviewed, summarizing recent progress with respect to several challenges faced by such calculations. These lattice calculations are based on a definition of TMDs through hadronic matrix elements of quark bilocal operators containing staple-shaped gauge connections. A parametrization of the matrix elements in terms of invariant amplitudes serves to cast them in the Lorentz frame preferred for a lattice calculation. Results presented include data on the naively T-odd Sivers and Boer-Mulders effects, as well as the transversity and a worm-gear distribution. Correlating quark transverse momentum with impact parameter, one can extract quark orbital angular momentum directly,including both the Ji as well as the Jaffe-Manohar definitions.

  4. MAR

    18

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Duality, Dimensions and Reduction on the Lattice"

    Presented by Joel Giedt, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 18, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Montonen and Olive found evidence that a duality could exist in Yang-Mills with adjoint scalars. In this scheme, the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole forms a gauge triplet with the photon, leading to a theory equivalent to the Georgi-Glashow model but with magnetic charge replacing electric charge. The duality is believed to be realized in N=4 super-Yang-Mills. We are pursuing numerical, nonperturbative evidence for this S-duality using our lattice formulation. Two lines of approach are being taken, which I will discuss. First, we attempt to show that there is a value of the gauge coupling for which the W boson mass is equal to the monopole mass. Second, we are relating the 't Hooft loop to the Wilson loop at this self-dual coupling. On a somewhat unrelated topic, we also discuss the determination of anomalous dimensions on the lattice. In the dual gravitational picture these correspond to masses of fields in the bulk, so that some aspects of the gauge-gravity duality could be tested by such determinations. In particular in N=4 super-Yang-Mills there are predictions for the dimensions of non-protected operators at the self-dual point, based on the superconformal bootstrap.

  1. FEB

    10

    Wednesday

    High Energy Theory

    "Heavy Mesons in Jets"

    Presented by Adam Leibovich, University of Pittsburgh

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, February 10, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  2. FEB

    11

    Thursday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-like transition in a highly underdoped La2-xSrxCuO4"

    Presented by Dragana Popovic, NHMFL Tallahassee

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 734, ISB Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Thursday, February 11, 2016, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Cedomir Petrovic

    In two-dimensional superconductors, the transition to the metallic state takes place via thermal unbinding of vortex-antivortex pairs, as described by the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) theory. The occurrence of the BKT transition in bulk underdoped samples of cuprate superconductors, which are highly anisotropic, layered materials, has been controversial. Therefore, the nature of the superconducting transition in highly underdoped thick films of La2-xSrxCuO4 has been investigated using the in-plane transport measurements. Both the temperature dependence of the paraconductivity above the transition and the nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics across it exhibit the main signatures of the BKT transition. Moreover, the quantitative comparison of the superfluid stiffness, extracted from the I-V data, with the renormalization-group results for the BKT theory, reveals a large value of the vortex-core energy, strongly suggesting that the relevant length scale controlling the BKT-like transition in this layered material involves a few coupled layers. Finally, measurements of the fluctuations of the resistance with time (i.e. noise) provide evidence for the critical slowing down of the dynamics and the onset of correlated behavior. The details of the observed dynamical critical behavior of the BKT transition and the role of disorder will be discussed.

  3. FEB

    18

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Weighing the Giants: Anchoring Cluster Cosmology"

    Presented by Adam Mantz, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, February 18, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Erin Sheldon

    The gas mass fractions and the distribution in mass and redshift of the galaxy cluster population provide powerful probes of cosmology, constraining the cosmic matter density, the amplitude of the matter power spectrum, properties of dark energy, and the mass of neutrinos, among other parameters. Historically, these tests have been limited by the absolute accuracy of cluster mass determinations. Here, mass measurements from weak lensing have an advantage over estimates based on observations of the intracluster medium (ICM), because the former are nearly unbiased and can be straightforwardly tested against simulations. I will describe recent cosmological constraints obtained from an analysis of X-ray selected cluster samples, incorporating extensive gravitational lensing data from the Weighing the Giants project — the first cluster cosmology study to consistently integrate a lensing mass calibration, including a rigorous quantification of all systematic uncertainties. The results highlight the power and potential of galaxy clusters, which constrain both the expansion of the Universe and the growth of cosmic structure, and their complementarity with other probes such as type Ia supernovae, large-scale galaxy surveys, and the cosmic microwave background.

  4. FEB

    29

    Monday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBD"

    Presented by Sergey Klimenko, University of Florida

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, February 29, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Erin Sheldon

  5. MAR

    30

    Wednesday

    High Energy Theory

    "Pseudo-scalar Higgs Form Factors at 3-loops in QCD"

    Presented by Taushif Ahmed, IMSC, Chennai, India

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 30, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Sally Dawson

  6. APR

    7

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Dark Matter Search Results from PICO-2L"

    Presented by Chanpreet Amole, Queen's University, SNOLAB

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 7, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Xin Qian

    New data are reported from a second run of the 2-liter PICO-2L C3F8 bubble chamber with a total exposure of 129 kg-days at a thermodynamic threshold energy of 3.3 keV. These data show that measures taken to control particulate con-tamination in the superheated fluid resulted in the absence of the anomalous back-ground events observed in the first run of this bubble chamber. One single nuclear-recoil event was observed in the data, consistent both with the predicted background rate from neutrons and with the observed rate of unambiguous multiple-bubble neutron scattering events. The chamber exhibits the same excellent electron-recoil and alpha decay rejection as was previously reported. These data provide the most stringent direct detection constraints on WIMP- proton spin-dependent scattering to date for WIMP masses < 50 GeV/c2.