General Information

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  • RHIC

    Brookhaven physicists are using detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to explore how the matter that makes up atomic nuclei behaved just after the Big Bang.

  • ATLAS

    Brookhaven physicists and engineers are collaborators in the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

  • Neutrinos

    LBNE and the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiments seek to understand the subtle oscillations of neutrinos, ghost-like particles formed in the heart of stars

  • Cosmology

    In the LSST and BOSS experiments, Brookhaven physicists seek to measure and constrain the properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the PHENIX experiment at RHIC.

STAR

Responsibile for the operation and  physics exploitation of the STAR experiment at RHIC.

RHIC Spin

Leads, supports, and provides for the common requirements of the RHIC spin program, particularly for polarimetry.

RIKEN BNL Research Center

Conducts quantum chromodynamics and proton spin structure research.

Nuclear Theory

Conducts research to understand many body aspects of QCD, including the properties of hot and dense matter as well high gluon density matter.  

Lattice Gauge Theory

Studies properties of hot and dense matter using lattice QCD methods.

RHIC Computing Facility

Provides computing services for experiments at RHIC, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project.

High-Energy Physics

Cosmology & Astrophysics

Solving problems in observational cosmology: how to measure and constrain properties of dark matter, dark energy and the standard cosmological model.

Electronic Detector

Studies very rare processes at the Intensity Frontier.

Omega

Group members are collaborators on the LHC ATLAS experiment.

Physics Application

Develops physics applications software for the LHC ATLAS experiment.

High-Energy Theory

Focuses on providing theoretical foundation for the search for physics beyond the standard model, including lattice QCD calculations of key quantities required for this quest.

ATLAS Computing Facility

Provides computing services for U.S. ATLAS.

High-Energy Physics

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

BOSS studies dark energy—the force thought to be responsible for the universe’s accelerating expansion.

Dark Energy Survey

Seeks to probe the origin of the accelerating universe and uncover the nature of dark energy by measuring the 14-billion-year history of cosmic expansion.

Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

A 3.2 gigapixel camera mounted in a  ground-based telescope designed to produce the widest, densest, and most complete images of our universe ever captured.

Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration working to precisely measure neutrino oscillations.

ATLAS

An experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider designed to detect particles created by proton-proton collisions.

Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment

An international collaboration studying the subtle transformations of neutrinos.

MicroBooNE

Measures low energy neutrino cross sections and investigates low energy excess events observed by the MiniBooNE experiment.

Muon g-2

A high precision measurement of the muon's g-2 value. A deviation between theory and observed value will suggest the existence of new particles.

Mu2e

Experiment which directly probes the Intensity Frontier and aids research on the Energy and Cosmic frontiers with precision measurements to characterize properties of new particles.

Nuclear Physics

PHENIX

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

STAR

An experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider designed to explore quark gluon plasma.

Electron Ion Collider (Future)

Plans for the world's first electron-nucleus collider, also known as eRHIC, call for the addition of a 5 to 10 GeV electron ring inside the RHIC tunnel.

The Physics Department is part of Brookhaven's Nuclear & Particle Physics Directorate.

Seminars & Colloquia

  1. JUN

    2

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Quarkonium with Effective field theories"

    Presented by Nora Brambilla, Munich Technical University

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 2, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Peter Petreczky

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the sector of the Standard Model of particle physics that describes the strong interaction, deceptively simple to formulate but notoriously difficult to solve. Heavy quarkonium is a multiscale system that probes the different energy regimes of QCD, from the high-energy region, where an expansion in the coupling constant is possible and precision studies may be done, to the low-energy region, dominated by confinement and the many manifestations of the nonperturbative strong dynamics. Properties of production and absorption of quarkonium in a medium are also crucial for the study of QCD at high density and temperature. On the theoretical side, the construction of new nonrelativistic effective field theories for quarkonium has recently revolutionized the field providing both a conceptual framework and a powerful calculational tool. On the experimental side, the diversity, quantity and accuracy of the data collected in the last few years at B and tau-charm factories and at RHIC and LHC experiments is impressive, featuring the observation of new states and new unexpected processes. I will discuss these theoretical and experimental advancements and their implications for our understanding of strong interactions.

