BNL Home
  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Neutrinos

    LBNE and the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiments seek to understand the subtle oscillations of neutrinos, ghost-like particles formed in the heart of stars

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

Conducts research to understand many body aspects of QCD, including the properties of hot and dense matter as well high gluon density matter.  

Lattice Gauge Theory

Studies properties of hot and dense matter using lattice QCD methods.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Physics Application

Develops physics applications software for the LHC ATLAS experiment.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

BOSS studies dark energy—the force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

MicroBooNE

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

Mu2e

Experiment which directly probes the Intensity Frontier and aids research on the Energy and Cosmic frontiers with precision measurements to characterize properties of new particles.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. JUN

    21

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Sterile Neutrinos as the Origin of Dark and Baryonic Matter"

    Presented by Mikhail Shaposhnikov, EPFL

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 21, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Robert Pisarski'

    I will discuss how three sterile neutrinos alone can simultaneously explain neutrino oscillations, the observed dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe without new physics above the Fermi scale. The experimental prospects to search for these particles will be outlined.

  2. JUN

    28

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "TBA"

    Presented by Larry Weinstein, Old Dominion University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 28, 2016, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Robert Pisarski

  1. MAY

    6

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Fluid dynamics for the anisotropically expanding quark-gluon plasma"

    Presented by Dennis Bazow, The Ohio State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 6, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: ''Soeren Schlichting''

    Local momentum anisotropies become large in the early stages of the quark-gluon plasma created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, due to the extreme difference in the longitudinal and transverse expansion rates. In such situations, fluid dynamics derived from an expansion around an isotropic local equilibrium state is bound to break down. Instead, we subsume the slowest nonhydrodynamic degree of freedom (associated with the deviation from momentum isotropy) at leading order defining a local anisoptropic quasi-equilibrium state, thereby treating the longitudinal/transverse pressure anisotropy nonperturbatively. Perturbative transport equations are then derived to deal with the remaining residual momentum anisotropies creating a complete transient effective theory called viscous anisotropic hydrodynamics. This approach has been shown to dramatically outperform viscous hydrodynamics in several simplified situations for which exact solutions exits but which share with realistic expansion scenarios the problem of large dissipative currents. We will discuss the present status of applying viscous anisotropic hydrodynamics to the phenomenological description of the quark-gluon plasma in realistic expansion scenarios.

  2. MAY

    13

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Evolution of the jet opening angle distribution in holographic plasma"

    Presented by Andrei Sadofyev, MIT

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 13, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Soeren Schlichting'

    Energetic jets are particularly interesting probes of QGP created in heavy ion collisions. Recently a lot of progress was made in attempting to describe the jet evolution in holography. In this talk I'll present an application of a simple dual model to study the jet substructure starting with energy and angle distributions from pQCD. In particular I will show that there are two competing effects: (1) each individual jet widens as it propagates through plasma; (2) the final jet opening angle distribution becomes narrower since wider jets lose more energy and less likely to survive. So, the mean opening angle for jets with a given energy can easily shift toward smaller angles, even while every jet in the ensemble broadens.

  3. MAY

    20

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Abhijit Majumdar, Wayne State University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 20, 2016, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Soeren Schlichting'

  1. MAY

    5

    Today

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Probing the Nature of Neutrinos with Double Beta Decay"

    Presented by Liang Yang, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 5, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    Understanding fundamental properties of neutrinos is of compelling interest to the nuclear and particle physics community. The discovery of neutrino oscillations is one of our first hints of physics beyond the Standard Model. Searching for neutrinoless double decay can provide key insights into the neutrino mass generation mechanism and put stringent constraints on the absolute neutrino mass scale. Such a rare decay, if exists, would signify the Majorana nature of neutrinos and the non-conservation of lepton number. In the past decade, large ultra-low background liquid xenon detectors have emerged as a promising technology that can push the neutrinoless double beta decay search to unprecedented sensitivity. In this talk I will describe recent results and prospects of current generation experiment EXO-200, as well as the R&D program for future tonne scale detector nEXO.

  2. MAY

    12

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Muon antineutrino oscillations at T2K"

    Presented by Jordan Myslik, University of Victoria

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 12, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Xin Qian'

    The T2K ("Tokai to Kamioka") experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment in Japan. A beam of muon neutrinos or muon antineutrinos is produced at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) in Tokai. The unoscillated neutrino flux is measured by the near detector complex 280 m from the proton target, and the oscillated neutrino flux is measured by the far detector, Super-Kamiokande, 295 km away. Using a beam of muon neutrinos, T2K has performed precise measurements of muon neutrino disappearance, and discovered muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillation by measuring electron neutrino appearance. Since the summer of 2014, T2K has been taking data using a beam of muon antineutrinos, and has released the results of both a muon antineutrino disappearance analysis and an electron antineutrino appearance analysis, both using antineutrino beam data up to the summer of 2015. This talk will discuss these analyses, going into detail about the role played by the near detector, and looking at future directions.

  3. MAY

    24

    Tuesday

    High Performance Computing and Programming

    "OpenACC and GPU Hands-on workshop"

    Presented by Presented by NVIDIA instructor Bob Crovella

    8:30 am, Stony Brook University

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016, 8:30 am

    NVIDIA and the Institute for Advanced Computational Science (IACS) at Stony Brook University are pleased to be organizing a 2-day High Performance Computing and Programming event. Presented by NVIDIA instructor Bob Crovella, the workshop will introduce programming techniques using OpenACC and will include topics such as optimization and profiling methods for GPU programming.

  4. MAY

    25

    Wednesday

    NVIDIA and the Institute for Advanced Computational Science (IACS) at Stony Brook University are pleased to be organizing a 2-day High Performance Computing and Programming event.

    "OpenACC and GPU Hands-on workshop"

    Presented by Presented by NVIDIA instructor Bob Crovella

    8:30 am, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, May 25, 2016, 8:30 am

    NVIDIA and the Institute for Advanced Computational Science (IACS) at Stony Brook University are pleased to be organizing a 2-day High Performance Computing and Programming event. Presented by NVIDIA instructor Bob Crovella, the workshop will introduce programming techniques using OpenACC and will include topics such as optimization and profiling methods for GPU programming.

  5. MAY

    26

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Searching for Sterile Neutrinos with MINOS"

    Presented by Ashley Timmons, University of Manchester

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 26, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: '''Xin Qian'''

  6. JUN

    23

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "TBD"

    Presented by Claire Lee

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, June 23, 2016, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Michael Begel'