General Information

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  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Neutrinos

    LBNE and the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiments seek to understand the subtle oscillations of neutrinos, ghost-like particles formed in the heart of stars

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

Conducts research to understand many body aspects of QCD, including the properties of hot and dense matter as well high gluon density matter.  

Lattice Gauge Theory

Studies properties of hot and dense matter using lattice QCD methods.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Physics Application

Develops physics applications software for the LHC ATLAS experiment.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

BOSS studies dark energy—the force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

MicroBooNE

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

Mu2e

Experiment which directly probes the Intensity Frontier and aids research on the Energy and Cosmic frontiers with precision measurements to characterize properties of new particles.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. No events scheduled

  1. MAR

    13

    Friday

    Nuclear Physics & RIKEN Theory Seminar

    "Hydrodynamic transport coefficients for the non-conformal quark-gluon plasma from holography"

    Presented by Jorge Noronha, Sao Paulo University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, March 13, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    : In this talk we shall present holographic formulas for the transport coefficients κ and τπ present in the second-order derivative expansion of relativistic hydrodynamics in curved spacetime associated with a non-conformal strongly coupled plasma described holographically by an Einstein+Scalar action in the bulk. These coefficients are computed as functions of the temperature in a bottom-up non-conformal model that is tuned to reproduce lattice QCD thermodynamics at zero baryon chemical potential. We directly compute, besides the speed of sound, 6 other transport coefficients that appear at second-order in the derivative expansion. We also give an estimate for the temperature dependence of 11 other transport coefficients taking into account the simplest contribution from non-conformal effects that appear near the QCD crossover phase transition. Using these results, we construct an Israel-Stewart-like theory in flat spacetime containing 13 of these 17 transport coefficients that should be suitable for phenomenological applications in the context of numerical hydrodynamic simulations of the strongly-coupled, non-conformal quark-gluon plasma. Using several different approximations, we give parametrizations for the temperature dependence of all the second-order transport coefficients that appear in this theory in a format that can be easily implemented in existing numerical hydrodynamic codes

  2. APR

    3

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Gravitational collapse, holography and hydrodynamics in extreme conditions"

    Presented by Paul Chesler, Harvard University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 3, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    A remarkable observation from RHIC and the LHC is that the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy-ion collisions behaves as a strongly coupled and nearly ideal liquid. Data also suggests that the debris produced by proton-nucleus collisions can also behave as a liquid. Understanding the dynamics responsible for the rapid equilibration of such tiny droplets is an outstanding problem. In recent years holography has emerged as a powerful tool to study non-equilibrium phenomena, mapping challenging quantum dynamics onto the classical dynamics of gravitational fields in one higher dimension. In the dual gravitational description the process of quark-gluon plasma formation and equilibration maps onto the process of gravitational collapse and black hole formation. I will describe how one can apply techniques and lessons learned from numerical relativity to holography and present recent work on holographic models of high energy collisions and the applicability of hydrodynamics to tiny droplets of quark-gluon plasma.

  3. APR

    10

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Michael Heller, Perimeter Institute

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 10, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  4. APR

    17

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Miklos Gyulassy, Columbia University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 17, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  1. FEB

    27

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "The ATLAS H-ZZ(*)-4l decay channel"

    Presented by Kalliopi Iordanidou, Columbia University, Nevis Laboratories

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, February 27, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The H->ZZ(*)4l decay channel is the experimentally cleanest signature for the Higgs boson production at the LHC (CERN). The selection of the candidates, the data driven background estimation methods and the property measurements of the Higgs boson are presented using the ATLAS Run-I data. Prospect expectations are explored for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) scenario.

  2. MAR

    10

    Tuesday

    Sustainable Energy Technologies Seminar

    "Surfactant Free Synthesis of Plasmonic Nanoparticles and Their Application in Optical Detection of Explosives and Ions"

    Presented by Devika Sil, Temple University, Philadelphia

    11 am, ISB 734 2nd Floor Seminar Room 201

    Tuesday, March 10, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Matthew Eisaman

    The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), arising due to the collective oscillation of free electrons in metal nanoparticles, is a sensitive probe of the nanostructure and its surrounding dielectric medium. Synthetic strategies for developing surfactant free nanoparticles providing direct access to the metallic surface that harvest the localized surface plasmons will be discussed first followed by the applications. It is well known that the hot carriers generated as a result of plasmonic excitation can participate and catalyze chemical reactions. One such reaction is the dissociation of hydrogen. By the virtue of plasmonic excitation, an inert metal like Au can become reactive enough to support the dissociation of hydrogen at room temperature, thereby making it possible to optically detect this explosive gas.1 The mechanism of sensing is still not well understood. However, a potential hypothesis is that the dissociation of hydrogen may lead to the formation of a metastable gold hydride with optical properties distinct from the initial Au nanostructures, causing a reversible increase in transmission and blue shift in LSPR. It will also be shown that by tracking the LSPR of bare Au nanoparticles grown on a substrate, the adsorption of halide ions on Au can be detected exclusively. The shift in LSPR frequency is attributed to changes in electron density rather than the morphology of the nanostructures, which is often the case.

  3. APR

    3

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Measurement of the pion polarizability at COMPASS"

    Presented by Jan Friedrich, Technische Universität München, Germany

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, April 3, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan