General Information

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  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Neutrinos

    LBNE and the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiments seek to understand the subtle oscillations of neutrinos, ghost-like particles formed in the heart of stars

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

Conducts research to understand many body aspects of QCD, including the properties of hot and dense matter as well high gluon density matter.  

Lattice Gauge Theory

Studies properties of hot and dense matter using lattice QCD methods.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Physics Application

Develops physics applications software for the LHC ATLAS experiment.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

BOSS studies dark energy—the force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

MicroBooNE

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

Mu2e

Experiment which directly probes the Intensity Frontier and aids research on the Energy and Cosmic frontiers with precision measurements to characterize properties of new particles.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. APR

    7

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Proton and the Future of Particle Physics"

    Presented by Richard Hill, Univ. Chicago

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Petrecky

    The venerable proton continues to play a central role in fundamental particle physics. Neutrinos scatter from protons in neutrino oscillation experiments, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are expected to scatter from protons in dark matter searches, and electrons or muons are bound by protons in precision atomic spectroscopy. Our understanding of the proton is an obstacle to the success of next generation experiments hoping to discover CP violation in the lepton sector and determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, discover the particle nature of dark matter, or reveal new interactions such as those that violate lepton universality. In this talk I present (i) an overview of the current state of knowledge in the neutrino sector, and theoretical advances that will determine a crucial missing ingredient in the predicted signal process of neutrino-nucleus scattering at a Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (ii) the first complete calculation of the scattering cross section of a proton on a static electroweak source, which determines WIMP-nucleus scattering rates at underground direct detection experiments and (iii) the status of the proton radius puzzle, whose most "mundane" resolution requires a 5 standard deviation shift in the value of the Rydberg constant. I describe how each of these problems has spurred the development of powerful new methods in effective quantum field theory.

  2. APR

    21

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Neutrinos and friends in the past and present universe"

    Presented by Alex Kusenko, UCLA

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 21, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    Neutrinos play a role in various aspects of cosmology, including production of light elements, and the rate of expansion of the universe. Furthermore, the neutrino masses imply the likely existence of right-handed neutrinos, which can exist in the form of dark matter, and which can explain the matterantimatter asymmetry of the universe. I will discuss the many faces ordinary and hypothetical neutrinos in cosmology.

  3. MAY

    12

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Where Did Half the Starlight in the Universe Go"

    Presented by Mark Devlin, University of Pennsylvania

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, May 12, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    We believe that approximately half of all the light from stars is absorbed and reprocessed by dust. The resulting emission is grey body with a temperature near 30 Kelvin. The COBE satellite made the first measurements of the resulting Far Infrared Background (FIRB), but since that time, we have been unable to resolve the background into individual galaxies. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) was designed to do this job. Its three bands at 250, 350, and 500 microns span the peak in emission for galaxies at z=1. I will discuss the BLAST experiment and present results from our measurements of resolved and unresolved galaxies. I will also discuss the implications for star formation in our own galaxy and how dust is changing the way we look at current and future searches for primordial gravity waves with the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  1. APR

    3

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Gravitational collapse, holography and hydrodynamics in extreme conditions"

    Presented by Paul Chesler, Harvard University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 3, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    A remarkable observation from RHIC and the LHC is that the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy-ion collisions behaves as a strongly coupled and nearly ideal liquid. Data also suggests that the debris produced by proton-nucleus collisions can also behave as a liquid. Understanding the dynamics responsible for the rapid equilibration of such tiny droplets is an outstanding problem. In recent years holography has emerged as a powerful tool to study non-equilibrium phenomena, mapping challenging quantum dynamics onto the classical dynamics of gravitational fields in one higher dimension. In the dual gravitational description the process of quark-gluon plasma formation and equilibration maps onto the process of gravitational collapse and black hole formation. I will describe how one can apply techniques and lessons learned from numerical relativity to holography and present recent work on holographic models of high energy collisions and the applicability of hydrodynamics to tiny droplets of quark-gluon plasma.

