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Physics Fellowship Program

The RIKEN BNL Research Center offers a Fellow system at Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) allowing joint appointments with universities and research laboratories throughout the world, enabling talented researchers to hold tenure track positions at their home institution as well as a Fellow position with the Center.

This system was established to increase the research potential of the Center and to disseminate its research activities and results. To date, nine RHIC Physics Fellows have received the U.S. Department of Energy Outstanding Junior Investigator Award and over 50 Fellows have received tenure at their home institutions since the inception of the program.

Institutions interested in initiating a new RHIC Physics Fellow position may obtain details on how to proceed by contacting Maureen McNeill-Shea, 1(631) 344-2758.


RBRC Research Groups

Kharzeev
Theory

D. Kharzeev, Group Leader

This group conducts QCD related research that includes heavy ion physics, the quark gluon plasma, color glass condensate and hard QCD/spin physics.

Izubuchi
Computing

T. Izubuchi, Group Leader

This group's mission is to solve the dynamics of QCD from first principle lattice simulations using in-house computer resources.

Akiba
Experimental

Y. Akiba, Group Leader

This group studies the spin structure of the proton via polarized p+p collisions at RHIC as well as the properties of quark gluon plasma.

The RIKEN BNL Research Center is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

There are no conferences scheduled at this time.

  1. OCT

    30

    Friday

    Nuclear Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "Matter and radiation in the fragmentation region of heavy-ion collisions"

    Presented by Dr Isobel Kolbe

    11 am, Webcast

    Friday, October 30, 2020, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Yoshitaka Hatta

    Abstract: We study the fragmentation (far forward/backward) region of heavy-ion collisions by considering an at-rest nucleus which is struck by a relativistic sheet of colored glass. By means of a simple classical model, we calculate the subsequent evolution of baryons and the associated radiation. We confirm that the struck nucleus undergoes compression and that the dynamics of the early times of the collision are best described by two separate fluids as the produced radiation's velocity distribution is very different to the velocity distribution of the matter in the struck nucleus. (Based on https://arxiv.org/abs/2009.05680)

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