BNL Home
  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Neutrinos

    LBNE and the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiments seek to understand the subtle oscillations of neutrinos, ghost-like particles formed in the heart of stars

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

The nuclear theory group conducts research in all areas of QCD, including structure of hadrons and nuclei at high energies, the QCD phase diagram and the properties of quark-gluon matter.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Physics Application

Develops physics applications software for the LHC ATLAS experiment.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

BOSS studies dark energy—the force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

MicroBooNE

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

Mu2e

Experiment which directly probes the Intensity Frontier and aids research on the Energy and Cosmic frontiers with precision measurements to characterize properties of new particles.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. SEP

    25

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Unraveling the nucleon's mass and spin structure at an Electron-Ion Collider"

    Presented by Yoshitaka Hatta, BNL and Kyoto University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, September 25, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

    The US-based Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is a future high-luminosity, polarized collider dedicated to the physics of the nucleon/nucleus structure. Among the many physics problems that can be addressed at the EIC, I will focus on the origin of the mass and spin of the nucleon, namely, how they can be understood in terms of quarks' and gluons' degrees of freedom. I will give a review of the mass and spin decompositions in QCD and discuss possible experimental observables.

  2. OCT

    30

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Cosmic Chandlery with Thermonuclear Supernovae"

    Presented by Alan Calder, Stony Brook University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, October 30, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

    Thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae are bright stellar explosions distinguished by light curves that can be calibrated to allow for their use as "standard candles" for measuring cosmological distances. Our research investigates how properties of the host galaxy such as composition and age influence properties of the progenitor system, which in turn influence the thermonuclear burning during an event and thus its brightness. I will present the results from ensembles of simulations addressing the influence of age and composition on the brightness of an event. These results show that the outcome depends sensitively on the nuclear burning, particularly weak interactions. Thus precise measurement of the largest possible scales of the Universe requires accurately capturing physics at some of the smallest scales.

  1. SEP

    21

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Status of Pythia 8 for an Electron-Ion Collider"

    Presented by Ilkka Helenius, University of Tubingen

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, September 21, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Andrey Tarasov

    Pythia 8 is a general-purpose Monte-Carlo event generator widely used to simulate high-energy proton-proton collisions at the LHC. Recently it has been extended to handle also other collision systems involving lepton and heavy-ion beams. In this seminar I will review the current Pythia 8 capabilities in processes relevant to an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) and discuss about the projected future improvements. The relevant processes can be divided into two regions based on the virtuality of the intermediate photon: deeply inelastic scattering (DIS) at high virtualities and photoproduction at low virtualities. I will begin with an introduction of the event generation steps in Pythia 8 and then briefly discuss how the DIS processes can be simulated. Then I present our photoproduction framework and compare the results to the HERA data for charged-hadron and dijet production in lepton-proton collisions. In particular I discuss about the role of multiparton interactions in photon-proton interactions with resolved photons and how these can be constrained with the existing HERA data. Then I discuss how the same framework can be applied to ultra-peripheral heavy-ion collisions at the LHC where one can study high-energy photon-nucleus interactions in a kinematic region comparable to EIC. Finally I will show our first predictions for dijet production in these events and quantify the contribution of diffractive events according to the hard diffractionmodel that has been recently implemented into Pythia 8.

  2. SEP

    28

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jordy De Vries, UMass Amherst

    2 pm, Building 510, CFNS Seminar Room 2-38

    Friday, September 28, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chun Shen

  3. OCT

    2

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Exporing the Phase Diagram with Succeptibility Scaling Functions: Epic Voyage or Just Another Bad Trip"

    Presented by Roy A Lacey, Stony Brook University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, October 2, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jiangyong Jia

    A major goal of the ongoing experimental programs at RHIC is to chart the QCD phase diagram.Pinpointing the location of the first order phase boundary which terminates at a critical end point (CEP), in the temperature versus baryon chemical potential (T,µB) plane of this phase diagram, is key to this mapping. Finite-Size-Finite-Time succeptibility scaling functions can give crucial insight on these essential landmarks of the phase diagram. I will discuss recent attempts to extract and use such scaling functions to pin down the location of the CEP, as well as the associated critical exponents required to identify its universality class.

  4. OCT

    12

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RBRC Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Srimoyee Sen, University of Arizona

    2 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Friday, October 12, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Andrey Tarasov

  5. OCT

    19

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Aleksas Mazeliauskas, University of Heidelberg

    2 pm, Building 510, CFNS Seminar Room 2-38

    Friday, October 19, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chun Shen

  6. OCT

    30

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Cosmic Chandlery with Thermonuclear Supernovae"

    Presented by Alan Calder, Stony Brook University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, October 30, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

    Thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae are bright stellar explosions distinguished by light curves that can be calibrated to allow for their use as "standard candles" for measuring cosmological distances. Our research investigates how properties of the host galaxy such as composition and age influence properties of the progenitor system, which in turn influence the thermonuclear burning during an event and thus its brightness. I will present the results from ensembles of simulations addressing the influence of age and composition on the brightness of an event. These results show that the outcome depends sensitively on the nuclear burning, particularly weak interactions. Thus precise measurement of the largest possible scales of the Universe requires accurately capturing physics at some of the smallest scales.