  2. APR

    7

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "New Studies of Elastic Nucleon Form Factors"

    Presented by Dr. Seamus Riordan, Stony Brook University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    The electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon provide experimental access to the underlying charge and magnetic moment distributions arranged by the strong nuclear force. These form factors provide excellent testing grounds for QCD and QCD-inspired models and are fundamentally important in understanding non-perturbative strong force physics. By studying them over a broad range of momentum transfers, they provide insight into the underlying mechanisms relevant to the generation of nucleon structure. At low Q2 there is presently a controversy regarding the charge radius measurements of the proton. At high Q2, scaling of the form factors are presently being studied in the context of a transition from soft QCD interactions. In this talk I will provide an overview of our present experimental of elastic nucleon form factors, review their context within current theoretical models, discuss upcoming future measurements at Jefferson Lab, in particular the Super Bigbite program.

  3. APR

    10

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Hydrodynamics Beyond the Gradient Expansion: Resurgence and Resummation"

    Presented by Michael Heller, Perimeter Institute

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 10, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Consistent formulations of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics involve short lived modes, leading to asymptotic rather than convergent gradient expansions. In this talk I will consider the Mueller-Israel-Stewart theory applied to a longitudinally expanding quark-gluon plasma system and identify hydrodynamics as a universal attractor without invoking the gradient expansion. I will give strong evidence for the existence of this attractor and then show that it can be recovered from the divergent gradient expansion by Borel summation. This requires careful accounting for the short-lived modes which leads to an intricate mathematical structure known from the theory of resurgence.

  4. APR

    24

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Heavy Hadrons under Extreme Conditions"

    Presented by Laura Tolos, Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (IEEC-CSIC)

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 24, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Hadrons under extreme conditions of density and temperature have captured the interest of particle and nuclear physicists as well as astrophysicists over the years in connection with an extensive variety of physical phenomena in the laboratory as well as in the interior of stellar objects, such as neutron stars. One of the physics goals is to understand the origin of hadron masses in the context of the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at low energies in the non-perturbative regime and to analyze the change of the hadron masses due to partial restoration of this symmetry under extreme conditions. Lately other proper QCD symmetries have also become a matter of high interest, such as heavy-quark flavor and spin symmetries. These symmetries appear when the quark masses become larger than the typical confinement scale and they are crucial for characterizing hadrons with heavy degrees of freedom. In this talk I will address the properties of heavy hadrons under extreme conditions based on effective theories that incorporate the most appropriate scales and symmetries of QCD in each case. With the on-going and upcoming research facilities, the aim is to move from the light-quark to the heavy-quark sector and to face new challenges where heavy hadrons and new QCD symmetries will play a dominant role.

  5. MAY

    1

    Friday

    Nuclear Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Ivan Vitev, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, May 1, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  1. APR

    2

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Neutrino Oscillations with IceCube"

    Presented by Tyce DeYoung, Michigan State University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 2, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Elizabeth Worcester

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is the world's largest neutrino detector. Although designed to detect TeV " PeV scale neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators, IceCube's DeepCore infill array permits searches for dark matter and measurements of neutrino oscillations in the 10-100 GeV range. The most recent measurements of muon neutrino disappearance with IceCube DeepCore will be presented, and prospects for future neutrino physics measurements with IceCube and the proposed PINGU array will be discussed

  2. APR

    3

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Measurement of the pion polarizability at COMPASS"

    Presented by Jan Friedrich, Technische Universität München, Germany

    10 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 3, 2015, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    For more than a decade, the COMPASS experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has been tackling the measurement of the electromagnetic polarizability of the charged pion, which describes the stiffness of the pion against deformation in electromagnetic fields. Previous experiments date back to the 1980's in Serpukhov (Russia), where the Primakoff method to study charged-pion interactions with quasi-real photons was first employed. Later also other techniques in photon-nucleon and photon-photon collisions were carried out at different machines. The COMPASS measurement demonstrates that the charged-pion polarizability is significantly smaller than the previous dedicated measurements, roughly by a factor two, with the smallest uncertainties realized so far. The pion polarisability is of fundamental interest in the low-energy sector of quantum chromodynamics. It is directly linked to the quark-gluon substructure and its dynamics in the lightest bound system of strong interaction.

