BNL Home
  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • DUNE

    After a rush to start up the first large prototype detector, stellar results show the technology for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment is ready to shine. Photo by CERN

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

The nuclear theory group conducts research in all areas of QCD, including structure of hadrons and nuclei at high energies, the QCD phase diagram and the properties of quark-gluon matter.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Nuclear and Particle Physics Software

Participates in experiments across BNL's nuclear and particle physics programs, providing software and expertise with a particular emphasis on common software solutions.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Belle II

An experiment at Japan’s SuperKEKB particle accelerator recording decay products from electron-positron collisisons. Brookhaven hosts a copy of the raw data and an archive of the detector’s conditions at the time of collision.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

Short-Baseline Neutrino Program

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

PROSPECT

Precision measurement of reactor antineutrino spectrum in searching for new oscillation signatures of neutrinos.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. FEB

    25

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "From actions to answers: flavour physics from lattice gauge theory"

    Presented by Peter Boyle, BNL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 25, 2020, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Hooman Davoudiasl

    Lattice gauge theory is a numerical approach to the Feynman path integral, and is the only systematically improvable approach to make theoretical predictions of hadronic properties from the underlying theory of quarks and gluons. I will present theoretical numerical calculations of hadronic properties that represent theoretical input to flavour physics, quark flavour mixing, and standard model CP violation in the Kaon, D and B mesons. These lead to constraints on CKM flavour mixing constants of the standard model, and searches for new physics.

  2. MAR

    10

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Tae Min Hong, University of Pittsburgh

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 10, 2020, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: George Redlinger

  3. MAR

    24

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Challenges in particle physics detectors development"

    Presented by Francesco Forti, University and INFN, Pisa

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 24, 2020, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: George Redlinger

    Detector technologies have always played a central role in particle physics experiments and enabled innovative measurements and discoveries. The development of new technologies for future experiments is increasingly complex and expensive, requiring significant human and monetary resources, as well as a long preparation period. Strong connection with industry and attention to technology transfer and societal impact have become essential elements of the development. This colloquium will discuss the main challenges in detector development, not only from the technological point of view, but also from the human resources and organizational perspectives, in particular in the context of the currently ongoing update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics

  1. FEB

    25

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Balance function as a unique probe to the quark gluon plasma: overview and outlook"

    Presented by Jin Jin Pan, Wayne State University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 25, 2020, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jiangyong Jia

    In relativistic heavy-ion collisions, correlations of hadrons with opposite quantum numbers provide insight into general charge creation mechanisms, the time scales of quark production, collective motion of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), and re-scattering in the hadronic phase. The longitudinal and azimuthal widths of general charge balance functions for charged pion (??±), kaon (??±) and (anti-)proton (??/??¯) are used to examine the two-wave quark production scenario recently proposed to explain quark-antiquark productions within the QGP, which predicts a large increase in up and down quark pairs relative to strange quark pairs around the time of hadronization. Balance function as a function of relative azimuthal angle is a good probe to the diffusion effect, which is a signature of the QGP. In addition, the balance function integrals measure hadron pairing probabilities, which provide a key constraint for hadron productions in models. Furthermore, balance function is also a key observable to study net-proton fluctuations and the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME). In this talk, I will present a state-of-the-art overview on experimental measurements of balance function by STAR and ALICE, along with an outlook for the future experimental measurements.

  2. MAY

    12

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Unitarity in meson spectroscopy: implications for experiment, lattice, and models"

    Presented by George Rupp, Instituto Superior Técnico

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 12, 2020, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    The most fundamental cornerstone of the PDG tables is the uniqueness of S-matrix pole positions of unstable particles, as a consequence of quantum-field-theory principles. Therefore, the unitarity property of the S-matrix should ideally be respected in whatever description of meson resonances in experiment, lattice-QCD simulations, and quark models. However, mesons are still often analyzed using non-unitary Breit-Wigner parametrizations and treated as manifest bound states on the lattice or in models. In the present talk I shall demonstrate the huge discrepancies that may result from such naive approaches, with potentially dramatic consequences for meson spectroscopy and the inferred confining potential.

  1. FEB

    26

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "HUNTER: a search for keV-scale sterile neutrinos using trapped atoms"

    Presented by Prof. Peter Meyers

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, February 26, 2020, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Hanyu Wei

    The HUNTER experiment is a search for sterile neutrinos with masses in the 10-300 keV range. The neutrino missing mass will be reconstructed from 131-Cs electron capture decays occurring in a magneto-optically trapped, laser-cooled sample. Reaction-microscope spectrometers will be used to measure the vector momenta of all charged decay products with high solid angle acceptance, and LYSO scintillators read out by silicon photomultiplier arrays detect x-rays, each with sufficient resolution to reconstruct the neutrino missing mass as a peak separated from the near-zero-mass active neutrinos. The stand-alone apparatus to do this has dimensions of a few meters.

  2. MAR

    4

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "What is the Higgs boson hiding"

    Presented by Caterina Vernieri, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    3:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, March 4, 2020, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Viviana Cavaliere

    The Higgs boson discovery at the LHC marked a historic milestone in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Over the last eight years, we have begun measuring its properties, which are essential to build a deep understanding of the Higgs sector of the Standard Model and to potentially uncover new phenomena. The Standard Model is far from being a complete theory of nature and many of its predictions have yet to be tested. In particular, the energy potential of the Higgs boson field, responsible for the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism, has not yet been measured by any experiment. A measurement of the Higgs boson self-coupling at the LHC would shed light into the actual structure of the potential, whose exact shape can have deep theoretical consequences. This coupling can be accessed directly through the very challenging measurement of Higgs pair production. In this talk the experimental status of the di-Higgs boson production searches and constraints on the self-coupling at the LHC will be presented and the special role played by the decay to b-quark, the largest Higgs branching fraction, and its distinctive signature will be described.

  3. MAR

    5

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "diHiggs Prospects"

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 5, 2020, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Viviana Cavaliere

  4. MAR

    12

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBA"

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 12, 2020, 3:00 pm

  5. MAR

    19

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "New result from CUORE"

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 19, 2020, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Hanyu Wei

  6. MAR

    24

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Challenges in particle physics detectors development"

    Presented by Francesco Forti, University and INFN, Pisa

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 24, 2020, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: George Redlinger

    Detector technologies have always played a central role in particle physics experiments and enabled innovative measurements and discoveries. The development of new technologies for future experiments is increasingly complex and expensive, requiring significant human and monetary resources, as well as a long preparation period. Strong connection with industry and attention to technology transfer and societal impact have become essential elements of the development. This colloquium will discuss the main challenges in detector development, not only from the technological point of view, but also from the human resources and organizational perspectives, in particular in the context of the currently ongoing update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics

  7. MAR

    26

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBA"

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, March 26, 2020, 3:00 pm

  8. APR

    9

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBA"

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 9, 2020, 3:00 pm

  9. APR

    23

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBA"

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 23, 2020, 3:00 pm

  10. APR

    27

    Monday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "The ILC as Window into the Early Universe"

    Presented by Jenny List, DESY

    3:30 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Monday, April 27, 2020, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Viviana Cavaliere

    A key motivation for the next generation of particle colliders is to shed light on some of the puzzles related to our current understanding of the evolution of the universe. These comprise the quest for Dark Matter, but also the mechanism of inflation and baryogenesis. The Higgs boson discovered at the LHC could be intimately related to these questions, and therefore precision determinations of its properties at a future electron-positron collider will provide important information on a potential Dark Sector. Beyond the precision characterization of established particles like the Higgs boson, such a future electron-positron collider would offer a discovery potential for Dark Particles which is to a high degree complementary to searches at the LHC.

  11. MAY

    7

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBA"

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 7, 2020, 3:00 pm

  12. MAY

    21

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBA"

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 21, 2020, 3:00 pm