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Scientists in Brookhaven's Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science Department study basic, theoretical and applied aspects of materials, their utilization, and their electronic, physical, mechanical, and chemical properties in relation to their structure. 

The field of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science integrates the knowledge and tools of chemistry and physics with the principles of engineering to understand and optimize the behavior of materials, as well as to create new and improved materials to help fulfill the missions of the Department of Energy.

  1. DEC

    18

    Tuesday

    Condensed-Matter Physics & Materials Science Seminar

    "Uncovering the interactions behind quantum phenomena"

    Presented by Keith Taddei, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    11 am, ISB Bldg. 734, Conf. Rm. 201 (upstairs)

    Tuesday, December 18, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Ian Robinson/Mark Dean

    Quantum computing, spintronics and plasmonics are nascent fields with potential to radically change our technological landscape. Fundamental to advancing these technologies is a mastery of quantum materials such as superconductors, quantum-spin-liquids and multiferroics. Ideally, we would know exactly what interactions give rise to these phenomena and design materials suitable for applications however, such an understanding as of yet eludes us. Instead we are stuck digging around in the phase space of known quantum materials slowly uncovering pertinent details to their design, filling in pieces of our incomplete picture. In this presentation, I will discuss recent bits I have found in my use of neutron scattering to study quantum materials. Starting with a novel new family of quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) superconductors (A1,2TM3As3 with A = alkali metal and TM = Cr, Mo) I will present findings of short-range structural order and a proximate magnetic instability which, due the radically different structure, allow for new insights to the pertinence to such orders to superconductivity. Importantly, in these materials the two orders break different symmetries and so their interactions with the superconducting order can be studied independently. Next, I will discuss an interesting yet neglected family of frustrated magnetic materials – the rare-earth pyrogermanates (REPG). We find the Er2Ge2O7 REPG to exhibit 'local-Ising' type magnetism in direct analogy to the spin-ice pyrochlores suggesting effects of local anisotropies and dipole interactions. Finally, I will present ongoing work investigating spin-driven polarization effects in the magnetically and structurally straightforward multiferroic BiCoO3. These results demonstrate the essential role of neutron and x-ray scattering techniques in studying these complex materials and the fruitful opportunities these systems present to advance our understanding of quantum materials.

Condensed Matter Theory

Conducts basic research over a wide swath of theoretical physics, ranging from strongly correlated electrons to first principle electronic structure theory.  

Neutron Scattering

Studies the role of antiferromagnetism in high-temperature superconductors.  The interaction of charge carriers with magnetic moments is of critical importance but remains a challenge to understand. .

X-Ray Scattering

Carries out basic studies of the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of condensed matter systems using synchrotron-based x-ray scattering techniques. .

comscope logo

The Center for Computational Material Spectroscopy and Design develops, advances, and shares a powerful and user-friendly software suite called Comsuite to accelerate the discovery, analysis, and design of functional strongly correlated materials—the basis for next generation technologies.

Electron Microscopy and Nanostructure

Utilizes advanced electron microscopy techniques to study nanoscale structure and defects that determine the utility of functional materials, such as superconductors, multiferroics, and other energy related systems including thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, and batteries.

Oxide Molecular Beam Epitaxy

Addresses key open questions in HTS physics such as the dimensionality of the HTS phenomenon, the spin and charge of free carriers, the nature of the superconducting transition, the role of charge stripes (if any) in the HTS state, the nature of the overdoped metallic state, and more.

Spectroscopic Imaging

Span a wide range of quantum matter systems, including superconductors, superfluids, supersolids, electronic liquid crystals, topological insulators superconductors & superfluids, heavy fermions, and spin liquids. Throughout, the focus is on development of innovative techniques and approaches to each problem.

Advanced Energy Materials

Studies both the microscopic and macroscopic properties of complex and nano-structured materials with a view to understanding and developing their application in different energy related technologies

Electron Spectroscopy

Explores the electronic structure and electrodynamics of topological insulators and strongly correlated electron systems, with particular attention to emergent phenomena, such as superconductivity and magnetism, using angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and optical spectroscopy.

The Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department is part of Brookhaven National Laboratory's Energy Sciences Directorate.