  3. APR

    7

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "The Proton and the Future of Particle Physics"

    Presented by Richard Hill, Univ. Chicago

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Petrecky

    The venerable proton continues to play a central role in fundamental particle physics. Neutrinos scatter from protons in neutrino oscillation experiments, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are expected to scatter from protons in dark matter searches, and electrons or muons are bound by protons in precision atomic spectroscopy. Our understanding of the proton is an obstacle to the success of next generation experiments hoping to discover CP violation in the lepton sector and determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, discover the particle nature of dark matter, or reveal new interactions such as those that violate lepton universality. In this talk I present (i) an overview of the current state of knowledge in the neutrino sector, and theoretical advances that will determine a crucial missing ingredient in the predicted signal process of neutrino-nucleus scattering at a Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (ii) the first complete calculation of the scattering cross section of a proton on a static electroweak source, which determines WIMP-nucleus scattering rates at underground direct detection experiments and (iii) the status of the proton radius puzzle, whose most "mundane" resolution requires a 5 standard deviation shift in the value of the Rydberg constant. I describe how each of these problems has spurred the development of powerful new methods in effective quantum field theory.

  4. APR

    15

    Wednesday

    High-Energy Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "CKM physics with lattice QCD"

    Presented by Aida El-Khadra, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 15, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chris Kelly

  5. APR

    16

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Cosmology with Strong Gravitational Lenses"

    Presented by Phil Marshall, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 16, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Anze Slosar

    Strong gravitational lenses have become an important astronomical tool: they allow us to make accurate measurements of galaxy masses, they provide a magnified view of the distant universe, and they allow us to constrain cosmological parameters. In particular, the time delays in multiply-imaged quasar systems enable measurements of distance in the Universe each with around 5% precision. I will present our recent measurement of time delay distance in two galaxy-scale lens systems. For us to realize the potential of this cosmological probe, we need to increase the size of our lens sample, and continue to improve the accuracy of its analysis. I will discuss the potential of LSST to provide a sample of several hundred lensed quasars with well-measured time delays that would enable competitive and complementary constraints on Dark Energy, and describe our ongoing investigations of how to find lenses, infer their time delays and model their mass distributions accurately, and account for weak lensing effects from external mass structures.

  6. APR

    22

    Wednesday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Implications of Cosmological Observations for History of Early Universe"

    Presented by Ghazal Geshnizjani, University of Waterloo/ Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Wednesday, April 22, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    I will argue that any theory of early universe that matches cosmological observations should include a phase of accelerated expansion (i.e. inflation) or it has to break at least one of the following tenets of classical general relativity: Null Energy Conditions (NEC), sub-luminal signal propagation, or sub-Planckian energy densities. This proof extends to a large class of theories with higher (spatial) derivative or non-local terms in the action as well. Interestingly, only theories in the neighbourhood of Lifshitz points with ω ∝ k^0 and k^3 are excluded from the proof. I will also discuss in what sense detecting primordial gravitational waves is a smoking gun for inflation.

  7. APR

    23

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "(Real) Early Universe Cosmology with Quark Gluon Plasma"

    Presented by Niayesh Afshordi, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, April 23, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    An intriguing possibility that can address pathologies in both early universe cosmology (i.e. the horizon problem) and quantum gravity (i.e. non-renormalizability), is that particles at very high energies and/or temperatures could propagate arbitrarily fast. In this talk, I introduce Thermal Tachyacoustic Cosmology (TTC), i.e. this scenario with thermal initial conditions. We find that a phase transition in the early universe, around the scale of Grand Unified Theories (GUT scale; T∼10^{15} GeV), during which the speed of sound drops by several orders of magnitude within a Hubble time, can fit current CMB observations. However, I will then argue that cosmological bounds on the density of primordial black holes suggest that Lorentz invariance in the primordial thermal plasma may not recover until much lower temperatures, close to the QCD phase transition. This presents the exciting possibility of testing this scenario in the thermal plasma produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions.