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Contacts: Karen McNulty Walsh, (631) 344-8350 or Peter Genzer, (631) 344-3174printer iconPrint

The following news release, issued by Columbia University's Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, describes research that took place, in part, at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory. The release describes optical nanostructures that can slow down photons and control light dispersion, which were made in the CFN’s nanofabrication facility. “This work would not have been possible without the instrumentation, training, and expertise available at the CFN,” said CFN scientific staff member Aaron Stein, who assisted with the fabrication process. For more information on Brookhaven’s role in this research and other capabilities of the CFN, contact: Karen McNulty Walsh, 631 344-8350, kmcnulty@bnl.gov. Columbia Engineering School media contact: Holly Evarts, 347-453-7408, holly@engineering.columbia.edu.

Columbia Engineers Control Light Propagation in Photonic Chips

Major Breakthrough in Telecommunications Field

New York, NY — July 10, 2011 — Researchers at Columbia Engineering School have built optical nanostructures that enable them to slow photons down and fully control light dispersion. They have shown that it is possible for light (electromagnetic waves) to propagate from point A to point B without accumulating any phase, spreading through the artificial medium as if the medium is completely missing in space. This is the first time simultaneous phase and zero-index observations have been made on the chip-scale and at the infrared wavelength.

The study, to be published on Nature Photonics’s website July 10, was led by Chee Wei Wong, associate professor of mechanical engineering, and Serdar Kocaman, electrical engineering PhD candidate, both at Columbia Engineering, with support from the University College of London, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and the Institute of Microelectronics of Singapore.

“We’re very excited about this. We’ve engineered and observed a metamaterial with zero refractive index,” said Kocaman. “What we’ve seen is that the light disperses through the material as if the entire space is missing. The oscillatory phase of the electromagnetic wave doesn’t even advance such as in a vacuum — this is what we term a zero-phase delay.”

This exact control of optical phase is based on a unique combination of negative and positive refractive indices. All natural known materials have a positive refractive index. By sculpturing these artificial subwavelength nanostructures, the researchers were able to control the light dispersion so that a negative refractive index appeared in the medium. They then cascaded the negative index medium with a positive refractive index medium so that the complete nanostructure behaved as one with an index of refraction of zero.

“Phase control of photons is really important,” said Wong. “This is a big step forward in figuring out how to carry information on photonic chips without losing control of the phase of the light.”

“We can now control the flow of light, the fastest thing known to us,” he continued. “This can enable self-focusing light beams, highly directive antennas, and even potentially an approach to cloak or hide objects, at least in the small-scale or a narrow band of frequencies currently.”

This research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Columbia Engineering

Columbia University's Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, founded in 1864, offers programs in nine departments to both undergraduate and graduate students. With facilities specifically designed and equipped to meet the laboratory and research needs of faculty and students, Columbia Engineering is home to major Centers in energy, nanoscience, optics, genomic science, materials science, as well as one of the world’s leading programs in financial engineering. These interdisciplinary centers are leading the way in their respective fields while individual groups of engineers and scientists collaborate to solve some of society’s more vexing challenges. http://www.engineering.columbia.edu/

Center for Functional Nanomaterials

The Center for Functional Nanomaterials at Brookhaven National Laboratory is one of the five DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs), premier national user facilities for interdisciplinary research at the nanoscale. Together the NSRCs comprise a suite of complementary facilities that provide researchers with state-of-the-art capabilities to fabricate, process, characterize and model nanoscale materials, and constitute the largest infrastructure investment of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. The NSRCs are located at DOE’s Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Oak Ridge and Sandia and Los Alamos national laboratories. For more information about the DOE NSRCs, please visit http://nano.energy.gov.

Media contact:

Holly Evarts, Director of Strategic Communications and Media Relations 347-453-7408, holly@engineering.columbia.edu

2011-1306  |  Media & Communications Office

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