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Physics Fellowship Program

The RIKEN BNL Research Center offers a Fellow system at Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) allowing joint appointments with universities and research laboratories throughout the world, enabling talented researchers to hold tenure track positions at their home institution as well as a Fellow position with the Center.

This system was established to increase the research potential of the Center and to disseminate its research activities and results. To date, nine RHIC Physics Fellows have received the U.S. Department of Energy Outstanding Junior Investigator Award and over 50 Fellows have received tenure at their home institutions since the inception of the program.

Institutions interested in initiating a new RHIC Physics Fellow position may obtain details on how to proceed by contacting Colleen Michael, 1-631-344-4919.


RBRC Research Groups

McLerran
Theory

L. McLerran, Group Leader

This group conducts QCD related research that includes heavy ion physics, the quark gluon plasma, color glass condensate and hard QCD/spin physics.

Izubuchi
Computing

T. Izubuchi, Group Leader

This group's mission is to solve the dynamics of QCD from first principle lattice simulations using in-house computer resources.

Akiba
Experimental

Y. Akiba, Group Leader

This group studies the spin structure of the proton via polarized p+p collisions at RHIC as well as the properties of quark gluon plasma.

The RIKEN BNL Research Center is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

There are no conferences scheduled at this time.

  1. APR

    2

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Spin-Orbit Coupling in an Unpolarized Heavy Nucleus"

    Presented by Matt Sievert, BNL

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, April 2, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Daniel Pitonyak

    The next-generation Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) will make high precision measurements of spin-dependent observables at high energies on nuclear targets. This unique nuclear physics laboratory will bring together access to the multitude of spin-spin and spin-orbit structures which can exist in hadronic targets, and the high color-charge densities which generate the most intense gluon fields permitted by quantum mechanics. The interplay between those two features gives rise to new physical mechanisms which translate these spin-orbit structures into the observed cross-sections, and it makes these mechanisms amenable to first-principles calculation. In this talk, I will discuss the spin-orbit structure of quarks within an unpolarized heavy nucleus in the quasi-classical approximation. The possibility of polarized nucleons with orbital motion inside the unpolarized nucleus generates nontrivial mixing between the spin-orbit structures of the nucleons, and the corresponding structures in the nucleus. This generic feature of a dense quasi-classical system leads to direct predictions testable at an EIC, and in principle allows direct access to the orbital angular momentum in the nucleus.

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