General Information

Top of Page

Photon Sciences Events

  1. No events scheduled

  1. Photon Sciences Directorate Seminar

    "The Sirius Project"

    Presented by Dr. Harry Westfahl Jr., LNLS, Brazil

    Monday, August 11, 2014, 1 pm
    Bldg. 745, Room 156

    Hosted by: Dr. Qun Shen

    The Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory has started the construction of Sirius, a 3 GeV and 0.28 nm rad emittance storage ring. In this talk, Dr. Westfahl will present some of the main aspects of this new storage ring and its first and second phase beamlines, as well as the current status of the project.

  2. Photon Sciences Town Meeting

    Tuesday, July 29, 2014, 1 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Photon Sciences Users' Executive Committee

    The Photon Sciences staff and user community are invited to a Town Meeting on Tuesday, July 29, from 1-3 p.m. in the NSLS Seminar Room, Bldg. 725. Watch webcast at 1 p.m. http://www.bnl.gov/video/

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "New dimensions in phase contrast X-ray imaging: faster and clinically relevant"

    Presented by Marco Stampanoni, Institute for Biomedical Engineering of the ETH and University of Zürichand Head of the X-ray Tomography group of the Swiss Light Source at the Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland

    Tuesday, July 8, 2014, 11 am
    Bldg. 744, room 156

    Hosted by: Jun Wang

    High brightness is a fundamental property of third generation synchrotron facilities. Those deliver coherent beams, which intrinsically provide access to the phase information from a sample. The Swiss Light Source operates TOMCAT, a beamline dedicated to TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs. Our group develops cutting-edge equipment for non-destructive tomographic investigations and provides the necessary instrumentation for phase contrast imaging at spatial resolution ranging over four orders of magnitude as well as the acquisition of 3D volumes within a fraction of a second. This presentation will illustrate how phase contrast imaging can be implemented with applications in human radiology down to nanotomographic imaging of single cells. A brief review of the most advanced phase contrast imaging techniques will be provided, with particular emphasis on full-field Zernike microscopy, free-space propagation and grating-interferometry. Each of these methods has shown to be particularly suited for selected investigations. Applications criteria as well as limitations for each technique will be presented, with the illustrative support of examples taken from daily experiments carried out at modern, third generation synchrotron facilities. Particular emphasis will be devoted to applications involving the investigation of life sciences relevant material like cells (organelles identification), soft tissue biopsies (tumor visualization, Alzheimer plaques detection), bones (canaliculi detection and statistical nano-morphometry), insects (biomechanics of tethered flight) and breast tissue (early cancer detection

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Quantifying Bone Microarchitectural Anisotropy with Diffraction Enhanced Imaging"

    Presented by Dean M. Connor, Medical University of South Carolina

    Friday, May 2, 2014, 12 pm
    Bldg. 744 (LOB 4) Room: 4L 156

    Hosted by: Klaus Attenkofer and Sanjit Ghose

  5. Brookhaven Lecture

    "491st Brookhaven Lecture 'A Fast, Versatile Nanoprobe for Complex Materials: The Sub-micron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline at NSLS-II'"

    Presented by Juergen Thieme, Brookhaven Lab's Photon Sciences Directorate

    Thursday, February 6, 2014, 4 pm
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Allen Orville

  6. Talk by Ignace Jarrige

    "SIX: A Looong Beamline at NSLS-II to Probe Electrons"

    Ignace Jarrige, SIX Beamline Group Leader, NSLS-II

    Thursday, January 9, 2014, 8 pm
    Berkner Hall, Room B

  7. NSLS-II Seminar

    "NSLS-II Early Experiment Workshop: Inelastic X-ray Scattering (IXS) Spectrometer"

    Tuesday, October 1, 2013, 7:30 am
    Berkner Hall, Room B

    The Photon Sciences Directorate is hosting a workshop about developing an inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectrometer for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). The workshop will be held in Berkner Room B on Tuesday, Oct. 1, beginning at 7:30 a.m.

  8. Annual Users' Meeting

    "2013 Joint NSLS/CFN Users' Meeting"

    Wednesday, May 22, 2013, 8:30 am
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

  9. NSLS Workbench

    "X9 SAXS Workbench - 2013 Session I"

    Saturday, April 20, 2013, 9:30 am
    Conferene Room C, Bldg. 725

  10. NSLS Workbench

    "X9 SAXS Workbench - 2013 Session I"

    Friday, April 19, 2013, 9:30 am
    Conference Room C, Bldg. 725

  11. NSLS Workbench

    "X9 SAXS Workbench - 2013 Session I"

    Thursday, April 18, 2013, 9:30 am
    Conference Room C, Bldg. 725

  12. Brookhaven Lecture

    "486th Brookhaven Lecture: 'The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe at NSLS-II: A Big Microscope to Tackle Challenges at the Nanoscale'"

    Presented by Yong Chu, Photon Sciences Directorate at Brookhaven Lab

    Wednesday, April 17, 2013, 4 pm
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Allen Orville

    During the 486th Brookhaven Lecture, Yong Chu of the Photon Sciences Directorate will illustrate unique challenges and innovative approaches for x-ray microscopy at the nanoscale—measured in billionths of a meter. He will also discuss measurement capabilities for the first science experiments at NSLS-II.

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source Workshop

    "XANES Short Course: Theory, Analysis, Applications"

    Thursday, November 8, 2012, 9 am
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

  14. NSLS-II Seminar

    "High Speed Choppers for X-Ray or Light Pulse Selection"

    Presented by Bernd Eberhard Lindenau, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH ( FZJ ), Central Department of Technology ( ZAT), Magnetic Bearings and Drives, Germany

    Monday, July 9, 2012, 1:30 pm
    703 Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Daniel Bacescu

    For experiments, which ask for light pulses with a sequence different from the bunch mode predominantly offered by the synchrotron source, high speed pulse selectors have been developed. A fast rotating triangular shaped disk with the beam channel grooved along one of the disk sides serves as shutter element in the beam line for hard x-rays. The maximum open sequence of about 1000Hz is limited by the tolerable rotation speed of the shutter rotor, which is machined from high strength titanium alloy. Open times of the beam channel in the range of 500ns and +/-2 ns phase stability with respect to the bunch clock are realized with the present systems, which are used in combination with a probing laser for time resolved experiments at ESRF, APS, SPring8 and PF-AR. A 1.25 MHz chopper for light pulses is currently under development for operation at BESSY. It is based on the same platform for magnetic rotor suspension and drive control. This chopper is equipped with a slotted aluminium disk to allow open periods of 140ns. The design criteria of these systems will be presented and technical feasibilities will be addressed.

  15. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "ID 10 beamline recent development for Coherent Diffraction Imaging"

    Presented by Yuriy Chushkin, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble, France

    Friday, July 6, 2012, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Andrei Fluerasu

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Thermal Expansion of Crystalline Materials from High Temperature Powder X-ray Diffraction"

    Presented by Waltraud M. Kriven, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    Friday, June 22, 2012, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  17. NSLS-II Seminar

    Frank Steinbruckner, Keller Technology Corporation

    Friday, June 15, 2012, 1:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Keller Technology Corporation offers vacuum components, weldments, custom vacuum chambers, and fully integrated vacuum systems-manufactured to your specifications, or designed & built to your requirements. KTC specializes in stainless steel and aluminum chambers with large, complex geometries. Our dedicated staff is well versed in the proper manufacture of custom vacuum chambers - from initial design through final test and packaging protocol. Keller Technology provides custom design and build-to-print services including: • Precision 5 Axis Machining • Fabrications in stainless steel, aluminum, steel alloys, exotic metals • ASME Code Pressure Vessels • Electro-mechanical assemblies • Integrated System Testing • Assemblies or components up to 40 tons

  18. NSLS/CFN Users' Meeting Workshop

    "Unique Tools for Energy Research: Chemical Analysis of Nanostructures Using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy"

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012, 8 am
    CFN Bldg 735, Seminar Room 2nd Floor Conference Ro

    Hosted by: Fernando Camino

  19. NSLS/CFN Users' Meeting Workshop

    "Workshop 2: Unique Tools for Energy Research: Chemical Analysis of Nanostructures Using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy"

    Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 12:30 pm
    CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room 2nd floor

    Hosted by: Fernando Camino

  20. NSLS/CFN Users' Meeting Workshop

    "Unique Tools for Energy Research: Chemical Analysis of Nanostructures Using Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy"

    Monday, May 21, 2012, 12:30 pm
    Berkner Hall, Room A

    Hosted by: Fernando Camino

  21. 2012 NSLS/CFN Users' Meeting

    Monday, May 21, 2012, 8:30 am
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

    The Joint National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) Users' Meeting provides a venue for scientists from diverse disciplines who use the NSLS and CFN facilities to share their work and discuss future directions for their research. New results and advances in experimental capabilities in synchrotron radiation and the nanoscale science research will be highlighted.

  22. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Capabilities for High PRecision UHV Engineering and Design"

    Presented by Larry Gilbert, Vacuum Solutions

    Thursday, May 17, 2012, 10 am
    703 Large Conf Room

    Hosted by: Scott Coburn

    Reuter Technology will be presenting their capabilities for high precision UHV engineering and design, and manufacturing including laser welding, vacuum brazing of such materials as diamond to copper, stainless steel to copper, and ceramic to copper and stainless steel. Reuter provides assembly of mechanical as well as electrical components in an Class ISO-3 clean room, including bakeout and leak testing. Reuter has extensive experience working with European beam lines and accelerator facilities and welcomes the opportunity to work with BNL. Reuter Technology is represented locally by Larry Gilbert ( lgilbert@vacuumsolutions.com ) of Vacuum Solutions Group.

  23. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "QIAGEN Sample & Assay Technologies"

    Presented by QIAGEN Sample & Assay Technologies, QIAGEN Inc.

    Wednesday, May 9, 2012, 11 am
    Conference Room C, Bldg.725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    Differential Scanning Fluorimetry on Rotor Gene Q and QIAgility: Fast Screening Methods for Protein Analysis The method we will discussing is Differential Scanning Fluorimetry and below are some examples of where DSF can provide helpful information when studying proteins > 1. Generate stability data on proteins with different additives and buffers. > 2. Determine different protein interactions > 3. Test efficient Ligand binding. > 4. Run mutant screenings from protein to protein. The Rotor Gene provides extremely high uniformity; due to even temperature distribution they can detect small. fluorescence differences between samples or states, more efficiently than any block based system. In addition the Rotor Gene Q is a real time cycler which can also perform: Quantitation Melt Curve Analysis Two Standard Curve method Delta Delta CT method Comparative Quantitation HRM End Point PCR Allelic Discrimination Scatter Plots

  24. NSLS-II Seminar

    "simulation of electron injection and diagnostic of plasma electron density in laser-plasma accelerator"

    Presented by An He

    Friday, April 27, 2012, 9 am
    Large conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: LiHua Yu

    Laser plasma accelerator(LPA) is becoming one promissing advanced accelerator due to its high acceleration gradient.Although lots of progress has been made, there are still many theorical and experimental details need to further be studied.In my talk I will disscuss two kinds of electron injection methods: the external bunch injection and the optical colliding pulse injection in the LPA. An experimental proposal on the diagnostic of plasma density in capillary in LPA will also be disscussed.

  25. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "A newly developed transmission x-ray microscope and its applications"

    Presented by Jun Wang, Photon Sciences

    Thursday, April 26, 2012, 1:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Ron Pindak

    A full field transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) has been developed with Xradia and commissioned at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The capabilities, which we developed in auto-tomography, local tomography, and spectroscopic imaging that overcome many of the limitations and difficulties in existing transmission x-ray microscopes, are described and experimentally demonstrated. Sub-50 nm resolution in 3-dimensions (3D) with markerless automated tomography has been achieved. Applications to energy storage research and other areas are presented.

  26. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Description of the complete process of manufacturing for a long mirror system: Design to Delivery"

    Wednesday, April 25, 2012, 10 am
    703 - Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Sanjit Ghose

    WinlightX is a mirror vendor from France, visiting BNL as part of the NSLS II XPD beam line Vertical Focusing Mirror Procurement contract. WinlightX will be around for 3 days and the last day (27th) is a free day for discussion. Therefore, anyone interested in meeting with them should contact Sanjit K Ghose(sghose@bnl.gov).

  27. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Accelerator and Beam Physics at the VEPP-4M Electron-Positron Collider"

    Presented by Victor Smalyuk, BINP, Russia

    Tuesday, April 24, 2012, 3 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

  28. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Spectroscopy at The Brazilian Light Source"

    Presented by Daniela Coelho, The Brazilian Light Source, Brazil

    Monday, April 23, 2012, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Klaus Attenkofer (PSD)

    Three scientists from the National Laboratory of Synchrotron Light Source (LNLS) of Brazil, Dr. Daniela Coelho, Dr. Cristiane Barbieri Rodella, and Dr. Narcizo Marques de Souza Neto will visit Brookhaven National Laboratory to exchange ideas in the area of x-ray spectroscopy. The group will present an overview on the Sirius project, a state-of-the-art 3 GeV storage ring with significantly reduced operations cost. The talk will focus on the needs of the spectroscopic community and its implementations.

  29. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Characterization of Calcrete-Hosted Uranium Ores: Challenges and Insights from Leach Columns, Synchrotron-based X-ray and Electron Microscopies"

    Presented by Markus Gräfe, Senior Research Scientist, CSIRO-Process Science & Engineering, Australian Minerals Research Centre, Australia

    Friday, April 20, 2012, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Ryan Tappero

  30. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The Future Brockhouse X-Ray Diffraction and Scattering Sector at the Canadian Light Source"

    Presented by Stefan Kycia, Department of Physics, University of Guelph, CANADA

    Thursday, April 19, 2012, 3:30 pm
    NSLS-II, Lg. Seminar Room (Bldg. 703)

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    We are in the process of constructing the Brockhouse X-ray Diffraction and Scattering Sector at the Canadian Light Source. This project was funded as a national project that has attracted support and interest from 20 universities and research institutions across Canada. The sector will support a diverse, active and successful community of Canadian and international scientists spanning the dissimilar disciplines of physics, chemistry, geology, environmental science, biology and engineering. The instrumentation will meet the researchers' diverse needs by providing excellent performance over a broad x-ray energy range from 5 to 100 keV. To achieve this, three beamlines will be sourced by two complimentary insertion devices: a Small Gap Undulator (SGU) and a Superconducting Wiggler (SCW). The SGU will source a high brilliance, beamline (5-22 keV) that will be dedicated to resonant and inelastic scattering, SAXS/WAXS experiments, magnetic scattering and reciprocal space mapping. The divergent x-ray beam produced by the SCW will be split by two side-bounce monochromators into two independent diffraction beamlines. One of them will be a lower energy beamline (5-22 keV) and will be used for high-resolution powder diffraction, microcrystal crystallography and reciprocal space mapping. The second SCW beamline will be a high energy one (20-90 keV) and will be dedicated to diffraction and scattering under extreme conditions and for high-resolution pair distribution function measurements. Over the last several years the design has evolved and we have managed to form the priceless collaborations with the LNLS Brazilian Synchrotron, the SINAP (the Shanghai Synchrotron) and IBM. An overview of the collaboration, the designs, predicted performance and science will be presented.

  31. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Resonant Scattering Experiments at P09/PETRA III"

    Presented by Joerg Strempfer, DESY, Germany

    Friday, April 13, 2012, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Tuning the x-ray energy close to an absorption edge can cause resonance effects in the diffracted signal, which are dependent on the properties of the material. The resonance effects are due to an increased sensitivity to small changes in the electron distribution around the atom to the absorption edge of which the energy is tuned to. Since the resonant signal can originate from a variety of influences acting on the atom, the challenge in the experiment is often to disentangle or determine the origin of the resonant signal. This is done by varying parameters like polarization, temperature or applied fields. The new beamline for Resonant Scattering and Diffraction (RSD), P09 at PETRA III, is designed especially for the investigation multipolar ordering processes like charge, magnetic or orbital order. Two diffractometers are available to conduct experiments using the highly brilliant synchrotron beam available at PETRA III. The polarization of the incident x-ray beam can be varied arbitrarily through x-ray phase-plates and the polarization of the scattered beam is analyzed by a polarization analyzer. Low temperature cryostats and high magnetic fields of up to 14 T combined with variable incident x-ray polarization allow the investigation of the electronic properties of the materials under investigation.

  32. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Promising Tool for Nano Materials Science, SPring-8"

    Presented by Masaki Takata, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Japan

    Monday, April 9, 2012, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Enhancement of outstanding light source characteristics of SPring-8 such as high brilliance, extremely narrow divergence and short pulse characteristics have brought an innovation to the time resolved experiment for Materials Science. Since 2005, the X-ray pinpoint structural measurement which is an elaborate coupling of the 40ps time resolved experiment with the 100nm beam diffraction technique, has been developed and applied to the rapid phase change mechanism of DVD materials1-4), photo-induced phase transitions5) etc. SPring-8 has also made further progress in development of the ultrafast pulse selector, which allows far higher performance in time resolved measurement by full-coverage of the bunch mode of SPring-8. This improvement of time resolved experiment technique has led to success in time resolved diffraction measurement of the tetragonal lattice strain in single crystal BaTiO3 under electric field6). In the talk, challenges and the prospects for SPring-8 nano application indispensable for time resolved experiment will be also presented.

  33. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Documentary Film Screening of Out of the Shadows"

    Presented by Kevin Sullivan

    Friday, March 30, 2012, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Pete Siddons

    For hundreds of years the public has only seen the surface of famous masterpieces by artists such as Van Gogh and Rembrandt; as well as medieval religious treasures such as The Norfolk Triptych. Now, through a melding of innovative scientific techniques and art connoisseurship, completely different paintings and important clues about the artists themselves are being uncovered one layer at a time by members of Holland's Rembrandt Research Institute and scientists from the University of Delft. Non-invasive technology such as x-ray fluorescence and 3D imaging can reveal these "worlds within a world" of art. Researchers can calculate how and when an artist first began working on their composition by tracing fingerprints, brushstrokes and analyzing different layers of paint pigments. These elements, once fully uncovered, sometimes reveal completely different works of art underneath the surface that were abandoned by these great artists and painted over. To help answer the question of why their works were abandoned, Out of the Shadows<http://www.sullivanmovies.com/our-library/out-of-the-shadows/> focuses on a group of scholars, the renowned Dr. Ernst Van De Wetering and Joris Dik who have recently been able to digitally restore lost images under existing masterpeices. The group's attention is drawn to two paintings, in particular, that were once dismissed as being mere copies of Rembrandt and which have recently been attributed as authentic. Out of the Shadows explores just how closely science allows art historians to enter an artist's psyche. The question of why an artist would choose to paint over their own masterpiece is explored in this fascinating documentary that ultimately rewrites the foundations of art history.

  34. NSLS-II Seminar

    "X6A Workbench: Hands-on Synchrotron Structural Biology"

    Tuesday, March 27, 2012, 9 am
    Conference Room C, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  35. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "The Status of SSRF and its User Experiments"

    Presented by Jianhua He, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, China

    Monday, March 26, 2012, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

  36. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "The SSRF Phase II Project"

    Presented by Tiqiao Xiao, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, China

    Monday, March 26, 2012, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  37. NSLS-II Seminar

    "X-ray Nanovision"

    Presented by Oleg Shpyrko, University of California, San Diego

    Friday, March 23, 2012, 1:30 pm
    Stony Brook Physics Building, Room B131

    Hosted by: Peter W. Stephens

    Attempts to produce focusing x-ray optics date back to the days of Roentgen, however, it was not until the past decade that X-ray Microscopy has finally been able to achieve sub-100 nm resolution. We have used X-ray micro-diffraction in combination with X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy to investigate slow relaxation dynamics of Charge Density Wave domains in antiferromagnetic chromium and TaS2. I will discuss similarities between dynamics in these charge- and spin-ordered condensates and dynamics in soft jammed materials. I will also introduce a novel x-ray microscopy technique developed in our group, which relies on coherent properties of x-ray beams, and eliminates the need for focusing optics altogether, replacing it with a computational algorithm. We have applied this Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging technique to image magnetic stripe domains in GdFe multilayer films, as well as to image the distribution of lattice strain and ferroelectic polarization in thin films, devices and nanostructures. I will discuss applications of these novel x-ray imaging methods in context of new generation of fully coherent x-ray sources.

  38. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Magnetic Field Induced Color Change in a-Fe203 Single Crystals"

    Presented by Jan Musfeldt, Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN

    Friday, March 23, 2012, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

    We investigated the magneto-optical properties of a-Fe203 in order to understand the interplay between charge and magnetism in a model transition metal oxide. We discovered that hematite appears more red in applied magnetic field than in zero field conditions, an effect that is amplified by the presence of the spin flop transition. Analysis of the exciton pattern on the edge of the d-d color band reveals C2/c monoclinic symmetry in the high field phase. These findings advance our understanding of magnetoelectric coupling away from the static limit and motivate spectroscopic work on other iron-based materials under extreme conditions.

  39. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Time-Resolved X-ray Studies of the Layer-by-Layer Growth Mode of Complex-Oxide Thin-Films During Pulsed Laser Deposition - Joint Photon Sciences Institute Seminar Series"

    Presented by Joel Brock, Cornell University

    Wednesday, March 21, 2012, 4 pm
    Stony Brook University Physics Building room S240

    Hosted by: Peter Stephens

    Performing simultaneous X-Ray Reflectivity and Diffuse X-ray Scattering measurements during the deposition process, we measure the time-dependent thickness, coverage, and in-plane structure of films in the layer-by-layer growth mode. These rich data sets enable us to extract both the intra-layer and the inter-layer kinetics. Our results on the SrTiO3/SrTiO3 〈001〉 homo-epitaxial system explicitly limit the possible role of island breakup, demonstrate the key roles played by nucleation and coarsening in Pulsed Laser Deposition, and place an upper bound on the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier. Using EuTiO3 and LaAlO3 on SrTiO3 〈001〉 as a model hetero-epitaxial systems, we demonstrate that the relaxation mechanism varies with both layer number and with thin-film material.

  40. NSLS-II Seminar

    "NSLS-II Injection System Pulsed Magnets."

    Presented by Eric Blum

    Wednesday, March 21, 2012, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Dick Hseuh

    Following a brief review of the major features of NSLS-II injection, the talk will examine the pulsed magnets used for injection. The design and current state of the booster pulsed magnets will be examined. This will be followed by a description of the storage ring injection septum, now beginning construction at Danfysik. The major emphasis of the talk will be the storage ring kicker magnets which are under construction by NSLS-II staff.

  41. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Metal oxide solar water oxidation photoanodes and their characterization by soft X-ray"

    Presented by Coleman Kronawitter, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley

    Monday, March 19, 2012, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    The use of metal oxide films, nanomaterials, and heterostructures in photoanodes enabling the solar-driven oxidation of water and generation of hydrogen fuel (solar water splitting) is examined. A range of transition- and post-transition-metal oxide material systems and nanoscale architectures is discussed in order to provide an overview of the field and recent results from the authors’ laboratories. Electrode structures examined include thin films, nanorod arrays, and heterostructures comprised of oxides such as -Fe2O3, ZnO, TiO2, and SnO2. The electronic structures of key oxide-oxide interfaces, relevant to the operation of efficient photoanodes, are examined using soft X-ray spectroscopy. These studies indicate that the interfacial regions of electrodes possess distinct electronic structures, which deviate in terms of orbital character and occupancy from those of their constituent bulk oxides. These observations can inform methodology to address certain operational deficiencies associated with the use of metal oxides for solar energy conversion applications.

  42. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "How Inelastic X-ray Scattering Can Be Used To Unveil The Mysterious Dynamic Behavior Of Water"

    Presented by Alessandro Cunsolo, BNL/NSLS-II

    Friday, March 16, 2012, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    Nearly two decades of thorough Inelastic X Ray Scattering (IXS) investigations on water will be reviewed. They evidenced an extremely reach phenomenology, which has been in the focus of a lively debate: from the so called “fast sound” phenomenon, revealing the presence of a structural relaxation, to the evidence of propagating shear waves. It will be shown how these effects are intimately related to the existence of a hydrogen bond network. Finally, the new scenarios opened up by the development of next-generation IXS spectrometers will be outlined.

  43. NSLS-II Seminar

    ""From Thermoelectrics and Iron-Based Superconductivity to Insertion Devices""

    Presented by Ivo Dimitrov

    Wednesday, March 14, 2012, 9 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Toshi Tanabe

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is at the frontiers of physics, materials research and light source development. The search for novel materials, especially when they hold the promise for energy harvest and/or storage presents a host of scientific and technological challenges. My talk will focus on (i) thermoelectric materials development at BNL with an emphasis on inelastic time-of-flight studies of Einstein modes in filled skutterudites, (ii) high magnetic field studies of iron-based superconducting thin films, and (iii) Radia-based simulation and optimization routine of a versatile Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) device, based on realistic superconducting materials’ properties. Prospects for future development will be presented.

  44. NSLS-II Seminar

    "X-ray Imaging in Real Life"

    Presented by Chris Jacobsen, Argonne National Lab / Northwestern University

    Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 4 pm
    Stony Brook Physics and Astronomy Colloquium, Harr

    Hosted by: Peter Stephens

    Hierarchical structures fill our body, our planet, and our devices. X-rays provide a unique tool to image this hierarchy: they can penetrate into real materials and environments, they can reveal trace elements, and they can measure chemical states and crystalline lattice rearrangements. There are interesting problems over many time and length scales, ranging from watching explosives at work to understanding the dynamics of zinc in oocyte fertilization. Future directions in nanoscale imaging look towards complexity: that of a material's environment, and that of the data, so that one can learn from x-ray imaging in real life.

  45. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Ancient Materials and Artworks Illuminated by Synchrotron Light - Worlds of Physics Seminar Series"

    Presented by Eric Dooryhee, Photon Sciences Directorate, BNL

    Friday, March 9, 2012, 7:30 pm
    Stony Brook University, Earth and Space Sciences R

    Hosted by: Peter Stephens

    Over the past 10 years, Eric Dooryhee has been using Synchrotron Radiation Diffraction (SRD) to examine ancient objects and artifacts from the Louvre museum collections. Nowadays he is concerned with SRD's future frontiers as group leader for the x-ray powder diffraction beamline at what will be the most advanced synchrotron light source in the world, NSLS-II at Brookhaven Lab. Dooryhee is a physicist who has specialized in powder diffraction at most of the research facilities where he has worked. These include the Synchrotron Radiation Source at Daresbury, UK; the Interdisciplinary Research Center with Ions and Lasers in Caen, France; the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France; and the Neel Institute, also in Grenoble. He has a master's degree in hard condensed matter physics and crystallography, and a Ph.D. in radiation physics, both from the University of Paris. Subsequently, Dooryhee's work has included studies on a range of artifacts: cosmetic products, ancient ceramics and fresco paintings of the Mediterranean from the Greco-Roman times, gilded medieval Islamic glazed ceramics and easel paintings of the Renaissance. More recently, he did more diffraction and spectroscopic work on the Maya Blue pigment, renowned for its remarkable resistance in the forests of Meso-America for the last centuries. Since 2005, Dooryhee has run a series of international conferences called SR2A, for Synchrotron Radiation in Art and Archaeology.

  46. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "The magnetic and chemical structural property of the epitaxially-grown multilayered thin film"

    Presented by Hwachol Lee, Department of Physics, MINT Center, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, USA

    Friday, March 9, 2012, 10 am
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

    The magnetic materials such as L10 FePt and B2 FeRh have been of great concern and studied intensively due to the high magnetocrystalline anisotropy and magnetic phase transition property. Modification of the magnetic material property by 3rd element provides more potential and flexibility in search of the novel phenomena, or in the future application. In this work, the epitaxially-grown Rh-doped FePt and Pd-doped FeRh multilayered thin films are studied for the structural and magnetic properties. For FePtRh, the compositionally-modulated L10 FePtRh superlattice structure shows the well-defined interface between layers and magnetic structure in spite of the compositional, structural similarity and high growth temperature. For Pd-doped FeRh, the magnetically and structurally correlated features are revealed in the Fe46Rh48Pd6 epitaxial thin films prepared in the 111-orientational growth mode. Additionally, the property of Rh seed layer on sapphire will be discussed.

  47. NSLS-II Seminar

    "New Ideas for Radiation Therapy Based on Synchrotron Radiation - Joint Photon Sciences Institute Seminar Series"

    Presented by Avraham Dilmanian, Medical Department, BNL, and Departments of Radiation Oncology and Neurology, SUNY Stony Brook

    Wednesday, March 7, 2012, 4 pm
    Stony Brook University, Physics building room S240

    Hosted by: Peter Stephens

    It was shown in the early 1990s at the X17B1 superconducting wiggler beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory that array of parallel, thin (25 to 90-μm thick) planes of synchrotron x rays (called microbeams) are tolerated by normal tissues in rats at up to very high doses (Slatkin et al., PNAS 1995). Within the next ten years the effect was confirmed in several other animal models both at the NSLS and at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). In the mid 2000s it was shown at the NSLS that a) arrays of microbeams as thick as 680 μm (called minibeams) still retain much of their tissue-sparing effect, and b) two arrays of parallel, horizontal minibeams aimed at the target from 90º angles can be “interleaved” to produce a solid radiation field at the target (Dilmanian et al, PNAS 2006). I will present our a) interleaved x-ray minibeam studies that successfully treated a high-grade glioma rat brain tumor model, and b) application of arrays of vertical microbeams to treat a model of rat spinal cord contusion injury.

  48. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Beam instrumentation for SuperKEKB Accelerators"

    Presented by Makoto Tobiyama, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, Japan

    Tuesday, March 6, 2012, 11 am
    Building 817, Conf Rm 71

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky

    Present status of the development of the beam instrumentation systems for SuperKEKB accelerators will be shown. The recovery status of the KEK accelerators from the earthquake on 11/Mar will also be shown.

  49. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Title: Structure-Property Relationships in Perovskite Oxide Thin Films"

    Presented by George Sterbinsky, National Institute of Standards and Technology

    Tuesday, March 6, 2012, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    In thin films, the biaxial strain imposed by heteroepitaxial growth can cause the appearance of novel properties wholly different from those of the bulk material. Two interesting examples are lanthanum cobaltite (LaCoO3) and europium titanate (EuTiO3). In bulk form, LaCoO3 has a non-magnetic ground state. When synthesized as a thin film, the ground state of LaCoO3 becomes ferromagnetic with a Curie temperature near 85 K. EuTiO3 is a paraelectric-antiferromagnet that becomes a ferroelectric-ferromagnet under biaxial tensile strain. In order to examine the origins of these phenomena, we have examined the atomic and electronic structures of epitaxial LaCoO3 and EuTiO3 thin films using x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Highly strained LaCoO3 deposited on SrTiO3 has a pseudomonoclinic structure with a large difference between in-plane and out-of-plane Co-O bond lengths, which strongly affects the Co-O orbital hybridization in the material. However, increased hybridization is not the cause of ferromagnetism in LaCoO3. Instead, strain induced distortions of the oxygen octahedra increase the population of unpaired spins beyond a stabilization threshold for ferromagnetic order. In EuTiO3 films deposited on DyScO3, a strong coupling between ordering of the oxygen octahedral rotations and the orientation of the ferroelectric polarization is observed.

  50. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Structural Basis of MAP Kinase Regulation"

    Presented by Prof. WolfganG Peti, Brown University, Department of Chemistry

    Friday, March 2, 2012, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Marc Allaire

  51. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "The making of next generation of MX beamlines at NSLS-II"

    Presented by Dieter Schneider, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, March 2, 2012, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    The continuing success of structural biologists in deriving structure and function of increasingly complex macromolecular assemblies drives the continuing development of their primary experimental tool: the MX beamline at the synchrotron. Increasingly smaller, more perfect and more readily available crystals demand a high performance micro-focusing beamline, and the increasing size of molecular assemblies under study requires an intense mini-beam line. The ongoing integration of crystallographic methods into a biologist’s standard toolkit spurs the development of more complete automation of the diffraction experiment and structure solving methods. This talk will measure our plans for the new AMX and FMX beamlines at NSLS-II in this context and offer an occasional look back at their predecessors at NSLS.

  52. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Effects of Fluoride Treatment on the Chemical, Mechanical and Structural Properties of Bone"

    Presented by Alvin Acerbo, Photon Sciences

    Friday, February 24, 2012, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  53. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The "Soda-stone" Alchemists: Re-defining Zeolite Natrolite at PTX Space"

    Presented by Yongjae Lee, Department of Earth System Sciences, Yonsei University, Korea

    Friday, February 17, 2012, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

    While an ever-expanding variety of zeolites with a wide range of framework topology is available, it is desirable to have a way to tailor the chemistry of the zeolitic nanopores for a given framework topology via controlling both the coordination-inclusion chemistry and framework distortion/relaxation. This is, however, subjected to the ability of a zeolitic nanopore to allow the redistribution of cations-water assembly and/or insertion of foreign molecules into the pores and channels. Small-pore zeolites such as natrolite (Na16Al16Si24O80x16H2O), however, have been known to show very limited capacity for any changes in the confinement chemistry. We have recently shown that various cation-exchanged natrolites can be prepared under modest conditions from natural sodium natrolite and exhibit cation-radius/temperature-dependent volume expansions/contractions by up to 18.8% via converting the channel ellipticity. Here, we show that pressure can be used as a unique and clean tool to further manipulate the chemistry and geometry of the natrolite nanopores. Our recent crystallographic and spectroscopic studies of pressure-insertion of foreign molecules, trivalent-cation exchange under pressure, and pressure-induced inversion of cation-water coordination and channel geometry in various cation-exchanged natrolites will be presented. This work was supported by Global Research Laboratory Program of the Korean Ministry of Education, Science, and Technology.