  7. NOV

    2

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RBRC Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Al Mueller, Columbia University

    2 pm, Building 510, Room 2-38

    Friday, November 2, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Andrey Tarasov

  8. NOV

    30

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RBRC Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Juan Rojo, VU University

    2 pm, Building 510, Room 2-38

    Friday, November 30, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Andrey Tarasov

  1. SEP

    20

    Today

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "The Belle II Experiment"

    Presented by Bryan Fulsom, PNNL

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, September 20, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: David Jaffe

    The first generation of B-Factories, BaBar and Belle, operated over the previous decade and produced many world-leading measurements related to flavor physics. Their discoveries contributed to the awarding of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physics. The Belle II experiment, now underway at the KEK laboratory in Japan, is a substantial upgrade of both the Belle detector and the KEKB accelerator. It aims to collect 50 times more data than existing B-Factory samples. This will provide unprecedented sensitivity to new physics signatures in the flavor sector. This talk will present the upgrade efforts of the Belle II experiment, results from its recent first e+e- collisions, and the future physics opportunities the experiment will provide.

  2. SEP

    25

    Tuesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Searches for decays of a Higgs boson into pairs of light (pseudo)scalars with the ATLAS detector"

    Presented by Ljiljana Morvaj

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, September 25, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

    The branching ratio of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson to non-SM or "exotic" states is currently constrained to be less than 34% at 95% confidence level. This opens possibility to search for new particles in the decays of the Higgs boson. Such searches could provide a unique access to hidden-sector states that are singlets under the SM gauge transformations. A search for decays of the Higgs boson to a pair of new spin–0 particles, H → aa, where the a–bosons decay to a b-quark pair and a muon pair, is presented in this seminar. The analysis uses 36.1 fb−1 of proton-proton collisions data with √s = 13 TeV recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2015 and 2016. No deviation from the Standard Model prediction is observed and limits on Br(H → aa → bbμμ) are set in the a–boson mass range of 20–60 GeV. Searches in other final states, such as four b-quarks (H → aa → 4b) and two jets and two photons (H → aa → ggγγ), are also discussed.

  3. OCT

    1

    Monday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Results from NA62 and its future program"

    Presented by Babette Döbrich, CERN

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, October 1, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

    The decay K+→π+νν, with a very precisely predicted branching ratio of less than 10^{-10}, is one of the best candidates to reveal indirect effects of new physics at the highest mass scales. The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS is designed to measure the branching ratio of the K+→π+νν with a decay-in-flight technique, novel for this channel. NA62 took data in 2016, 2017 and another year run is scheduled in 2018. Statistics collected in 2016 allows NA62 to reach the Standard Model sensitivity for K+→π+νν, entering the domain of 10-10 single event sensitivity and showing the proof of principle of the experiment. The analysis data is reviewed and the preliminary result from the 2016 data set presented. In addition, owing to the high beam-energy and a hermetic detector coverage, NA62 also has the opportunity to directly search for a plaethora of long-lived beyond-the Standard Model particles, such as Axion-like Particles and Dark Photons. We will review the status and results of this searches and give prospects for future data taking at NA62.

  4. OCT

    4

    Thursday

    Special Particle Physics Seminar

    "Latest XENON1T results"

    Presented by Qing Lin, Columbia University

    1 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 4, 2018, 1:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chao Zhang

    Understanding the properties of dark matter particle is a fundamental problem in particle physics and cosmology. The search of dark matter particle scattering off nuclei target using ultra-low background detector is one of the most promising technology to decipher the nature of dark matter. The XENON1T experiment, which is a dual phase detector with ~2.0 tons of xenon running at the Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy, is designed to lead the field of dark matter direct detection. Since November 2016, the XENON1T detector is continuously taking data, with a background rate of more than one order of magnitude lower than any current generation dark matter search experiment. In this talk, I will present the latest results from XENON1T. Details about the XENON1T detector as well as the data analysis techniques will also be covered.

  5. OCT

    4

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Dr Elinor Medezinski, Princeton University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 4, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chi-Ting Chiang

  6. OCT

    11

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Higgs to beauty quarks"

    Presented by Caterina Vernieri, SLAC

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 11, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

    The Higgs boson discovery at the LHC marked a historic milestone in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Over the last six years, we have begun measuring its properties, which are essential to build a deep understanding of the Higgs sector of the Standard Model and to potentially uncover new phenomena. The Higgs' favored decay mode to beauty (b) quarks (~60%) had so far remained elusive because of the overwhelming background of b-quark production due to strong interactions. Observing the Higgs decay to b-quarks was one of the critical missing pieces of our knowledge of the Higgs sector. Measuring this decay is a fundamental step to confirm the mass generation for fermions and may also provide hints of physics beyond the Standard Model. The CMS observation of the decay of the SM Higgs boson into a pair of b-quarks exploiting an exclusive production mode (VH) is yet another major milestone. This experimental achievement at the LHC, considered nearly impossible in the past, makes use of several advanced machine learning techniques to identify the b-quark distinctive signature, improve the Higgs boson mass resolution, and discriminate the Higgs boson signal from background processes.

  7. OCT

    11

    Thursday

    NSLS-II Colloquium Series

    "Biophysical Studies of an RNA Virus particle and its Maturation: Insights into an Elegantly Programmed Nano-machine"

    Presented by John E. (Jack) Johnson, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 11, 2018, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: John Hill

    Nudaurelia Capensis ? Virus (N?V) is a eukaryotic, quasi-equivalent, RNA virus, with a T=4 surface lattice, where maturation is dramatic (a change in particle size of 100Å) and is novel in that it can be investigated in vitro. Here we use X-ray crystallography, biochemistry, Small Angle X-ray Scattering, and electron cryo-microscopy and image reconstruction (CryoEM), to characterize maturation intermediates, an associated auto-catalytic cleavage, the kinetics of morphological change and to demonstrate that regions of N?V subunit folding are maturation-dependent and occur at rates determined by their quasi-equivalent position in the capsid. Matsui, T., Lander, G. C., Khayat, R., and Johnson, J. E. 2010. Subunits fold at position-dependent rates during maturation of a eukaryotic RNA virus. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:14111-5. Veesler, D., and Johnson, J.E. 2012. Virus Maturation. Annual review of biophysics 41:473-496. Doerschuk, P. C., Gong, Y., Xu, N., Domitrovic, T., and Johnson, J. E. 2016. Virus particle dynamics derived from CryoEM studies. Curr Opin Virol 18:57-63.

  8. OCT

    18

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "ATLAS Di-boson resonance searches"

    Presented by Viviana Cavaliere, Brookhaven National Lab

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 18, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

  9. NOV

    1

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search of the rare decay of KL→π0νν at J-PARC"

    Presented by Yu-Chen, Tung

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 1, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chao Zhang

    J-PARC KOTO is a dedicated experiment to search for the rare KL→π0νν decay. This decay is special not only because of its direct CP violating process, but also its theoretical cleanness. In the standard model, the branching ratio of KL→π0νν is calculated to be 3×10-11 with only a few percent uncertainty, which provides a clean base to explore new physics through finding deviations from the standard model. In the recently released results of data collected in 2015, the sensitivity of search was improved by an order of magnitude from the previous result and no event was observed in the signal region, with the prediction of 0.4 background event. In this talk, I will report the analysis and DAQ plan toward the sensitivity of O(-11).

  10. NOV

    29

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "The structure of the proton in the LHC precision era"

    Presented by Juan Rojo, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and Nikhef

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, November 29, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

    The determination of the partonic structure of the proton is a central component of the precision phenomenology program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This internal structure of nucleons is quantified in the collinear QCD factorization framework by the Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs), which encode the probability of finding quarks and gluons inside the proton carrying a given amount of its momentum. PDFs cannot currently be computed from first principles, and therefore they need to be determined from experimental data from a variety of hard-scattering cross-sections in lepton-proton and proton-proton collisions. This program, known as the global QCD analysis, involves combining the most PDF-sensitive data and the highest precision QCD and electroweak calculations available within a statistically robust fitting methodology. In this talk I review our current understanding of the quark and gluon structure of the proton, which emphasis for the implications for precision LHC phenomenology and searches for new physics, but also exploring other aspects of the nucleon structure such as their impact on high-energy neutrino telescopes, the connection with lattice QCD calculations, and the onset of novel small-x dynamics beyond the collinear framework. Finally, I highlight the prospects for improving our understanding of the quark/gluon structure of the nucleon at the high-luminosity LHC era.

  11. DEC

    6

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "W mass and Weinberg angle measurments at ATLAS"

    Presented by Matthias Schott

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, December 6, 2018, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricoli

  12. JAN

    10

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Cross section measurements and new physics searches with WZ vector boson scattering events at CMS"

    Presented by Kenneth Long, University of Wisconsin - Madison

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, January 10, 2019, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Alessandro Tricolli

    As the standard model (SM) Higgs boson looks increasingly like its SM expectation, expanded tests of the electroweak (EW) sector of the SM are a focal point of the long-term LHC program. Production of massive vector bosons via vector boson scattering provides a direct probe of the self-interactions of the massive vector bosons, which are intimately connected to the Higgs-Englert-Brout mechanism of EW symmetry breaking. A search for vector boson scattering of W and Z bosons has recently been performed by the CMS experiment using data collected in 2016. I will present this search as well as WZ cross section measurements, which are less dependent on theoretical inputs. This process is also sensitive to New Physics in the EW sector. I will present interpretations of these results in terms of explicit models predicting additional charged Higgs bosons and in the generalized framework of dimension-8 effective field theory.