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Physics Fellowship Program

The RIKEN BNL Research Center offers a Fellow system at Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) allowing joint appointments with universities and research laboratories throughout the world, enabling talented researchers to hold tenure track positions at their home institution as well as a Fellow position with the Center.

This system was established to increase the research potential of the Center and to disseminate its research activities and results. To date, nine RHIC Physics Fellows have received the U.S. Department of Energy Outstanding Junior Investigator Award and over 50 Fellows have received tenure at their home institutions since the inception of the program.

Institutions interested in initiating a new RHIC Physics Fellow position may obtain details on how to proceed by contacting Colleen Michael, 1-631-344-4919.


RBRC Research Groups

Kharzeev
Theory

D. Kharzeev, Group Leader

This group conducts QCD related research that includes heavy ion physics, the quark gluon plasma, color glass condensate and hard QCD/spin physics.

Izubuchi
Computing

T. Izubuchi, Group Leader

This group's mission is to solve the dynamics of QCD from first principle lattice simulations using in-house computer resources.

Akiba
Experimental

Y. Akiba, Group Leader

This group studies the spin structure of the proton via polarized p+p collisions at RHIC as well as the properties of quark gluon plasma.

The RIKEN BNL Research Center is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

  1. APR

    26

    Wednesday

    RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop

    Synergies of pp and pA Collisions with an Electron-Ion Collider

    April 26-28, 2017

  2. APR

    26

    Wednesday

    RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop

    Saturation: Recent Developments, New Ideas and Measurements

    April 26-28, 2017

  1. MAR

    30

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "The hadronic light-by-light contribution to muon g-2 from lattice QCD"

    Presented by Luchang Jin, BNL

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, March 30, 2017, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: 'Enrico Rinaldi'

    The current measurement of muonic g-2 disagrees with the theoretical calculation by about 3 standard deviations. Hadronic vacuum polarization (HVP) and hadronic light by light (HLbL) are the two types of processes that contribute most to the theoretical uncertainty. The current value for HLbL is still given by models. We report our latest lattice calculation of hadronic light-by-light contribution to muon g-2 using our recent developed moment method. The connected diagrams and the leading disconnected diagrams are included. The calculation is performed on a 48^3 × 96 lattice with physical pion mass and 5.5 fm box size. We expect sizable finite volume and finite lattice spacing corrections to the results of these calculations which will be estimated in calculations to be carried out over the next 1-2 years.

  2. APR

    7

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Anisotropic dissipative fluid dynamics - foundations & applications in heavy-ion physics"

    Presented by Johann Wolfgang, Goethe-Universität

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 7, 2017, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: 'Heikki Mantysaari'

    In collisions of heavy ions at ultrarelativistic energies, a system of hot and dense strongly interacting matter is created. This matter exhibits a surprisingly strong degree of collectivity, implying a short mean free path of its constituents and, consequently, a small shear viscosity-to-entropy density ratio. This allows to describe the evolution of the system using relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics. Dissipative fluid dynamics can be understood as an expansion around local thermodynamical equilibrium, corresponding to the ideal-fluid limit where dissipative corrections are absent. A short mean free path means that this expansion is well defined and converges sufficiently rapidly. Nevertheless, in the initial stage of a heavy-ion collision, space-time gradients of the fluid-dynamical fields (energy-momentum and net-charge densities) are so large that dissipative corrections to the ideal-fluid limit can become sizable. In this situation, novel approaches to relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics are called for. One such approach is anisotropic dissipative fluid dynamics, which is based on an expansion around an anisotropic non-equilibrium state (instead of local thermodynamical equilibrium, as in conventional dissipative fluid dynamics). In this talk, I present a derivation of the equations of motion of anisotropic dissipative fluid dynamics from the Boltzmann equation, using the method of moments. I also discuss how to resolve an ambiguity to close the system of equations of motion in the case when there are no corrections to the anisotropic state which constitutes the basis of the moment expansion.

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