BNL Home

Seminars

  1. FEB

    22

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Drell-Yan process beyond collinear approximation"

    Presented by Stebel Tomasz, BNL

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, February 22, 2018, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Yuya Tanizaki

  2. FEB

    27

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Multi-Messenger Picture of a Neutron Star Merger"

    Presented by Brian Metzger, Columbia University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, February 27, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    On August 17 the LIGO/Virgo gravitational wave observatories detected the first binary neutron star merger event (GW170817), a discovery followed by the most ambitious electromagnetic (EM) follow-up campaign ever conducted. A gamma-ray burst (GRB) of short duration and very low luminosity was discovered by the Fermi and INTEGRAL satellites within 2 seconds of the merger. Within 11 hours, a bright but rapidly-fading thermal optical counterpart was discovered in the galaxy NGC 4993 at a distance of only 40 Mpc. The properties of the optical transient match remarkably well predictions for kilonova emission powered by the radioactive decay of heavy nuclei synthesized in the expanding merger ejecta by the r-process. The rapid spectral evolution of the kilonova emission to near-infrared wavelengths demonstrates that a portion of the ejecta contains heavy lanthanide nuclei. Two weeks after the merger, rising non-thermal X-ray and radio emission were detected from the position of the optical transient, consistent with delayed synchrotron afterglow radiation from an initially off-axis relativistic jet with the properties consistent with those of (on-axis) cosmological short GRB. I will describe a unified scenario for the range of EM counterparts from GW170817 and their implications for the astrophysical origin of the r-process and the properties of neutron stars. I will preview the upcoming era of multi-messenger astronomy, once Advanced LIGO/Virgo reach design sensitivity and a neutron star merger is detected every few weeks.

  3. MAR

    2

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Quark / Antiquark Correlations in Heavy-Light Ion Collisions"

    Presented by Matt Sievert, LANL

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 2, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chun Shen

    It has long been known that sub-nucleonic fluctuations of the energy density in the initial stages of heavy ion collisions play an important role in generating the observed distributions of particles and their flow. These energy density fluctuations are dominated by the radiation of small-x gluons which are populated to classically large occupation numbers in the wave functions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions. While these soft gluons dominate the initial conditions for the energy density, it is quark production which determines the initial conditions of other conserved charges, like flavor and baryon number. With the recent development of state-of-the art hydrodynamics codes tailored to the Beam Energy Scan which can propagate these conserved charges into the final state, it is timely and important to calculate the initial conditions of these conserved charges from first principles in QCD. In this talk, I will present new results for the spatial correlations among quarks and antiquarks produced at mid-rapidity by pair production from small-x gluons. This single-pair production mechanism, which has been studied for some time in momentum space, is the leading contribution to these correlations in coordinate space for dilute-dense collisions. As one moves from the dilute-dense regime toward the dense-dense regime, correlations due to double pair production become more important, and these correlations persist over larger length scales than the single-pair production mechanism. Over nonperturbative length scales, only the correlations from the overlap geometry remain. I will present explicit results for quark-antiquark correlations due to single pair production, and I will outline some preliminary results for the various double-pair production mechanisms. The ultimate goal of this work will be to construct a code which can initialize these conserved charges over all length scales in heavy-ion collisions.

  4. MAR

    6

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Quantum simulation of gauge theories in optical lattices"

    Presented by Alexei Bazavov, Michigan State University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 6, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Andrei Nomerotski

    hile non-perturbative approaches such as lattice gauge theory led to significant advances in understanding the physics of strong interactions, many problems remain out of reach for classical computation, in particular, real-time dynamics or properties of QCD at finite baryon density that are being explored in heavy-ion collision experiments. Recent advances in the technology of engineering custom interactions for ultra-cold atomic gases in optical lattices opened a possibility for quantum simulations as was envisioned by R. Feynman in the 1980s. The main idea is that the degrees of freedom of the original system are mapped onto a quantum Hamiltonian whose dynamics can be realized in a laboratory. Many condensed matter Hamiltonians, such as Bose-Hubbard model, have been recently studied in this way. Quantum simulation of gauge theories is however challenging since the gauge symmetry is not naturally present in the ultra-cold atomic systems. I will review the current status of theoretical proposals for quantum simulation of field theories and then focus on our recent work on an explicitly gauge-invariant formulation of the Abelian-Higgs model for simulation on optical lattices.