  2. JUL

    21

    Tuesday

    Physics Colloquium

    "Seeking the Origin of Asymmetry"

    Presented by Xin Qian, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    3:30 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, July 21, 2015, 3:30 pm

    Hosted by: Laurence Littenberg

    Why are we made of matter, not antimatter? Where such asymmetry comes from remains one of the biggest mysteries in physics. In this talk, the speaker will take you through the process how physicists design a scientific experiment aiming to address this important question. We will examine the thinking behind, review the current progress, and discuss the challenges in the future.

  1. MAY

    27

    Today

    Brookhaven Lecture

    "505th Brookhaven Lecture: 'Scanning the Structure of Steel From Nuclear Reactor Vessels'"

    Presented by Lynne Ecker, Nuclear Science & Technology Department

    4 pm, Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Wednesday, May 27, 2015, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Thomas Watson

  2. JUN

    2

    Tuesday

    Nuclear Physics Seminar

    "Elliptic flow from anisotropic escape"

    Presented by Denes Molnar, Purdue University

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Tuesday, June 2, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Jin Huang

    While hydrodynamics is regarded as the dominant paradigm for describing heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies, its applicability to nuclear reactions is not very well understood. Open question remain about the mechanism of rapid thermalization, initial conditions, treatment of decoupling (conversion of the fluid to particles), finite system effects, and quantum corrections in very small systems, for example. In a recent work (arXiv:1502.05572) we showed that in the AMPT transport model elliptic flow is generated quite differently from hydrodynamics, mainly through anisotropic escape from the collision zone. I will demonstrate that this is, in fact, a general feature of kinetic theory, originating in the modest opacities <Ncoll> \sim 4-5 in AMPT calculations. Implications of the escape effect will be discussed together with connections to other hydro related problems such as proper particle distributions (arXiv:1404.8750) and anisotropic flow from quantum mechanics (arXiv:1404.4119).

  3. JUN

    5

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "Novel mechanisms of charmonium suppression/enhancement in pA and AA collisions"

    Presented by Boris Kopeliovich, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 5, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  4. JUN

    5

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN seminar

    "Novel mechanisms of charmonium suppression/enhancement in pA and AA collisions"

    Presented by Boris Kopeliovich, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 5, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

    Charmonium production in pA collisions is known to be suppressed by shadowing and absorption. There are however nuclear effects, which enhance charmonium yield. They steeply rise with energy and seem to show up in LHC data for J/psi production in pA collisions. In the case of heavy ion collisions produced charmonia are additionally suppressed by final state interaction in the created dense medium. On the contrary to current evaluations of the melting effects caused by Debye screening, a charmonium produced with a large pT easily survives even at high temperatures. Another source of charmonium suppression, missed in previous calculations, color-exchange interactions with the medium, leads to suppression of a comparable magnitude. A quantitative comparison is performed.

  5. JUN

    26

    Friday

    Nuclear Theory/RIKEN Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Jacobus Verbaarschot, Stonybrook University

    2 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 26, 2015, 2:00 pm

    Hosted by: Soeren Schlichting

  1. MAY

    28

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "LHCb Run I Results and Run II Prospects"

    Presented by Philip Ilten, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, May 28, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The LHCb detector is a forward arm spectrometer on the Large Hadron Collider, designed for the study of particles containing b or c quarks. A variety of recent results from the Run I dataset, taken from 2010 - 2013, will be presented, emphasizing the scope of the LHCb physics program. These areas include central exlusive production of quarkonia, exotic particle searches, precision electroweak cross-sections, CKM measurements, and more. Prospects for Run II measurements will be outlined.

  2. JUN

    4

    Thursday

    RIKEN Lunch Seminar

    "Non-relativistic particles in a thermal bath"

    Presented by Antonio Vairo, Munich Technical University

    12:30 pm, Building 510 Room 2-160

    Thursday, June 4, 2015, 12:30 pm

    Hosted by: Tomomi Ishikawa

  3. JUN

    11

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Search for dark sector particles at Belle and Belle II"

    Presented by Igal Jaegle, University of Hawai`i at Mānoa

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, June 11, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The dark photon, A′,, and the dark Higgs boson, h′, are hypothetical constituents featured in a number of recently proposed Dark Sector Models. We will present a search for these particles in the so-called Higgs-strahlung channel, e+e''A′h′, with h′'A′A′. We investigated ten exclusive final-states with A′'e+e', μ+μ', or π+π', in the mass ranges 0.1 GeV/c2 <mA′<3.5 GeV/c2 and 0.2 GeV/c2 <mh′<10.5 GeV/c2. We also investigated three inclusive final-states, 2(e+e')X, 2(μ+μ')X, and (e+e')(μ+μ')X, where X denotes a dark photon candidate detected via missing mass, in the mass ranges 1.1 GeV/c2 <mA′<3.5 GeV/c2 and 2.2 GeV/c2 <mh′<10.5 GeV/c2. Using the entire 977fb'1 data set collected by Belle, we observed no significant signal. We will also discuss prospects for searches for light dark matter and the dark photon in the radiative decay process at Belle and Belle II.

  4. JUN

    12

    Friday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Constraining the Standard Model and new physics with LHC data"

    Presented by Alessandro Tricoli, CERN

    11 am, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Friday, June 12, 2015, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Ketevi Assamagan

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project at CERN Laboratory in Geneva has achieved one of its primary goals, i.e. the discovery of the Higgs boson particle, which completes the Standard Model of particle physics. However, no signatures of new physics beyond the Standard Model have been observed yet, despite thorough searches. Nature turns out to be subtle. The direct search will continue in the upcoming LHC runs, however new physics can also be pursued indirectly by looking for deviations of experimental results from predictions in measurements of Standard Model processes. The LHC has provided a large data set during its first years of operations. This has been used to perform measurements of Standard Model processes that constrain predictions in the strong and electro-weak sectors and are sensitive to new physics in a model-independent way, thanks to the high level of precision and the extent of their kinematic reach. A good understanding of these processes is of paramount importance for precision Higgs physics, as well as for searches for new physics, as they constitute irreducible backgrounds. After presenting a selection of highlights of recent Standard Model measurements from the LHC, I will discuss how the precision and phase space reach of these measurements will improve in future LHC runs, given the increase of centre-of-mass energy and integrated luminosity, emphasising some of the experimental challenges ahead.

  5. JUN

    18

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Detection of Lensing of the CMB by Dark Matter Halos"

    Presented by Mathew S Madhavacheril, Stony Brook University

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, June 18, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Morgan May

    I will report on the first detection of lensing of the cosmic microwave background by dark matter halos. Halo lensing of the CMB provides a method for constraining cluster masses complementary to optical weak lensing, with the advantage that the source plane has a very well determined redshift and statistical properties. In this work, the lensing field was reconstructed from CMB temperature observations using the ACTPol telescope and stacked at the location of CMASS galaxies which trace dark matter halos of ~10^13 M_solar galaxy groups, providing a 3.2 sigma detection and a ~35% mass constraint. I will also briefly touch on the capabilities of future CMB experiments to use this method to constrain dark energy parameters.

  6. OCT

    1

    Thursday

    Particle Physics Seminar

    "Top Quark Precision Physics and the Fate of the Universe"

    Presented by Andreas Jung, Fermilab

    3 pm, Small Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Thursday, October 1, 2015, 3:00 pm

    Hosted by: Ketevi A. Assamagan

    The talk will discuss recent measurements in the top quark sector, the heaviest known elementary particle known so far, performed at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and at the LHC. I will highlight Tevatron results that are competitive to those at the LHC, especially regarding the top quark mass and production asymmetry. The talk will also present CMS results on the top quark mass and Yukawa coupling. I will discuss the implications for the standard model electroweak sector regarding the vacuum stability. I will conclude with an outlook towards the high luminosity phase of the LHC and the CMS silicon detector upgrades required for the high luminosity phase.