  5. MAR

    8

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Looking ahead to BESII: new observables and new theoretical frameworks"

    Presented by Yi Yin, MIT

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, March 8, 2018, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Chun Shen

    Upcoming beam energy scan (BES) phase II will explore the QCD phase diagram with an unprecedented precision and would potentially discover the QCD critical point. I will discuss recent theoretical developments aim at maximizing the discovery potential of BESII from both phenomenological and formal perspectives. First, I will discuss new observables which are very sensitive to the presence of the QCD critical point and are possible due to the iTPC upgrade. In the second part, I will report recent progress on understanding and describing hydrodynamic fluctuations. Remarkably, effects of hydrodynamic fluctuations can be potentially important for precise determination of shear viscosity at top RHIC energy and would play a crucial role near the QCD critical point.

  6. MAR

    9

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Anna Stasto, Penn State

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 9, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chun Shen

  7. MAR

    15

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Hadronic light-by-light scattering in the muon g-2"

    Presented by Andreas Nyffeler, University of Mainz

    12:30 pm, Building 510, Room 2-160

    Thursday, March 15, 2018, 12:30 pm

  8. MAR

    20

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Probing the collectivity of heavy quarks in pPb collisions with prompt D0 elliptic flow using CMS detector"

    Presented by Zhenyu Chen, Rice University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, March 20, 2018, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Lijuan Ruan

    Recent years, evidence for collective effects has been revealed in pp and pPb collisions when looking at events releasing large number of particles. The experimental observations lead to a debate of the formation of strongly coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma in those small collision systems. Azimuthal anisotropy coefficient (vn) of heavy-flavor particles, and especially the comparison to light flavor particles vn, can shed light on the strength of the coupling between heavy flavor quarks and the hypothesized hydrodynamic medium at a significantly reduces size, and impose further constrains on different interpretations related to the origin of the observed collectivity. In this talk, the most recent results of prompt D0 meson elliptic flow (v2) in high-multiplicity pPb collisions are presented over a wide transverse momentum range. The results are compared to those of strange hadrons, including Kshort, Lambda, Cascade and Omega particles.

  9. APR

    3

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Eigenstate thermalization and its implications to statistical mechanics"

    Presented by Anatoli Polkovnikov, Boston University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 3, 2018, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Rob Pisarski

    In this talk I will overview recent developments in understanding quantum chaos through random matrix theory. I will discuss various conjectures on the nature of quantum stationary states in chaotic systems and show numerical evidence supporting them. It is the random nature of eigenstates, which ultimately leads to loss of information about initial conditions and leads to emergence of statistical mechanics in isolated systems. I will then introduce the so-called Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis (ETH) ansatz first proposed by J. Deutsch and M. Srednicki in 90th, which gives a unified framework for the structure of physical observable in quantum chaotic systems. I will demonstrate how the ETH ansatz naturally leads to emergence of various thermodynamic relations. At the end of the talk I will mention some open problems.

  10. APR

    6

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Andreas Schmitt, University of Southampton

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 6, 2018, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chun Shen

  11. MAY

    25

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Stanley Brodsky, Standford Univeristy

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 25, 2018, 2:00 pm

  1. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "High-pt Hadron Production in Au+Au and d+Au Collisions at sqrt (s) = 200 GeV"

    Presented by Sasha Milov, Stony Brook University

    Tuesday, July 1, 2003, 11 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  2. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Production of Lambda (1520) at RHIC at sqrt (s) = 200 GeV"

    Presented by Ludovic Gaudichet, Subatech, France

    Tuesday, July 15, 2003, 11 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  3. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Induced Criticality of Non-Order Parameter Fields"

    Presented by Agnes Mocsy, Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark

    Tuesday, July 22, 2003, 11 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  4. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Strangeness Production in Au+Au Collisions at RHIC"

    Presented by Ben Norman, Kent State University

    Tuesday, July 29, 2003, 11 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  5. Nuclear Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "Hydrodynamic Afterburner for Color Glass Condensate"

    Presented by Yasushi Nara, University of Arizona

    Friday, August 8, 2003, 2 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  6. High-Energy Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "Strong Interaction Effect on Muon g-2"

    Presented by Masashi Hayakawa, RIKEN/BNL Research Center

    Sunday, August 10, 2003, 1:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  7. High-Energy Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "Elitzurs Theorem and the Sign Problem"

    Presented by Kim Splittorff, Stony Brook University

    Wednesday, August 13, 2003, 1:30 pm
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  8. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Development of Novel Silicon Stripixel Detectors for High energy and Nuclear Physics Experiments"

    Presented by Zheng Li, Instrumentation Division

    Wednesday, September 10, 2003, 2:30 pm
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 535

  9. Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Discovery of Penta Quarks"

    Presented by Prof. Ken-chi Imai, Kyoto University, Japan

    Tuesday, October 14, 2003, 11 am
    Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

  10. RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop

    "Collective Flow and QGP Properties"

    Monday, November 17, 2003, 9 am
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510