  54. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Development and experimental study of all-solid-state mediator supercapacitor"

    Presented by Juanjuan Zhou, University of Miami

    Tuesday, February 14, 2012, 10 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Supercapacitors (SCs) are energy storage devices with much higher specific power, much longer cycle-life, much greater charge/discharge rate, but lower specific energy than rechargeable batteries. It is desired to develop all-solid-state supercapacitors that are compact, light-weighted, flexible, environmentally benign, and suitable for use in a wide temperature range with a comparable specific energy to rechargeable batteries. However, conventional all-solid-state supercapacitors suffer from both very low specific power and energy mainly due to very limited access of ions to active sites and low conductivity of polymer electrolytes. This presentation describes a new type of supercapacitors, mediator supercapacitors. Introducing and dispersing mediator molecules into polymer electrolytes enable the ultimate accessibility of the ions in polymer electrolytes to the active sites of the active material, mediators, and greatly enhance charge transport in polymer electrolytes. Two series of all-solid-state mediator supercapacitors have been developed: one is based on Nafion separator and the other one is based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)/LiCF3SO3 separator. Both provide much greater specific power and energy than those for other solid-state electrolyte supercapacitors and greater than those for conventional liquid electrolyte supercapacitors. SEM/EDS, FTIR, XRD, and in situ XAS measurements using the BNL facility were conducted to characterize the physicochemical states of mediators in the electrodes and to elucidate the mechanisms of charge/discharge, ionic conduction, and cycle stability. In situ XAS demonstrate that the charge/discharge cycle correlate with the oxidation/reduction of the mediators and the majority of the charge capacity is provided by the mediators as the receivers or donors of electrons. As the sideline of this presentation, new developments and findings of atomistic simulation of polymer electrolyte/electrode interfaces and in situ electrochem

  55. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Nanostructured Electrodes for High-performance Electrochemical Capacitors"

    Presented by Qi Lu, University of Delaware

    Friday, February 10, 2012, 10 am
    Building 703, Large Conference Room

    Despite significant progresses in the development for high-performance supercapacitors, it lacks techniques to realize the full potential of electrode material by achieving simultaneously tailored pore structure, electrode conductivity, and crystallinity. Moreover, the problem of being difficult for industrial scale manufacture still exists. For an attempt to address all these issues, we recently have developed a simple and cost-effective process, which is also scalable, for achieving supercapacitor electrodes with both high energy and power densities. The process starts with the production of nickel nanoparticles with a modified polyol method. A simple mechanical compaction of nanoparticles and a followed thermal treatment result in compact, stable, highly porous Ni/NiO electrodes that do not require a support. During the charging process, OH- electrolytic ions are bound to the NiO, giving off electrons. The process is reversed when the stored electrical energy is drawn off as current. The high granularity NiO provides a large inner surface area, and the conductive network of the metal particles is maintained. High energy density of about 60 Wh kg-1 and power density of 10 kW kg-1 were simultaneous achieved with a slow charge/fast discharge process.

  56. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Organic Devices: Insights Provided by Soft X-ray Characterization Methods"

    Presented by Harald Ade, North Carolina State University

    Wednesday, February 8, 2012, 4 pm
    Stony Brook University, Physics, S240 Room

    Hosted by: Peter Stephens, pstephens@stonybrook.edu

    Conjugated, semi-conducting polymers have tremendous potential for use in cheap, flexible, light weight devices and have been widely studied in thin film transistors (TFTs), light emitting diodes (LEDs), and photovoltaics (OPVs). Such devices offer the potential to create cheap energy, consume less energy, or be simply cheaper and more practical. Despite great empirical advances during the recent past and a rapidly growing research community, fundamental understanding of device function is still lacking in many instances. The relationship, for example, between structure, processing, and device performance is still unclear in poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecyllthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (pBTTT) based TFT devices. Recent work at the Advanced Light Source has for the first time uncovered a fundamental relationship between the length-scale of the correlation of the polymer backbone orientation as measured with resonant scattering and the saturation mobility. I will discuss these results and a number of other important issues in organic devices that could be resolved. I furthermore delineate important questions that are raised by the soft x-ray experiments. The examples discussed exemplify the importance of the mesoscale structure, i.e. how the nano-scale is connected to the “real world”. The advanced characterization capabilities anticipated to be available at NSLS-II should further accelerate progress and understanding in this rapidly growing field.

  57. Photon Sciences Directorate Talk Announcement

    "Visit of ISP System to BNL"

    Presented by Gerard Guillemin, ISP Systems, USA/France

    Monday, February 6, 2012, 9 am
    Bldg. 817, Conference Room 4

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

  58. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "In Vitro Assessment of the Cellular Toxicity of Nanostructures"

    Presented by Lenke Horváth, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and University of Fribourg, Switzerland

    Friday, February 3, 2012, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

    A major contribution to nanotechnology is the controlled synthesis of a large variety of nanomaterials, the basis of future applications. Within the last decades we have seen the rapid development of nanotubes and nanowires, like TiO2 nanofilaments, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), zinc-oxide nanowires and especially that of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Recently, another family of carbon-based compounds, graphene and its derivatives have received worldwide attention due to its particular electrical, thermal, optical, and mechanical properties. All these structures are very promising for applications and there is a forecasted expansion of their manufacturing which makes likely that human and environmental exposure will exponentially increase in the near future. As a result, there is a growing worry related to their possible health hazards, as some of them strongly resemble to asbestos. We have studied the toxic effect of CNTs, TiO2, BNNTs and graphene oxide by assessing cell proliferation on several cell-lines and the modification of their metabolism and their morphology. We tried to unravel the role of local catalytic activity, the importance of structural defects, functional groups and the tortuosity of these nanostructures in their alteration of cell proliferation. Acknowledgement. The study was performed in close collaboration with Beat Schwaller, Arnaud Magrez and László Forró.

  59. National Synchrotron Light Source II seminar

    "PLS-II Storage Ring Vacuum Commissioning Status"

    Presented by Taekyun Ha and Chongdo Park, Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Korea

    Friday, February 3, 2012, 9:30 am
    Building 902, Training Room #1

    Hosted by: Hsiao-Chaun Hseuh

    Pohang Light Source upgraded machine (PLS-II) has been on commissioning stage since installation completed on June 2011. PLS-II storage ring vacuum system is designed to maintain pressure of low 10-9 torr for the beam-gas scattering lifetime to be longer than 20 hours, and the vacuum components, especially photon absorbers are designed to endure 3 GeV and 400 mA beam operation of PLS-II. In this talk, the present commissioning status of PLS-II storage ring vacuum will be introduced.

  60. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Design of Resilient Silicon-Carbon Nanocomposite Anodes"

    Presented by Benjamin Hertzberg, Georgia Institute of Technology

    Tuesday, January 31, 2012, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Si-based anodes have recently received considerable attention for use in Li-ion batteries, due to their extremely high specific capacity – an order of magnitude beyond that offered by conventional graphite anode materials. However, during the lithiation process, Si-based anodes undergo extreme increases in volume, potentially by more than 300 %. The stresses produced within the electrode by these volume changes can damage the electrode binder, the active Si particles and the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), causing the electrode to rapidly fail and lose capacity. These problems can be overcome by producing new anode materials incorporating both Si and C, which may offer a favorable combination of the best properties of both materials, and which can be designed with internal porosity, thereby buffering the high strains produced during battery charge and discharge with minimal overall volume changes. However, in order to develop useful anode materials, we must gain a thorough understanding of the structural, microstructural and chemical changes occurring within the electrode during the lithiation and delithiation process, and we must develop new processes for synthesizing composite anode particles which can survive the extreme strains produced during lithium intercalation of Si and exhibit no volume changes in spite of the volume changes in Si. In this work we have developed several novel synthesis processes for producing internally porous Si-C nanocomposite anode materials for Li-ion batteries. These nanocomposites possess excellent specific capacity, Coulombic efficiency, cycle lifetime, and rate capability. We have also investigated the influence of a range of different parameters on the electrochemical performance of these materials, including pore size and shape, carbon and silicon film thickness and microstructure, and binder chemistry.

  61. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Zeeko Corrective Polishing and Smoothing Processes with Illustrations of their use in “Large Science Projects”"

    Presented by Richard Freeman, ZEEKO Ltd

    Monday, January 30, 2012, 11 am
    Bldg. 703 Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Mourad Idir

    The talk will present the background and development of the Zeeko “Precessions” corrective polishing process with details the principles of the process and of the way that its universal toolkit and supporting software can be used to develop polishing solutions for many essential but complex optics. Examples of artefacts processed in this way will be shown as will the details and development of on machine (and off machine) metrology that has been developed for the control of these surfaces. Specifically included will be the techniques used and the results obtained on the following key projects: 1. E-ELT (the European Extremely Large Telescope) and TMT (the US Thirty Meter Telescope) 2. The production of X-Ray Telescope Mandrels for the Japanese NeXt telescope and the European e-Rosita telescope 3. The direct polishing of an experimental glass shell for WFXT (Wide Field of View X-Ray Telescope) 4. Supporting Metrology and details of our polishing partner for making Synchrotron mirrors

  62. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Accelerator based x-ray sources: Beyond the Optical Microscope"

    Presented by Jerome Hastings, SLAC National Accelerator Lab

    Monday, January 23, 2012, 10 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: David Siddons

    The x-ray science community has enjoyed the exponential growth of sources and instruments that has developed over the past 30 plus years. As we look forward the challenges for the x-ray community are to justify billion dollar investments. The potentials and possibilities will be discussed from a perspective of imaging compared with optical microscopes. The presentation is a personal view.

  63. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Processing of Polymer Thin Films Using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide"

    Presented by Peter Gin, Stony Brook University

    Friday, January 20, 2012, 10:30 am
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Tremendous amounts of research are currently in place to investigate alternatives to energy inefficient and environmentally harmful operations. One such novel route in the polymer industry is the utilization of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as a “green” solvent for polymer processes. Unfortunately, because of its chemically inert nature, few long-chained molecules are soluble in CO2, limiting its potential to be a vital industrial processing tool. However, we recently found that under a specific set of temperature and pressure conditions near the critical point (Tc = 31.3 °C and Pc =7.38), known as the density fluctuation ridge, anomalous adsorption of the molecules occurred in polymer thin films. In this talk, I would like to show that by exploiting this unique trait, density fluctuating scCO2 could be utilized as a valid polymer processing tool, and towards the fabrication of advanced materials: 1) low density polymer thin films with molecular scale porosity used for low-dielectric applications 2) polymer thin films with enhanced crystallinity 3) well-ordered block copolymer thin films with controllable orientations. Such advances can eventually play a key role in the transformation of industrial operations to meet evolving environmental standards.

  64. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Developments at the GM/CA CAT beamlines at the APS"

    Presented by Craig Ogata, Argonne National Laboratory

    Wednesday, January 11, 2012, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    GM/CA CAT has continued to take advantage of the development of tools that enhance the capabilities of its mini-beam collimators and development of a focused one micron beam. These tools are rolled into the JBluIce Graphical User interface. It provides a convenient user-friendly interface that provides intuitive controls to search for crystals or the best regions in larger crystals, an automated procedure to move along a defined 3-dimensional vector to collect data, a strategy protocol for collecting data, and continued improvement in sample mounting automation and remote operations. A current status report and examples of applications will be presented.

  65. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Measurements of solid oxide fuel cell electrode microstructure and correlation with electrochemical performance and degradation"

    Presented by Scott Barnett, Northwestern University

    Monday, January 9, 2012, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Jun Wang

    Quantitative analysis of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrode microstructure is a key element in connecting materials processing with microstructure and electrode performance, as well as understanding degradation mechanisms. This paper will describe the application of focused ion beam – scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) for analyzing electrodes using both two-dimensional images and three-dimensional image reconstruction. The analysis yields a number of structural parameters needed for use in electrochemical models, including solid and pore volume fractions, interface areas, three-phase boundary lengths, connectivities, and tortuosities. The discussion will focus on the widely-used SOFC electrodes Ni-YSZ and LSM-YSZ (YSZ = Y-stabilized Zirconia; LSM = (La,Sr)MnO3). The effect of varying the volume fractions of the electronically-conducting and ionically-conducting phases will be described. Effects of varying the firing temperature of LSM-YSZ will be described. Initial results on the time evolution of Ni-YSZ structure will be discussed.

  66. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Probing the structure of membranes and membrane proteins using X-ray scattering"

    Presented by Lin Yang, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Thursday, December 22, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Structure determination of membrane proteins is one of the challenges in structural biology. While X-ray crystallography remains the workhorse technique in these efforts, innovative use of X-ray scattering could provide complementary information to help elucidate the structures and function of these proteins. I will summarize the scientific results and technical developments in past studies of membrane fusion and pore-forming peptides utilizing substrate-supported multi-layered lipid membranes. I will then describe the recent progress using substrate-supported single-bilayers, which promise a more versatile platform for structural biologists to explore the structure of membrane proteins in near native environments, and how they interact with each other and with the lipid membrane. Expected advances with the advent of the new beamlines at NSLS-II will also be discussed.

  67. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    ""Two rings for folding: crystal structure of the mammalian chaperonin CCT in complex with tubulin""

    Presented by Ines Munoz, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain

    Friday, December 16, 2011, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  68. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    Presented by Dmytro Nykypanchuk, BNL / CFN

    Friday, December 9, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  69. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "High resolution soft-RIXS: scientific results and technical challenges"

    Presented by Giacomo Ghiringhelli, Visiting scholar at SIMES-Dept. of Physics, Stanford University

    Wednesday, December 7, 2011, 2 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: John Hill

  70. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Overview of Magnetic Measurement Activities at the Sincrotrone Trieste"

    Presented by Marco Musardo, Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza, Italy

    Friday, December 2, 2011, 9 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Toshi Tanabe

    An overview of recent magnetic measurement activities performed on insertion devices at Sincrotrone Trieste is presented. This includes the magnetic characterization of an APPLEII Undulator Prototype, developed in order to test different field optimization methods, and the results of the final Undulators and Phase Shifters for FERMI@Elettra, a Free Electron Laser facility in the extreme ultra-violet and soft X-rays. The main results obtained so far will be described together with the techniques and instruments used for measuring the above devices.

  71. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Creating a strong synchrotron program in Macromolecular Crystallography"

    Presented by Robert Sweet, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Biology Department

    Thursday, November 17, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Knowledge of molecular structure is the cornerstone of life science, and macromolecular crystallography -- MX -- is the gold standard for structure determination. 74% of the 70,000 Protein Data Bank deposits depended on MX diffraction data measured at a synchrotron. And seven recent Nobel Prize winners in Chemistry required readily available synchrotron x-rays for their research. Three of them used X25. Right now one third of all NSLS users come here to do MX measurements, and NSLS beamline X29 is the second most effective in the world in the production of PDB depositions. To accomplish this wasn't easy. In this lecture I'll take you back to the early days when we used x-ray film and had no cryogenics, will tell you how we created the present system, and will describe what we have in mind for NSLS-II.

  72. Photon Sciences Town Meeting

    Thursday, November 10, 2011, 1 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  73. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Challenges in MX beamline design and implementation"

    Presented by Julian Adams, FMB Oxford Beamlines Ltd

    Thursday, November 10, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    The design, construction, integration, commissioning and user operation of the current generation of highly automated; remotely operated MX beamlines holds many challenges. All the aspects of hardware and software integration must be of the highest specification and quality to achieve stable user operations with low levels of intervention from operations staff with high reliability. I will describe the many successes and few less successful aspects of the implementation of the two MX beamlines at the Australian Synchrotron from 2005 till 2009. I will then look at advances in the state of the art in beamline diagnostics and detectors as well as new ideas in software automation and integration. These will bring to the next generation of beamlines higher levels of automation and improve the stability of the beamline. This will enhance the user experience and result in higher quality data with less lost time.

  74. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Protein folding and Stability Distinguishing folded from unfolded state effects"

    Presented by Shifeng Xiao, Stony Brook University, Dept. of Chemistry

    Tuesday, November 8, 2011, 10 am
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

    The interactions which stabilize the native state and control the folding of the villin headpiece subdomain (HP36) are examined. HP36 is an extremely popular model for computational and experimental studies because of its small size, simple three-helix topology and very fast folding. Proline-aromatic interactions involving P62 and W64 have been proposed to play a critical role in specifying the subdomain fold by acting as gatekeeper residues, i.e. as residues absolutely essential for specifying the fold. Using a stable variant of HP36 as the new background we show that proline-aromatic interactions are not required for specifying the subdomain fold. This work is important because it argues against the concept of specific gatekeeper residues. To probe denatured state ensemble (DSE) electrostatic interactions, the pH dependent stability of wildtype HP36 and two mutants, K48M and K70M, both of which significantly increase the stability of the protein were examined. The increased stability of the K48M mutant is due to the removal of favorable electrostatic interactions in the DSE, while the increased stability of the K70M mutant is due to the introduction of a new hydrophobic interaction between the methionine and the hydrophobic core in the native state. The results demonstrate that electrostatic as well as hydrophobic interactions can play an important role in the DSE, and illustrate an approach for distinguishing native state effects from DSE effects. This work also has interesting implications for studies which attempt to stabilize proteins by targeting surface electrostatics since it shows the mechanism of stabilization may be much more complicated than anticipated.

  75. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Growth Mechanisms and Electronic Properties of Epitaxial Graphene"

    Presented by Graham Creeth, University of Leeds, United Kingdom

    Friday, November 4, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

    Epitaxial growth on SiC is a candidate for exploiting graphene's extraordinary properties in technological applications [1]. Growth is achieved by annealing at temperatures above 1200 C, causing Si to evaporate from the SiC preferentially to C; the resulting carbon-rich surface forms a graphitic layer with the structural and electronic properties extremely sensitive to annealing conditions [2]. We present electronic transport and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) data for (0001) 4H SiC samples annealed under UHV at various temperatures. The evolution of coherent electronic transport occurs for samples annealed at higher temperatures, as the size of individual graphene domains increases from tens of nm to several microns. Using a two-stage annealing protocol, we show that the larger grain size is due to a coalescence mechanism, as opposed to faster propagation of single grains. Fitting Magnetotransport (MR) data to weak localisation or weak anti-localisation models [3,4] yields electron scattering rates for various processes, while subtraction of the ts from the measured data allows less dominant contributions to magnetotransport from electron-electron interations and mesoscopic phenomena to be discerned. This work was supported by the EPSRC and Intel Ireland. References [1] C. Berger, Z. Song, T. Li, X. Li, A.Y. Ogbazghi, R. Feng, Z. Dai, A.N. Marchenkov, E.H. Conrad, P.N. First, and W.A. deHeer. [2] Luxmi, N. Srivastava, Guowei He, R. M. Feenstra, and P. J. Fisher. [3] Xiaosong Wu, Xuebin Li, Zhimin Song, Claire Berger, and Walt A. de Heer. [4] E. McCann, K. Kechedzhi, Vladimir I. Fal'ko, H. Suzuura, T. Ando, and B. L. Altshuler.

  76. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Small-angle Neutron Scattering Study of Lipid Bilayer and Protein in Solution"

    Presented by Shuo Qian, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Monday, October 24, 2011, 10 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Small-angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) has been used to study the structure, function and dynamics of complex biological systems. With the selective deuterium labeling and contrast variation techniques, SANS is capable of distinguishing one component of the complex from the rest of it without changing the structure and function of biomolecules in biological relevant solution condition. This talk will present two recent studies on lipid vesicle bilayer structure and protein structure under crowding conditions, respectively. In the first study, the result shows that two membrane-active peptides alamethicin and melittin induce asymmetric distribution of charged lipids, enriching the outer leaflet of bilayer with negatively charged lipid. It suggests that these peptides may have a secondary stressful effect on target cells at even low concentrations. In the second study, the structure and oligomerization state of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were investigated under crowded conditions created by another protein human serum albumin (HSA). By using perdeuterated GFP and hydrogenated HSA, I am able to probe only the GFP in the solutions by contrast matching HSA with an appropriate D2O/H2O buffer mixture. Analysis of the data indicates that GFP undergoes an HSA concentration-dependent transition that alters the way in which GFP oligomerizes in the solution.

  77. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "On-Axis Microscope for Sample and X-ray Beam Visualization with 2 um Resolution"

    Presented by Kazimierz Gofron, Brookhaven National Laboratory, NSLS-II

    Friday, October 14, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  78. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Undulator Development and Operation at BESSY II"

    Presented by Johanns Bahrdt, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Germany

    Monday, October 10, 2011, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Reuben Reininger

    All permanent magnet undulators have been constructed and built at BESSY. The major part of the BESSY user community needs variable polarization and, thus, 6 APPLE II undulators are installed. Furthermore, a 5m long APPLE II undulator has been built at HZB for PETRA III. The device has been installed and characterized with electron beam. The operation of APPLE II undulators in a low electron energy storage ring such as BESSY II requires specific compensation schemes and accurate symplectic tracking schemes are essential. Recently, the undulator development at HZB concentrated on cryogenic permanent magnet undulators. A 20 period 9mm period length PrFeB based hybrid undulator has been built, magnetically characterized at low temperatures and tested with electron beam at MAMI. The results of this prototype are valuable for a 1.5m cryogenic undulator to be built for BESSY II.

  79. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Infrared Spectroscopy of Charge Recombination in Superconductors in a Magnet Field"

    Presented by Xiaoxiang Xi, University of Florida

    Monday, October 10, 2011, 10 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    In a conventional superconductor, electrons of opposite spin and momentum form pairs and condense to the ground state. When a picosecond laser pulse is used to break the pairs, the relaxation process involves the recombination of two excess quasiparticles and the creation of a phonon. A magnetic field can suppress the pairing by coupling to the electron orbital motion or aligning the spin. Both effects influence the recombination of excess quasiparticles. In this presentation, I will discuss the magnetic-field-induced weakening of superconductivity observed in type-II superconductors by infrared spectroscopy. The consequence on the excess quasiparticle recombination is studied by laser-pump synchrotron-probe time-resolved spectroscopy. We find that a magnetic field significantly reduces the recombination rate. A recombination model is proposed to interpret our experimental findings.

  80. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Magnetic order and frustrated spin dynamics on a triangular lattice - the magnetic behaviour of Li(NiCoMn)O2"

    Presented by Dr. Markus Wikberg, Research Scientist, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

    Friday, October 7, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

    Layered transition metal oxides of α-NaFeO2-type structure have been > of historical interest from both theoretical and experimental > point-of- views. For instance, LiNiO2 was initially predicted as being > the first realization of a spin liquid. Even though a spin liquid > state has not been realized in LiNiO2, the magnetic ground state (in > this and other equi-structural materials) has been controversial and > is currently under considerable investigation. > Interests in Li- > layered compounds have also prompted a tremendous research effort due > to their application in Li-ion batteries. Where one seeks to partially > or in full replace Co in the LiCoO2 cathode with other transition > metal (TM) ions while maintaining the structural stability and > increasing the capacity. The replacement is primarily motivated by > cost and environmental concerns regarding Co. > > The magnetic properties in several compounds of Li(NixCoyMnz)O2 have > been investigated through SQUID magnetometry, neutron diffraction and > muon-SR. > The materials show a ferrimagnetic re-entrant cluster glass behaviour > with spin frustration in both 2 and 3 dimensions. The magnetic > behaviour is believed to originate from the degree of cationic mixing > (Ni2+ in the Li-layer), the TM- distribution, as well as the magnetic > cluster size in the material. > Additionally, a > possible link between low temperature magnetic order and frustration > and cathode performance at room temperature will be presented. > > [1] J. M. Wikberg et al. Physics Procedia, in print (2011) [2] J. M. > Wikberg et al. J. Appl. Phys., 180 083909 (2010) [3] J. M. Wikberg et > al. Phys. Rev. B, 81 224411 (2010) > > > >

  81. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Second Order Nonlinear Imaging of Chiral Crystals (SONICC)"

    Presented by Jeremy Stevenson, Formulatrix

    Friday, October 7, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  82. NSLS-II Seminar

    "ITT Geospatial Systems & Sydor Instruments Capabilities Briefing"

    Presented by Sydor, Sydor Instruments

    Thursday, October 6, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    ITT Geospatial Systems and Sydor Instruments will present an overview of their company capabilities. Topics to be discussed include x-ray optics, precision structures, detectors, diagnostics, and high resolution imaging systems. Both ITT and Sydor have participated in a number of directed energy programs and critical scientific applications where the highest level of performance is required. Sydor is currently working with BNL to commercialize the HERMES x-ray strip detector and manufactures a portfolio of streak cameras specifically for the synchrotron and accelerator community. ITT is currently working on (amongst other high tech products and projects): Precision Optics solutions for various industries, including aerospace, astronomy, and microlithography. Our world-class facilities are capable of manufacturing and delivering a full range of precision optics and optical systems including: mirrors, mounts and metering structures for ground, sea, air and space-based platforms and systems. Sydor and ITT have formed a joint team to address the critical needs of next generation beam lines and end station instrumentation for NSLS II and programs around the world.

  83. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Title: Development of X-Ray Holography Methods for Structure Determination: Application of High Speed Detectors and Novel Numerical Methods"

    Presented by Yuhao Wang, : Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Friday, September 30, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  84. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Water as a solvent: structure and dynamics of simple water solutions."

    Presented by Simone DePanfilis, Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”.

    Friday, September 30, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    The hydration structure and thermodynamics of simple and complex polar or non-polar entities in water is central to a molecular understanding of many biological and chemical processes, including protein folding and the self-assembly of micelles or membranes. The peculiar interaction of water with solutes stems from the molecular nature of the solvent itself. Thus, to understand the water-induced conformational and behavioural changes in macromolecules, or the water power as solvent of ionic species, one has to study not only the effects of water on the solutes but also the reverse, i.e. the modified behaviour of water in the vicinity of these entities. Within this framework, we carried out several experiments on water solutions of simple molecules that made use of advanced x-ray and neutron techniques. We will present the results of these experimental campaigns and comment on our findings.

  85. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Angle‐resolved photoemission using photons from several eV to several keV"

    Presented by Lukasz Plucinski, Peter Gruenberg Institute PGI‐6, Forschungszentrum Juelich

    Tuesday, September 27, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    I will present an overview of recent angle‐resolved photoemission (ARPES) studies performed using monochromatized laboratory sources (Xe hv = 8.44 eV and Kr hv = 10.06 eV), non‐monochromatized HeI (hv = 21.22 eV), synchrotron soft x‐ray (20 eV – 1keV, with added spin‐resolved capability), laboratory MgKa (1.26 eV), and synchrotron hard x‐ray (3‐6 keV) radiation. These techniques have been recently applied to several important material systems including W and GaAs single crystals [1, 2], thin films of the topological insulator Bi2Te3 grown on Si(111) [3], LSMO/STO multilayers [4], and thin films of Fe grown on Au(001) and W(001) [5]. Figure 1: High resolution ARPES results from 20 nm thick Bi2Te3/Si(111) films at 15K with HeI hv=21.22 eV radiation [3]. In addition, I will discuss the details and planned upgrades of several photoemission systems which we operate at PGI-6, including a laboratory-based one with extremely low energies using Kr, Xe, Ar, and He radiation [6], and another one, with added spin-polarized capability, based at a soft x-ray synchrotron beamline of DELTA/Dortmund [7].

  86. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Ferrofliud-based two-dimensional magnetic nanostructures studied by grazing incidence neutron and x-ray scattering"

    Presented by Alexei Vorobiev, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France

    Tuesday, September 27, 2011, 9 am
    CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Large Seminar Room

    In view of increasing demands for new material with advanced physical properties, which should provide further progress in development of e.g. nano-electronic devices, novel magnetic nanostructures with well controllable parameters are highly requested. On the other hand, magnetic nanostructures are also of interest for fundamental science because they often reveal new physical phenomena having no analogies in bulk materials. We examined possibility to use field- and surface-induced ordering of ferrofluids [1] for production of thin magnetic heterostructures consisting of single-domain nano-units periodically embedded into non-magnetic matrix. Particularly we studied ordering of ferrofluid at the bottom interface with a solid substrate [2], at the top interface with gas [3] and ordering of magnetic nanoparticles in the Langmuir layers. From simultaneous treatment of reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction data we found that interfacial structures of bulk ferrofluids are essentially inhomogeneous, depend on the liquid carrier and type of the surfactant and can be manipulated by the external magnetic fields. Langmuir technique is described as the most straightforward way to create desired mono- or multilayered systems of laterally ordered magnetic nanoparticles on solid substrates. 1. R. E. Rosensweig, Ferrohydrodynamics (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, 1985). 2. A. Vorobiev, J. Major, H. Dosch, G. Gordeev, and D. Orlova, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 267203 (2004). 3. A. Vorobiev, G. Gordeev, O. Konovalov, and D. Orlova, Phys. Rev. E. 79, 031403 (2009).

  87. Photon Sciences 6th IXS BAT Meeting

    "Photon Sciences 6th IXS BAT Meeting"

    Monday, September 26, 2011, 8 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    The 6th NSLS-II IXS Beamline Advisory Team Meeting Bldg 817, Room 4, Sept 26th, 2011 Participants: BAT members: Clement Burns (WMU) - Chair Alfred Baron (RIKEN/SPring-8), Sow-Hsin Chen (MIT), John Hill (BNL), Michael Krisch (ESRF), Ho-kwang Mao (Carnegie), Tullio Scopigno (Universita’ Roma), Stephen Shapiro (BNL), Yuri Shvyd’ko (APS). NSLS-II members: Qun Shen, Ron Pindak, Andy Broadbent, Yong Cai, Scott Coburn, Alessandro Cunsolo, Jeff Keister, Nalaka Kodituwakku, Alexey Suvorov, Yuriy Stetsko, Kaz Gofron Main Topics for Discussion: • Choice of high energy-resolution optics for baseline scope • Spectrometer design • Early Science and sample environments Agenda (8:00am – 5:00pm): 08:00 – 08:20 Breakfast 08:20 – 08:30 Opening remarks and agenda (Clem Burns) 08:30 – 08:45 NSLS-II update (Qun Shen) 08:45 – 09:30 Updates on the beamline development and optics R&D (Yong Cai) - Latest results of NSLS-II optics R&D - Choice of high resolution optics for baseline - Procurement status - Other updates 09:30 – 10:30 Discussion - Choice of high resolution optics for baseline 10:30 – 11:00 Coffee break 11:00 – 11:45 Spectrometer design and discussion (Scott Coburn) - Design concept and specifications 11:45 – 12:30 Initial experiments and discussion (Yong Cai) - Possible early experiments and sample environments 12:30 – 13:30 Lunch break (discussion continues during lunch) 13:30 – 15:00 Open discussion (Clem Burns) 15:00 – 15:30 Coffee break 15:30 – 16:30 BAT discussion (Clem Burns) 16:30 – 17:00 Close-out Summary (Clem Burns) 17:00 Adjourn

  88. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Motion and Positioning Systems for Specific Synchrotron Applications"

    Presented by Philip Wallington, Q-SYS

    Friday, September 23, 2011, 11 am
    Large Conf Room Build 703

    Hosted by: Mourad Idir

    Q-Sys BV was founded in 2007 by four senior managers from Anorad Europe to continue the tradition of supplying high performance bespoke positioning systems. Within our portfolio of past works are several systems supplied to synchrotrons around the world, together with many special purpose machines for industries as diverse as digital printing, semiconductor wafer metrology, holographic origination and laser machining. To date we have supplied systems to BESSY, Canadian Light Source, Diamond Light Source, ALBA (CELLS) and DESY. Our latest project is an optical metrology bench for NSLS II, the fourth derivative of this system.

  89. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Upgrades of XAFS Beamlines for Higher Scientific Performance"

    Presented by Tao Liu, Institute for Synchrotron Radiation (ANKA), Germany

    Tuesday, September 20, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is a technique for exploring the details of how x-rays are absorbed by an atom in a matter at energies near the core-level binding energies. XAFS measurement provides a practical and straightforward way to determine the chemical state and local atomic structure for the selected atomic species. Over the past forty years XAFS has benefited largely from the development of synchrotron radiation science and technology, from high brilliant sources, novel beamline optics to high performance detectors and end station facilities. To a large extent, these were pushed by various challenging practical applications from basic research and industry. In this talk I will present a brief overview of these developments and some of my previous work to improve the performance of XAFS beamlines. These include the development and improvement of XAFS facilities at the 3W1B beamline (BSRF), detector development for thin film and near surface XAFS measurements at the XDD beanline (SSLS), and the design of a novel X-ray device for energy filtering and monochromatizing based on X-ray refractive lens at ANKA. Some scientific cases will be involved, such as dilute magnetic semiconductors, high performance catalysts for hydrogen storage and ferromagnetic gold nanoparticles, etc.

  90. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Observing the Gaps in High-Tc Superconductors by Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES)"

    Presented by Hongbo Yang, Brookhaven National Laboratory, CMPMSD

    Monday, September 19, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    An energy gap opening in the spectral function at the Fermi level is a signature of superconductivity. High-Tc cuprates not only has a d-wave superconducting gap, which has the zero gapped nodal points along the Fermi surface, but also has a pseudogap in the normal state above the critical temperature. These fascinating features complicate that quest of understanding the nature of high-Tc superconductivity. Our recent ARPES studies shed some light on the nature of the pseudogap in the underdoped cuprate-BSSCO, and potentially clear the path for reaching the goal of solving the puzzle of high-Tc superconductivity.

  91. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Analysis of Organic Grain Coatings in Primitive Interplanetary Dust Particles: Implications for the Origin of Solar System Organic Matter"

    Presented by Professor George J. Flynn, SUNY Plattsburgh

    Friday, September 16, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  92. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "The Macromolecular Crystallography Beamline BL13-XALOC at the Synchrotron Alba"

    Presented by Jordi Benach, CELLS - ALBA Synchrotron Light Facility, Spain

    Wednesday, September 14, 2011, 2:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lonny Berman

    ALBA is a third generation 3-GeV synchrotron near Barcelona, Spain that is currently under commissioning. Out of the initial seven first-phase beamlines, BL13-XALOC is devoted to Macromolecular Crystallography (MX). The photon source of this beamline has been optimized to deliver the highest flux at the Se K-edge while keeping full tunability. The optics consists of a cryogenically cooled Si(111) channel-cut crystal monochromator and a pair of mirrors in a Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration. The end station includes a high accuracy single axis diffractometer and a removable mini-kappa mount. The end station is also equipped with an automated mounting robot that can deal with samples in cryo conditions or in crystallization plates. The main data collection detector is a photon-counting 6-Mpixel detector that offers outstanding capabilities like a very fast framing rate (12 images/second), a large dynamic range (20 bits, >10^6), and negligible dark current noise. Most of the components of BL13-XALOC have been installed and the control system is currently being finalized. The beamline is ready to start x-ray beam commissioning in October 2011 and it is expected to be opened to users during the first half of 2012.

  93. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "The Macromolecular Crystallography Beamline BL 13 - XALOC at the Synchrotron Alba"

    Presented by Jordi Benach, CELLS - ALBA, Synchrotron Light Facility, Spain

    Wednesday, September 14, 2011, 2:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lonny Berman

    ALBA is a third generation 3-GeV synchrotron near Barcelona, Spain that is currently under commissioning. Out of the initial seven first-phase beamlines, BL13-XALOC is devoted to Macromolecular Crystallography (MX). The photon source of this beamline has been optimized to deliver the highest flux at the Se K-edge while keeping full tunability. The optics consists of a cryogenically cooled Si(111) channel-cut crystal monochromator and a pair of mirrors in a Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration. The end station includes a high accuracy single axis diffractometer and a removable mini-kappa mount. The end station is also equipped with an automated mounting robot that can deal with samples in cryo conditions or in crystallization plates. The main data collection detector is a photon-counting 6-Mpixel detector that offers outstanding capabilities like a very fast framing rate (12 images/second), a large dynamic range (20 bits, >10^6), and negligible dark current noise. Most of the components of BL13-XALOC have been installed and the control system is currently being finalized. The beamline is ready to start x-ray beam commissioning in October 2011 and it is expected to be opened to users during the first half of 2012.

  94. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Surface Induced Order at Liquid and Polymer Interfaces"

    Presented by Benjamin Ocko, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Tuesday, September 13, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Surface freezing, the formation of a one or two molecular layers thick crystalline film on the surface of a melt, occurs in long-chain hydrocarbons such as n-alkanes and alcohols over a range of temperature where the bulk remains molten. More recently, related phenomenon has also been observed at solid interfaces and at surfactant covered surfaces of water. I will provide an overview of surface freezing in a variety of systems and provide a basis for understanding this phenomenon. I will also report recent work on the ordering of conjugated polymers at the nanostructured interfaces. Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory is supported by US Department of Energy,

  95. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Path from soft x-ray microscopy to inelastic scattering"

    Presented by Konstantine Kaznatcheev, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Monday, September 12, 2011, 3 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Soft x-ray microscopy at a SR source takes full advantage of soft x-ray specific interactions and provides chemical sensitivity based on a distinct x-ray absorption structure that is characteristic of each chemical species. The variation of x-ray polarization extends measurements to include dichroic signals, which permits one to derive molecular orientation or element-specific magnetic moments. Large penetration length provides “bulk sensitivity” and enables the study of buried interfaces under relevant conditions (magnetic and electrical fields; in a wet, pH controlled state; or under mechanical impact). Individual angular projections can be combined in a tomographic set and give 3D reconstruction at a spatial resolution approaching 25nm. Still, as with any other technique, x-ray transmission microscopy has limitations. I will use the research examples from the Canadian Light Source Spectromicroscopy beamline to illustrate them. In particular, the discussion will evolve around heterogeneous catalysis, where a variety of size-dependent structural, magnetic, electronic, and catalytic properties of nano-particles demands in situ fine characterization. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis provides an effective route to green, sustainable, clean bio-fuel production, but requires a development of a chemical reaction model for further improvement of catalytical activity. It is now possible (a) to construct enclosed reaction cells, (b) to identify the valence state of different nano-particles at reactive condition, and (c) to follow oxidation state variation through a chemical reaction. We can extend snap-shot imaging to sequential time evolution as reactive condition changes and, based on quantitative compositional analysis at a scale finer than 30nm, follow the chemical balance and flow of reactive products. Finer details of adsorbate–adsorbent interaction, or catalytical particle surface composition remain more obscure. The interaction of nano-particle (guest)

  96. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The Preliminary Application of Synchrotron Radiation Technique on Archaeology"

    Presented by Dr. Changsui Wang, Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

    Monday, September 12, 2011, 1:30 pm
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Eric Dooryhee

    Two applications of Synchrotron Radiation Technique on Archaeology were introduced. First, the distribution of zinc and lead in the brass artifact of the fifth millennium BC and two kinds of brass produced by “melting” and “solid-state reduction” simulation experiments were analyzed by -X-ray fluorescence at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The results suggest that the archaeological brass artifact utilized alloy produced by a solid-state reduction process. This result is consistent with an indigenous origin in China. Second, as we knows, drilling is one of the most complex techniques for making stone implement during ancient times. In this report, virtual 3D reconstruction by using µCT was first applied to disclose drilling tool marks on the inner wall of one small perforation

  97. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Droplet microfluidics technologies for single cell gene expression analysis"

    Presented by Professor Helmut H. Strey, Department of Biomedical Engineering, SUNY Stony Brook

    Friday, September 9, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  98. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The realization of in situ approach in imaging and spectroscopy using SPEM, PEEM and SEM"

    Presented by Andrei Kolmakov PhD, Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University

    Friday, September 2, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  99. C-AD Accelerator Physics Seminar

    "Design of an ultimate storage ring for future light source"

    Presented by Dr. Yichao Jing, C-AD, BNL

    Friday, August 26, 2011, 4 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 911B

    Hosted by: Coordinator: Chuyu Liu

    An ultimate storage ring with natural emittance reaching diffractive limit is capable of producing transversely coherant synchrotron radiation. In this talk, speaker reports the progress of a 10 pico-meter storage ring design and dynamica aperture study. He will also talk about the study of instabilities which limit the ring's performance.

  100. Photon Sciences Seminar

    "Soft X-ray Spectromicroscopy on Environmental and Biological Samples"

    Presented by Julia Sedlmair, University of Gottingen, Germany

    Friday, August 26, 2011, 1:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Juergen Thieme

  101. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "Applications of spherically bent crystals and Pilatus hybrid pixel array detectors (PAD) for x-ray spectroscopic measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity in ITER and NIF: Potential applications on x-ray light sources"

    Presented by Kenneth Hill and Manfred Bitter, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Wednesday, August 24, 2011, 2:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

    Recently developed one-dimensionally imaging high resolution x-ray spectrometers using a single spherically bent crystal and Pilatus PAD arrays, or 2D multiwire proportional counters, have revolutionized Doppler spectroscopic measurements of plasma ion temperature and flow velocity in tokamak plasmas worldwide by providing, from a single instrument, measurements over the entire extended plasma cross section. We have collaborated with groups to install and operate such spectrometers on tokamaks and stellarators at MIT and in Japan, China, and Korea, and are presently developing the conceptual design for a set of such x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers (XICS) for the international tokamak, ITER, which is being constructed in Cadarache, France. This XICS instrument is also applicable for Doppler measurements of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Additional schemes have been developed which eliminate the astigmatism by use of specially matched pairs of spherically bent crystals and which provide 2D x-ray imaging with almost arbitrary angles of incidence over millimeter scales with potential spatial resolution of microns. These x-ray optical schemes may also have beneficial applications in other areas, such as x-ray lithography, x-ray microscopy for biological research on x-ray light sources, or x-ray beam steering, focusing, and monochromatization at synchrotron facilities. An overview of the 1D imaging Doppler spectroscopy on present tokamaks, performance simulations for the ITER spectrometers, and preliminary testing of the 2D imaging schemes in visible light will be presented, as well as planning and progress on testing the 2D imaging schemes with x rays.

  102. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Research of electronic structure of transition metal dichalcogenides by methods of Soft X-ray Absorption, Photon Emission and Photoelectron spectroscopies"

    Presented by Mikhail Yablonskikh, Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Basovizza I-34012, Italy

    Wednesday, August 24, 2011, 9:30 am
    Building 703, Large Conference Room

    Layered dichalcogenides of Ti intercalated with transition metals TMxTiZ2 (TMDC's) where TM= Mn, Cr, Fe, Co, Cu or Ag and Z= S, Se, Te are low dimensional solids where monoatomic layers of TM atoms with a given density are separated by nonmagnetic slabs of the TiZ2 matrix [1]. Discovery of charge-denstity wave (CDW) to superconductive state transition in Cu dichalcogenides and promise of that for Fe and Cr TMDC's inspired a number of studies of their electronic structure [2] which are dedicated to understand the nature of superconductivity, the origin of magnetism and the formation of CDW. The formation of electronic band structure and the chemical bonding situation were examined for three classes of compounds: TiZ2 host-lattice materials, TM (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co) intercalates and Cr substitution compounds. Since electronic properties of TMDCs can be understood in terms of charge transfer and interlayer separation [3], Soft X-ray Absorption, Soft X-ray Photoelectron and Soft X-ray Emission spectroscopies were used. It was found that a strong hybridization between 3d orbitals of intercalated TM atom, Ti 3d and Z p orbitals plays a major role resulting in energy shifts of the conduction band, modi cations of the valence band and variations of the density of states at the Fermi level [4]. The interplay between the band structure, interlayer separation and the chemical bonding of TM atoms with a host lattice TiSe2 will be shown. Further opportunities for research of TMDCs and corresponding experimental challenges will be discussed.

  103. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "From X-ray standing waves to Borrmann Spectroscopy"

    Presented by Martin Tolkiehn, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY)

    Thursday, August 11, 2011, 9:30 am
    Building 703, Large Conference Room

    The method of x-ray standing waves (XSW) is a well established technique for the determination of adsorbate or dopant atomic positions in single crystals. It is based on the interference of incident and Bragg reflected wave, which is calculated with the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction. This means that highly perfect crystals are necessary. I will present an improvement of the classical XSW method, which allows application of the XSW technique to non-perfect single crystals. This is achieved by describing the standing wave field in the frame of the kinematical approximation. Recent results of such kinematical x-ray standing waves (KXSW) investigations of doped non-perfect crystals will be shown. Usually the XSW and KXSW techniques are used in Bragg geometry. However the application of both methods is also possible in Laue geometry. A particularly interesting phenomenon observed in the latter case is the Borrmann effect, which is caused by the standing wave field inside the crys- tal. For certain reflections the low electrical field intensity at the atoms leads to a low dipole absorption (anomalous transmission). At the same time the high field gradient results in an enhanced quadrupole absorption. Therefore the intensity of the reflected beam strongly depends on the quadrupole absorption cross section of the atoms at the nodes of the standing wave field. This effect can be used for the identification and investigation of quadrupolar features in the x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). I will present a theoretical model of this novel Borrmann Spectroscopy method and demonstrate its applicability to transition metal K edges and rare earth L edges.

  104. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "High Resolution Soft X-Ray RIXS in Quasi One-Dimensional Cuprates and Oxide Heterostructures"

    Presented by Thorsten Schmitt, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland

    Wednesday, August 10, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) is a powerful bulk-sensitive photon-in/photon-out spectroscopic probe of the electronic structure with atomic and orbital sensitivity. It is an ideal method for studying excitations from the electronic ground state in correlated transition metal oxides, being directly sensitive to charge-, orbital- and spin-degrees of freedom. Ultra-high resolution instrumentation for RIXS is available at the ADvanced RESonant Spectroscopies (ADRESS) beamline of the Swiss Light Source at the Paul Scherrer Institut, being optimized for soft X-rays with variable polarization between 0.4 and 1.8 keV [1]. The SAXES (Super Advanced X-ray Emission Spectrograph) RIXS spectrometer of the ADRESS beamline has a resolving power of ca. 12000 for 1 keV. It allows varying the scattering geometry between incident and inelastically scattered X-rays in order to study low-energy excitations as a function of momentum transfer. In this talk I will give an overview on high-resolution and momentum dependent RIXS studies of magnetic and electronic excitations in quasi one-dimensional cuprate and oxide hetersotructure systems Sr2CuO3 is a quasi one-dimensional corner-sharing single-chain compound possessing the nearly ideal properties of the one-dimensional antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin-1/2 model. The momentum transfer dispersion of the Cu L3-RIXS signal in Sr2CuO3 along the chain direction reveals that the main spectral weight follows the lower onset of the two-spinon (and higher order) continuum and probes the dynamical spin structure factor. Numerical calculations within the Bethe Ansatz allow a detailed line shape analysis of the RIXS response. The modes within the orbital excitation energy range show that the dd excitations in Sr2CuO3 are momentum dispersive and can be associated with orbitons, i.e. dispersive excitations mediated by the superexchange interactions. A spin-orbital superexchange model reproduces this orbiton dispersion and explains the lar

  105. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of the iron pnictides – a slow start but a strong finish?"

    Presented by Ignace Jarrigge, SPring 8

    Tuesday, August 9, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    For the past three years, photoelectron and optical spectroscopies have provided most of the momentum behind the tremendous research effort on the electronic structure of the new superconducting iron pnictides. In contrast, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) has yet to make a solid contribution to the research on this new class of superconductors. This is because the iron pnictides are metals, and hence have a very low Raman scattering cross-section. In this talk, I will present RIXS data recently obtained at both Fe-K and Fe-L edges on single-crystals of PrFeAsOx (x=0.7,1), which belong to the so-called 1111 family. Owing to a combination of high energy resolution and high incident flux, we were able to observe features corresponding to two types of charge excitations: dd interband transitions between 0.2 and 2.0 eV energy loss, and As4p-Fe3d charge transfer around 4 eV. A weak momentum dependence across the Fe-As plane is observed for the dd interband transitions. The knowledge of these excitations enables us to readily assess the strength of the electron correlation effects, believed to play a central role in the peculiar physics of the iron-based superconductors. Finally, I will discuss which other iron pnictide compounds are likely to be well suited to RIXS.

  106. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The Effects of a High Fluoride Treatment on Osteoporotic Bone as Measured by Fourier Infrared Transform Imaging"

    Presented by Natalie Delpratt, Columbia University

    Friday, August 5, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  107. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Analysis of Oil Production in Algae as a function of Visible Light Wavelengths"

    Presented by William Willis, Stony Brook University

    Friday, August 5, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  108. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Understanding how Pollen Tube Germination is Affected in Plants Genetically Modified to Improve Biomass Production"

    Presented by Maria Sirenko, Ridge High School, NJ

    Friday, August 5, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  109. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Understanding the Aggregation of Cu, Zn Superoxide Dismutase in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis"

    Presented by Daphne Meza, University of New Orleans

    Friday, August 5, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  110. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Understanding how Pollen Tube Germination is Affected in Plants Genetically Modified to Improve Biomass Production"

    Presented by Genevieve Kuczewski, Shoreham - Wading River High School

    Friday, August 5, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  111. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Scanning photoemission microscopy in soft X-ray and VUV"

    Presented by Pavel Dudin, Sincrotrone Trieste, Elettra, Italy

    Friday, August 5, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    The talk is devoted to the use of scanning photoemission microscopies in material studies. The surface, electronic, chemical and structural sensitivity of photoemission makes it an instrument that is very useful for material studies like strongly electronically correlated systems, catalysts, superconductors, graphene, etc. With the photon spot of small size (less than 1 m) photoemission acquires spatial resolution, substantially extending research possibilities. For example, extremely small samples could be studied, like graphene flakes, polycrystalline domains, single crystals that couldn’t be grown to large sizes, etc. Another interesting possibility are the systems with intrinsic spatial inhomogeneties in electronic and/or chemical properties. The good examples are the domains in conductivity formed under the conditions of the metal to insulator transition. Further, the artificial structures with micron sizes could be studied. At Elettra the core level and VB/ARPES photoemission microscopies are developed at the beamlines of ESCA microscopy and Spectromicroscopy, respectively. The former is well known to provide mapping of surfaces with spatial resolution of 200 nm and highly relevant chemically, due to high sensitivity of core level lineshape to local environment of the atom. The beamline successfully used in studies of OLED, fuel cells, catalysts, nanotubes, semiconducting heterostructures, etc. The upgrade of SpectroMicroscopy beamline dedicated to the development of spatially resolved ARPES has been commissioned few years ago. Now it builds up the user community by offering the possibility of ARPES with spatial resolution less than 1 micron. Up to now, the spatially resolved ARPES has been already used in studies of various materials with strong electronic correlations: superconductors, graphene, CDW materials (TaS2 and TaSe2), vanadium oxides, etc. The correlated use of shallow core level (less than 70 eV in binding energy) and ARPES microsc

  112. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Photoelectron Spectroscopy & Photoelectron Microscopy"

    Presented by Elio Vescovo, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Photon Sciences

    Tuesday, August 2, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Ultrathin metal films – let’s say in the 1 to 10 monolayers range – exhibit characteristic physical and chemical properties with no counterpart in bulk materials. This behavior stems from the two-dimensional character of their electronic structure. Photoelectron techniques are therefore optimal tools to investigate these systems. In this talk, spin- and angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (SP-ARPES) will be used to investigate the lifting of the spin degeneracy in the surface electronic states of a non-magnetic system: the 1-dimentionally modulated Bi monolayer on Ag(110). X-ray Photoelectron microscopy will instead be applied to study the low temperature mass transport during the separation of Fe70Ni30 martensite into the equilibrium bcc and fcc phases.

  113. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Coherent diffraction imaging with transmission and Bragg reflection geometries"

    Presented by Xiaojing Huang, ANL

    Monday, August 1, 2011, 2:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Dr. Yong Chu

    Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) technique inverts far-filed diffraction pattern to real-space images using phase retrieval algorithms. Because CDI provides higher radiation dose efficiency compared with lens-based microscope system and has the potential to reach diffraction-limited resolution, it is favorable for image radiation sensitive biological samples. CDI applications on imaging freeze-dried, chemically dried and frozen hydrated yeast cells will be presented. Combined with resonant excitation process, CDI is capable to unravel magnetic domain structures. When operated in Bragg reflection geometry, Bragg CDI recovers real-space images of crystals, with magnitudes represent electron densities and phases represent strain distribution. Presenter will show Bragg CDI studies on silicon-on-insulator and zinc oxide crystals, and discuss the developments on extending Bragg CDI's capability to investigate specimens under extreme conditions, such as heavily strained and in high-pressure environment.

  114. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "The copper speciation studies in biological samples using X-ray Fluorescence Microprobe (XFM)"

    Presented by Naresh Kujala, Argonne National Laboratory

    Monday, August 1, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Copper plays an important role in angiogenesis and tumor growth. The anti-growth action of copper chelators is mainly their induced inhibition of angiogenesis. Cu is considered as a target for novel cancer therapies that offer lower level of toxicity compared to current available chemotherapies. Although Cu oxidation state has not been directly implicated as being a characteristic of the tumor growth process, this can not be completed excluded as a potential role of Cu in tumor growth. As Cu concentration in tissue samples (prostate and breast cancer) has few parts per million. X-ray fluorescence microprobe (XFM) spectroscopy can detect very low metal concentrations with high efficiency and identify oxidation states and coordination chemistry using spectral lines that are normally unresolved by other techniques. This low metal concentration required a high flux incident beam capable to generate enough fluorescence x-rays to be detected. The main drawback in this configuration is the high intensity of the scattering signal from the supporting matrix. Measuring copper K fluorescence from tissue samples, for instance, can be critically masked by the strong scattering signal, reducing the sensitivity level and potentially saturating conventional solid-state photon-counting detectors. To overcome these limitations a high energy resolution and high efficiency compact, short focal distance Bent Crystal Laue Analyzer (BCLA) detection system has been developed for copper speciation in biological samples. The analyzer has energy resolution of 14 eV@ Cu Kα line and it has notable advantages to resolve the Cu Kα1, Kα2, and Kβ fluorescence lines while offering a very low background. The designed BCLA will be used on copper speciation studies in biological samples with specific applications to cancer biology.

  115. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Characterization of Crystalline Structures in Organic Semiconductors for High Performance Organic Electronics"

    Presented by Professor Hoichang Yang, Inha University, Korea

    Friday, July 29, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

    Various organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) containing conjugated materials are now becoming commercially available in the form of light emitting diodes, and proto-type electronic polymer circuits of pi-pi conjugated polymers or oligomers. Successful uses of these devices are presently being demonstrated. Thin films for OTFT applications can be fabricated through various film processing techniques, such as vacuum deposition and solution casting. Since the performance of OTFT devices is inherently related to the local ordered structure of these semiconducting films, it is important to achieve a greater control of the self-assembly of semiconducting materials on functionalized dieletric substrates. Specifically, the desire to make nanometer scale devices for future electronic applications further emphasizes a preferential orientation of pi-pi conjugated crystal planes, as a hole-transporting path in p- or n-type semiconductor-based OTFTs. Herein, I introduce the effects of crystalline structures in pentacene, oligothiophene derivative, PTCDI-C13, TES-ADT, TIPS pentacene, F8T2, PQT12, and poly (3-alkyl thiophene) thin films, as organic semiconductors, on their charge-transport behaviors in OTFTs using two-dimensional grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Interconnection between crystal grains, as a prerequisite for high performance OTFT applications, is highlighted via conducting-AFM characterization.

  116. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Lipid-Mediated Assembly of Biomolecular Nano-objects at Liquid Interfaces."

    Presented by Masa Fukuto, Brookhaven National Laboratory, CMPMS

    Wednesday, July 27, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Biomolecular nanoparticles (BNPs), such as proteins and viruses, bound to a lipid monolayer are well suited for investigating interface-directed assembly of nanoscale building blocks. Using the air-water interface as the assembly platform, we have recently demonstrated density-driven 2D crystallization of BNPs for two types of BNP-lipid interactions, one based on electrostatic interactions (type I) and the other based on specific ligand binding (type II). For type I, the assembly of icosahedral viruses (CPMV and TYMV) on a cationic lipid monolayer was studied as a function of pH and the monolayer charge density. In-situ grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements show that 2D crystals of these virus particles are formed above a threshold monolayer charge density and only in a narrow pH range just above the virus' isoelectric point, where the net charge on the virus is weakly negative. For CPMV, the observed 2D crystal structure is analogous to the densest lattice plane within the known 3D crystals. By contrast, for TYMV, two new forms of 2D crystal structures have been found that are distinct from any lattice planes in the previously observed 2D or 3D assemblies. The roles of particle shape and patchiness, interface-induced particle orientation, and competing anisotropic inter-particle interactions in stabilizing these structures will be discussed. For type II, the 2D assembly of the protein streptavidin (SA) on a biotin-bearing lipid monolayer was studied as a function of the surface density of biotin, a protein-binding ligand. In-situ Brewster-angle microscopy, GISAXS, and x-ray reflectivity measurements were carried out to elucidate the relationship between the adsorption, 2D phase behavior, and binding state of SA. In particular, the threshold biotin density for inducing the 2D crystallization is found to be remarkably close to the density of the ligand-binding sites in the SA crystal. Moreover, the fully bound state of SA, correspo

  117. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Magnetic Order in Multiferroic Rare Earth Ferroborates"

    Presented by Christie Nelson, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Photon Sciences

    Tuesday, July 26, 2011, 9 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Multiferroics are materials with more than one type of ferroic order, and have attracted recent interest due to potential device applications. Multiferroic rare earth ferroborates, RFe3(BO3)4, exhibit simultaneous antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric order, and strong coupling is indicated by the magnetic field dependence of the electric polarization. In order to shed light on the multiferroic mechanism in RFe3(BO3)4, x-ray scattering studies were carried out. A combination of resonant— at the rare earth L edges— and nonresonant magnetic x-ray scattering allows the behaviors of the rare earth and iron magnetic subsystems to be unraveled. For R = Gd and Nd, both commensurate and incommensurate magnetic phases are observed, and there is a correlation between the magnetic field-induced destruction of the incommensurate magnetic phases and the onset of electric polarization. In substituted ferroborates with rare earth species having different anisotropies, a decoupling between the rare earth subsystems is observed.

  118. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Performing magnet design and beam optics in an integrated framework"

    Presented by Shashikant Manikonda

    Monday, July 25, 2011, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Toshi Tanabe

    Map methods are standard techniques used to design and optimize accelerator lattices. But for simulations with realistic electromagnetic fields computing transfer maps is a challenging problem. Recently new tools have been developed to do magnet design and perform beam optics simulations in an integrated framework. We will discuss the implementation, performance and advantages of these tools and show the utility for few practical cases.

  119. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Core Level Spectroscopy at High Flux Beamlines"

    Presented by Klaus Attenkofer, Argonne National Laboratory

    Monday, July 25, 2011, 10 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lisa Miller

    Recent developments in beamline design, detection technology, and data analysis has brought core level spectroscopy to a sophistication which allows one to probe “real materials under real conditions”. Many disciplines currently face the task to understand, tailor or optimize highly complex heterogeneous materials. Catalysis, battery development, organic solar cells or even the optimization of concrete are typical examples. All these examples have in common that the scientist needs to visualize morphology and microscopic structure during processing or operation of the devices. Modern X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAFS) can play a key role for this exciting challenge. As a local probe, not requiring long-range order like most scattering techniques, XAFS explores the local structure and the electronic configuration around the absorber atom, making it to an exceptional instrument in the toolkit of the developer. The talk will give an overview how high flux beamline designs combined with modern detection technology will increase throughput and opens avenues to novel spectroscopic approaches.

  120. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "X-ray Views of Biological Mineralization"

    Presented by Elaine DiMasi, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Monday, July 25, 2011, 9:30 am
    Building 703, Large Conference Room

    Mineralized tissues such as bone and tooth have a mysterious origin, from a physical chemistry point of view. Classical crystallization theory concerns energetic tradeoffs in the addition of molecules or ions to the surfaces of crystal nuclei. From these considerations the formation of less stable precursor phases and the concept of Ostwald ripening emerge. However, minerals produced by cells in live tissue are likely to emerge along a significantly different path. The observation and speculation of “electron dense granules”, “x-ray amorphous mineral”, matrix vesicles, calcium phosphate “Posners clusters”, and organic-mineral clusters such as lipid-calcium phosphate complexes have been mentioned in the literature for decades. These ideas connect to current thinking from biomimetic chemistry experiments, where polymer-induced liquid precursors and prenucleation clusters have been reported. This is the backdrop for experiments using synchrotron x-rays to make new observations of biological minerals. I will briefly mention achievements at the organic interface in model systems and, in more depth, discuss Ca L-edge absorption spectroscopy performed at the nanoscale at scanning transmission x-ray micro-spectroscopy beamlines.

  121. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "A Dense Monolayer of Ions at Soft Interfaces"

    Presented by Dr. Binyang Hou, University of Illinois at Chicago

    Friday, July 22, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

    An important unsolved problem in the study of ion distributions is the relationship of macroscopic electrochemistry measurements to the ion distribution determined by microscopic synchrotron x-ray scattering measurements. In this work, we present recent x-ray reflectivity and interfacial tension measurements of electrified oil/water interfaces as a function of interfacial electric potential for a series of interfaces between solutions of 10 mM alkali chloride (XCl, where X is the alkali metal ion of Li+, Na+, Rb+ and Cs+) in water and 5 mM organic supporting electrolyte BTPPATPFB in 1, 2-dichloroethane (DCE). The potential is established by the use of electrodes and supporting electrolytes in the bulk phases. Interfacial tension as a function of interfacial electric potential was measured to determine the potential of zero charge (PZC) and the capillary wave roughness of each interface. The interfacial excess charge was determined from the tension measurements as well. X-ray scattering experiments were carried out at the ChemMatCARS beamline 15-ID at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory, USA). Large changes in reflectivity occur from intermediate potentials for each sample. These results disagree with predictions of the Gouy-Chapman (GC) theory. A Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) calculation that incorporates a potential of mean force (PMF) to describe the role of liquid structure on the ion distributions agrees well with the x-ray reflectivity data. These results confirmed a layer of TPFB- ion formed at the interfaces at high positive electric potentials. In addition, we calculated the excess interfacial charge from the ion distributions determined by the x-ray measurements analysis for each interface. These calculated excess interfacial charges from the PB-PMF method are in good agreement with the tension measurement results. These agreements make a direct connection between the molecular level x-ray measurements and macroscopic interfacial tensi

  122. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Evidence of high metal tolerance in seeds of hyperaccumulator plants revealed by X-ray fluorescence microprobe"

    Presented by Ryan Tappero, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Photon Sciences

    Friday, July 22, 2011, 9:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Metal hyperaccumulator plants are used in commercial phytoremediation and phytomining operations to recover metals of economic value from enriched soils or sediments. Information regarding the distribution and speciation of metals at the micron scale is needed to locate the phenomena of hyperaccumulation in tissues, cells, and organelles in order to understand the mechanism of (hyper)tolerance and ultimately improve phytoextraction efficiency. Metal (hyper)tolerance in mature plants occurs via chemical binding of metals (i.e., chelation) and intracellular compartmentalization. X-ray fluorescence microprobe was used to investigate metal localization and speciation in situ because standard sample preparation methods (e.g. embedding) cause re-distribution of metals or alter their speciation. In seeds of nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulator Thlaspi goesingense, Ni was preferentially localized in the embryonic tissue with the greatest enrichment in the cotyledons (leaves), radicle (root), and hypocotyl (stem); nickel was nearly absent from the testa (seed coat). Nickel within the embryo was spatially correlated with sulfur (S) and closely associated with manganese (Mn). For intact seeds, fCMT revealed preferential localization of Ni in the epidermis of the rudimentary plants. High-resolution images of seed cross-sections showed Ni compartmentalized preferentially within the single layer of epidermal cells. In cotyledons, epidermal cells contained circa 8-fold more Ni than immediately adjacent palisade cells and circa 6-fold more Ni than (spongy) mesophyll cells. Nickel K-edge XAS measurements on (oriented) seeds and single epidermal cells exposed in cross-section revealed the storage form of Ni was a nickel-sulfur nanocluster resembling alpha nickel sulfide (-NiS). Intracellular compartmentalization and chemical binding of Ni in the seed embryo provides evidence that these rudimentary plants have developed a (hyper)tolerance mechanism for metal homeostasis. Ne

  123. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "In situ experiments in Synchrotron X ray Tomography"

    Presented by Prof. Eric Maire, Université de Lyon and Havard University

    Wednesday, July 20, 2011, 3 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Jun Wang

    The microstructure of heterogeneous materials such as multiphase alloys, composites, cellular materials, etc... has sometimes a very complicated nature. The complexity of this microstructure can nowadays be imaged in 3D using different methods at different scales (FIB/SEM, Atom Probe Tomography, TEM tomography, etc.). The most commonly used of these methods is probably X-Ray Computed Tomography (XRCT) because of its multimaterial, multiscale and non destructive character. 3D imaging (if non destructive like it is the case for XRCT) can also be coupled with in situ loading (1) of the sample (in situ tension or compression, in situ heating, in situ freezing, etc.). The observation of the evolution of the microstructure under load in 3D allows to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved during the transformation/ deformation of these heterogeneous materials as illustrated in Fig. 1 in the case of a dual phase steel. The 3D image of the initial microstructure of the sample can, in a final analysis stage, be used as a direct input for a numerical simulation of the response of the material to the load, the results of which being directly comparable to the in situ experiments. This presentation will illustrate this combination of techniques and how we have used it in recent studies in order to understand the deformation of heterogeneous materials.

  124. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Modeling study of SPEAR3 nonlinear dynamics"

    Presented by Xiaobiao Huang, SLAC

    Wednesday, July 20, 2011, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

    Lattice modeling is studied to understand the nonlinear dynamics of the SPEAR3 ring, using data from magnet modeling, magnetic field measurements and alignment requirements. The gradient dipoles are modeled with an analytic magnetic field profile and a numeric integration pass method in Accelerator Toolbox (AT). Linear and nonlinear effects of quadrupole fringe field are included with a new AT pass method. Linear and nonlinear parameters from the modeling are compared to experimental measurements.

  125. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Electronic Structure and Surface Characterization of Semiconducting Nanocrystals Using Synchrotron Radiation"

    Presented by Professor Robert Meulenberg, University of Maine

    Friday, July 15, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  126. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Synchrotron full field x-ray imaging: APS experience and outlook"

    Presented by Wah-Keat Lee, Argonne National Laboratory

    Thursday, July 7, 2011, 9:30 am
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Lisa Miller

    The advent of synchrotrons have led to a renewed interest in x-ray imaging, in particular, various forms of phase-contrast imaging. In 2005, the APS upgraded an existing beamline into a dedicated full field imaging facility that houses three separate instruments: a white beam micron-resolution instrument, a monochromatic beam micron-resolution instrument and a 40 nm resolution transmission x-ray microscope. The first part and bulk of the talk will focus on a few applications using the micron-resolution instruments, namely insect physiology, ferrofluids and fuel injection systems. These systems involve very complex fluid dynamics, where for the first time, direct experimental data can be collected. The second part of the talk will discuss some of the current technical developments, challenges and general outlook.

  127. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    ""A Mechanism for S-adenosyl methionine Assisted Formation of a Riboswitch Conformation: A Small Molecule with a Strong""

    Presented by Wei Huang, Department of Biological Science, Louisiana State University

    Friday, July 1, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  128. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Femtosecond Carrier Dynamics and Nonlinear Effects in Quantum Cascade Lasers"

    Presented by Sheng Liu, University of Maryland Baltimore County

    Tuesday, June 28, 2011, 2 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg 703

    Hosted by: Dr. G. Larry Carr

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are semiconductor lasers based on intersubband transitions, resonant tunneling and phonon scattering, emitting Mid- to far-IR light. In order to understand the ultrafast carrier dynamics in QCLs, pump-probe technique has been extensively employed to investigate the electron transport dynamics and coupled light-matter interactions. Moreover, people have observed giant optical nonlinearity in quantum well structures and QCLs by taking advantage of the large dipole-matrix elements of intersubband transition. The talk will focus on studying the carrier dynamics of ultrastrong-coupling designed QCLs using degenerate Mid-IR pump-probe technique. Second harmonic generated pulses were also obtained from the QCLs pumped by femtosecond Mid-IR pulses through front facet illumination. Furthermore, other experiments related to Mid-IR such as supercontinuum generation in chalcogenide fiber, photoluminescence of type-II detector will be briefly discussed.

  129. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Thermoelectric and Structual Properties of the Cu Doped Ca3Co409 System"

    Presented by Tao Wu, Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Friday, June 17, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  130. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Screening Effect of Highly Compressible supercritical Carbon Dioxide on Attractive Polymer/Substrate Interactions"

    Presented by Peter Gin, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stony Brook University

    Friday, June 17, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  131. NSLS-II Seminar

    "NSLS II injection system"

    Presented by Guimei Wang

    Thursday, June 16, 2011, 10 am
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Timur Shaftan

  132. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Vector Potential Photoelectron Microscope (VPPEM)"

    Presented by Raymond Browning, R. Browning Consultants, Shoreham, N.Y.

    Friday, June 10, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

    A new class of electron microscope has been developed for the chemical microanalysis of a wide range of real world samples using photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly structured, three dimensional samples, such as fiber mats and fracture surfaces can be imaged, as well as insulators, and magnetic materials. The new microscope is unique in using the magnetic vector potential field as a spatial reference for imaging. The very different properties of the imaging method open up many opportunities for novel experiments such as the high resolution imaging of in situ chemical reactions on highly textured surfaces. A prototype instrument on U4A has demonstrated imaging of uncoated silk, magnetic steel wool, and micron sized single strand tungsten wires. This demonstration suggests that the microscope will have a major impact in many fields including: the study of catalysis, biological and organic thin films, battery technologies, and geology. This work has been funded by several NIST SBIR awards with the support and encouragement of Dan Fischer and the NIST Synchrotron Methods Group at NSLS.

  133. Science Cafe Book Reading & Discussion

    "Forensics at Brookhaven Lab's Light Source: The Truth and the Fiction Behind Red Herring"

    Presented by Archer Mayor, author & 2004 New England Booksellers Association award-winner

    Thursday, June 9, 2011, 7 pm
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Marsha Belford

    In a open-to-the-public evening mixing fiction and science, author Archer Mayor will first read excerpts from Red Herring, his 21st novel featuring Joe Gunther of the fictional Vermont Bureau of Investigation. In Red Herring, single drops of blood are found at the scene of three seemingly unrelated murders -- and the blood is not that of any of the victims. When conventional forensics only leads Joe Gunther to a dead end, the investigator takes a detour to the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Lab on Long Island. Here, the high-intensity beams of the NSLS shed light upon the culprit of these dastardly deeds and enable Joe Gunther and his fellow gum-shoes to track down not only the perpetrator of these crimes, but also the villainous master-mind. Following the reading, researchers from the NSLS will explore how tomorrow's forensics capabilities are being developed through research at the Light Source today. And, finally, the author will discuss what inspired him to make the NSLS a pivotal character, as it were, in Red Herring before answering questions from the audience. After the auditorium presentation, free refreshments will be served, and the author will autograph copies of his books, which will be offered for sale by Borders of Stony Brook. All are invited. Age 16 and over, bring photo ID.

  134. Photon Sciences Directorate Seminar

    "Nanoparticle Behavior in Environmental and Test Media: Conclusions from Static and Dynamic Stability Testing"

    Presented by Frank Von Der Kammer, University of Vienna, Austria

    Friday, June 3, 2011, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Juergen Thieme

    The appearance and behavior of engineered nanoparticles in the environment determine their distribution, their fate and the exposure of organisms. This behavior is governed by several well-known parameters as surface potential of the particles, particle size and shape and of course the water chemistry. However a detailed understanding how the inter-connected processes of aggregation, transport, settling and transformation are influenced by these parameters is still missing. From the perspective of risk assessment it would be essential to be able to predict behavior, fate and transformation, but meaningful predictions derived from first principles remain difficult, even in fairly simple systems. For certain engineered nanoparticles like citrate stabilized Gold-NPs for example, which come with a fairly simple surface chemistry, the prediction of reactions may be more straight forward than for others, especially metal-oxide particles. Hence as long as process understanding remains underdeveloped empiric approaches will be necessary. We have addressed this issue by developing a testing approach to generate empiric data for the dispersion stability of nanoparticles in a wide variety of conditions. The testing procedure itself and the comparison of conditions and materials will be presented and discussed with respect to the application to real world conditions including analytical challenges in real surface waters and soils, limitations due to reduced complexity of the set-up, and the problem of heterogeneity and property distributions of the nanoparticles.

  135. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Roughness-induced Scattering of EUV/Soft-X-ray Optical Components"

    Presented by Sven Schroeder, Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering (IOF), Jena, Germany

    Wednesday, June 1, 2011, 1:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Mourad Idir

    The unrelenting demand for computer processors and memory with higher speed and capacity is directly connected to higher integration densities and, consequently, the printing of smaller feature sizes. Optical lithography at 193 nm is the current state of the art for manufacturing semiconductor structures. One key to enhance the resolution is to decrease the lithography wavelength. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography at 13.5 nm is expected to be the next generation lithography. The great leap to the Soft-X-ray spectral range, however, leads to tremendous requirements on the surface roughness of optical components. Roughness-induced light scattering may drastically reduce the throughput, the resolution, and the contrast in lithographic systems. The measurement and modeling of EUV light scattering are essential for improving the performance of EUV optical components. Furthermore, characterizing the relevant roughness properties even at very early stages in the manufacturing chain of optical components ensures that the desired performance can in fact be achieved. The talk first provides a brief overview of the EUV/Soft-X-ray related activities at IOF in general including multilayer coatings and diffraction gratings. Special emphasis will be placed on the modeling and measurement of roughness-induced light scattering. An instrument for EUV light scattering measurements at 13.5 nm developed at IOF will be presented. Results of angle resolved scattering measurements of Mo/Si multilayer mirrors for 13.5 nm will be analyzed using simple roughness and light scattering models. Furthermore, a laser light scattering method will be presented that enables the roughness of large collector mirrors for laser-produced plasma EUV sources to be characterized and the performance to be predicted before coating. If you would like to meet with this speaker please contact the host (midir@bnl.gov) or Peter Takacs (takacs@bnl.gov) to cordinate a time.

  136. NSLS-II HXN BAT Meeting

    Wednesday, June 1, 2011, 8:30 am
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Dr. Yong Chu

  137. Photon Sciences Seminar

    "New Improvements in Figuring of X-Ray Substrates"

    Presented by Deborah Dahan, SESO

    Tuesday, May 31, 2011, 10 am
    Bldg 703, Large Seminar Room

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    SESO will present the company’s facilities and describe its x-ray products. Being aware of the scientific needs for nanofocusing mirrors, the company has developed new technologies and processes (including new mirror benders, Ion Beam Figuring and deterministic polishing) to manufacture micro to nanofocusing mirrors from 150mm to more than 600 mm length. The technological improvements in manufacturing and measuring X-ray mirrors are such that the company can now produce mirrors with slope errors down to 0.1µrad rms.

  138. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Monte Carlo Simulation of Neutron Powder Diffraction at Spallation Source"

    Presented by LI LI, Columbia University

    Friday, May 27, 2011, 2:30 pm
    Large Conference Room Building 703

    Hosted by: Enju Lima

    Measured powder diffraction patterns contain contributions from the sample examined in the study and the instrument used for the measurement.  Most available data analysis software operate on the measured data to extract sample parameters. However, there are few programs that can take sample parameters and rigorously simulate the expected diffraction profile for a given instrument. In this work Monte Carlo methods, within the framework of McStas software, were used for the simulation of neutron diffraction at SMARTS diffractometer in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Simulations included all machine components, such as the moderator, guide system, collimator, sample (kernel) and detector banks. The simulation yielded information on the line broadening introduced into the diffraction profile as a function of energy and was used to predict the size limit above which line broadening studies cannot be performed on this instrument. This work provides an example of how rigorous scattering theory can be used to design optimal diffraction instruments.

  139. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Mapping Structure from Microns to Atomic Length Scales with Coherent Diffraction."

    Presented by Stephan Hruszkewycz

    Thursday, May 26, 2011, 2:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Enju Lima

    Coherent x-ray diffraction techniques that utilize speckle can be designed to provide reciprocal space information encoded with complex structural information ranging from unit cell to micron length scales. With two decades of development and an increased emphasis on coherence at light sources around the world, these techniques are maturing to the point of being useful as tools for exploring complex structural issues in materials science. This talk will focus on recent efforts to understand, develop, and apply novel coherent Bragg diffraction techniques to materials with complex local non-periodic structure. I will discuss experiments designed to use the coherent beams at the Advanced Photon Source(APS) and at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) as well as the simulation tools we designed to clarify the interaction of these beams with complex atomic structures. Specifically, our goals include 3D imaging of non-ideal oxide nanocrystals at the APS with both plane wave and focused coherent beams as well as measuring femtosecond dynamics in atomic glasses at LCLS using coherent speckle.

  140. Users' Meeting

    "Free Plenary Session, 2011 NSLS/CFN Users' Meeting"

    Tuesday, May 24, 2011, 8:30 am
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: NSLS and CFN Users' Executive Committees

  141. NSLS-II Workshop

    "NSLS-II Workshop"

    Wednesday, May 18, 2011, 1 pm
    Berkner Hall

    Hosted by: Doon Gibbs

  142. NSLS-II - Beamline Development Workshop

    "BDP Workshop - Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy (MIRT)"

    Presented by Various Speakers, Different Affiliations

    Monday, May 9, 2011, 8 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Avraham Dilmanian

    We propose the development of a state-of-the-art medical imaging and radiation therapy beamline for the NSLS-II, building on the experience and success to date at NSLS. The justifications for such a facility are a) the local expertise in medicine and technology in support of the ideas and demands of a diverse user community, and b) the specifications of the NSLS-II, making it one of the most suitable facilities anywhere for use in medical applications. These specifications include the facility’s 3.0 GeV ring energy, 500 mA top-off ring current and low emittance, the possibility of a high field superconducting wiggler source for full field, wide fan-beam imaging, and prospects for having a long beam line for imaging of large animals and potentially human subjects. Both basic research and preclinical studies in a wide range of applications will be conducted at the beam line. The facility will attract a large number of investigators from the immediate neighborhood, from the rest of the United States, and from other countries. The beamline will be competitive with the similar existing and planned facilities, globally.

  143. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Measuring the dynamics on the go: X-ray photon correlation experiments under continuous flow"

    Presented by Andrei Fluerasu, NSLS-II BNL

    Friday, April 29, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  144. Workshop

    "Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems at NSLS II"

    Friday, April 29, 2011, 8:30 am
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 490

    In order to gather and hear the scientific community opinion we are organizing a workshop on Synchrotron X-ray studies of advanced nuclear energy systems at NSLS II to be held on April 28-29, 2011, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Sponsored by Brookhaven National Laboratory, this workshop will focus on the use of synchrotron X-rays techniques for investigating advanced nuclear structural materials and fuels, radioactive materials, materials of interest to the nuclear forensics and national security, and fabrication of materials using ion implantation

  145. Photon Sciences Beamline Development Workshop-Trends in Structural Biology

    "Beamline Development Workshop - All Day Event"

    Presented by Various Speakers, Various Institutions see below

    Thursday, April 28, 2011, 8 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Patrick Loll (Drexel) and Vivian Stojanoff (PS)

    With the advent of the NSLS-II, it is a good time to take stock of the current state of the art in structural biology, and to look forward to what the future will bring. This meeting is intended to survey current research and develop a perspective on future themes in structural biology. Discussions will focus both on current methods and methods currently under development, with the goal of identifying advances that are most likely to benefit the field.One and half day event. Confirmed speakers Mario Amzel (John Hopkins), Bert van den Berg (UMASS), Gino Cingolani (Thomas Jefferson), Roger Fourme (SOLEIL), James Holton (ALS), Veijo Honkimaki (ESRF), XianPeng Kong (NYU), Dean Madden (Dartmouth), Enrique Rudino (UNAM), Peter Siddons (PS), Gyorgy Snell (Takeda), Yong Tang (Wistar), Michael Wiener (UVa), Ji-Fang Zhang (Thomas Jefferson), Ming-Ming Zhou (MSSM).

  146. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "TUNABLE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AND MORPHOLOGY OF LANGMUIR FILMS"

    Presented by Yevgeny Lifshitz

    Wednesday, April 27, 2011, 1 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

    Preparation of organic layers on liquid surfaces has been a topic for the scientific curiosity for more than hundred years. By this low–cost production method the variety of materials with important electrical, optical, structural and chemical properties can be made. However, in spite of the relatively good investigation of structure and properties of Langmuir films (LF), their use still did not become commercial. The main obstacle is the pure stability of organic layers on liquid sub phase. One way to overcome this problem is to use the organic molecule with ability to be polymerized after arrangement on the liquid surface. For this purpose in the present work the amphiphilic molecules containing either the diacetylene (PDA) or thiol part (TDT), which can be easily initiated for the polymerization, were used. The main idea of current research was to investigate the promising systems of ultra – thin organic layer on the gas – liquid interface and find the external parameters, which can control their basic properties such as crystal structure and morphology and advance the realization of the potential applications of this type of materials.

  147. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Complexity behind Metal Organic Frameworks’ Chemistry"

    Presented by Jorge Gascon, Delft University of Technology, Catalysis Engineering – Chemical Engineering Dept, The Netherlands

    Friday, April 22, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

    During the last decade, Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) have attracted a great deal of attention in the field of nanostructured materials. The combination of organic and inorganic subunits in these crystalline porous materials has led to vast chemical versatility. In spite of initial skepticism owing to poor stability of the first MOF generation, impressive progress has been made during the last few years, yielding promising results in very different technological disciplines, such as, adsorption and heterogeneous catalysis. MOFs are indeed among the most sophisticated nano-structured solids: not only they possess high surface area and pore volume, but their chemical environment can be fine-tuned by selecting the appropriate building blocks, or by post-synthetic functionalization. In spite of the plethora of publications on the topic, very little is known about the factors that rule both the performance and the formation of this new class of materials. During this lecture, using two amino functionalized aluminum terephthalate based frameworks (NH2-MIL-53(Al)[1] and NH2-MIL-101(Al)[2]) as example, the reasons for the excellent CO2 capture ability and the step-by-step mechanism behind the competitive formation of these two MOF phases will be unraveled with the help of several in situ synchrotron based techniques. [1] a) A. Boutin, S. Couck, F.-X. Coudert, P. Serra-Crespo, J. Gascon, F. Kapteijn, A. H. Fuchs and J. F. M. Denayer, Microporous and Mesoporous Materials 2011, 140, 108-113; b) S. Couck, J. F. M. Denayer, G. V. Baron, T. Remy, J. Gascon and F. Kapteijn, Journal of the American Chemical Society 2009, 131, 6326-6327; c) S. Couck, T. Remy, G. V. Baron, J. Gascon, F. Kapteijn and J. F. M. Denayer, Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 2010, 12, 9413-9418; d) E. Stavitski, E. A. Pidko, S. Couck, T. Remy, E. J. M. Hensen, B. M. Weckhuysen, J. Denayer, J. Gascon and F. Kapteijn, Langmuir 2011, 27, 3970-3976. [2] P. Serra-Crespo, E. V. Ramos-Fernandez, J. Gascon

  148. Instrumentation Division Seminar

    "New Detectors with Novel Electrode Configurations for Applications in Extremely Harsh Radiation Environments (sLHC), RHIC-Upgrade and Photon Sciences"

    Presented by Zheng Li, Instrumentation Division, BNL

    Wednesday, April 20, 2011, 2:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 535

  149. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The role of heparin in APP dimerization"

    Presented by Dr. Ya Ha, Yale School of Medicine

    Friday, April 15, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  150. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Structure and Mechanism of the UvrA-UvrB DNA Damage Sensor"

    Presented by Danaya Pakotiprapha, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University

    Friday, April 8, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: LinYang

  151. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Low dimensional superconductivity and proximity effect of Pb nano-islands"

    Presented by Jungdae Kim, University of Texas at Austin

    Wednesday, April 6, 2011, 11 am
    Large Conference Room, Bldg 703

    Hosted by: E. Nazaretski

    Low-dimensional superconductivity has been the subject of intense interest for decades. One of the key open questions in superconductivity concerns its detailed properties in confined geometries at the nanoscale, particularly the size limits for which a real physical system can maintain global and local superconducting phase coherence. I will systematically address this fundamental issue via a detailed scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) study of Pb superconducting islands with different thicknesses and lateral sizes supported on Si(111). As the lateral dimension of an island is reduced, suppression of the superconducting gap D depends to a good approximation only on the volume of the island, being largely independent of its shape. We have discovered an intriguing lateral proximity effect on Pb nano-islands; an island with a higher transition temperature can induce superconductivity in a nearby island with a lower transition temperature. By measuring the spatial mapping of the local superconducting gap, we also experimentally determine a lateral “proximity” length. When an island is smaller than the proximity length, it is found that superconductivity within the island is rather uniform, indicating the rigidity of the order parameter on the scale of proximity length.

  152. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    Christian Broennimann, Dectris, Switzerland

    Tuesday, April 5, 2011, 1 pm
    703 Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Lutz Wiegart

    The PILATUS pixel detectors, large area modular two-dimensional hybrid pixel array detectors, have revolutionized protein crystallography and biological SAXS/WAXS by combining noise-free counter properties with highest data acquisition rates. These features enable optimized data acquisition modes and new experimental techniques. The PILATUS 6M detector was developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut specifically for protein crystallography. The PILATUS 1M and 2M detectors are becoming common at synchrotron SAXS facilities. Optimal data collection strategies for protein crystallography will be discussed in terms of oscillation angle, data redundancy and beam focusing properties as well as dose rate effects in room temperature data collection. Diffraction based alignment and grid scanning is ideally supported by virtue of the high framing rate (Aishima et al Acta Cryst. D66, 1032, 2010). Besides static and time-resolved biological SAXS, these detectors enable previously impossible data acquisition protocols such as scanning-SAXS and X-ray ptychography (Bunk et al, New J. Phys. 11 123016, 2009). Time resolved SAXS/WAXS experiments are enabled by the gating possibility of the detectors. The MYTHEN detector is a one-dimensional strip detector (Bergamaschiet al, J. Synchrotron Rad. 17, 653, 2010) widely used for a number of techniques as powder diffraction, surface diffraction and reflectometry. DECTRIS is further developing the detector technology. The large area detectors are now available with a factor of 2 higher frame rates. We are investigating the influence of synchrotron bunch structure effects on count rate corrections. A new concept to increase the count rate capability is presented. The most important development however concers pixel detectors with smaller pixels and higher frame-rates. Most recent results from the EIGER detector, currently developed at PSI and to be commercialized by DECTRIS, will be shown.

  153. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Protein-protein interactions - some dynamic features"

    Presented by David Cowburn, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    Monday, April 4, 2011, 3 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Marc Allaire

  154. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "X-ray microdiffraction for the microstructural studies at micron/submicron scale"

    Presented by Kai Chen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Monday, April 4, 2011, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Evi Nazaretski

    Beamline 12.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a newly commissioned beamline dedicated to x-ray microdiffraction. It operates in both monochromatic and polychromatic radiation mode. The facility uses a superconducting bending magnet source to deliver an x-ray spectrum ranging from 5 to 24 keV. The x-ray beam is focused down to about 1 μm size at the sample position using a pair of Kirkpatrick–Baez (KB) mirrors enclosed in a vacuum box. The sample placed on high precision stages can be raster-scanned under the microbeam while a diffraction pattern is taken at each step. The arrays of diffraction patterns are then analyzed to derive distribution maps of phases, orientation, and strain/stress inside the sample. It has demonstrated wide applications in the investigations of materials, earth, and environmental sciences, combining with other advanced techniques such as FIB, TEM, and so on.

  155. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Extracting vibrational information from crystallographic data"

    Presented by Enrique Rudino-Pinera, Instituto de Biotecnologia Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico

    Friday, April 1, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  156. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Theory and Practice of Scattering Techniques in the Elastic and Quasi-Elastic Regimes"

    Presented by Yimin Mao, SUNY Stony Brook

    Thursday, March 31, 2011, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Scattering is a complicated process which, depending on the form of the sample and the detection scheme, can generate abundant structural and dynamic information for a broad range of systems such as solid state crystal, amorphous liquid, semi-crystalline polymer, polymer/colloidal/biomacromolecular solution, etc. A consistent description of scattering phenomena, focusing on aspects of spatial and time correlation will be presented, based on the author’s scattering theory understanding and experimental practice. In classic X-ray scattering experiment, time-averaged measurements are performed, we seek the spatial correlation in the detected signal, in both wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering(WAXS/SAXS) geometry . An ex- ample of crystallization behavior of propylene-1-butene(P-B) random copolymer under external field will be given, illustrating how advanced X-ray scattering data analysis can help to understand polymorphism, morphology and preferred orientation. On the other hand, laser source demonstrates excellent coherence property which can be used to perform time-dependent measurements such as dynamic light scattering (or photon correlation spectroscopy). In this case, we focus on intensity fluctuation induced by particle dif- fusion. Recent progress on theory and instrumentation on a new technique, the photon cross-correlation spectroscopy aimed at solving multiple scattering problem will be introduced. The presentation is based on the research projects during the author’s graduate study. No attempt will be made to introduce all specific details as individual case study, but the interrelationship among various experimental phenom- ena will be stressed, demonstrating that many important concepts can be interpreted coherently under a concrete framework.

  157. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Molecular assembly of metal-organic frameworks as studied by X-ray scattering"

    Presented by Eli Stavitski, PhD, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, March 25, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  158. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Structure and Dynamics of Lipid Membranes — An x-ray and neutron study"

    Presented by Dr. Gang Chen

    Wednesday, March 23, 2011, 10 am
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Dr. Enju Lima

    The model phospholipid membranes are of considerable scientific and practical interest because they provide a window into understanding the thermodynamics for phase separation of membrane components in a living cell. Within this framework, intense debate currently surrounds the understanding of the fundamental basis for the formation and dynamics of the so called raft micro-domains, which have been broadly implicated in many membrane functions. Here we report an unusual consequence of a physical property of the membrane-substrate interface in influencing phase separation in supported bilayers. The planarity of the interface constrains the head-groups of the lower leaflet to organize in a single topologically-defined plane. As a consequence, we find that the topology of the outer leaflet becomes strongly corrugated in multicomponent bilayers. Influences of such imposed physical topology on phase separation are also discussed. The effect of the membrane-substrate interaction is further demonstrated in a multi-stack bilayer system. Off-specular diffuse scattering shows a kink which corresponds to the cutoff wave vector of surface capillary waves. In order to circumvent the substrate proximity effect and fully lift the dynamics of lipid membranes, we studied lipid membrane multilayers in humidity. Both x-ray and neutron scattering techniques are applied to study their phase transition. Below the phase transition temperature, a new phase which is related to the raft formation appears with distinct bilayer spacing and pops off from the lipid mixture. We also observed for the first time the dynamics of lipid membrane multilayers in humidity with X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS).

  159. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "High kinetic energy photoemission in basic and applied research"

    Presented by Olof Karis, Department of Physics, Uppsala University

    Friday, March 18, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  160. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Applications of XAS/XMCD to Magnetic Oxide Thin Films"

    Presented by Dario Arena, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, March 18, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  161. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "From growth of multilayers to multilayer Laue lenses nanofabrication"

    Presented by Nathalie Bouet, Brookhaven National Lab

    Thursday, March 17, 2011, 2:30 pm
    Bldg 703, Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Raymond Conley

    In spite of the widely recognized importance of WSi2/Si multilayer coatings for X-ray nanofocusing [1, 2], little work has been done to explore the different possibilities to prepare Multilayers Laue Lenses (MLL) from the as-grown films. The current technique to section the multilayers [3] is based on TEM cross-section like preparation. Despite the good results provided by this method, it has the disadvantage of being highly time and material consumptive, as well as imparting mechanical stress on the MLLs being sectioned which leads to a very poor yield rate and inherent limitation on sectioning thickness for the latest MLLs which have an unprecedented growth thickness. Reactive ion etching is actively being explored as a technique of choice to achieve a high-quality sectioning of the multilayers with preservation of the as-grown qualities of the samples. In addition, this preparation technique would provide access to more exotic shapes, which may provide greater mechanical stability of the MLL during actual use in synchrotron applications. This presentation will discuss the growth of multilayers, the associated metrology controls and our recent experimental investigations on reactive ion etching and inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching of WSi2/Si multilayers [4] to fabricate usable Multilayer Laue lenses.

  162. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Development of sub-20nm Hard-x-ray Microscopy and Applications in Microangiogenesis and Nanomedicine"

    Presented by Yeukuang Hwu, Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

    Monday, March 14, 2011, 10 am
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Yong Chu

    Using state-of-the-art nanofabrication, phase zone plates suitable for hard-x-rays, sub-20 nm resolution can now be obtained with ease. Ongoing developments in the instrumentation and reconstruction algorithms continue to improve the nanometer scale resolution x-ray imaging in 3D and non-destructive way. Review of this advent of this technology, its application to various domains in science, the relevance to the nanoscience and nanotechnology will be presented. Specifically, an effort to take full advantage of the power of x-ray imaging to look into deep and fine structures, such as the study of the microvascular structure in details and in different aspects relevant to the tumor angiogenesis. The high lateral and temporal resolution of x-ray microscopies are exploited in an optimal way to achieve the detailed understanding of the microangiogenesis process and benefit the drug development based on the anti-angiogenesis strategy. The key factors enable such capability are the effective integration of research community in biology, medicine, physics and chemistry. In particular, the proper animal handling, the selection of relevant animal models, the application of nanomedicine as labeling and contrast agents attributed to the first successful exploration of the imaging capability offered long ago by SR x-ray microscopy. This presentation will focus on course of the development in the instrumentation and experiments with special emphasis on the nanomedicine, nanofabrication and nanosynthesis made possible by synchrotron x-rays.

  163. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "In-Situ X-Ray Studies of Lithium Battery Electrodes"

    Presented by Michael Lowe, Cornell University

    Friday, March 11, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  164. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Tomography and In situ time-resolved Imaging of Structural Evolution in Nanoporous Gold during Dealloying and Coarsening by Transmission X-ray Microscopy"

    Presented by Yu-chen Karen Chen, Northwestern University

    Monday, March 7, 2011, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Nanoporous gold has attracted great attentions due to its numerous potential applications in sensors, actuators and catalytic materials. Dealloying of silver-gold alloys result in a sponge-like porous gold structure with 5-20 nm pore size. In order to change the optical and mechanical properties of the materials, their pore size can be further coarsened by post-annealing. To fully understand the underlying mechanisms of the dealloying and coarsening processes, we characterized the structural evolution of nanoporous gold using the transmission x-ray microscope at Advanced Photon Source. The microscope offers tomography capability and a 30-40 nm 2D resolution. Dealloying of silver-gold was imaged in-situ, within a custom designed chemical reaction cell. Coarsening of nanoporous gold was studied by 3D tomography as function of annealing time and temperatures. The structural evolution and kinetics in dealloying and coarsening will be discussed. Furthermore, many research fields can potentially benefit from this cutting edge imaging technique, especially with the higher time resolution achievable at third generation synchrotron x-ray sources, which provide high x-ray flux. A few new possible future applications using TXM for time-resolved imaging and nano-tomography will also be discussed.

  165. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Full spin polarization of the surface state on a topological insulator Bi2Se3."

    Presented by Zhihui Pan, MSCMD, BNL

    Friday, March 4, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  166. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Magnetic Soft X-Ray Microscopy: A Path Towards Imaging Magnetism Down to Fundamental Length and Time Scales"

    Presented by Peter Fischer, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Friday, February 25, 2011, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Dario Arena

    One of the scientific and technological challenges in nanomagnetism research is to image magnetism down to fundamental magnetic length and time scales with elemental sensitivity in advanced multicomponent materials. Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy is a unique analytical technique combining X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) as element specific magnetic contrast mechanism with high spatial and temporal resolution. Fresnel zone plates used as X-ray optical elements provide a spatial resolution down to currently 10nm thus approaching fundamental magnetic length scales such as magnetic exchange lengths. Images can be recorded in external magnetic fields giving access to study magnetization reversal phenomena on the nanoscale and its stochastic character with elemental sensitivity. Utilizing the inherent time structure of current synchrotron sources fast magnetization dynamics such as current induced wall and vortex dynamics in ferromagnetic elements can be performed with a stroboscopic pump-probe scheme with 70ps time resolution, limited by the lengths of the electron bunches. With a spatial resolution approaching the <10nm regime, soft X-ray microscopy at next generation high brilliant fsec X-ray sources will make snapshot images of nanosclae ultrafast spin dynamics become feasible.

  167. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Extreme Precision Optics manufacturing capabilities at Zygo Corporation"

    Presented by Marc Tricard, Zygo Corporation

    Tuesday, February 22, 2011, 1 pm
    Bldg. 703, Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Mourad Idir

    Zygo Corporation, a leading provider of high precision optical components and optical metrology instruments, has recently acquired all the assets of ASML US Richmond Optics facility. Zygo has also hired key managements and employees working at ASML's Richmond facility to become part of Zygo's Optical Systems Division - Extreme Precision Optics (EPO) Group. In this presentation we will give an overview of Zygo’s overall capabilities for high end precision optics manufacturing with particular emphasis on these newly acquired capabilities. Of direct relevance to BNL’s optics needs will be various deterministic finishing techniques (including Computer Controlled Polishing - CCP, Ion Beam Finishing - IBF and Magneto-Rheological Finishing – MRF) capabilities now available at Zygo and of course the associated metrology to drive these processes.

  168. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Structural Characterization of Aromatic-Solute Binding Proteins from Rhodopseudomonas palustris"

    Presented by Ruth Pietri, Ph.D, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, February 18, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  169. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Electronic Structure of Zinc Tetraphenyl Porphyrins adsorbed on wide band gap semiconductors"

    Presented by Dr. Sylvie Rangan, Rutgers University

    Friday, February 11, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  170. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Membrane Protein Folding Conformations and Interactions"

    Presented by Karen G. Fleming, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University

    Friday, February 4, 2011, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  171. NSLS-II Seminar

    Dr. Paul Zschack, Argonne National Laboratory

    Tuesday, January 25, 2011, 3 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Knowledge of atomic arrangements and composition at surfaces in complex environments and at buried interfaces is fundamental to our understanding and control of fabricated thin-film structures and of complex interfaces found in nature. Indeed, many critical processes are controlled by interfacial structure and chemistry. Because of favorable cross sections, x-rays offer a unique opportunity to penetrate through gas, liquid, or solid thin-films to probe this structure on the atomic length scale. The hard x-ray brilliance of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) enables these in-situ studies and permits real-time investigations. In this talk, I will illustrate several important x-ray scattering and imaging techniques that are presently used at the APS for the study of interface structure. One area includes materials synthesis where in-situ, time-resolved crystal truncation rod scattering has been used to demonstrate that Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is a two-layer growth process, largely governed by extremely fast non-equilibrium interlayer transport. In other studies, new x-ray imaging techniques have been used to characterize surface and buried interface structures with excellent spatial resolution. For example, X-ray Reflection Imaging Microscopy (XRIM) is a promising new full-field imaging technique that exploits phase contrast in interface scattering and has been used at the APS to characterize the step/terrace structure at solid-solid and solid-fluid interfaces. In addition to an overview of these current research capabilities, plans to expand Interface Science research at the APS through development of a dedicated, comprehensive facility will also be presented.

  172. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Compact ERL Project Status at KEK"

    Presented by Takashi Obina, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, Japan

    Wednesday, January 12, 2011, 1:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky, Weixing Cheng

  173. NSLS-II Seminar

    "SuperKEKB Status"

    Presented by Makoto Tobiyama, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, Japan

    Tuesday, January 11, 2011, 1:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky, Weixing Cheng

  174. NSLS-II Seminar

    "First Light at I13: News about the Imaging and Coherence Beamline at Diamond"

    Presented by Christoph Rau, Diamond Light Source, Didcot, United Kingdom

    Monday, January 10, 2011, 10:30 am
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Yong Chu

    The coherence and imaging beamline I13L is dedicated to hard X-ray microscopy either in direct or reciprocal space. For both, lens and lensless imaging, two inde-pendent stations will be operated at a distance of 250m from the source. The coherence length can be adjusted over a large range by a modification of the electron beam in the storage ring and slits in the fron-end. The imaging branch will perform In-line phase contrast imaging and tomography over a large field of view in the 6-30keV energy range. In addition it will be possible to switch to full-field microscopy with 50nm spatial resolution. Projection microscopy will be developed, as it is dose efficient and therefore particular suitable for radiation sensitive samples. Resolution beyond the limitations given by the detector and X-ray optics may be achieved with techniques working in the far field. For crystalline samples Coherent X-Ray Diffraction allows not only to reconstruct the shape of nano-crystals but also to provide 3D information about parameters such as internal stress. Other Coherent Diffraction Imaging techniques such as ptychography will be also implemented on the same 'coherence branch'. The electron optics have been modified in August 2010 and the new operation of the storage ring has been successfully implemented in user operation mode. We recently took a first image of a test pattern, the stations will be operational from October 2011. Reference: The Diamond Beamline I13L for Imaging and Coherence, C. Rau, U. Wagner, A. Peach, I. K. Robinson, B. Singh, G.Wilkin, C. Jones, SRI 2009, AIP Conference Proceedings Vol. 1234, pp. 121-126, (2010). Double Mini-Beta y plus Virtu7al Focusing Optics for Diamond Storage Ring, B. Singh, R. Bartolini, R. Fielder, E.C. Longhi, I.P. Martin, U.H. Wagner, C. Rau, PAC09 proceeding.

  175. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Next generation optics for high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering: Principles, challenges, and progress"

    Presented by Yuri Shvyd'ko, Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source

    Thursday, January 6, 2011, 2:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    Principles and optical schemes of angular-dispersive backscattering monochromators and analyzers will be presented. The novel x-ray optics has a potential of achieving sub-meV energy resolution, spectral functions with sharper tails, and better momentum transfer resolution in inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) experiments, as compared to the state of the art IXS optics. Optical and mechanical designs of the in-line angular-dispersive backscattering monochromators/analyzers, termed CDDW, will be introduced. Results of the first tests, at the APS, of the CDDW monochromators for 9.1 keV x-rays will be presented, in which a 0.4 meV resolution, and 16% average spectral efficiency have been demonstrated. If you would like to meet with this speaker after this presentation, please contact the host @ cai@bnl.gov prior to this presentation to coordinate a time slot.

  176. NSLS-II Seminar

    "MAX-IV: Status, Schedule and Technical Challenges"

    Presented by Jonas Modeer, MAX-Lab, Sweden

    Monday, December 20, 2010, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

  177. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Functional transport properties in complex transition metal oxides"

    Presented by Dr. Hee Taek Yi, Rutgers Center for Emergent Materials, Rutgers University

    Friday, December 17, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Larry Carr

  178. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "News from PETRA III"

    Presented by Wolfgang Caliebe, DESY

    Friday, December 10, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Steven Hulbert

  179. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Advanced R+D at the Advanced Light Source"

    Presented by Anthony Warwick, LBL

    Thursday, December 9, 2010, 8:30 am
    Bldg. 817, Conference Room 4

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    After 15 years of operation there are many vigorous development programs at the ALS, some to develop new beamlines, some to radically improve instrumentation. This talk features a few examples, in the context of this mature and productive facility.

  180. Photon Sciences (United Way) Craft & Bake Sale

    Wednesday, December 8, 2010, 1 pm
    NSLS Lobby

    Hosted by: Betsy Hanson, Tammy Stein, Mary Anne Corwin

  181. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The bio-imaging and diffraction beamline P11 at PETRA III"

    Presented by Dr. Alke Meents, HASYLAB - DESY, Germany

    Monday, December 6, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Yong Chu

    Petra III is the new German 6 GeV synchrotron source with an emittance of only 1 nm rad. This makes PETRA III ideally suited for experiments requiring nanometer beam sizes in the harder X-ray regime. 14 different endstations cover experiments from material- to life sciences. The storage ring has reached its full performance and 3 beamlines have started regular user operation already. Beamline P11 is dedicated to the structure determination of biological objects in two different modalities. A Scanning Transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) operated at X-ray energies between 2.4 and 10 keV will allow structural investigations of aperiodic objects such as single cells and also small tissue sections. The STXM will allow cryo-cooling of the samples and will be operated in vacuum. A crystallography endstation will provide beamsizes down to 1 micron for the investigation of micro crystals and also a parallel beam option for large unit cell systems. The experiment will be equipped with a Pilatus 6M detector and an automatic sample changer. The first part of the presentation will provide a general introduction to the PETRA III facility and its beamlines. In the second part, beamline P11 will be presented in more detail with emphasis on different high precision hardware components developed by our group.

  182. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Diboride Thin Films: Growth, Structure and Surface"

    Presented by Yukiko Yamada- Takamura, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), Ishikawa, Japan

    Friday, December 3, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  183. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Review of the present technology of the radiation source for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography"

    Presented by Prof. Dr. Akira Endo, Japan

    Friday, December 3, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  184. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Diboride Thin Films: Growth, Structure, and Surface"

    Presented by Yukiko Yamada-Takamura, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), Japan

    Friday, December 3, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Jurek Sadowski

    Metal diborides, which have a simple crystal structure consisting of alternating hexagonal close-packed metal layers and honeycomb boron layers, have superior hardness and high melting temperature, together with high electrical and thermal conductivities. In the form of thin films, they could be integrated with other materials more easily, and become even more attractive. For example, zirconium diboride (ZrB2), which has a very good lattice matching to a wide-gap semiconductor, GaN, has a lot to offer in the form of epitaxial thin film: buffer layer, light reflector, heat-resistant electrode, etc. Here, I will present our recent results on the hetero-epitaxial growth of highly pure ZrB2 thin films using ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor epitaxy method. Their surface structure and electronic properties were studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and the similarities and differences between epitaxial thin film and single crystal will be discussed.

  185. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The Photon Transport System and Diagnostic for the FERMI at Elettra FEL Project"

    Presented by Daniele Cocco, Sincrotrone Trieste ScpA, Photon Transport and Beamlines Area, Mechanical Vacuum and Optics Group, Italy

    Friday, December 3, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Ruben Reininger

    The FERMI at Elettra project, a VUV and Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL), located in Trieste, Italy, is ready to deliver the first photons.This new machine is placed side by side to the 3rd generation SR source ELETTRA to extend the scientific capabilities of the Laboratory. In this seminar, after a brief introduction to the machine, the photon transport system of the FEL will be described, including diagnostic instrument and metrology issues. The first part of it, called PADReS, is dedicated to the photon diagnostic, intensity control and beamline selection. The second part is formed by four beamlines dedicated to four different kinds of experiments. Some solution will be described together with the preliminary results.

  186. National Synchrotron Light Source Workshop

    "CTM4XAS Charge Transfer Multiplet Course"

    Presented by Frank DeGroot, University of Utrecht, Netherlands

    Thursday, December 2, 2010, 1 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg 703

  187. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "In-Situ STXM and RIXS"

    Presented by Frank de Groot, Utrecht University, Netherlands

    Thursday, December 2, 2010, 10 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Steve Hulbert

    This talk deals with in-situ experiments that make use of Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) and Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering. First, a brief introduction is given of x-ray absorption spectroscopy, including the multiplet interpretation of XAS spectral shapes. (The atomic multiplet, crystal field and charge transfer effects will in detail be explained in the afternoon course). With the recent developments in nanoreactors, soft X-ray STXM experiments make it possible to follow metal L edges at 1 bar and 500 C, with a spatial resolution of 20 nm. This allows the in-situ spectroscopic study of a single nanoparticle (in action). Recent STXM results show the spatial distribution of the degree of reduction of iron-oxide nanoparticles. A comparison is made with electron microscopy and some future directions of spectromicroscopy of nanomaterials are given. The second part of the talk deals with the role of Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) to unravel the nature of the states that are visible in the pre-edge region of the 3d metal K edges. Using the 1s2p RXES of LiCoO2 as example, the presence of a 1s4p dipole pre-edge next to the traditional 1s3d quadrupole pre-edge is explained. A recent development is the combination of hard x-ray RIXS with XMCD, allowing the possibility to measure magnetic properties under extreme conditions. Soft X-ray RIXS allows the detection of charge transfer and dd-excitations. Recent improvements in energy resolution allow the detection of spin-orbit and magnetic excitations. Potential new applications for in-situ nanoparticle research are indicated.

  188. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "How Electrons are Emitted from the [100] Negative Electron Affinity Surface of Boron Doped Diamond"

    Presented by Jonathan Rameau, BNL, Physics

    Friday, November 19, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  189. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Folding of RNA in crowded solutions"

    Presented by Duncan Kilburn, Johns Hopkins University

    Friday, November 12, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  190. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Electronic Structure of Strained Vanadium Dioxide Thin Films Using Soft X-ray Spectroscopy at X1b"

    Presented by Louis Piper, PhD, Assistant Professor, Physics, Applied Physics & Astronomy, Binghamton University, State University of New York

    Friday, November 5, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  191. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Rigaku Osmic Capabilities"

    Presented by William Bowman, Rigaku Osmic

    Monday, November 1, 2010, 1:30 pm
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lonny Berman

  192. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "One-dimensional hard-x-ray field retrieval using a moveable structure"

    Presented by Kenneth Evans-Lutterodt, BNL, PS

    Friday, October 29, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  193. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Spatially-resolved analysis of Element Distribution and Speciation in Soils and Soil Aggregates by by (mu)-XRF and (mu)-XANES"

    Presented by Joerg Prietzel, Techncial University of Munich, Germany

    Thursday, October 28, 2010, 9 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Juergen Thieme

    In recent decades, novel techniques of synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy have emerged as powerful methods to study the biogeochemistry of nutrient as well as toxic elements in environmental samples, such as soils and sediments. The evaluation of element-specific or species-specific X-ray fluorescence or absorption patterns [X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy, XRF; X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy, XANES] enables environmental scientists to reveal patterns of element distribution and element speciation in environmental samples (e.g. soils) at different scales (from the m- or km-scale in landscapes or watersheds down to the micron- or submicron-scale in soil aggregates. Even spatial correlations between elements and/or element species can be addressed by analyzing the same sample at different element specific X-ray energies. The application potential of synchrotron-based spectroscopy and spectromicroscopy in soil science will be demonstrated by several examples. Furthermore, technical limitations as well as future prospects of the application of XAFS and (mu)-XAFS techniques for the analysis of soils and important biogeochemical interfaces in soils will be addressed.

  194. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Structure-Property Relationships to Enable Plastic Electronics"

    Presented by Joe Kline, National Institute of Standard and Technology

    Friday, October 22, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  195. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Textured Dysprosium Poles for High-field, Short-period Cryogenically-cooled Hybrid Permanent-magnet Undulators"

    Presented by Slowa Solovyov, CMPD MSD, BNL

    Friday, October 22, 2010, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Oleg Chubar

    In the presentation we discuss feasibility of enhancement of the peak field in a short-period cryogenically-cooled hybrid permanent-magnet undualtor by using pole inserts with the saturation inductance Bsat over that of iron ( 2 - 2.5 Tesla). Magnetic simulations performed by RADIA magnetostatics code for the magnet material (PrFeB) and geometrical parameters of cryogenically-cooled permanent-magnet undulators considered for the development at the NSLS-II, demonstrate that the peak field continues to increase as Bsat of the pole is increased, reaching saturation at Bsat = 3.5 Tesla. Dysprosium metal, with the saturation inductance of 3.4 Tesla below 90 K, appears as a good candidate for the optimized pole material. However, due to high magnetic anisotropy of Dy, such a high level of magnetization can only be realized when the external field lies in the basal plane. This implies that the pole has to be single-crystalline or highly textured. Considering that the growing of large, >10 mm, Dy single crystals is difficult, we propose secondary re-crystallization as a method to induce the required texture in thin Dy foils. The textured foils can be stacked to produce pole inserts of the desired geometry and orientation. Results of small-scale processing and magnetic measurements of thin (20-60 microns) foils prove that the required texture quality can be achieved by relatively simple sequence of heat-treatment and rolling.

  196. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Morphology of Phthalocyanine blends in thin film organic solar cells"

    Presented by Matthew Jurow, Hunter College, CUNY

    Friday, October 15, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  197. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Fourteen Years of Synchrotron Radiation for Museums: from Egyptian Cosmetics to Mona Lisa"

    Presented by Philippe Walter, Director, Laboratory - Centre Of Research and Restoration of the French Museums, France

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Eric Dooryhee

  198. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The stability of nanoimprint induced molecular orientation in polymer nanostructures"

    Presented by Htay Hlaing, Stony Brook, BNL Condensed Matter Physics

    Friday, October 8, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  199. NSLS-II Seminar

    "PETRA III - Commissioning, First User Runs, Collective Effects"

    Presented by Rainer Wanzenberg, DESY, Germany

    Tuesday, October 5, 2010, 1:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

  200. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Determining the spin polarized unoccupied electronic structure of organic based magnetic system M[TCNE] using UV-Vis MCD by Saad Janjua"

    Presented by Saad Z. Janjua, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, September 24, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  201. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Optics, Sources and Systems for Laboratory X-ray Micro- and Nano-Imaging"

    Presented by Hans Hertz, Department of Applied Physics, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden

    Thursday, September 16, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Juergen Thieme

    Progress in laboratory-scale x-ray micro- and nano-imaging is reviewed. In the soft x-ray regime we demonstrate laboratory water-window microscopy with <25-nm-resolution, 3D microtomography of cryo-fixed biological samples, and aqueous-state imaging of environmental colloids. The progress relies heavily on our developments in diffractive optics, for resolution (13 nm Ni zone plates, compound zone plates), efficiency (Ni-Ge zone plates, now also at 13 nm) and for new contrast mechanisms (DIC and Zernike zone plates). In hard x-rays (10-30 kV) we discuss diffractive optics for high-brilliance synchrotron sources as well as phase-contrast x-ray imaging with few-µm detail based on a high-brightness laboratory electron-impact liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray source.

  202. NSLS-II Seminar

    Mark Sutton, McGill University

    Wednesday, September 15, 2010, 11 am
    703 - Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Andrei Fluerasu

    Intensity fluctuation spectroscopy (IFS) is an ideal way to study fluctuations in the microstructure of materials. For the last three decades or so, it has been extensively used with light scattering to study a large variety of transparent systems. Extending IFS to x-rays allows us to study opaque materials and to probe much shorter length scales, as required for example by binary alloys and carbon black in polymers (rubber). Recently, we have demonstrated how to make heterodyne measurments allowing measurements of relative phase information. In this talk, I will describe XIFS and discuss some of our recent results on a set of model rubbers.

  203. NSLS-II Seminar

    "JBluIce-EPICS: a modern control system with classical look for macromolecular crystallography at the Advanced Photon Source"

    Presented by Sergey Stepanov, ANL

    Wednesday, September 8, 2010, 9:30 am
    Bldg. 703 Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Dr. Qun Shen

    The trio of macromolecular crystallography beamlines constructed by General Medicine and Cancer (GM/CA) Institutes at the APS has been in growing demand due to their outstanding micro crystallography capabilities. To raise the efficiency of these beamlines a significant effort has been put into designing fast, convenient, intuitive and robust beamline controls that could easy accommodate new beamline developments and provide high level of automation. This resulted in a system combining the widely praised user interface of SSRL BluIce as a frontend and the industrial power of EPICS as a backend. While the GM/CA controls have the look and feel of BluIce, their software design is very different making them faster, simpler and more flexible than most similar systems. The report will reveal the key design solutions implemented in JBluIce and discuss some automations making JBluIce highly praised by the crystallographic community: one-click change between 5, 10 and 20μm beam sizes; one-click beamline energy change that may involve switching undulator harmonics, mirrors lanes and beam realignment; automated diffraction rastering for finding small crystals and 'sweet' spots on poorly diffracting crystals with automated scoring of raster cells by the number of reflections; data collection along a vector; automated on-the-fly fluorescent rastering, a faster and lower-irradiation compliment to the diffraction rastering; fully automated fluorescence measurements for MAD that include signal optimization, fast on-the-fly energy scanning and automated adaption of scan range to chemical shifts; fly-scan minibeam realignment; automated loop and crystal centering, controls for sample automounter, automated screening, data collection auditing, remote access and a lot more.

  204. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Non-destructive characterization of microstructures utilizing the 3DXRD technique - an overview of software and applications"

    Presented by Soren Schmidt, RISOE, Denmark

    Friday, September 3, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    The 3DXRD (Three Dimensional X-ray Diffraction) methodology for non-destructive characterization of individual grains in polycrystalline materials has been around for more than a decade. The first implementation, the 3DXRD microscope, is situated at beamline ID-11 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) developed in collaboration between Risoe and ESRF. A wide range of algorithms has been developed to facilitate new data analysis procedures. The ability to monitor the evolution in the local microstructure in materials has proven successful in studying recovery, recrystallization, grain growth as well as deformation mechanisms. The talk will give an overview of the 3DXRD software along with current and future scientific activities.

  205. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Hummingbird: active vibration isolation technology"

    Presented by Johan van Seggelen, MECAL, Netherlands

    Thursday, September 2, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Evgueni Nazaretski

    The high-tech industry constantly requires improvement of the accuracy of mechatronic systems. Floor vibrations around 1 Hz are a limiting factor in the performance of these systems. The Dutch engineering company MECAL (www.mecal.eu) developed a solution to suppress these vibrations significantly. - Suppression of floor vibrations of at least 30 : 1 - Low noise at low frequencies (around 1 Hz) as a result of direct position sensing - No stiff floor required as a result of voice coil actuation MECAL is a leading supplier of high-end active vibration isolation technology in the semiconductor and related high-tech industry. With their engineering competences they can carry out dedicated design-in projects and deliver customized platforms. Dr. Ir. Johan van Seggelen MBA (Business Development Manager at MECAL) will give a presentation on the technical details of the hummingbird technology and show performance measurement results. If you would like to meet with this speaker after this presentation, please contact the host @ enazaretski@bnl.gov prior to this presentation to coordinate a time slot.

  206. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The Design of the ALS Top-Off Mode Beam Interlock System -- from Requirements to Operation"

    Presented by Kenneth Baptiste, ALS/LBNL

    Tuesday, August 31, 2010, 1:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

    ALS has been upgraded recently by adding a new mode of operation, the Top-Off Mode, which is in addition to the existing modes of Fill and Stored Beam. The Top-Off Mode permits injection of 1.9GeV electron beam into the Storage Ring, with the safety shutters open, once certain strict conditions are met and maintained. Top-Off Mode enables User operation without an interruption caused by mode switching between the Stored Beam Mode when safety shutters are open, to the Fill Mode with the safety shutters closed and back. The conditions necessary to permit Top-Off Mode are; stored beam is present, the energies are matched between the injector and storage ring, a select set of storage ring lattice magnets are operating at the correct current levels, and radiation losses are minimized. If certain combinations of these conditions are not met, a potentially dangerous condition of injecting electrons down a users beam line can exist. Therefore in addition to the configuration controlled beamline apparatus, a system of mode control, energy match, lattice match and stored beam interlocks are needed to actively control the injected beam prohibiting potentially dangerous conditions. In this talk I will present the Top-Off Mode Beam Interlock system requirements, specification, design, implementation and the operational experience from the first two years of operation.

  207. NSLS-II Seminar

    "An Overview of Science and Software Infrastructure at HPCAT"

    Presented by Dr. Arun Bommannavar, Carnegie Institution of Washington

    Friday, August 27, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Dr. Qun Shen

    An overview of science and software infrastructure at HPCAT is presented. Science at extreme conditions and instrumentation to accomplish the measurements is discussed with an emphasis on computer infrastructure and data acquisition software deployed. Planned APS upgrade adds additional requirements for data storage and user friendly operation. Java based softwares developed and deployed currently at HPCAT are shown . Current capabilities and future needs for data acquisition is presented.

  208. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Methods, related to ptychography used to reconstruct a hard X-ray beam waist"

    Presented by Cameron Kewish, Synchrotron SOLEIL, France

    Thursday, August 26, 2010, 1:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Ray Conley

    When coherent diffraction patterns are measured from overlapping regions in an extended sample it is possible to reconstruct not only the optical transmission function of the sample, but also the full complex-valued wavefield that was incident upon it. In this talk I will discuss the methods, related to ptychography, that we have used to reconstruct a hard X-ray beam waist created by nanofocusing K-B mirrors. Beyond characterizing the focus, the reconstructions provide us with a quantitative map of the aberrations in the mirror surface, and allow us to calculate corrections for astigmatism and misalignment. Ptychography provides an answer to the question "could the mirrors be re-aligned to produce a better focus?", even when the performance is close to the diffraction limit.

  209. NSLS-II Seminar

    "A New Beamline for Surface and Interface Science at Diamond Light Source"

    Presented by Dr. Tien-Lin Lee, Principal Beamline Scientist, Diamond Light Source, Oxford, UK

    Wednesday, August 25, 2010, 2 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Joe Woicik and Cecilia Sanchez Hanke

    A new beamline for studying surfaces and interfaces is currently being constructed at Sector 9 at Diamond Light Source and is scheduled to have its first light in November 2011. It is designed to be a dedicated facility for high-resolution investigations of atomic structures and electronic properties of a wide range of surfaces and buried interfaces, under ultra-high vacuum or ambient conditions, using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), x-ray standing waves, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron diffraction and x-ray reflectivity. To apply the different techniques to the same sample, and to access a wide range of absorption edges, which can be highly beneficial for studying complex systems, the beamline will provide both soft and hard x-rays with two canted undulators installed in a modified long straight section, and is designed to have one end-station where a spot on the sample can be probed by both beams. Such a combination also offers a unique opportunity for hard x-ray PES experiments over a wide energy range. This presentation will be focused on the technical design, scientific cases and current status of the beamline, with an overview of the research activities of other beamlines in the Surface and Interface Village at Diamond.

  210. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Numerical Simulations of X-ray Optics"

    Presented by Alexey Suvorov, SPring-8, Japan

    Tuesday, August 24, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Dr. Yong Cai

    In the talk I will demonstrate several algorithms to perform numerical evaluation and simulation of basic optical elements, namely planar x-ray mirrors, high resolution monochromators and crystal based focusing optics. In particular, first, I will discuss a problem of one-dimensional surface profile retrieval of x-ray mirror from grazing incidence images under coherent x-ray illumination. Three different approaches (analytical, iterative and a one based on the neural networks) to the problem will be analyzed and compared to each other. Next, a generalized solution to the problem of multi-beam dynamical x-ray diffraction from single and layered crystals will be presented. The new formalism embraces all possible diffraction geometries, including extreme cases of grazing and normal incidence and emergence. Finally, a focusing performance of cylindrically bent crystal in symmetric back diffraction geometry will be analyzed using wave-optical formalism. I will demonstrate a numerical simulation of a double-crystal setup which allows one to achieve a linear focal spot size of 2.8 nm.

  211. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Synchrotron-based infrared research at Spring-8"

    Presented by Hidekazu Okamura, Physics Department, Kobe University, Japan

    Friday, August 13, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  212. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Glimpses of Electronic Structure Peculiarities from Soft and Hard X-ray Absorption Studies: Lessons from Graphene and Vanadium Oxide Nanostructures"

    Presented by Sarbajit Banerjee, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo

    Friday, August 13, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  213. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Canadian Light Source and the REIXS Beamline"

    Presented by Feizhou He, Canadian Light Source, Saskatoon, Canada

    Friday, August 13, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Ruben Reininger

    Canadian Light Source, located at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, is Canada's national synchrotron research facility. Since the commencement of the operation in 2004, it now has 13 operational beamlines, and 6 more under construction. The REIXS beamline at CLS is a new soft X-ray scattering facility for elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering experiments. With two elliptical polarizing undulators (EPU) in the same straight section, the REIXS beamline can produce photons of various polarizations, and is capable of rapidly switching the polarizations. In the commissioning tests, the beamline has demonstrated high energy resolution, good beam flux, and excellent reliability. The REIXS beamline has two permanent endstations. The Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering (RSXS) endstation has started to generate very good scientific data since November 2009, and is now accepting general user proposals. The X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) endstation is in the final stage of assembling and will start commissioning soon.

  214. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Assessment of Skin Disease Diagnosis and Treatment with Infrared Light"

    Presented by William Willis, SBU

    Friday, August 6, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  215. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The Effects of Sodium Fluoride on Human Embryonic Fibroblast Cells"

    Presented by Lauren Carlson, LeMoyne College

    Friday, August 6, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  216. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Designing a Water Chamber to Generate Relative Humidity"

    Presented by Peter Ghali, NYIT

    Friday, August 6, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  217. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Spontaneous Ferroelectric Order in a Bent-Core Liquid Crystal Phase of Orthorhombic Smectic Layers"

    Presented by Chenhui Zhu, Colorado

    Friday, July 30, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  218. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Application of x-ray absorption spectroscopy in electrocatalysis"

    Presented by Minhua Shao, UTC Power

    Friday, July 30, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  219. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Multilayer optics at the (ESRF)"

    Presented by Christian Morawe, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble, France

    Monday, July 26, 2010, 2 pm
    Bldg. 703, Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Ray Conley

    The general mission of the ESRF Optics Group is to perform research and development of x-ray optical elements and systems. The group assists ESRF scientists in the conception of their beamline optics, and designs, fabricates, and tests optical elements. The group members operate a Crystal Laboratory, a Metrology clean room facility, a Multilayer Laboratory, and dedicated beamline instrumentation for rapid experimental access. In addition, they participate in development programmes on refractive lenses and on diamond crystals. The Multilayer Team is in charge of the development and fabrication of multilayer coatings for x-ray optical applications. The Multilayer Facility has been operational for about 15 years. During this period, more than 100 multilayer based optical elements were delivered to ESRF beamlines, some of which representing the workhorse in the optics hutch. A few years ago a new deposition system was designed, installed, and commissioned. Since 2008 the new laboratory is operational and has produced its first optical elements for ESRF beamlines. This talk will recall some fundamental properties of multilayer optics, discuss design and fabrication aspects, highlight the most prominent applications, and outline ongoing developments.

  220. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Multi-Axis Positioning with a Hexapod system and the advantages of a using Parallel Kinematics"

    Presented by Rainer Gloess, PI (Physik Instrumente) L.P.

    Monday, July 26, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Evgueni Nazaretski

    Dr. Rainer Gloess accompanied by Mark Wood: Talk will cover different hexapod designs and special designs for high vacuum and nonmagnetic applications. Measurement results, error budget, load capacity and thermal effects. Also using simulation tools and collision prevention software. If you would like to meet with the speaker after this presentation, please contact the host @ enazaretski@bnl.gov prior to this presentation to coordinate a time slot.

  221. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Data Management and Analysis Computing for LCLS"

    Presented by Alf Wachsmann, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Monday, July 26, 2010, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Overview of the online and offline data management and computing system for SLAC's LCLS free-electron X-ray laser facility.show the DAQ system to illustrate the data flow from the various experiments and then talk about the offline data management system and the analysis computing facility.The entire system is fully operational now for a few month and I will report on first experiences.

  222. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Resonant x-ray studies on novel liquid crystal structures"

    Presented by Zengqiang John Liu, Assistant Professor of Physics, Department of Physics, Astronomy and Engineering Science St. Cloud State University WSB

    Friday, July 16, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  223. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Slow dynamics in an azopolymer molecular layer studied by XPCS"

    Presented by Luigi Cristofolini, Physics Department, University of Parma, Parma, Italy

    Friday, July 16, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  224. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Lattice dynamics at ultra-high pressures: Quantification of phonon energies using high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering"

    Presented by Daniel L. Farber, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Earth Science Division

    Thursday, July 15, 2010, 11 am
    NSLS-II Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    Over the past few years our group has focused a large experimental and theoretical effort on quantifying the vibrational energies in metals at high-pressures and high-temperatures. Our interest in the high-pressure properties of these elements is motivated both by their importance as constituents in the cores of many planetary bodies and by the rich variety of intriguing phenomena displayed by their lattice dynamics at room pressure. While IXS has addressed a number of phenomenological problems of great importance, such as the nature of the acoustic anisotropy of the Earth’s inner core by direct measurements on the high-pressure hcp-phase of iron, as well as by proxy experiments on cobalt; we have also pursued more general studies of condensed matter at high-pressure aimed at understanding many fundamental physical properties in systems as varied as Fe, Co, Mo, Ta, V, Ce, and even Pu. Indeed, with the application of pressures approaching 100 GPa, we are able to perturb the energy of condensed systems on the order of ~1 eV. Thus, performing lattice dynamics measurements under these conditions allows us to probe systems that have undergone fundamental changes the energetics of the chemical bonds. Most recently, we have determined the phonon dispersions across the isostructural gamma- to alpha-cerium transition, one of the most intriguing elemental phase transitions. Our new data together with first principals calculations place important thermodynamical and theoretical constraints on the underlying physics of this important transition. Such experiments have now begun to shed light on important magneto-elastic interactions, electron-phonon coupling and have the singular potential to provide critical data on the newly observed elastic perturbations across pressure induced spin-transitions. If you would like to meet with these speakers after this presentation, please contact the host at cai@bnl.gov prior to this presentation to coordinate a time slot.

  225. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Instruments and methods for high-energy-resolution x-ray diffraction characterization of diamond crystals."

    Presented by Stanislav Stoupin, Argonne National Laboratory

    Monday, July 12, 2010, 10 am
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    To date, silicon is the primary material for x-ray crystal optics. Well-established silicon crystal growth methods and processing techniques offer high quality diffracting elements with customizable crystallographic orientation. This flexibility is the key towards realization of millielectronvolt-resolution x-ray monochromators and analyzers for x-ray spectroscopy. However, silicon is inferior to diamond in terms of thermal conductivity, radiation hardness and thermal expansion. These are key aspects for high-heat-load applications of diamond in x-ray crystal optics, which become increasingly important at fourth-generation synchrotron sources. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that diamond is indispensable for realization of x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO), a highly anticipated future source of fully coherent x-rays of the highest brightness. Diamond crystals can play the role of high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors of the XFELO optical cavity. Realization of the XFELO requires x-ray diffraction studies of diamond crystals with millielectronvolt resolution. This talk, presents an overview of recently developed x-ray optical instruments and methods for routine characterization of diamond x-ray mirrors. Several schemes are discussed which enable measurements of diamond reflectivity for different Bragg reflections and ultraprecise measurements of thermal expansion

  226. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Superconductivity under pressure in the iron-arsenides: The peculiar case of CaFe2As2"

    Presented by Alan I. Goldman, Ames Laboratory, U.S. DOE, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University

    Thursday, July 8, 2010, 1:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lawrence Margulies

    The discovery of pressure-induced superconductivity in the AFe2As2 (A=Ba, Sr, Ca) family opened an exciting new avenue for investigations of the relationship between magnetism, superconductivity, and lattice instabilities in the iron arsenide family of superconductors. At ambient pressure, the undoped parent phases undergo a tetragonal-to-orthorhombic distortion accompanied by antiferromagnetic order at lower temperatures. CaFe2As2 is unusual since, under modest pressures (< 1GPa), a new non-magnetic “collapsed tetragonal” (cT) phase emerges from the antiferromagnetically ordered low-temperature orthorhombic phase. Superconductivity in the parent AFe2As2 compounds, under applied pressure, has been reported by several groups using liquid-media pressure cells. Measurements under hydrostatic pressure conditions, however, found that superconductivity, if present at all, occurs over a very narrow range close to the reported orthorhombic-to-cT transition. I will discuss neutron and x-ray diffraction measurements under uniaxial and hydrostatic pressure conditions that have elucidated the nature of the phase responsible for superconductivity in this system.

  227. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Ferroelectric thin films and superlattices: At Stony Brook and X21"

    Presented by Matthew Dawber, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University

    Friday, July 2, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  228. NSLS-II Seminar

    "High Quality Crystal Optics Fabrication for the IXS beamline at NSLS-II"

    Presented by Chaminda (Nalaka) Kodituwakku

    Thursday, July 1, 2010, 2 pm
    Large Conference Room. Building 703

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    High quality crystal optics fabrication is one of the greatest challenges for synchrotron based x-ray beamlines. Specially, high resolution inelastic x-ray scattering requires very high quality crystal optics to achieve the required resolution and efficiency. One of the key breakthrough in x-ray optics is the development of Germanium (733) analyzer at sector 9 of APS. This medium resolution spherical diced analyzer designed for Cu K-edge resonant experiments, which gives ~120 meV resolution. Similar work has been done in many places including the set of high resolution analyzers of HERIX spectrometer at sector 30 of APS. These are made from Si (12 12 12) and gives 2-2.5 meV resolution at 21.657keV. The new NSLS-II sub meV resolution IXS beamline requires a state-of-the-art crystal optics to deliver required 0.1meV resolution. In contrast to these requirements I will demonstrate the preliminary work done at the IXS R&D lab of NSLS-II. Lastly I will discuss studies related to steady lattice parameters of diamond and silicon.

  229. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Recent X-ray Optics Projects at Diamond: Polychromator and Mirrors"

    Presented by John Sutter, Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom

    Tuesday, June 29, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    The Optics and Metrology group at the Diamond Light Source undertakes a variety of projects both theoretical and experimental, both to support Diamond's own beamlines and to advance the knowledge of X-ray optics throughout the scientific community. The modeling of a bent-crystal polychromator for the X-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline I20 is one example. Such a device permits a full absorption spectrum to be collected in one shot. Both ray-tracing and wave-optical calculations have been performed on a silicon (1 1 1) polychromator diffracting 7 keV X-rays. These have yielded the instrumental resolution and the optimal sample-detector distance. The inspection and optimization of focusing Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors is also of great practical importance. To perform these tasks, the Optics and Metrology group have developed both "ex-situ" techniques applied in a metrology cleanroom and "in-situ" techniques applied under beamline conditions. Slope error measurements obtained from both techniques show good agreement. The in-situ method has improved the focusing quality of Diamond's mirrors and permits deliberate defocusing.

  230. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Order in Artificial Spin Ice: Real and Reciprocal Space Studies"

    Presented by Jason Morgan, PhD Student, School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Leeds

    Friday, June 25, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  231. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Soft X-ray Spectroscopic Study of Strontium-doped Lanthanum Manganite (La0.8Sr0.2MnO3) Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications"

    Presented by Dr. Louis Piper, Assistant Research Professor, Department of Physics, Boston University

    Friday, June 25, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrochemical devices characterized by a ceramic electrolyte - typically yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) - that enables the conduction of negative oxygen ions at elevated temperatures (i.e. > 800°C). At present the drive is to maintain high performance at intermediate operating temperatures (i.e. 500-700°C), which are more suitable for small-scale applications. As the temperature drops, reaction kinetics at conventional cathodes, such as strontium doped lanthanum manganite (La0.8Sr0.2MnO3), slow down considerably. This has led to various attempts to improve performance. The most notable being associated with the “burn-in” phenomenon or activation, where an applied bias improves the performance of the cathode over time. Various mechanisms have been proposed ranging from: Sr segregation; removal of Mn (Sr) oxide; nanopore formation; Mn2+ migration to the interface; and, La0.8Sr0.2MnO3/YSZ intermixing. However its origin still remains unclear. In this talk, I will report our recent results regarding the chemical composition and electronic structure of LSMO films at various stages of operation. By rapidly quenching and sealing in vacuum, we were able to directly compare the pristine (as-fabricated) La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 with both "heat-treated" (800°C in air, and no bias) and "burnt-in" (800°C in air, -1 V bias) La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 cathodes. This circumvented issues regarding 1) surface preparation (i.e. Mn reduction) and 2) use of soft x-ray techniques (i.e. ultra-high vacuum). Using a combination of core-level X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, X-ray emission/absorption spectroscopy, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and resonant photoemission spectroscopy, we observed La-deficiency (severest near the surface) and an increased Mn4+ contribution (i.e. corresponding to hole doping > 0.55) of the cathode prior to activation. In addition we also observed dramatic changes in the oxygen environment before the application of a

  232. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Latest Developments for Ultra-precision Mirrors and Benders (reaching the nm scale)"

    Presented by Philippe Godefroy, WINLIGHT, France

    Thursday, June 24, 2010, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    WINLIGHT is a supplier of mirrors, benders and KB mirrors. We will present our last developments in terms of polishing and surface inspection to reach the nm scale for large mirrors. As a supplier of complete systems, WINLIGHT will also present its bending technology. Results on the inspection machine and on beamlines will be presented.

  233. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Accelerator Aspects of APS Upgrade"

    Presented by Michael Borland, APS/ANL

    Thursday, June 24, 2010, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

  234. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Soft x-ray beamline optics"

    Presented by Ruben Reininger, BNL, NSLS-II

    Friday, June 18, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  235. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Synchrotron Radiation in Art and Archaeology"

    Presented by Joris Dik, Delft University, Netherlands

    Tuesday, June 15, 2010, 4 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Eric Dooryhee

  236. NSLS-II Beamline Development Proposal Workshop

    "NSLS-II BDP Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction and Spectroscopy Under Extreme Conditions Workshop"

    Presented by Various Speakers

    Tuesday, June 15, 2010, 8:30 am
    Bldg. 703, Large Conference Rm

    Hosted by: Alex Goncharov, and Vitali Prakapenka

  237. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Far-infrared Mueller matrix ellipsometer at U4IR and its application for multiferroic materials and materials with the negative index of refraction."

    Presented by Andrei Sirenko, Associate Professor, Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Friday, June 11, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

    We present the far-IR spectroscopic ellipsometer at U4IR beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This Ellipsometer is designed to measure a full-Mueller matrix of the sample by using compensators and wire-grid linear polarizers. With the exceptional brightness of synchrotron radiation and the Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer, we measure ellipsometric data at multi-wavelengths between 10 and 4,000 cm-1. Studies of the phase transitions in multiferroic crystals are available using the close-cycle cryostat for temperatures between 4.2 K and 450 K. The wide range of -2 rotation, angle adjustment, and X-Y-Z translation of sample stage enables high accuracies in the alignment, calibration, and ellipsometric measurement. With the Labview program interface, the automated experiments with the pre-programmed measurement schedules are performed by controlling the motors, temperature, and FT-IR spectrometer. The ellipsometric data analysis is based on the Berreman’s 4×4 propagation matrix formalism to extract dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability tensors for bulk and thin film samples from the Mueller matrix measured at variable incidence angles and sample orientations across the broad far-IR spectral range. Applications of this far-IR ellipsometry for multiferroic materials with ≠1 and for metamaterials with the negative index of refraction will be discussed. This development effort is supported by NSF-MRI-0821224.

  238. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Modern High-resolution photoemission: an overview"

    Presented by Tony Valla, BNL- Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science Dept.

    Friday, June 4, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  239. Beamline Development Proposal Workshop

    "Full-Field Imaging Beamline at NSLS II"

    Presented by Several Speakers

    Friday, June 4, 2010, 8:30 am
    Bldg. 817 Room 4

    Hosted by: Wah Keat Lee (APS-ANL)

  240. Beamline Development Proposal Workshop

    "X-ray Scattering for Biological Applications at NSLS-II"

    Presented by Several Speakers

    Wednesday, June 2, 2010, 8:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang (BNL)

    Workshop held June 2nd & 3rd, 2010

  241. NSLS-II Beamline Development Proposal Workshop

    "Time-resolved full field x-ray microscopy at nano and micro scale"

    Presented by Jun Wang, Organizer, NSLS

    Wednesday, June 2, 2010, 7:30 am
    Bldg. 703, Large Conference Rm.

    Hosted by: Jun Wang

    We will be holding a Workshop on time-resolved full-field transmission x-ray microscopy at nano and micro scales. The purpose of the workshop is to provide a forum to discuss the beamline development proposal to build a time-resolved full field imaging beamline at both nano and micro scale on an insertion device source at NSLS-II. The beamline will support scientific research benefiting from 2D and 3D x-ray imaging with high spatial resolution down to 30nm, high energies (5-25 keV) for larger penetration depths, high sensitivity using differential-absorption and phase-contrast, and faster imaging for investigation of dynamics. The main focus of this workshop is (a) to identify strong scientific cases in the areas of energy storage, biofuels, nano-electronics and materials, and geo and environmental

  242. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "From Scattering to Imaging, Recent Activities at the cSAXS Beamline"

    Presented by Andreas Menzel, Swiss Light Source, Switzerland

    Tuesday, June 1, 2010, 3 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

  243. Beamline Development Proposal Workshop

    "X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Related Techniques at NSLS-II"

    Presented by Several Speakers

    Tuesday, June 1, 2010, 8:30 am
    Bldg. 703 Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Bruce Ravel (NIST)

  244. NSLS/CFN Users' Meeting Plenary Session

    Presented by Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director, Office of Science US Department of Energy

    Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 8:30 am
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

  245. NSLS/CFN Joint Users' Meeting

    Monday, May 24, 2010, 7:30 am
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

  246. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Electrostatically Self-assembled amphiplexes: A combinatorial X-ray diffraction approach"

    Presented by Vesna Stanic, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University

    Friday, May 21, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  247. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Confinement Induced Phase Transition in a DNA-Lipid Hydrated Complex"

    Presented by Laurence Navailles, Universite de Bordeaux, Centre de Recherche Paul-Pascal, France

    Thursday, May 20, 2010, 1:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Ron Pindak

    We study the effect of the soft confinement by fluid lipid bilayers on the spatial organization of DNA molecules in a DNA/zwitterionic lipid hydrated lamellar complex. The confinement is increased by dehydrating the complex in a controlled way, which leads to a decrease of the water channel thickness separating the periodically stacked bilayers. Using grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering on an oriented thin film, we follow in situ the structure of the DNA-lipid complex as dehydration proceeds. A structural phase transition is evidenced, where the 'classical' 2D nematic phase of DNA rods embedded within the one-dimensionally ordered lipid lamellar phase observed at high hydration is replaced by a new 2D hexagonal structure of DNA molecules intercalated between the lipid bilayers. In order to correlate the structural and diffusive properties of the system, we started 'surgical' FRAP (Fluorescence Recovery after photobleaching) experiments, using a confocal microscope (CLSM) on oriented samples. We have identified three modes of DNA diffusion: an isotropic diffusion, where the molecules in each layer are randomly distributed and randomly orientated, a noncorrelated nematic anisotropic diffusion, with a directional order in each layer but no correlation between neighbouring layers, and finally a correlated nematic anisotropic diffusion with correlation between neighbouring layers. Further we present a method of data analysis that allows distinguishing between isotropic and anisotropic diffusion, when averaging over several layers of a lamellar phase in homeotropic orientation.

  248. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Nanopositioning techniques development for hard x-ray nanoprobe with nanometer scale resolution"

    Presented by Deming Shu, Argonne National Laboratory - Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    Tuesday, May 18, 2010, 3:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Evgueni Nazaretski

    At modern synchrotron radiation sources and beamlines, high-precision positioning techniques present a significant opportunity to support state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation research. Meanwhile, the required instrument positioning performance and capabilities, such as resolution, dynamic range, repeatability, speed, and multiple axes synchronization are exceeding the limit of commercial availability. This talk presents the current nanopositioning techniques developed for the Argonne CNM/APS hard x-ray nanoprobe and the CNM/APS/NSLS-II test-bed of the multilayer Laue lenses (MLLs) based hard x-ray nanoprobe. Future nanopositioning techniques to be developed for the NSLS-II project will also be discussed. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. If you would like to meet with this speaker, please contact the host @ enazaretski@bnl.gov prior to this presentation to coordinate a time slot.

  249. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Energy Dispersive Detectors by Ketek"

    Presented by Richard Varall, Andreas Pahlke, and Jurgen Knoblo, Ketek, Germany

    Thursday, May 6, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Yong Chu

    Presentation of the semiconductor company KETEK/Germany and it's Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) product portfolio including complete ED-XRF acquisition systems and KETEK's upcoming 7 chanel large area SDD array. Duration of the presentation will be about 45min plus time for questions/discussions.

  250. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Probing Migration of Magnetic Impurities at Sub-Nanometer Depth Resolution and Understanding Ion Beam Induced Magnetism in Nonmagnetic Multilayers"

    Presented by Professor B. Dev, Department of Materials Science Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata, India

    Wednesday, May 5, 2010, 10 am
    Bldg. 703, Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Sanjit Ghose

    X-ray standing wave fields, excited in periodic nanostructured multilayers during Bragg diffraction, have been used to probe atomic migration in multilayers. Ion beam induced migration of Fe impurity atoms from the C layers to the Pt layers in a Pt(Fe)/C(Fe) multilayer, where each layer is about 2 nm thick, has been detected. With a depth resolution better than 0.2 nm, the change of Fe concentration in C (also Pt) layers has been determined as a function of fluence of 2 MeV Au ions, which the multilayers were irradiated with. Magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements show ferromagnetism and an increase of coercive field in the ion-irradiated multilayers with increasing ion fluence. Magnetic force microscopy also shows the evolution of ferromagnetic domains. Further investigations with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal the formation of FePt nanoparticles, as a consequence of Fe migration from C-layers into Pt-layers. In view of the availability of focused ion beams with beam spots of a few nanometer diameter, possible applications of this ion beam induced ferromagnetism in nanoscale fabrications will be discussed.

  251. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Soft xray fluorescence high angular collection optics"

    Presented by Joseph Dvorak, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, April 30, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  252. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "X-ray excited optical luminescence in InGaN/GaN MQW structures"

    Presented by Andrei A. Sirenko, Associate Professor, Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ

    Friday, April 30, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

    Synchrotron-based x-ray radiation at Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS - A2 beamline) was used to excite luminescence spectra in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures for optoelectronic devices. Both, cw and time-resolved techniques have been performed in detecting the x-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) signal. The peak of XEOL for GaN layers coincides with that for conventional PL obtained with a laser excitation, while the XEOL peak for the InGaN active region has a 50 nm shift compared to spectra measured with laser-based PL and cathode-luminescence. Time-resolved measurements were done on XEOL spectra using a streak camera. The temporal structure of the x-ray synchrotron beam at CHESS permits exciton life-time measurements in a broad range from 0.5 ns up to a few microseconds. We determined that GaN exciton lifetime varies between 1.3 and 4.5 ns in different structures, while the InGaN exciton lifetime is on the microsecond scale due to higher defect density. Our experimental approach has been extended to the use of x-ray micro-beams. Using this approach a micron-size spot can probe InGaN/GaN device structures simultaneously measuring: (i) x-ray diffraction, (ii) photoluminescence spectra, and (iii) exciton life-times. Work is in collaboration with S.M. O'Malley (Rutgers University - Camden), P. Revesz and A. Kazimirov (CHESS)

  253. NSLS-II Seminar

    "High Perfromance Synchrotron Components from Industry: The Reliable Bruker ASC Way"

    Presented by Riccarado Signorato and Wolfgang Diete, Bruker ASC/ACCEL, Germany

    Wednesday, April 28, 2010, 1 pm
    Bldg. 703 Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Andrew Broadbent

    Bruker ASC is continuing and expanding the X-ray beamlines and components business of former ACCEL Instruments GmbH, capitalizing on the vast amount of experience gathered by key ACCEL personnel over more 10 years of successful deliveries of full beamlines and components to synchrotron radiation facilities worldwide. Thus, the current Bruker ASC portfolio includes all developments and technologies mastered by former ACCEL and is complementing them with additional capabilities in Insertion Devices and Endstations. Our X-ray activity can then be traced back to our first beamline installed in year 2000 and since then ACCEL, now Bruker ASC, has a clear track record of successfully completed projects, as proven by our large number of satisfied references worldwide. Bruker ASC operates on projects that are often technically demanding, innovative and at the current limits of state-of-the-art technology and they are generally developed and finalized in a collaborative way with our scientific counterparts. This talk will give an overview of our current activities and products and will present a few selected results especially focused towards the challenging specifications needed to match the extremely high brilliance of future NSLS II sources

  254. NSLS-II Seminar

    "High Energy X-rays for Materials Science-New Trends"

    Presented by Veijo Honkimanki, European Sychrotron Radiation Facility, France

    Tuesday, April 27, 2010, 10 am
    NSLS Conference Room Am, 725

    Hosted by: Eric Dooryhee

  255. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Bent Crystal Optics for High Energy Diffraction"

    Presented by Veijo Honkimaki, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), France

    Monday, April 26, 2010, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Eric Dooryhee

  256. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Mith and Realities about protein crystallography under magnetic fields"

    Presented by Dr. Abel Moreno, Professor Biological Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, UNAM

    Friday, April 23, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  257. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Development of a Fluorescence‐type Monochromatized X‐ray Beam Position Monitor with Sub‐micron Spatial Resolution for NSLS‐II Beamlines"

    Presented by Phil Yoon, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Thursday, April 22, 2010, 1:30 pm
    NSLS-II Larege Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Hanfei Yan

    A new enhanced prototype (Prototype‐II) of a Monochromatic X‐ray Beam‐Position Monitor (X‐BPM) has been developed for end‐station users at the future NSLS‐II beamlines. A new design of a ring array of multi‐segmented Si photodiodes as a photon sensor has a larger solid angle than the previous design. Backscattering mode of operation is realized by utilizing custom‐made bi‐ASIC chips in a new electronic readout design. Cooling module and UHV operation are selected to reduce inherent noise and background events. As a result of unprecedented and detailed modeling, characterization, and various calculations, the new X‐ray BPM is capable of achieving sub‐micron spatial resolution and even higher. I will present the novel methodology of developing a fluorescence‐type X‐ray detector in an ultra high spatial resolution regime.

  258. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Nanopositioning: Technology and Applications"

    Presented by Katerina Moloni, VP of Product Development at nPoint, Inc.

    Thursday, April 22, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Evgueni Nazaretski

    The talk will present design choices when nanopositioning devices are used while focusing on application requirements. If you would like to meet with this speaker after this presentation, please contact the host at enazaretski@bnl.gov prior to this presentation to coordinate a time slot.

  259. Brookhaven Lecture

    "456th Brookhaven Lecture: 'Getting More From Less: Correlated Single-Crystal Spectroscopy and X-ray Crystallography at the NSLS'"

    Presented by Allen Orville, Ph.D., Biology Department, BNL

    Wednesday, April 21, 2010, 4 pm
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Stephen Musolino

    <p>By integrating different techniques to collect complementary data at beam line X26C of the National Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS), Allen Orville and his colleagues of the Macromolecular Crystallography Research Resource are providing new insights into the structures of macromolecules.</p> <p>During the 456th Brookhaven Lecture, on Wednesday, April 21st, Orville will describe his approach and his findings in a talk entitled "Getting More From Less: Correlated Singe-Crystal Spectroscopy and X-Ray Crystallography at the NSLS," beginning at 4 p.m. in Berkner Hall. Refreshments will be offered before and after the lecture.</p> <p>During his talk, Orville will discuss his field of protein crystallography, reviewing its landmark discoveries and explaining new ways of using the NSLS and, in the future, the NSLS-II, to build on those discoveries.</p> <p>Allen Orville took his Ph.D. in biology from the University of Minnesota in 1997. After completing a postdoc with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of Oregon, 1997-2000, he began an assistant professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Orville joined BNL's Biology Department in 2006 as an associate biophysicist and was promoted to biophysicist in 2008.</p> <p> To join the lecturer for dinner at an off-site restaurant following his talk, please contact Kathy Folkers, folkers@bnl.gov or Ext. 3415.</p>

  260. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Nanofabrication for x-ray science a case study"

    Presented by Ming Lu, Ph.D., Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, April 16, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  261. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Back-diffraction in HPHT diamond single crystals"

    Presented by Marcelo Honnicke, NSLS-II

    Friday, April 16, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  262. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Opto-mechanical Design Considerations for the LCLS X-ray Mirror System"

    Presented by Tom McCarville, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Thursday, April 15, 2010, 1:30 pm
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Kon Kaznatcheev

    Coherent X-rays present interesting challenges for the opto-mechanical system. They are not only imposes stringent requirements on mirror surface figure, but due the large distances mirror pointing resolution and stability requires new approach to the mechanical design. Pointing resolution of LCLC mirror system must be within 100 nano-radians, and must be stable throughout the experiment duration of several hours. This presentation describes the opto-mechanical system being designed for LCLS, and how it rises to these challenges. The design approach and supporting analysis are described, along with experimental results from prototypes and final installation.

  263. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Impedance and Collective Effects Studies for the TPS Storage Ring."

    Presented by Andriy Rusanov

    Monday, April 12, 2010, 10:30 am
    Large Conference Room (Lower Level), Building 703

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky

    Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) is a new third generation synchrotron storage ring which will be built at the present site of the NSRRC (Taiwan). The talk summarizes results of the impedance and collective effects studies for the TPS storage ring. Wake potentials and impedances for each component of the storage ring have been simulated with a 3D electromagnetic code GdfidL. Collective effects in the TPS storage ring have been simulated with tracking code ELEGANT (quasi-Green's function for the entire ring and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) have been taken into account). Thresholds of the longitudinal microwave instability and the CSR induced instability have been estimated.

  264. Light Sources Directorate Seminar

    "Synchrotron SOLEIL: Present status and future plans"

    Presented by Steve Dierker, Light Sources Directorate

    Monday, April 12, 2010, 9:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Steve Dierker

  265. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "In situ characterization of atomic layer deposition using synchrotron radiation"

    Presented by Christophe Detavernier, In situ characterization of atomic layer deposition using synchrotron radiation

    Friday, April 9, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  266. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "3DXRD: A Tool for Grain Mapping And For Studying Grain Dynamics"

    Presented by Henning Friis Poulsen, Riso National Lab for Sustainable Energy, Denmark

    Thursday, April 8, 2010, 1 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Chi-Chang Kao

    Three-Dimensional X-Ray Diffraction (3DXRD) microscopy is an emerging methodology for in situ studies of mm-sized polycrystals (metals, ceramics, rocks). In favorable cases, the position, volume, orientation, stress-state and dislocation densities of hundreds of grains can be determined simultaneously and sufficiently fast to enable in situ studies of e.g. phase transformations, coarsening and plastic deformation. 3D movies of the changes in grain boundary topology of samples with > 1000 grains have been obtained with a spatial resolution of 1 mu. In addition, the approach allows for structure solution and refinement of multigrains. Examples of work will be shown, with a bias towards basic studies in metallurgy, and the prospect of combined 3DXRD-tomography work highlighted. Ideas for generalizing 3DXRD microscopy to the nano-scale will be presented. Focus will be on R&D in the so called nanodetector: a single photon counting imaging detector for 5-200 keV x-rays with specifications of 100 nm resolution, 1 mm^2 active area and a throughput of 10^9.

  267. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Some scientific computer tools for spectroscopy and diffraction developed at ESRF"

    Presented by Manuel Sanchez del Rio, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), France

    Thursday, April 8, 2010, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Eric Dooryhee

    A fundamental part in a synchrotron radiation experiment is related to the analysis of data, usually done in two phases, i) on-line (at the beamline) for improving the measurements and extracting as much of results as possible, and ii) off-line (careful detailed analysis at home). In a first part I'll discuss the requests and interest in data analysis means for users working on beamlines that produce massive amount of data. Then, I'll present some developments available in XOP for x-ray diffraction using 2D detectors and X-ray Absorption spectroscopies. Finally, I will first present a short overview of some tools developed and maintained at ESRF and distributed worldwide for different applications in X-ray spectroscopies (fluorescence, reflectivity, absorption) and ab-initio calculations.

  268. NSLS-II Seminar

    "X-ray optics simulations and beamline modeling for the ESRF Upgrade Programme"

    Presented by Manuel Sanchez-del Rio, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), France

    Wednesday, April 7, 2010, 2 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Eric Doorhee

    The challenging ESRF Upgrade Programme foresees the reconstruction of about one third of the beamlines. The new beamlines will be very long (more than 100 m) to use routinely micro- and nano-beams. This requires a very high demagnification of the ESRF source, which makes beamline optics design a fundamental concept for the future availability of bright and small beam. At present, during the concept phase, an intense use of computer tools for x-ray optics is necessary, in particular ray-tracing, which has demonstrated to be the most reliable tool for designing and optimizing synchrotron beamlines. A substantial effort has already been invested at the ESRF in developing optics tools and facilitating their use. I will summarize our existing tools, based on XOP and SHADOW. Some examples of recent simulations will be presented, including all kind of synchrotron optics (reflective, refractive and diffractive). An important issue is to understand what are the conditions required (figure shape and figure errors) for the maximum allowed demagnification, and what are the limits. In parallel, an ambitious project for the upgrade of the existing software and development of new tools has been planned.

  269. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Detector Development and Charge Transport Studies in Diamond at Surrey University"

    Presented by Annika Lohstroh, Surrey University, United Kingdom

    Friday, April 2, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  270. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Superconducting thin films of FeSe0.5Te0.5 and FeTe:Ox by Pulsed Laser Deposition"

    Presented by Weidong Si, Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, BNL

    Friday, April 2, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  271. National Synchrotron Light Source and Materials Science Department Seminar

    "High-Throughput Science: the Electronic Structure of All Known Inorganic Materials and Beyond"

    Presented by Anubhav Jain, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Monday, March 29, 2010, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    Accelerating discovery in science and technology is a goal we all share. This talk discusses the Materials Genome project at MIT, which has as its goal to compute properties of all inorganic materials with known crystal structures using Density Functional Theory (DFT). We have completed over 60,000 DFT calculations, encompassing most of the materials reported in the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) as well as many newly predicted compounds. We describe how such rapid computational screening has led to the discovery of several interesting new materials for use as Li ion battery cathodes. Statistics collected from screening were used to address the inverse problem of designing materials satisfying constraints on cathode voltage and stability. Finally, we present work in the field of crystal structure prediction through data mining of crystal structure databases. Our approach has predicted several novel ternary oxide materials, providing a path forward to the rapid discovery of promising new materials.

  272. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Recent Developments in X-ray Refractive Optics at the ESRF"

    Presented by Anatoly Snigirev, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, ESRF, France

    Monday, March 29, 2010, 10:30 am
    Bdlg. 703, Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Oleg Chubar

    The presentation is intended to review the most recent developments of hard X-ray micro- and nano- focusing optics at the ESRF. The main emphasis will be given to the performance of refractive optics. As in-line optics, compound refractive lenses do not change the direction of x-ray beam. They can be easily incorporated at almost any beamline providing collimating or focusing option. X-ray transfocators as energy tuneable refractive optical systems were recently developed at the ESRF. The transfocator is a lens assembly whose focal length can be continuously adjusted by the mechanical movement of one or more groups of individual parabolic lenses. These devices are simple to align, allow good working distance between the optics and the sample, and are becoming standard elements in synchrotron beamlines instrumentation. In the last few years a rapid progress in the fabrication of X-ray refractive optics using MEMS micro-electronics technology has opened the possibility of developing planar nanofocusing lenses. Driven by the requirements of new 100 m-long beamlines at the ESRF we have designed, manufactured and tested planar parabolic lenses made of silicon that have a short focal distance in the energy range of 10 and 100 keV. In addition to nanofocusing lenses each lens-chip contains a set of bi-lens interferometers enabling on-line coherence characterization of the incoming beam. The optical tests of the new lenses were performed at the Instrumentation Test ID6 beamline using the Micro-optics test bench (MOTB). The MOTB is a versatile instrument capable of high resolution X-ray optics characterization, coherence and stability measurements. The current status of the MOTB end station will briefly be described.

  273. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Experiments with geometrically frustrated magnets - a quantum spin liquid and a valence bond glass"

    Presented by M. A. deVries, E.C. Stoner Laboratory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK

    Friday, March 26, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  274. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Megapixels per hour: Ultrafast X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy at the Australian Synchrotron"

    Presented by David Paterson, Austrailian Light Source, Austraila

    Wednesday, March 24, 2010, 1 pm
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    A hard x-ray micro-nanoprobe [1] has been constructed at the Australian Synchrotron to provide versatile X-ray fluorescence microscopy across an incident energy range from 4 to25 keV. Two X-ray probes are used to collect µ-XRF and µ-XANES for elemental and chemical microanalysis: a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror microprobe for micron resolution studies; and a Fresnel zone plate nanoprobe with laser interferometer encoding of sample position and capable of 60 nm resolution. Some unique aspects of the XFM beamline design, including a horizontal bounce DCM, and some lessons learned will be discussed. The beamline is commissioning an advanced energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence detection scheme named Maia developed by BNL [2] and CSIRO Australia [3]. The Maia detector employs an annular geometry of 384-element planar silicon array to create a large acceptance solid-angle and handle count rates greater than 107/s. On-the-fly scanning combined with event mode data acquisition enables sub-ms per virtual pixel dwell with real-time elemental deconvolution and image projection. A 96-element Maia prototype used on the KB mirror microprobe has created high definition elemental maps with over 100 megapixels on a range of geological, materials and biological samples in practical time frames. Ultrafast X-ray fluorescence acquisition realises high definition elemental mapping, and creates the opportunity for fluorescence tomography and XANES imaging within practical time frames.

  275. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Growth of electrochemically deposited ZnO nanostructures: in situ synchrotron experiments and modelling"

    Presented by Bridget Ingham, Industrial Research Ltd., Lower Hutt, New Zealand

    Friday, March 19, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  276. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Two-dimensional Mean Field Treatment of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Effects with Application to Microbunching Instability in Bunch Compressors"

    Presented by Gabriele Bassi, University of Liverpool and Cockcroft Institute

    Thursday, March 18, 2010, 1:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky

    Bunch compressors, designed to increase the peak current, can lead to a microbunching instability driven by an increased coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, with detrimental effects on the beam quality. This is a major concern for free electron lasers (FELs) where very bright electron beams are required, i.e. beams with low emittance and energy spread. We have developed a parallel code based on a two-dimensional mean field treatment of CSR effects. The two-dimensional charge/current distribution is represented by a Fourier series in beam frame, with coefficients determined through Monte Carlo sampling over an ensemble of tracked points. This method, used in statistical density estimation, gives a globally smooth distribution with low noise. The field equations are solved accurately in the lab frame using retarded potentials and a novel choice of integration variables that eliminates singularities. We will discuss our algorithm and its application to the microbunching instability for the bunch compressor system of the FERMI@Elettra FEL.

  277. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Experimental Observation of Optical Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Stacked ZnTe/ZnSe Type-II Quantum Dots"

    Presented by Igor L. Kuskovsky, Department of Physics, Queens College of CUNY

    Wednesday, March 17, 2010, 10 am
    Bldg. 703, Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Hanffei Yan

    The Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect is typically discussed for a quantum charged particle moving along a closed trajectory in a magnetic field. There, however, exists a possibility of the AB effect associated with an overall neutral quasi-particle that possesses a radial electric dipole moment, such as excitons in cylindrical type-II quantum dots (QDs). The AB phase reveals itself in photoluminescence (PL) properties of type-II QDs since, due to the cylindrical symmetry, the exciton ground state initially has a zero orbital angular momentum, which changes to higher values with increasing magnetic field. This transition of the angular momentum to a non-zero value influences the optical properties in two ways: (i) the ground state energy will oscillate as the orbital angular momentum states cross and (ii) the PL intensity will change from strong (bright exciton with zero angular momentum) to weak (dark excitons with non-zero angular momentum) with increasing magnetic field. We present experimental studies on type-II magneto-excitons in stacked ZnTe/ZnSe type-II QDs. Results show strong AB oscillations in both the energy and intensity of the PL from the same structure. This is the only system for which the oscillations in both energy and intensity have been reported. In addition, we find that the AB oscillations are remarkably robust against temperature, with the AB signature visible up to 180 K. We believe this to be the highest temperature at which the AB effect, and therefore quantum coherence, has been observed in semiconductor ring-like structures. To explain the observations, we evoke an idea of the QD stacking, which ensures that the electron's wave-function is "pushed" to the side of the dot due to electron-electron interaction, independent of stress, whereas cylindrical geometry nicely defines the ring-like trajectory for an electron. In our model, an electron moves around an entire stack of QDs, one of which is occupied by a hole.

  278. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Imaging soft tissue structures with high energy x-rays: Contrast mechanisms and applications of diffraction enhanced imaging"

    Presented by Dean Connor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Wednesday, March 10, 2010, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Zhong Zhong

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is an x-ray-based imaging modality that yields image contrast from the absorption, scattering, and refraction of x-rays. Particularly because of its ability to extract refraction contrast, even from low-density materials, it has proven to be a powerful tool for the imaging of soft tissue features. DEI has already shown significant contrast-to-noise ratio gains over conventional radiography for the imaging of soft tissue in mammography and cartilage, and, most recently has shown the ability to image amyloid beta plaques in the excised brains of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Connor will discuss the contrast mechanisms of DEI, summarize the existing research, and point towards future developments in both synchrotron-based and x-ray-tube-based DEI systems.

  279. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The Electronic Structure and Morphology of Organic Semiconductors ---- A Case Study of Rubrene"

    Presented by Huanjun Ding, University of Rochester

    Monday, March 8, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Evgueni Nazaretski

    Rubrene, a tetraphenyl derivative of tetracene, has demonstrated strong potential for organic electronic applications. The recent studies suggest that the field-induced hole mobility of rubrene single crystal is over 20 cm2/Vs at room temperature, which is among the highest in organic semiconductors and is comparable to that of poly-Si. Despite of the exciting achievements in the device application, the current understanding about the relationship between the molecular structure and the electronic properties is limited by several factors. In this talk, I will present, to our knowledge, the first band structure measurement of an bulk rubrene single crystal with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (AR-PES). The high quality of the crystal surface was confirmed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Highly reproducible dispersive features were observed with nice symmetry about the Brillouin zone center and boundaries. The energy dispersion of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-derived bands show strong anisotropic behavior in the a-b plane of the unit cell. The measured band structure is compared to the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Furthermore, the energy level alignment at the interfaces between rubrene thin film and different metal substrates are studied with ultraviolet and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (UPS and XPS). The charge injection barriers at these interfaces are discussed. Finally, the morphology of the thermally evaporated rubrene thin film is studied with AFM for various sample preparation conditions.

  280. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Diffraction Enhanced Imaging: Recent Progress Towards the Clinic"

    Presented by Zhong Zhong, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, March 5, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  281. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Beam Diagnostics and Detectors from FMB Oxford"

    Presented by Nigel Boulding, Managing Director and Scott Mowat, FMB OXFORD, United Kingdom

    Thursday, March 4, 2010, 9 am
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    Since 1994 FMB Oxford has designed and manufactured synchrotron beamline systems for facilities around the world, first as Oxford Instruments ATG, as Oxford Danfysik from 2001 and in its latest incarnation from October 2007. Since that time we have successfully delivered around $150M of equipment operating primarily in 3rd generation sources. We have marketed, licenced and developed a range of products for use in beamlines. The focus of recent licences has been that concerning the in-situ measurement of beam position and intensity. These measurements can then be used to stabilize the beam via the control of the upstream beamline elements. The designs of various detectors and diagnostics, along with their associated electronics, are presented and discussed

  282. NSLS-II Seminar

    "FMB Oxford Capabilities in Beamlines and Components"

    Presented by Nigel Boulding, Managing Director and Scott Mowat, FMB OXORD, United Kingdom

    Wednesday, March 3, 2010, 10 am
    Bldg. 703 Large Seminar Room

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    Since 1994 FMB Oxford has designed and manufactured synchrotron beamline systems for facilities around the world, first as Oxford Instruments ATG, as Oxford Danfysik from 2001 and in its latest incarnation from October 2007. Since that time we have successfully delivered around $150M of equipment operating primarily in 3rd generation sources. The recent years have been characterized by the success of full beamline projects in Australia (4) including software and controls and full beamline optics packages on the CLAESS beamline at ALBA, the NANO beamline at ANKA and the ROBL beamline at the ESRF. Advances in performance and stability of monochromators and mirror systems are continuing in response to the ever-increasing search for the perfect beam. The designs of various components are presented and discussed

  283. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Probing the Electronic Structure of Metal Vanadates Using Hard and Soft X-rays"

    Presented by Christopher J. Patridge, Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

    Friday, February 26, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  284. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Diffraction Enhanced Imaging: Recent Progress Towards the Clinic"

    Presented by Zhong Zhong, BNL, NSLS

    Friday, February 26, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  285. National Synchrotron Light Source-II Seminar

    "The X-ray Optics Metrology Laboratory at APS: Status and Future Plans"

    Presented by Jun Qian, Argonne National Lab, X-ray Science Division

    Thursday, February 25, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: R. Conley

    The APS X-ray optics metrology laboratory has been serving the APS users community since its commissioning in 1994. The laboratory houses four instruments: a long trace profilers, a 150 mm aperture laser Fizeau interferometer, a dual phase shifting/white light vertical scanning microscope interferometer, and an atomic force microscope. In this talk, the metrology laboratory will be described and the instrument performance and capabilities will be discussed along with future plans and upgrades. * This work is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  286. National Synchrotron Light Source Town Meeting

    Wednesday, February 24, 2010, 1 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: NSLS Users' Executive Committee

  287. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Control-Systems Based Analysis and Design Methods for Scanning Probe Microscopy"

    Presented by Dr. Chibum Lee, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    Monday, February 22, 2010, 10:30 am
    Bldg. 703, NSLS-II Large Seminar Room

    Hosted by: Evgueni Nazaretski

    Recent demonstrations of nanoscience provide ample evidence indicating the feasibility of rational control, manipulation and interrogation of matter at the atomic scale. A class of devices, with micro-sized sensor probes, called Scanning Probe Microscopes (SPMs) are in the forefront of the technology that have demonstrated imaging and manipulation of sample properties. However, this technology is still far from realizing the promise of routinely tailoring matter at the atomic scale. Such ability, once realized, will have far reaching impact and revolutionize every area of science and technology, especially the areas of material science, biology, medicine, and manufacturing. This talk presents control systems theoretic analysis and synthesis of new modes of operations that significantly expand the range of performance specifications and capabilities of SPMs. In particular, the focus is on the two main requirements of SPMs, the precision positioning of the matter with respect to the probe and the obtaining of the surface topography from the probe data. A characterization of the inherent fundamental trade-offs between resolution, tracking-bandwidth, and reliability specifications on the positioning capability of these devices. A series of control designs which exploit these trade-offs appropriately to achieve pre-specified feasible performance objectives is discussed. These designs have two degrees of freedom (2DOF), that is, have the feedforward and the feedback components, and are obtained using the optimal control framework. Implementations and experimental results on the application of these designs show over 100-300% improvement over competing existing designs. For imaging, control systems tools have been used to model and analyze probe-sample (matter) interactions and design signals that estimate the sample topography. The central concept in this design is to view sample-topography signals as disturbance signals and use system theoretic tools to estimate

  288. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Infrared Spectroscopy of GaAs"

    Presented by Stephanie Gilbert, Vanderbilt University

    Friday, February 19, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  289. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Is there a Dirac cone in the iron-based superconductor?"

    Presented by Hongbo Yang, CMPMSD, BNL

    Friday, February 19, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  290. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "CO adsorption on Ru(0001) and PtRu/Ru(0001) near surface alloys using ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy"

    Presented by David Starr, Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, February 12, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  291. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Origin of the magnetoelectric coupling in PZT/LSMO multiferroic structures"

    Presented by Carlos A. F. Vaz, Department of Applied Physics and CRISP, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520

    Friday, February 12, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

    By using a combination of electric, transport, magnetic and spectroscopic techniques, we shed light on the origin of the magnetoelectric coupling recently observed in LaSrMnO3/PZT heterostructures. A modulation in the Mn valence state as a function of the PZT polarization is found from x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy measurements, demonstrating the electronic origin of the magnetoelectric coupling effect. By correlating the changes in valency with the changes in magnetic moment, we conclude that a change in the spin configuration of LaSrMnO3 takes place at the interface. This effect is attributed to changes in the electron occupancy of the Mn 3d orbitals and the competing super-exchange and double exchange interactions that are a hallmark of these strongly correlated oxides.

  292. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Non-Destructive 3-D Structural Imaging and Characterization of Heterogeneous Functional Materials (HeteroFoaMs) for Energy Systems"

    Presented by Wilson Chiu, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut

    Monday, February 8, 2010, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Jun Wang

    Fuel cells, batteries, capacitators, electrolyzers, solar cells, combustion devices, fuel processing devices, and membranes and coatings all consist of heterogeneous functional materials (HeteroFoaMs) that exhibit functional behavior in a manner that controls their collective performance as an energy system. There is a critical need to understand the role of a HeteroFoaMs structure, morphology, and composition on system performance. This seminar presents a non-destructive approach to image and characterize HeteroFoaMs using a transmission x-ray microscope at the Advanced Photon Source 32-ID-C. Three-dimensional structures within the sample volume are tomographically reconstructed at 38 nm spatial resolution. Multi-component lattice Boltzmann methods are used to analyze mass transfer, heat transfer, ionic/electronic charge transfer, and chemical/electrochemical reaction rates in the HeteroFoaM. To demonstrate this technique, chemical elements, chemical bonding, and phase- and pore-network structures in a solid oxide fuel cell are examined to provide fundamental insight into the origins of transport-related losses during operation. This work is supported by an Energy Frontier Research Center on Science Based Nano-Structure Design and Synthesis of Heterogeneous Functional Materials for Energy Systems (HeteroFoaM Center) funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (Award DE-SC000106).

  293. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Ketek GMBH Silicon Drift Detectors"

    Presented by Richard Varall, KETEK Creative Detector Solutions, Munich, Germany

    Friday, February 5, 2010, 1:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Andy Broadent

    Ketek has been the leading manufacturer of SDD's since the early to mid 90's. As many are aware, much of the development of the silicon drift detector was done at BNL. However, the production rights and patents eventually came under the control of the Max Plank Institute who sold the rights to Ketek. Ketek is located in Munich, Germany. The first devices were 5 mm sq. surface area devices. Improvements in crystal size, count rate capability, energy resolution and peak to background followed with the primary emphasis of development geared towards the microanalysis and XRF commercial markets. Ketek and the few other manufacturers have over the years virtually eliminated the Si(Li) detector from the commercial markets and Ketek is now developing the product more for the synchrotron market. The enhanced capabilities of the SDD in the areas of energy resolution, high count rate and ease of use will be discussed. Ketek now has crystal sizes up to 100 mm sq. It is Ketek's intention to deliver a 7 element array to the APS by September of 2010. I am hoping the discussion can include NSLS input on how the multi-element array product can be designed to fit the applications of the NSLS and NSLS II.

  294. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The Magnetic Field Dependence of Quasiparticle Dynamics in a Superconductor Studied by Time-Resolved Far-Infrared Spectroscopy"

    Presented by Xiaoxiang Xi, University of Florida

    Friday, February 5, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  295. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "A bi-prism based coherometer for hard x-rays"

    Presented by Kenneth Evans-Lutterodt, NSLS/NSLS-II

    Friday, February 5, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  296. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Energy of the Quasi-free Electron in Atomic and Molecular Fluids (Queens College & SRC) & The Optical Design of the X-ray Powder Diffraction Beamline (NSLSII - BNL)"

    Presented by Xianbo Shi, Queens College

    Friday, February 5, 2010, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Eric Dooryhee

    Part I: My graduate work focused on the systematic study of perturber critical point effects on the quasi-free electron energy in atomic and molecular supercritical fluids, which involved obtaining vacuum ultraviolet photoionization spectra at various electric fields for a myriad of dopant/perturber systems. I will show these experimental results and the theoretical modeling. Part II: Since July 2009, I have been participating in the optical design of the XPD beamline. The beamline characteristics are studied theoretically and simulated using third party ray tracing softwares (e.g., SHADOW). I will present the results on the energy resolution, the beam size and the reflectivity of the bent Laue and Bragg crystals. I will then discuss the integration of the analytical theory results with the SHADOW ray tracing, which is used in the simulation of the sagittal bent double-Laue monochromator. Finally, I will talk about the combination of the monochromator and the vertical focusing optics (e.g., multilayered mirrors, bent crystals and CRLs).

  297. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Persistent Superconductivity in Ultrathin Pb Films: An STM/S Study"

    Presented by Daejin Eom, Columbia University

    Wednesday, February 3, 2010, 10:30 am
    Bldg. 703, Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Evgueni Nazaretski

    I will present the measurements of the superconducting energy gap of epitaxially grown Pb films as a function of the layer thickness. Ultrathin Pb films (5 18 ML) on Si(111) were grown by low temperature deposition followed by room temperature annealing. A home-built, low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was used to probe the relevant electronic and geometric properties. The layer-dependent energy gap and transition temperature (Tc) show persistent quantum oscillations down to the lowest thickness without any sign of suppression. Moreover, by comparison with the quantum-well states measured above Tc and the theoretical calculations, we found that the Tc oscillation correlates directly with the density of states oscillation at the Fermi level (EF). The oscillation is manifested by the phase matching of the Fermi wavelength and the layer thickness, resulting in a bilayer periodicity modulated by a longer wavelength quantum beat.

  298. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Optical and At wavelength Metrology development at SOLEIL synchrotron"

    Presented by Mourad Idir, Synchrotron SOLEIL, France

    Tuesday, February 2, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Generalization of specific optical metrology and systematic testing of all delivered components has yield in the last decade to a significant improvement of the optical surfaces installed on synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines around the world. Surface roughness is classically characterized by phase-shift interferential microscope, sometimes AFM. Long trace profiler (LTP), which measures the local slope along a line profile, has been the choice instrument to measure figure errors of large size components. Controlling optical components (mirrors, crystals, gratings) is an essential task in order to predict the properties of a beamline and optimize its alignment and final performances. Synchrotron center around the world have developed the appropriate equipment and in the last ten years have accumulated a large expertise and moreover, the ability of measuring reliably small departure from the ideal shape has generated a continuous improvement of the quality of the optics deliver by the main synchrotron mirror manufacturers. In this talk, I will focus on the development of Metrology capabilities develop at SOLEIL Synchrotron both in the optical metrology laboratory and using the Metrology and Tests Beamline. I will report also on some R&D activities develop during the last years:  Design, development, test and use of active x-ray optics coupled with wavefront analyser.  2 D stitching system based on Shack Hartmann wavefront I will then concluded describing some new ongoing development in order to be able to measure the optical component needed to achieve diffraction limited focal spot on new Nanoprobe beamlines

  299. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Advanced Optical Systems For Basis Science Research"

    Presented by Michael Pivovaroff, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Monday, February 1, 2010, 1:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Chi-Change Kao

    Lawrence Livermore has a long history of developing innovative optical systems for basic science applications. In this talk, I will discuss two such efforts: the X-ray offset mirror systems for the Linac Coherent Light Source, the recently commissioned X-ray free electron laser, and the Gemini Planet Imager, an adaptive optic-based instrument capable of direct detection of nearby extra-solar planets. The capabilities LLNL has developed in X-ray and adaptive optic design and modeling, precision metrology and engineering and thin-film and multilayer deposition, coupled with expertise from other DOE laboratories, could be used to develop the novel X-ray optics for the next generation of national light sources.

  300. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Integrating X-ray solution scattering and computation: Multimeric assembly of the Src-kinase Hck"

    Presented by Sichun Yang, Ph.D., Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago

    Monday, February 1, 2010, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Wuxian Shi

    This presentation will introduce an integrative framework that combines small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and computer simulations for the study of structural assemblies of multimeric complexes. I will first propose the procedure of integrating SAXS data and molecular simulations and a newly developed computational method – Fast-SAXS – for high-throughput scattering computing. The integrative approach uses a Monte Carlo scheme to minimize the differences between theoretical and experimental SAXS profiles and provides the ability to derive structural descriptions of multimeric complexes in solution. Then, I will describe the application of this integrated approach to unravel assembly mechanisms of a multidomain Hck signaling complex under various conditions of ligand binding and mutation. Finally, I will outline the use of this integrated approach for a future exploitation on the long-standing unsolved problem of multidomain assembly of nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs) and its application to high-throughput drug screening for ER-positive and hormone-sensitive breast cancer treatments.

  301. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Structural characterization of disordered states of proteins"

    Presented by Veronika Csizmok, University of Toronto

    Friday, January 29, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  302. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Structural Biology of Rap-mediated Competence Development in Bacillus Subtilis"

    Presented by Melinda Baker, PhD., Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)

    Friday, January 29, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  303. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Electrostatic 2d assembly of nanoparticles on lipid monolayers at air-water interface"

    Presented by Sumit Kewalramani, Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Sciences Dept.

    Friday, January 22, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  304. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Study of low temperature oxygen mobility and related properties in non stoichiometric oxides."

    Presented by Andrea Piovano, University of Torino, Italy

    Friday, January 22, 2010, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  305. NSLS-II Seminar

    "High-Energy X-Ray Optics Development (50-150 keV) at the APS"

    Presented by Sarvjit Shastri, APS, Argonne National Laboratory

    Thursday, January 21, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II, Bldg. 703 Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    Due to its high electron beam energy (7 GeV) and small source size/divergence, the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a brilliant source of high-energy x-rays, which are often the scattering probe of choice for various types of investigations in materials and condensed matter systems. The APS beamline 1-ID is dedicated to this photon energy range in regard to research applications and beam-delivering optics. The high-energy x-ray optics at 1-ID and its performance will be primarily presented, including monochromatization to various energy resolutions (using bent and flat crystals), refractive lenses for focusing and collimation, brilliance preservation, stability issues, and ongoing development. Applications enabled by the optics will be mentioned, such as materials deformation studies, pair distribution function measurements, high-pressure diffraction, high-energy fluorescence, and resonant diffraction at heavy element K edges. Optics upgrades at other APS high-energy beamlines will also be discussed.

  306. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Capabilities and advances in x-ray mirror manufacturing"

    Presented by Helge Thiess

    Tuesday, January 12, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Applications such as FEL and recent 3rd generation synchrotron sources imply further improvement of the achievable beamline optics quality. Here the level for the residual slope errors can be as small as 0.1 rad. In addition beam quality preservation in the scattering process frequently demands height errors in the order of 0.5-1nm rms over the clear aperture combined with surface roughness about 0.1 nm rms. These new challenges are out of reach without proper profiling, interferometric and/or stitching methods. However the process technology for the manufacturing of surfaces in desired quality range cannot be achieved without close interaction of metrology and figuring. Collaboration of mirror manufacturers and optics groups at the user facilities on topics such as figuring iterations with external surface data and metrology cross comparison is mandatory.

  307. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Combined in situ Micro-Spectroscopic Approach to Study Catalytic Solids in Action"

    Presented by Eli Stavitski, Utrecht University, Netherlands

    Monday, January 11, 2010, 10 am
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lisa Miller

  308. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Electric field control of magnetism and ferroelectricity in single crystals of multiferroic BiFeO3"

    Presented by Valery Kiryukhin, Rutgers University

    Monday, January 11, 2010, 10 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

    Abstract: BiFeO3 is a room-temperature multiferroic combining large electric polarization (P) with long-wavelength spiral magnetic order. Significant efforts have been devoted to studies of thin-film BiFeO3 model multiferroic devices, and local control of magnetization by an electric field has been demonstrated recently. However, the extant thin films consist of a poorly controlled patchwork of ferroelastic domains severely impeding experimental work. We report growth of mm-sized single crystals consisting of a single ferroelectric (FE) domain. The obtained crystals were studied using optical microscopy, PFM, and neutron diffraction. Switching between two (out of 8) unique directions of P by an electric field is demonstrated. Magnetic moments are strongly coupled to the lattice, and rotate together with P when the field is applied. Within a single FE domain, electric field can be used to control the populations of the 3 equivalent magnetic domains with different directions of the spiral wave vector. In particular, a FE monodomain with a single-wave-vector magnetic spiral can be prepared. The spiral has the same helicity in the entire sample. These effects are reversible. Thus, electric field can be used to control the ferroelectric and magnetic states, and even the magnetic helicity of the sample. This level of control makes single-crystal BiFeO3 a promising object for investigation of physics of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroics, as well as for model multiferroic device research. Based on these results, we demonstrate a novel device, a switchable FE diode, and also report observation of a photovoltaic effect in semiconducting BiFeO3 samples.

  309. Light Sources Seminar

    "The Jefferson Lab Amplifier - JLAMP - a next generation light VUV/Soft X-ray light source proposal"

    Presented by Gwyn Williams, Jefferson Lab

    Friday, January 8, 2010, 11 am
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Steve Dierker

  310. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Diffraction of focused x-ray beams from perfect crystals: first experimental results and possible applications"

    Presented by Alexander Kazimirov, CHESS, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

    Wednesday, January 6, 2010, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    Modern focusing optics is able to deliver x-ray beams of the size of 100 nm and smaller for a variety of applications based on scattering and diffraction techniques. Meanwhile, diffraction of focused beams from crystals requires detail theoretical and experimental analysis. Theory predicts that a focused x-ray beam Bragg diffracted from a perfect crystal has a fine structure which depends on the size of the beam, thickness of the crystal and diffraction conditions. In this talk, I will present first experimental results allowing for a detailed comparison with theory and outline possible practical applications. Experiments were performed at the APS and the ESRF by using zone plates and refractive lenses as focusing optics. New experimental setup in which high-resolution detector is placed in the focus and crystal is positioned between the focusing optics and the focus was proposed and utilized. The broadening of the focused beam by crystals due to extinction effect and the evolution of fine spatial structure with angle were experimentally observed and analyzed. Experimental images recorded from real crystals and semiconductor structures demonstrate that this experimental setup can be used as a new imaging technique that combines spatial locality and depth sensitivity.

  311. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "A Salt and Batteries: Applications of Nonresonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering to Model and Applied Systems"

    Presented by Ken Nagle, University of Washington

    Monday, January 4, 2010, 2:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Bruce Ravel

    The rational design of improved battery electrodes for Li-ion batteries faces many barriers, not the least of which is a correct, fundamental understanding of the changes in local electronic structure that accompany insertion and removal of lithium. For this reason, the DOE report “Basic Research Needs for Electrical Energy Storage” singled out nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NIXS) as a promising technique for in situ studies of these basic electrochemical processes. NIXS at ~1 eV energy resolution provides a bulk-sensitive alternative to x-ray absorption spectroscopy for studies of low-energy (<1.5 keV) electronic transitions. Furthermore, at sufficiently high momentum transfers NIXS is sensitive to dipole-forbidden transitions, providing additional information about electronic structure. After illustrating these issues with a study of Na 1s core excitons in NaCl and NaF, I will discuss the application of NIXS to ex situ and in situ studies of lithiation of transition metal oxide compounds.

  312. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Multiple-Wave X-ray Diffraction: Fundamentals and Application"

    Presented by Yuriy Stetsko, Davron Staffing

    Wednesday, December 23, 2009, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    Abstract Multiple-wave x-ray diffraction takes place when more than one set of atomic planes is simultaneously brought into position to diffract an incident beam. As a result of the scattering of x-rays from periodic two- or three-dimensional structures, the multiple-wave diffraction reflects structural crystal information that cannot be obtained from single two-wave diffraction. However, due to the comparably large number of waves involved in the multiple-wave diffraction process, generally, the correspondent wavefields and diffracted intensities cannot be resolved analytically. For this reason, we have developed several approaches for numerical solution of the multiple-wave dynamical x-ray diffraction equations for bulk crystals and crystalline multilayers in a plane-wave approximation of the incident beam. We also proposed several approximations, including the iterative Born and resonance perturbation Bethe approximations, for the explanation of the fundamental behavior of three-wave x-ray diffraction. Among such behavior we have theoretically predicted and experimentally studied some new phenomena of a multiple-wave interaction of x-rays with matter: the indirect excitation of polarization-forbidden x-ray reflections, the polarization suppression of the detour-excited waves, the anomalous behavior of multiple-wave x-ray interaction at atomic resonance, the coherent multiple-wave x-ray interaction in charge-density wave materials. Due to the sensitivity to the phases of the structural factors, the multiple-wave diffraction has found its unique application for the solution of the phase problem of x-ray optics, diffraction physics and crystallography. We have proposed some theoretical approaches to explain the phase sensitivity of multiple-wave diffraction, as well as developed the experimental techniques for quantitative determination of reflection phases for bulk crystals, surface layers, macromolecular crystals, charge-density waves, and phase shifts at at

  313. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams Project"

    Presented by Thomas Glasmacher, FRIB

    Friday, December 18, 2009, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Diane Hatton

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a DOE-SC national user facility supporting the mission of the Office of Nuclear Physics. Michigan State University designs and establishes FRIB on its campus in East Lansing, MI. FRIB will be centered around a 200 MeV/nucleon superconducting-rf heavy-ion driver linac and create rare isotope beams by projectile fragmentation followed by in-flight separation. FRIB will provide experimenters with fast, stopped and reaccelerated rare isotope beams. This seminar will present an overview of the FRIB project and the science it enables.

  314. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Vacuum R&D Related to CesrTA and ERL-based Light Sources"

    Presented by Yulin Li, Cornell University

    Thursday, December 17, 2009, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Dick Hseuh

    Over the past 3 years, a prototype DC photo-cathode injector was designed and constructed at CLASSE, as a key initial step toward the Energy Recover Linac (ERL) based light sources at Cornell. The prototype injector includes a DC photo-cathode electron gun, a 10-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity cryo-module, electron beam transport beamlines equipped with a suit of beam instrumentation and electron beam dumps In the meantime, we have also successfully re-configured the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) vacuum system to convert it into a test accelerator (CesrTA), as a part of the Globe Design Efforts (GDE) of the International Liner Collider Damping Ring. In this talk, highlights of the vacuum R&D efforts related to these two research programs are discussed.

  315. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Transition from Anisotropic Magneto-Resistance to Giant Magneto-Resistance in Tape Drives"

    Presented by John Nibarger

    Monday, December 14, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Toshi Tanabe

    This talk will investigate the transition of Anisotropic Magneto-Resistance (AMR) to Giant Magneto-Resistance (GMR) in tape drives. Although GMR was introduced in the late 90s in disk drives, tape drives are just beginning to implement this technology. To provide a context for this seemingly late adoption, an introduction of magnetic recording head fundamentals will be given followed by scaling issues that has governed the magnetic data storage industry. These scaling issues provide the motivation for the transition from AMR to GMR in tape drives as well as the transition to Tunneling Magneto-Resistance (TMR) in disk drives.

  316. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Charge accumulation at La2CuO4 - La2-xSrxCuO4 interfaces studied with resonant soft x-ray scattering ...and other recent goings on at beam line X1B"

    Presented by Peter Abbamonte, Physics Dept., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Friday, December 4, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Steve Hulbert

    Several groups have recently reported that the onset temperature of superconductivity in certain copper oxides may be enhanced - perhaps even exceeding the bulk maximum - at interfaces in artificial structures fabricated by atomic layer-by-layer deposition techniques [1,2]. A key question is whether this effect is purely structural, i.e. arising from cation interdiffusion between the layers, or arises from something more fundamental like the formation of a carrier accumulation region, such as occurs at a metal-on-semiconductor interface. To address this issue we used resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS) to quantify the hole distribution in a superlattice of insulating La2CuO4 (LCO, x=0) and overdoped, nonsuperconducting La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO, x=0.36). Despite its nonsuperconducting constituents, this structure is superconducting with Tc = 38 K. We found that the conducting holes redistribute electronically from LSCO to the LCO layers, indicating the existence of an electronic, charge accumulation region. The LCO layers were found to be optimally doped, suggesting they are the main drivers of superconductivity. Our results demonstrate that nontrivial electronic effects take place in oxide heterostructures, and may be observed with RSXS.

  317. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Smart Magnetic Shape Films To Improve X-ray Optics Performance"

    Presented by Mel Ulmer, Dearborn Observatory - Northwestern University

    Thursday, December 3, 2009, 1:30 am
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Qun Shen and Peter Takacs

    The goal is to demonstrate that shape modification can be successfully applied to thin walled (~100-400 micron thickness) replicated optics or slumped glass optics to improve the near net shape of the mirror as well as the mid-frequency ripple. The proposed process involves sputter deposition of a magnetic smart material (MSM) film onto permanent magnetic material. The permanent magnetic material would be the mirror substrate in the case of electroformed optics and would be plated onto the back of glass optics. The MSM material exhibits strains about 400 times stronger than ordinary ferromagnetic materials. The deformation process involves a magnetic write head which traverses the surface, and under the guidance of active metrology feedback,locally magnetizes the surface to impart strain where needed. Because of the hard magnetic material, the localized shape change remains until actively demagnetized. The following tasks will be performed. Upgrade of a sputtering chamber to enable coating 10 cm and larger diameter pieces. Make sputtering targets of our baseline MSM called KelvinAll(TM). Make substrates onto which to sputter the MSM. Sputter onto both electroformed and and plated glass substrates. Model the magnetostrictive response for various substrate and MSM thickness combinations. Finite element modeling of the mirror based on all materials, thicknesses, boundary conditions, and magnetic field magnitude and location. The final step in year 3 will be to show that both free standing cylinders of revolution, mounted glass, and mounted cylinders can be shaped with a goal of 1" half-power diameter encircled energy as demonstrated primarily by ray tracing. The Argonne Advanced Photon Light Source will be used as well. In addition to changes in the macro figure, determine what is the smallest length (goal 100 microns) scale over which the substrates, particularly glass can be smoothed.

  318. NSLS-II Seminar

    "An Ultra-Stable Platform for the Study of Nanowires and Single-Atom Chains"

    Presented by Douglas T. Smith, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD

    Monday, November 23, 2009, 10:30 am
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Evgueni Nazaretski

    If you would like to meet with the speaker afterwards, please contact the host, enazaretski@bnl.gov prior to this presentation to coordinate a time slot. Accurate measurement of mechanical and electronic properties at length scales approaching atomic dimensions often requires the ability to measure and control displacement between, for example, a probe tip and a surface with resolution and stability finer than those atomic dimensions. We have developed a new instrument we call a feedback-stabilized break junction (FSBJ) based on a fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometer that has been optimized for DC stability. The FSBJ allows us to accurately measure and control the motion of a probe tip relative to a surface with long-term stability better than 10 % of a typical atomic radius. In this talk, I will describe the design and performance of the interferometer system in detail, and will also show how we are using the FSBJ to study the electronic and mechanical properties of gold nanowires and single-atom chains formed between a probe tip and a surface.

  319. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Development of short period high field undulators at the ESRF and SOLEIL"

    Presented by Charles Kitegi

    Monday, November 23, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Toshi Tanabe

    In synchrotron radiation sources, Planar Polarized Undulators (PPUs) and Elliptically Polarized Undulators (EPUs) produce high energy photon beams with controlled polarization. As far as PPUs are concerned, In Vacuum Undulator is the existing technology to build small period high field undulator. In such devices, Neodymium-Iron-Boron (NdFeB) or Samarium Cobalt (SmCo) permanent magnets maintained at ambient temperature are enclosed in the vacuum where the multi GeV electron beam is stored. IVU requires the use of magnets with high resistance against demagnetization. This constraint limits the use of magnets with a remanence below 1.3T. In particular NdFeB magnets with remanence higher than 1.4T cannot be used. However below 150K these magnets have similar resistance to SmCo magnet. Thus since 2004, several Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMU) are under development in radiation sources. A first CPMU was installed in the storage ring at the ESRF in 2008. Two other CPMU are under development at the ESRF and SOLEIL, there are planned to be installed in 2010. Specificities relevant to such devices such as the operation temperature, the impact of thermal gradient will be presented. In-vacuum magnetic measurement bench developed at the ESRF and SOLEIL are discussed. Among EPUs, Advanced Planar Polarized Light Emitter-II (APPLE-II) is the device which produces the strongest helical field. APPLE-II consists in two planar undulators side by side; the adjustable shift between girders sets the polarization. At SOLEIL, 9 APPLE-II with period ranging from 80 mm down to 44 mm have been successfully assembled and installed in the storage ring. An APPLE-II with 36 mm period and 0.8 T peak field is under development. At such low period and high field, magnetic force introduces mechanical deformation leading finally to systematic error in the undulator field. The investigations done to point out the deformation are presented. Solutions to minimize systematic errors are dis

  320. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Computing on Adaptive 2-D Graphitic Nanostructures"

    Presented by Bin Yu, SUNY @ Albany, College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering

    Friday, November 20, 2009, 2:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Chi-Chang Kao

    2-D graphitic nanostructures (mono- and bi-layer graphene) have been the subject of intense research due to unique structure and associated quantum phenomena which can be exploited to implement novel electronic and quantum devices for information processing. We seek to develop new device operation principle on an electronically flexible and optically active 2-D graphitic material platform to achieve energy efficiency, scalability, and potential heterogeneous integration between electronics and photonics for information processing. The central task is to explore electronic and quantum properties of these materials, serving as the ground for further device research. In this seminar, recent research activities in related topics will be presented.

  321. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Imaging Interfacial Structures by Phasing Coherent Bragg Rod: Total and Element-Specific Structure Factors"

    Presented by Hua Zhou, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, November 20, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  322. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "X-ray Crystallography: Guiding Drug Discovery and Development"

    Presented by Robert Suto, Xtal BioStructures, Inc.

    Friday, November 20, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  323. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Zone plate based scanning photoemission imaging and spectromicroscopy at Elettra"

    Presented by Luca Gregoratti, ELETTRA, Italy

    Friday, November 20, 2009, 10 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

    With respect to the other photoelectron microscopy techniques a Scanning PhotoEmission Microscope (SPEM) uses the most direct approach to photoelectron spectromicroscopy which is the use of a small focused photon probe to illuminate the surface. The SPEM at the Elettra synchrotron light source can operate in two modes: imaging and spectroscopy. In the first mode the sample surface is mapped by synchronized-scanning the sample with respect to the focused photon beam and collecting photoelectrons with a selected kinetic energy. The second mode is photoelectron spectroscopy from a microspot. The SPEM on the ESCAmicroscopy beamline at Elettra has a lateral resolution of 120 nm; and an overall energy resolution which is now better than 200 meV. Samples can be heated, cooled (liquid N2) and biased during the measurements. The beamline is open to the public and private research community; two call for proposals of experiment are available per year together with the possibility of dedicated collaborations on specific projects. Some recent achievements in the chemical, physical and electronic characterization of nano- and micro-structured surfaces and interfaces will be presented providing an overview of the capabilities of this powerful technique. Metallic adsorbate interaction, oxidation and supporting properties of multiwall carbon, semiconducting and metal-based nanotubes will be presented, showing how even dynamic phenomena such as mass transport along the nanotube surface can be monitored by the SPEM. A special design of the samples allows for the investigation of single nanotubes with diameter down to 60nm. Finally an overview of the limits in the applications of the x-ray photoelectron microscopes imposed by the operation principles will be given together with the future developments allowing the investigation of materials at mbar and even ambient pressure.

  324. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Accelerator magnets: from low to high field in approximately 45 minutes"

    Presented by Mauricio Lopes

    Thursday, November 19, 2009, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Toshi Tanabe

  325. NSLS-II Seminar

    "X-Ray Multilayer Mirrors for Synchrotron Application"

    Presented by Yuriy Platnov and James Wood, Rigaku Innocative Technologies

    Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 11 am
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    The presentation includes the following: Multi layer deposition facility at RIT LTP,Interferometric microscope, AFM,Talysurf profiler for surface roughness testing of substrates and multilayer mirrors X-Ray performance characterization Sizes, materials, uniformity, d-accuracy The lowest d-spacing multilayer structures Structures with highest and lowest spectral resolution Experimental reflectivity in 5keV to 60keV range Striped DMM Radial d and gamma graded structures Multilayer Fresne Zone Plates

  326. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Kinoform Refractive X-ray Optics Lenses for Nanofocusing and Prisms for Interferometry and Coherence Measurements"

    Presented by Abdel Isakovic, NSLS

    Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 2 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: K. Evans-Lutterodt

    In the past two decades X-ray community witnessed an increase in the use of refractive optics. Following the demonstrations that allow refractive lenses to focus down to 1 micron spot size, a logical step is to explore the possibility of nanofocusing tests. The NSLS refractive optics program has explored two different materials (silicon and diamond), and I will show in this talk how nanofocusing can be performed at the spot size near 30 nm with Si lenses, and how diamond lenses can be further advanced to reach the same or better result. In the second part of the talk, I will demonstrate a novel method of controlling the X-ray photons for the purpose of measuring the degree of synchrotron X-ray coherence, and for potential future interferometric applications. The method uses microfabricated bi-prism arrays that lead to X-ray interference in the mode of Young's double slit experiment and allows for easy measurements and applications in the Fresnel regime. The talk will showcase various useful technical details, including a brief review of nanopatterning and etching solutions we developed, and the use of X-ray fluorescence in detection of nanoscale focal spot size, and in quantification of X-ray interference patterns. Lastly, some applications of our optics in various collaborative efforts will be shown.

  327. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project Status"

    Presented by Yeldez Amer, ANL

    Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Diane Hatton

    Overview of the technical, funding and planning activities associated with the proposed APS Upgrade.

  328. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Nanoscopium: a Scanning Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline at Synchrotron Soleil (France)"

    Presented by Andrea Somogyi, Synchrotron Soleil, France

    Friday, November 13, 2009, 1:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Juergen Thieme

    . Nanoscopium is the single scanning hard X-ray nano-probe beamline planned at SOLEIL. This ~155 m long beamline will exploit the high brilliance and coherence characteristics of the X-ray beam both for diffraction limited focusing and for contrast formation. It will offer imaging techniques in multimodal mode in the 30 nm to 1 m spatial resolution range and will be a research tool for a wide user community working in the fields of earth-, environmental-, and life-sciences. The beamline will cover the 5-20 keV energy range. The stability of the nanobeam will be ensured by horizontally reflecting beamline optics (a sagitally and a tangentially pre-focusing mirror, horizontally reflecting monochromators) in front of the overfilled secondary source. Trade-off between high energy resolution (E/E~10-4) and high flux (1011 ph/s with E/E~10-2) will be achieved by two interchangeable monochromators (a double crystal and a double multilayer one). KB mirror and FZP lenses will be used as focusing devices. The beamline is in the design and construction phase. It is foreseen to be open for users at the beginning of 2013

  329. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Environmental Significance of Bauxite Residues"

    Presented by Markus Grafe, Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organization, Australia

    Friday, November 13, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  330. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The Band Gap Controversy of Indium Oxide"

    Presented by David Payne, University of Oxford, UK

    Friday, November 13, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  331. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Prospects for Adaptive X-ray Optics"

    Presented by Ali Khounsary, Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source

    Thursday, November 12, 2009, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Ed Haas

  332. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Study of Ion Effects in the ILC Electron Damping Ring"

    Presented by Dr. Guoxing Xia

    Thursday, November 12, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky

    Ion effects are one of the very high priority issues in the damping ring R&D for the Technical Design Phase of the International Linear Collider (ILC). Ions produced from the processes like collision ionization, tunnel ionization and synchrotron radiation ionization of the residual gas in the vacuum pipe couple the beam motion and cause the two-stream instabilities in the machine. For the low-emittance storage rings with multi bunch operation, like the ILC electron damping ring, the single passage instability so-called fast ion instability is prominent and potentially deleterious to the machines performance. In this talk, ion effect issues are overviewed, followed by a detailed introduction to the simulation study of the fast ion instability in the ILC damping ring. Possible cures are proposed as well. In addition, the latest experimental results on the fast ion instability at KEK ATF damping ring are also presented.

  333. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "In situ HT Synchrotron Studies of Phase Transformations in Oxide Ceramics"

    Presented by Waltraud Kriven, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Friday, November 6, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  334. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Investigation of L-Ta2O5 to H-Ta2O5 Phase Transformation using HTXRD"

    Presented by Pankaj Sarin, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Friday, November 6, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  335. NSLS UEC Town Meeting

    Wednesday, November 4, 2009, 1 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  336. NSLS-II Seminar

    "X-ray mirror surfacing, on-line metrology and nanofocusing: challenges, achievements and perspectives"

    Presented by Dr. Luca Peverini, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France

    Wednesday, November 4, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Present and future world-leading radiation sources are being designed and optimized to enable the routine production of coherent X-ray nanobeams of great interest in X-ray spectroscopy, diffraction and imaging applications. X-ray beams with sizes as small as a few tens of nanometers have been recently obtained in dedicated experiments. There is now an evergrowing demand to make nano-beams accessible to a wider community. Along this line a surfacing station for X-ray mirrors was recently developed and installed at the metrology beamline BM5 of the ESRF. The instrument allows to eventually realize and control strongly aspheric mirrors for X-ray nanofocusing using an on-line at-wavelength metrology. This seminar will review some recent achievements in the field along with pertinent examples of on-line diagnostics for which X-rays prove to be a unique probe. A set of novel experimental techniques will be presented to describe: a) the use of real time diffuse X-ray scattering to study the scaling behaviour of roughness in growing/eroded surfaces. b) An exact solution to the classical phase retrieval problem in X-ray reflectometry and its application to obtain the depth density distribution of an evolving thin film. c) The use of shearing X-ray interferometry and of the near field X-ray scattering to infer the wave front and the coherence degradation of radiation in X-ray optical systems and, finally d) the development of a fast and robust ion beam profiling process to realize nanofocusing mirrors. The proposed integrated approach promises to be a valuable and complementary alternative to the existing technologies for realizing the next generation of reflective X-ray optics for synchrotron and FEL radiation sources.

  337. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The Oxidation State of Earth's Mantle"

    Presented by Elizabeth Cottrell, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    Friday, October 30, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  338. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Photo-induced structural dynamics studied by x-ray diffraction with time resolution 200 fs"

    Presented by Dr. Gerhard Ingold, Laboratory for Synchrotron Radiation, PSI Switzerland

    Thursday, October 29, 2009, 3 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Chi-Chang Kao

    The design and performance of the FEMTO laser slicing source operated at the Swiss Light Source [1] is presented. The spatiotemporal stability of the source allows to perform pump-probe grazing incidence x-ray diffraction with time resolution 200 fs. Options to increase the flux at the experimental station by 1-2 orders of magnitude are discussed. We report on experiments where the photoinduced non-equilibrium carrier and structural dynamics in Peierls distorted systems (Bi, Te) has been studied [2[. In a recent experiment we measured the structural response to ultrafast melting of charge and orbital order in a manganite (LCMO) [3]. We find that in addition to Angstrom spatial resolution a time resolution of ultimately 10 fs will be needed to follow the coupling between different degrees of freedom (i.e. charge, orbital, spin and lattice) and the dynamics of phase transitions between different competing phases in such strongly correlated materials. For this we pursue to extend our present experiments to resonant and non-resonant scattering experiments both in the soft and hard x-ray range at existing FEL facilities [4]. [1] P. Beaud et al., PRL 99 (2007), 174801. [2] S.L. Johnson et al., PRL 100 (2008), 155501 and PRL 102 (2009) 175503. [3] P. Beaud et al., submitted. [4] G. Ingold et al., Z. Kristallgr. 223 (2008) 292.

  339. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Spectro-microscopy at the ID21 beamline: Recent Developments and Applications to Cultural Heritage"

    Presented by Marine Cotte, Centre of Research and Restoration of the French Museums and ESRF, France

    Monday, October 26, 2009, 10:30 am
    Large Conference, Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Eric Dooryhee

    The ID21 beamline at the ESRF is dedicated to X-ray micro-spectroscopy. The scanning X-ray microscope has a tunable energy ranging from 2.1 to 7.2 keV and is optimized for very low background and low detection limit. It has been recently refurbished to give enhanced functionalities. As an example, the microscope can now host two different optical focusing configurations: either zone plates (ZP) or a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system (KB). A compact X-ray wavelength dispersive spectrometer achieving a few tens of eV energy resolution has also been implemented for highly selective fluorescence detection. A load-lock system allows fast exchange of samples under vacuum, and greatly facilitates operation under cryogenic conditions. The microscope enables identification down to few ppm and localization with a submicron beam of various elements. These elemental mappings can be completed with spectroscopic analyses, performed on single points or as 2D images as well. Typical scientific questions concern the co-localization and/or speciation of trace elements in heterogeneous matrices at the micron scale. Therefore, the submitted proposals are mainly in the field of Environmental Science and Biology. Besides, since a few years, applications in the field of Cultural Heritage are increasing. Generally speaking, the non-invasive character, low detection limit, high lateral resolution and high chemical sensitivity of SR-based X-ray techniques are highly relevant properties for the chemical characterization of art materials, which are usually precious, heterogeneous and complex. The chemistry involved in both the past history of the objects, i.e. during their fabrication, and in their future life, i.e. during preservation and restoration treatments, can be addressed by such techniques. A particular focus will be made on recent applications of XAS (at the ESRF, but more generally on synchrotron facilities) in art conservation.

  340. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "3He Opalescence as Seen by Neutron Transmission"

    Presented by Timothy Charlton, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, United Kingdom

    Friday, October 23, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  341. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Successful Completion of the Top-off Upgrade of the Advanced Light Source"

    Presented by Christoph Steier, LBNL

    Wednesday, October 21, 2009, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

  342. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Photo-active Ceramic Membranes for the Control of Biofouling"

    Presented by Shannon Ciston, University of New Haven

    Friday, October 16, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  343. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Perspectives on X-Ray Coherent Diffraction Imaging"

    Presented by Malcolm Howells, Senior Physicist Emeritus, Advanced Light Source Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Friday, October 9, 2009, 3 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lonny Berman & Andrei Fluerasu

  344. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Quantification of Organochlorine Concentrations by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Environmental and Public Health Applications"

    Presented by Alessandra Leri, Marymount Manhattan College

    Friday, October 2, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  345. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Study of the structure of starch and biomass materials by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques in relation to their enzyme digestibility"

    Presented by Yong-Cheng Shi, Kansas State University

    Friday, October 2, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  346. Physics Colloquium

    "How NSLS Came to Brookhaven"

    Presented by Robert Crease, Stony Brook University

    Tuesday, September 29, 2009, 3:30 pm
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: William Morse

  347. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Real-Time Studies of Surface Nanostructure Development during Ion Bombardment"

    Presented by Karl Ludwig, Dept. of Physics; Boston University

    Friday, September 25, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

    The ion bombardment of surfaces is of considerable scientific and technological interest. Theoretical and experimental work has shown it to be a complex process, in some cases leading to surface instabilities that produce self-assembled nanostructures while leading in other cases to nanoscale surface smoothening. However, important questions remain about the fundamental processes acting on the surface during the bombardment. Using real-time GISAXS were able to make detailed comparisons of observed kinetics with theory that are difficult or impossible with other methods. Our primary focus has been on surface morphology development of Si during low-energy (< 1000 eV) Ar+ ion bombardment, both the native development of the surface and the formation of nanodots via Mo seeding during bombardment.

  348. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Simultaneous XAFS Measurements of Multiple Samples"

    Presented by Bruce Ravel, NIST

    Friday, September 25, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  349. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Modeling Effects that Accelerate Aluminum Corrosion: A Kinetic Study of the Copper-Aluminum Displacement Reaction"

    Presented by Sabrina Sobel, Professor & Chair, Hofstra University, Dept. of Chemistry

    Thursday, September 24, 2009, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lisa Miller

    Aluminum corrosion is an important industrial concern. Studies have indicated the aluminum corrodes more quickly in sea water, and when in contact with copper, either metallic or as Cu(II) in solution. Since Cu is a more noble metal than Al, a Galvanic cell can be established easily, promoting aluminum oxidation. The ‘chloride acceleration effect’ is well established, and is the major reason for accelerated aluminum corrosion in sea water. Aluminum natively forms a tough, impervious oxide (Al2O3) layer on its surface upon natural exposure to air. This impedes the redox reaction until it is removed. Acidic (< pH 4) and basic (> pH 9) conditions will dissolve the oxide layer and accelerate aluminum corrosion as well. Several groups have investigated the kinetics of the Cu/Al displacement reaction with and without added chloride, termed a copper cementation reaction. , , I have determined that the kinetics model developed for a rotating aluminum disk in reaction with a copper(II) solution works well for the much simpler reaction of household aluminum foil with copper(II) solution. In addition, my research has revealed that bromide also accelerates the corrosion of aluminum. The ‘halide acceleration effect’ was found to be quite significant, speeding up the reaction by about 100x and shortening the induction period. What the halide ion does to actually speed up the reaction is still unclear. I plan to continue my investigations to determine the dependence of the acceleration effect on the relative concentration of chloride as well as investigate the relative effect of fluoride on aluminum corrosion.

  350. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Beam Dynamics Aspects of Crab Cavities in the Large Hadron Collider"

    Presented by Dr. Yipeng Sun

    Thursday, September 24, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are RF cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g. crab cavities might not only cancel synchro-betatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit, also degrade the collimation cleaning efficiency, and so on. In this paper, we explore the principal feasibility of LHC crab cavities from beam-dynamics point of view. The implications of the crab cavities for the LHC optics, analytical and numerical luminosity studies, dynamic aperture, aperture and beta-beating, emittance growth, beam-beam tune shift, long-range collisions, and synchro-betatron resonances, crab dispersion and collimation efficiency will be discussed.

  351. Brookhaven Accelerator Forum (BAF)

    "Accelerator Physics Challenges for the NSLS -II Storage Ring"

    Presented by Sam Krinsky, NSLS-II

    Wednesday, September 23, 2009, 3:30 pm
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Satoshi Ozaki

    Abstract The NSLS-II is an ultra-bright synchrotron light source based upon a 3-GeV storage ring with a 30-cell (15 super-period) double-bend-achromat lattice with damping wigglers used to lower the emittance below 1 nm. In this talk, we discuss the accelerator physics challenges for the design including: optimization of dynamic aperture; estimation of Touschek lifetime; achievement of required orbit stability; and analysis of ring impedance and collective effects.

  352. NSLS-II Seminar

    "A Control Systems Perspective to Nanopositioning"

    Presented by Srinivasa Salapaka and Chi Bum Lee, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    Tuesday, September 22, 2009, 9:30 am
    NSLS-II Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Evgueni Nazaretski

    If you would like to meet with these speakers after this presentation, please contact the host,enazaretski@bnl.gov prior to this presentation to coordinate a time slot. This talk will focus on control systems theoretic analysis and synthesis of new modes of operations that significantly expand the range of performance specifications of nanopositioning systems. We will present a systems theory framework to study fundamental limitations on the performance of these devices. In particular, we will characterize the inherent fundamental trade-offs between resolution, tracking-bandwidth, and reliability specifications on positioning capability of these devices. In addition to determining fundamental limitations, this framework leads to a better understanding of existing technology and in overcoming some technological hurdles that were previously thought to be fundamentally limiting. The analysis is done in robust optimal-control setting with various architectural constraints that arise typically in nanopositioning systems imposed on both one- and two- degrees of freedom control-design frameworks. We show design strategies for improving some common existing nanopositioning systems, making nanopositioning systems insensitive to modeling uncertainties, and feedback designs that achieve simultaneously high bandwidth, resolution and robustness to modeling uncertainties. The outcomes of this research will be corroborated with experimental results on a nanopositioning system of an atomic force microscope. Experimental results that demonstrate significant improvements in bandwidth, resolution and robustness over common existing designs will be presented.

  353. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Elemental Trends in Ocean Chemistry, Revealed by Synchrotron Microprobe of Echinoderms"

    Presented by Aaron Frodsham, Stony Brook University

    Friday, September 18, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  354. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Probing the Influence of Polyvinyl Pyrrolidone (PVP) on Platinum Electrocatalysts Using in Situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy"

    Presented by Badri Shyam, George Washington University

    Friday, September 18, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  355. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Some Aspects of the Low Energy Excitations in High-Tc Cuprates via ARPES"

    Presented by Wei-Sheng Lee, Stanford University

    Monday, September 14, 2009, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Yong Cai / Chi-Chang Kao

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has revealed several energy scales in the low energy excitations of high-Tc cuprates. In this presentation, I will discuss two important features in this hierarchy from my thesis work. Starting from the lowest energy, I will first discuss energy gap issues in high-Tc cuprates, specifically, our temperature dependence and doping dependence studies on the two-gap phenomena (superconducting gap vs. pseudogap). Moving to the higher energy scale, a kink in the dispersion near the nodal region is observed around 70 meV, and I will discuss materials dependence on this band renormalization effect based on our recent ARPES measurements on Tl-family cuprates. We have found a distinct evolution of this dispersion kink from nodal toward antinodal region between single-layer and multi-layer compounds, giving us a further hint about the origin of the renormalization effect. Finally, if time permits, I will briefly introduce our proposed time resolved x-ray scattering experiment using the x-ray free electron laser, the LCLS at SLAC.

  356. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Novel Biaxial Smectic Phases"

    Presented by Chenhui Zhu, University of Colorado

    Friday, September 11, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  357. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Nanopositioning, Scanning Probe Microscopy and Metrology in Extreme Environments"

    Presented by Dr. Pierre-Francois Braun, Dipl. Ing. Florian Pon, Attocube Systems AG/Inc., German

    Friday, September 11, 2009, 11 am
    NSLS-II Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Evgueni Nazaretski

    If you would like to meet with these speakers after this presentation, please contact the host @ enazaretski@bnl.gov prior to this presentation to coordinate a time slot. Attocube Systems, a German company located in Munich, manufactures and provides ultra high precision spatial positioning systems and complete probing tools which are particularly suitable for extreme environmental conditions such as cryogenic temperatures (10mK - 300 K), high magnetic fields (+31 T) and ultra high vacuum environments (5 x 10-11 mbar). We will present the technology incorporated in the range of nanopositioners, complete microscope systems and novel approaches regarding displacement sensors and AFM solutions in an SEM environment. The product lines of attocube systems are: nanoPOSITIONING, LTSYS, nanoSCOPY, nanoTOOLING, nanoSEMsolutions, and attoCONTROL.

  358. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Recent Mechanical Upgrades to the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD)"

    Presented by Kevin Morris

    Thursday, September 10, 2009, 10:15 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Andrew Broadbent

    Scientific programs at CAMD have developed over the last several years leading to increased demand for photon energies beyond the original design criterion of the synchrotron. This talk outlines two projects at CAMD that impact opposite ends of the available photon spectrum. Modifications to, and the ultimate replacement of, a 7T superconducting wavelength shifter for higher brightness hard X-ray photons and construction of a new dipole vacuum chamber to access the far infrared region.

  359. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Insight into heterogeneous geomaterials through XANES Imaging Spectroscopy."

    Presented by Vincent De Andrade, ESRF, X-ray microscopy beamline ID21, 38043 Grenoble

    Wednesday, September 9, 2009, 9 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Juergen Thieme

    Because of their complex genesis, materials are commonly polycrystalline heterogeneous systems, with both chemical and structural heterogeneities at various scale-level. As most of the micro- and nano- analytical techniques relying on scanning instruments with a pencil-beam, XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) technique offers high spatial resolution but suffers from long acquisition times imposing practical limits on the field of view. Now, region of interest in samples are generally several orders of magnitude larger than the beam size. Along this presentation, an overview will be given onto the on-going technical developments of the ESRF ID21-beamline Scanning Microscope, relating to detection (multi-elements detector, in-house developed WDX spectrometer) and optics (Fresnel zone plate, KB mirrors). Then, we will focus on an original setup developed and optimized to perform spectroscopic imaging on geomaterials, with relatively short acquisition time (≈1 h) and large field of view (0.5-2 mm2) while keeping a sub-micron resolution. The setup consists in coupling full-field absorption radiographies with a large parallel beam of hard X-rays, XANES and PIC (Polarization Imaging Contrast) techniques. The potential of this combined approach will be demonstrated on metamorphic rocks. This non-invasive method enables 2D quantitative Fe3+/Fetotal estimates revealing subtle redox variations inside mineralogical phases. Moreover, besides providing crystalline orientations at the pixel scale, the PIC and XANES combination allowed to correct XANES estimates from polarization effects, which is a tricky but important task in polycrystalline materials. Finally, the last application concerns an experimental study of a bentonite analog (clayey material) considered for nuclear wastes and CO2 storage. Mapping of the proportions of finely mixed phases at the m3 scale were extracted from hyperspectral data acquired on a reference bentonite. The spatial repartition o

  360. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Element- and Site-Specific Electronic Structure of Planar Organics: Soft X-ray Emission and Absorption Spectroscopy of Hexadecafluoro Phthalocyanine"

    Presented by Louis Piper, Boston University

    Friday, September 4, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  361. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Micro-spectroscopy at the U5UA beamline: graphene on transition metals"

    Presented by Jurek Sadowski, CFN, BNL

    Friday, September 4, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  362. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Exploring Quantum Phase Transitions in Strongly Correlated Materials Using Optical Spectroscopy"

    Presented by Harini Barath, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Monday, August 31, 2009, 11 am
    NSLS-II Bldg. 703, Room 20

    One of the primary areas of interest in contemporary condensed matter physics is the study of strongly correlated materials, which are materials in which there is a strong coupling between charge, spin, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Because of the interplay between various competing orders, these systems have highly complex phase diagrams and exhibit interesting phenomena such as colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), high temperature superconductivity and charge/orbital ordering (COO). In this talk, I will present the results of our temperature- and magnetic- eld-dependent inelas- tic light scattering studies of two such correlated materials: (i) In TbMnO3, a magnetoelectric multiferroic, we map out the temperature and eld phase diagram, and find evidence for field-induced quantum uctuations of commensurate domains near the field-tuned incommensurate-commensurate phase transition. (ii) In the charge-density-wave (CDW) system, TiSe2, we study the collapse of the CDW state as a function of Cu-intercalation and examine the novel emergent phases that result from the competition between CDW and superconducting orders in this complex system.

  363. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Bacteriophage T7 DNA polymerase and its processivity factor, E. coli thioredoxin: a structure-function study"

    Presented by Barak Akabayov, Harvard University

    Friday, August 28, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  364. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Ethanol and ethylene glycol (EG) TPD on Pt/transition metal oxide nanoparticles: a metal-support interaction study"

    Presented by Zhong He, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Friday, August 28, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  365. NSLS Town Meeting

    Thursday, August 27, 2009, 1 pm
    NSLS Seminar Room

    Hosted by: NSLS Users' Executive Committee

  366. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Applications of X-ray characterization for advanced materials in the electronics industry"

    Presented by Assunta Vigliante, Bruker-AXS

    Monday, August 24, 2009, 2:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: K. Evans-Lutterodt

  367. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Looking at the magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials from their lattice dynamics perspective"

    Presented by Ricardo Lobo, School of Physics and Chemistry of Paris, CNRS

    Friday, August 21, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  368. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Zinc, it's more important that you think: its role in brain and behavior"

    Presented by Dr. Jane Flinn, George Mason University

    Friday, August 21, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  369. NSLS-II Seminar

    "X-ray Fluorescence Holography in Theory and Experiment"

    Presented by Jainming Bai, University of Tennessee

    Thursday, August 20, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Eric Dooryhee

    X-ray fluorescence holography is a new structure determination method developed in the last two decades. It can provide 3D atomic image around a fluorescence atom in a crystal structure and thus being considered as a promising tool for determination of local structures of doped atoms, buried clusters and impurities in a bulk crystal, as well as solving structures of nano-crystals, quasi-crystals or other structures lacking of long range translational order. The current state of the atomic resolution x-ray holography will be discussed with emphases on the near field effects and the recent XFH/MEXF measurements conducted at NSLS will be reported.

  370. NSLS-II Seminar

    "X-ray Microscopy of Crystalline Alkanes and Semi-crystalline Polyethylene Thin Films"

    Presented by Dr. Ying Zou, Department of Physics, University of Milwaukee-Wisconsin

    Monday, August 17, 2009, 3 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Juergen Thieme

    Abstract: Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) has been used to establish a correlation of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra of crystalline n-tetracontane (C40H82) with its structural anisotropy in orthorhombic (001) plane. Two subcomponent peaks of the spectral doublet near 287.5eV reverse their intensity ratio when the orientation of polarization vector of incident light swaps from along a axis to b axis [1]. Such an intra-plane linear dichroism complements prior known linear dichroism along c axis [2]; together they can be used to determine three dimensional orientations for linear alkane chains or ordered C-C backbone chains in semi-crystalline polyethylene (PE). This new information allows us to understand details of the growth orientation of polyethylene (PE) in ultrathin films. In linear low density PE (LLDPE) films, STXM shows large dichroic signals between various sample features for photon energies of ~287.4 eV and ~294 eV, irrespective of film thickness. This suggests that in these thin films, the average C-C bonds are in the plane of the thin film with predominantly edge-on lamellae orientation. In very thin films, the averaged NEXAFS spectrum switches from a slight dominance of b-axis signal to one of slight a-axis signal dominance. This suggests that the interfacial constraints alter the average orientations of crystallites. Linear medium density PE (LMDPE) thin films showed a transition from edge-on to flat-on lamellae (C-C backbone parallel to the surface normal) in films thinner than 30 nm [3]. References: 1. Y. Zou, T. Araki, G. Appel, A.L.D. Kilcoyne, H. Ade, Chem. Phys. Lett. 430, 287 (2006) 2. J.X. Fu, S.G. Urquhart, J. Phys. Chem. A, 109, 11724 (2005); T. Ohta, K. Seki, R. Yokoyama, I. Morisada, and K. Edamatsu, Physica Scripta 41, 150 (1990) 3. Y. Wang, M. Rafailovich, J. Sokolov, D. Gersappe, T. Araki, Y. Zou, A.D.L. Kilcoyne, H. Ade, G. Marom, A. Lustiger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 028303 (2006)

  371. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Smart Matrix Theory: is collagen a brilliant string or a dumb rope?"

    Presented by Jeff Ruberti, Northeastern University, Boston

    Friday, August 14, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

    Nature places structural material in the path of high loads where it persists. Indeed, multicelled plants and animals must resist dissipation at multiple scales to survive. However, it is not yet clear precisely how highly-organized, load-bearing structures are produced in biological systems. Traditionally, control of fibrillar organization has been attributed to cells, which are thought to directly place components in the extracellular matrix. However, we have developed a working hypothesis which suggests that nature has evolved a set of structural molecules whose interaction profoundly simplifies the production of anisotropic materials (suitable for load-bearing). Among these, collagen, defined most simply as Gly-X-Y, is the structural molecule of choice and most abundant protein in vertebrates, comprising 25% of total body protein. Collagen arose approximately 700 MYA and appears to have played a major role both in metazoan radiation and evolutionary success. Fibrillar collagens can be found in arteries, bone, ligament, tendon, skin, cornea, anulus fibrosus and cartilage. It seems that wherever there are difficult mechanical design criteria, collagen is employed. Our laboratory has been compiling evidence which suggests that fibrillar collagen (and other associated ECM moieties) comprise the basis of a smart, adaptable structural system. We are currently developing a smart matrix theory which posits that the development and growth of collagenous matrix proceeds by three mechanisms: 1) spontaneous formation of highly-organized tissue rudiments from concentrated solutions (~50-400 mg/ml) of collagen monomers, 2) strain-driven load-adaptation of the rudiments and 3) strain-driven growth of the rudiments through preferential polymerization.

  372. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Longitudinal Beam dynamics in PEP-X with a Passive Third Harmonic Cavity"

    Presented by Lanfa Wang

    Friday, August 14, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

    A proposed high-brightness synchrotron light source (PEP-X) is under design at SLAC. The 4.5-GeV PEP-X storage ring has four theoretical minimum emittance (TME) cells to achieve the very low emittance and two double-bend achromat (DBA) cells to provide spaces for IDs. Damping wigglers will be installed in zero-dispersion straights to reduce the emittance below 0.1 nm. The Touschek lifetime is short due to the small beams emittance. High Harmonic Cavity (HHC) can be used to lengthen the bunch in order to improve the Touschek lifetime. Transient beam loading in the main cavities and harminic cavities with a uneven beam filling pattern can cause significant variation of the bunch synchrotron phase and bunch length along the bunch train. We studied the impact of HHC on beam dynamics of a bunch train with a gap. The beam loading effect is anaylized based on the linear theory. We also simulated the phase shift, bunch lengthening and beam instability for various options of the cavities.

  373. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Design, Construction and Hard Won Lessons at the Australian Synchrotron"

    Presented by Bradley Mountford, Australian Synchrotron, Australia

    Thursday, August 13, 2009, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Andrew Broadbent

    The Australian Synchrotron is a 3rd Generation light source which has been receiving users since 2007. The topics of this presentation will range from the design and construction of the machine with attention to the storage ring vacuum system and frontends, and then move on to a detailed look at the design and construction of the SAXS/WAXS Endstation. A summary will be made of design projects currently under way which include a Multi Crystal Analyzer for use on the Powder Diffraction Beamline and a new Infrared Branchline from the existing Beamline to a new second microscope. The presentation will conclude with a discussion on lessons learnt in design and commissioning by presenting the more dramatic equipment failures experienced at the Australian Synchrotron.

  374. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Recent Technology at Tinsley and Brashear Optics"

    Presented by Tony Hull, Tinsley and Brashear Optics; Part of L-3 Integrated Optical Systems

    Thursday, August 13, 2009, 9 am
    NSLS-II Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Ray Conley

    Tinsley and Brashear Optics, part of L-3 Integrated Optical Systems (IOS) Group, are merchant suppliers offering state-of-the-art optical finishing solutions for exacting space, military and commercial requirements. The presentation will summarize our recent developments in deterministic finishing of aspheric optics, and describe a range of projects capabilities from the James Webb Space Telescope mirrors to production optics for NIF and other laser fusion programs. Capabilities for superb aspheric optics will be summarized, ranging from small sub-nanometer off-axis parabolas, Hubble Space Telescope aberration correction optics, up to making the mirror set for an 8m diameter ground based telescope.

  375. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Atomic structure at the nanoscale: a 21st century materials challenge"

    Presented by Emil Bozin, Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, BNL

    Wednesday, August 12, 2009, 9 am
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Eric Dooryhee

    Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, BNL Study of structure began almost 100 years ago with the pioneering experiments of the Braggs and von Laue. What is there still to be learned in the 21st century? Atomic structure determines physical properties of complex functional materials. Detailed knowledge of the structure is a prerequisite for understanding the physics of these materials. However, in many of these systems structural features of interest are not long range ordered, but exhibit short range order, typically on a nanometer lengthscale. Conventional crystallographic approach used for studying average crystal structure fails at the nanoscale, as significant component of scattering from such "nanophase" materials is diffuse. The atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis based on neutron and x-ray total scattering experiments, utilizing both Bragg and diffuse scattering, is a powerful tool for assessing the nanometer lengthscale structural information in such complex materials. At Michigan State University, and more recently at Columbia University, we have been developing and applying the PDF method to problems of scientific and technological interest, from nanostructured bulk materials, via nanoporous materials, to nanoparticles. For example, we characterize the structural distortions associated with the local polaronic state of the La1-xCaxMnO3 colossal magnetoresistive manganites above the metal-insulator transition [1], and show the existence of locally correlated spin dimer states in CuIr2S4 thiospinel that are not evident in crystallographic measurements [2]. These insights, gained from going beyond the average structure, give key input that will direct complex materials design and synthesis into the future.

  376. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    Presented by Wolfgang Caliebe, HASYLAB, PETRA III, Germany

    Tuesday, August 11, 2009, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Steve Hulbert

  377. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Status of Taiwan Photon Source"

    Presented by Ken-San Liang, Taiwan Photon Source, Taiwan

    Monday, August 10, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Steve Dierker / Chi-Chang Kao

  378. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Following structural phase transitions in natural quantum well structures via single-crystal diffraction."

    Presented by Andreas Lemmerer, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

    Friday, August 7, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  379. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Using Focused White Beam to Study the Structure and Dynamics of a Molecular Machine"

    Presented by Jennifer Bohon

    Monday, August 3, 2009, 2 pm
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Juergen Thieme

    Large biomolecular complexes often challenge the limits of traditional high-resolution structural biology techniques, requiring alternative methodologies for the study of structure and particularly of dynamics. In the research presented, synchrotron x-ray footprinting has been used to complement conventional structural techniques to study the 1.3MDa ClpAP Protease complex, a molecular machine responsible for the dissolution of protein aggregates and the degradation of unwanted proteins. The results provide structural support for a previously proposed mechanism of substrate translocation and implicate the ClpP N-terminus in both substrate gating and enzymatic activity. Investigations of this and other difficult systems have driven the need for focusing of the white beam and subsequent development of robust beamline components and diagnostic tools.

  380. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Upgrade Program of the ESRF"

    Presented by Harald Reichert, ESRF

    Friday, July 31, 2009, 2 pm
    Building 703 - Large Seminar Room

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

  381. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Towards More Compact IXS Spectrometers"

    Presented by Daisuke Ishikawa, RIKEN, SPring-8 Center, Japan

    Friday, July 31, 2009, 11 am
    Bldg. 703, Large Conference Room, First Floor

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    A central issue in IXS spectrometer design is achieving high resolution with a compact design. Present meV resolution spectrometers typically have two-theta arms that are ~10 m length. The recent introduction of "dispersion compensation" [1] showed it was possible to use a position sensitive detector to improve the resolution using a short spectrometer arm operating with ~10 meV resolution. However this concept at a cost of severe reduction in the sample space, which becomes prohibitive for higher resolution. We introduce a new spectrometer concept [2] that allows large sample space with high resolution and a relatively short arm. The essential idea is to add a temperature gradient across the analyzer. This compensates for chromatic aberrations that are introduced when the detection point is moved off the Rowland circle. Investigations using both analytical approximations and detailed ray-tracing shows it is possible to make a ~1.5 meV resolution spectrometer using a ~3 m while leaving ~200 mm free space near the sample. In medium resolution, 10-100 meV, setups, this method may also be used to make large gains in space near the sample position for a given resolution. This method may also be used to improve energy resolution with a single element detector, and can allow improved momentum resolution without slitting analyzer crystals. [1] S. Huotari, et al (2005). J Synchrotron Rad. vol.12, 467-472 [2] D. Ishikawa and A. Q. R. Baron, Submitted.

  382. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Synchrotron micro-imaging with different contrast modalities - instrumentation and applications"

    Presented by Alexander Rack

    Wednesday, July 29, 2009, 4 pm
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Juergen Thieme

    The special properties of synchrotron light sources, such as intense flux, high brilliance and partial coherence allow for pushing the limits of hard X-ray imaging methods: full-field micro-tomography can be extended by more sophisticated contrast mechanisms to image weakly attenuating objects or elements with identical absorption contrast. Digital radiography can be used for in situ investigations of fast processes on the millisecond scale, sampled with a spatio-temporal micro-resolution. A focused synchrotron beam in combination with scanning tomographic techniques probes a sample with respect to e.g. its local diffraction behaviour. This talk focuses on instrumentation and applications of synchrotron micro-imaging exploiting different contrast modalities. Experiments and developments were performed at the BAMline (BESSY-II), TopoTomo (ANKA) as well as ID15a, ID19 and ID22 (ESRF). By developing further indirect 2D X-ray detectors, radiography in vivo of living species as well as in situ of liquid metal foams has been performed. The latter allowed for the first time to image a coalescence event by using an image acquistion speed of 40 000 frames/s. Optimising besides the detector as well the beamline instrumentation makes micro-tomography feasible even at moderate flux light source, i.e. dedicated multilayer monochromators can be used. Examples to apply micro-tomography are bioceramics in regenerating bone and early pore formation in foams. Subsequent 3D image analysis by means of algorithms based on transformations known from stochastic geometry derives quantitative results like spatial correlations between different constituents within the volume image.

  383. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Engineering Solutions to Collider-Accelerator Components and Systems"

    Presented by Steven Bellavia

    Tuesday, July 28, 2009, 11 am
    Large Conference Room , Building 703

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    Various engineering solutions are presented for several collider-accelerator components and systems. The EBIS Drift Tube project required the prediction and improvement of Ultra-High Vacuum levels for the EBIS drift tubes in areas of low conductance (long, narrow pipes). This was accomplished using hand calculations aided by Excel Spreadsheet macros and subroutines. The detailed design and ultimately the fabrication of the first-of-its kind Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) in high voltage was installed. Thermal and thermal-structural management of these drift tubes was performed both by classical hand calculations as well as state-of-the-art Finite Element Analysis software. Another major project effort was the proposed Neutrino Horn. This required extensive thermal-hydraulic analysis. Other thermal-structural challenges include the BLIP Targets. These targets are exposed to extremely harsh radiation, thermal and corrosion environments. Their survival is key to the production of much needed radioisotopes, currently lagging national and global demands. Many detectors are used throughout the Collider-Accelerator Complex. The first-of-its kind zero-beam-loss detectors where designed and installed at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) beam line and have been running flawlessly for the last 7 years. Another unique detector project was the Hydrogen Jet Luminescence Monitor. Optics analysis combined with clever mechanical design continues to provide real-time imaging of proton and heavy ion beam profiles. Using advanced prototyping and manufacturing methods, cryogenic RF systems and devices are currently being analyzed and designed with production scheduled for the near future. In summary, vast numbers of components, detectors, magnets, cooling systems and optics have been analyzed, designed, fabricated, tested and installed using basic engineering principles and conventional as well as state-of-the-art techniques. All of these projects were realized fro

  384. C-AD/NSLS/NSLSII/CAP Accelerator Physics Seminar

    "Shot Noise Reduction in e-beams"

    Presented by Avi Gover, Tel Aviv University

    Monday, July 27, 2009, 4 pm
    Large Conference Room, Bldg. 911B

    The possibility to control optical frequency current shot-noise by longitudinal collective Coulomb interaction in an electron beam was suggested by us recently, based on an extended 1D (single Langmuir mode) model[1,2]. This model predicts the possibility to reduce the beam current-noise below the classical shot-noise level. However it was expected, that at certain limits, 3D interaction effects may compromise the efficiency of the process. We executed 3D simulations with GPT in order to verify the predicted current shot noise reduction. The numerical simulations demonstrated current shot-noise reduction, which, as predicted, attains its minimal value at a drift-length of quarter plasma wavelength oscillation. In order to avoid 3D deterioration effects (interference of higher order Langmuir modes) the attainment of the new suggested effect requires proper setting of the beam geometrical and current density parameters. The parameters range in which the single mode model is valid were identified, and parameters for future experiments are suggested. The implication of this noise control process for overcoming micro-bunching instabilities and attaining temporally-coherent seeded FELs are considered.

  385. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Selenate in macromolecular crystallography"

    Presented by Jean Jakoncic, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, July 24, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  386. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Looking at traces of life in high-pressure rocks by soft x-ray scanning transmission x-ray microscopy"

    Presented by Karim Benzerara, CNRS, Institute of Mineralogy and Physics of Condensed Matter, Paris

    Friday, July 24, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  387. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Crystal growth and ion exchange in environmentally important materials"

    Presented by Aaron Celestian

    Wednesday, July 22, 2009, 2 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Eric Dooryhee

    Materials capable of selectively sieving cations from aqueous media are extremely useful for environmental applications like remediation. The molecular processes leading to ion selectivity in zeolites and other porous materials under extreme environmental conditions are not well understood. This is in part due to the fast rates of exchange reactions and the experimental difficulty probing crystal structures under adverse conditions. By understanding the mechanisms that govern crystal growth and ion selectivity in zeolitic materials, we can learn how to optimize ion exchange for specific environmental conditions. I will present time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies demonstrating how structural transformations that occur during ion exchange serve to enhance the exchange capacity and/or ion selectivity . I will also describe current work on in situ crystal growth and decomposition in highly acidic and basic solutions. The primary goal of this research is to understand the mechanistic and dynamic nature of cation diffusion and crystallization processes for materials in harsh environments.

  388. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Current Status and Upgrade Plans at APS"

    Presented by Denny Mills, ANL

    Wednesday, July 22, 2009, 11 am
    703 Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

  389. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Protein Crystallography at the HHMI Beamlines: The Good, the Bad, and the Upgrades"

    Presented by Dr. Corie Ralston, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley California

    Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) protein crystallography beamlines at the ALS (beamlines 8.2.1 and 8.2.2) were fully commissioned in 2003. Since that time, they have grown tremendously in the size of their user community and in their versatility, becoming two of the most productive crystallography beamlines at national synchrotron light sources. In this talk, I will cover the history of the beamlines up through the recently implemented robotics upgrade, discuss the planned beamline optics upgrades, and demonstrate the remote operation of the beamlines. I will present recent examples of structures obtained at the beamlines, and discuss the value of the science made possible at the beamlines in the context of the wider biological sciences.

  390. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Description, Status and Commissioning Results"

    Presented by Dr. John N. Galayda, LCLS Project Team Leader, SLAC National Accelerator Lab

    Friday, July 17, 2009, 10:30 am
    Building 735 (CFN) Large Seminar Room

    Hosted by: Dr. James B. Murphy

    The LCLS located at SLAC is the premier hard xray free electron laser facility (FEL) in the world. It was recently successfully commissioned resulting in the first ultra high intensity, short pulse 1.5 Angstrom xray beams. John Galayda headed the talented team that designed, built and commissioned the LCLS. He will provide an overview of the commissioning results, a current status report and a glimpse of the future program.

  391. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Inelastic x-ray scattering from phonons at the ESRF: Status and Perspectives"

    Presented by Michael Krisch, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France

    Thursday, July 16, 2009, 11 am
    Bldg. 703, Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    Starting from pioneering work in the 1980s, and profiting from the development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources and performing x-ray optics, inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) with meV energy resolution has become a powerful tool in the study of phonon dispersion in condensed matter. The most important aspects distinguishing IXS from inelastic neutron scattering (INS) techniques are the absence of kinematic limitations and the possibility to study very small samples (down to 10-5 mm3). This has opened up new possibilities in a range of research fields ranging from geophysics to biology. The talk will illustrate the present capabilities of the technique by discussing a few representative examples of research conducted on beamline ID28 at the ESRF. Furthermore, recent developments and future perspectives shall be highlighted.

  392. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Nanopositioning by PI (Physik Instrumente)"

    Presented by Mark Wood, PI

    Wednesday, July 15, 2009, 11 am
    Building 703 - Large Seminar Room

    Hosted by: Ray Conley

    * Nanopositioning and Micropositioning products * Piezo Technology and how to achieve longer lifetime * Reliability of PZT materials * Creating Multi-Axis Motion with PZT actuators * Serial Kinematics vrs. Parallel Kinematics * Measuring Nanometers - Parallel Metrology * Ultrasonic Motors solutions * Piezo walk solutions - Nexline and NexAct * Hexapod solutions

  393. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Nanopositioning: Design and Applications"

    Presented by Sharath Chandrasekaran, nPoint, Inc.

    Tuesday, July 14, 2009, 10 am
    Building 703 Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    Nanopositioning devices are tools for a wide range of research, manufacturing, and test applications in the semiconductor, data storage, optoelectronics, and biotechnology industries. This talk will concentrate on the design and selection process used to achieve the desired performance. Since the application typically dictates the performance requirements, we will use a variety of application examples.

  394. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The LTP development and the design of nanometer and nanoradian surface profiler (NSP)"

    Presented by Shinan Qian

    Monday, July 13, 2009, 2 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    A brief development description of the LTP is presented. In past 20 years the significant progresses of the LTP had satisfied synchrotron radiation beam line requirements. A number of LTPs and metrology methods have been developed, which include the first LTP, commercial LTP II, penta-prism LTP, in-situ LTP, portable LTP, vertical scan LTP, multiple functions LTP, in-situ heat load distortion test and in-situ angle monitoring of grating monochromator. The LTP accuracy had improved by one order of the magnitude (from 5 to 0.5 rad). However, the newest state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation light sources (NSLS II and TPS) require focusing SR beam to 1 nm spatial resolution spot to study nanostructures. The great challenge to the optics and in particular to its metrology is: nanometer and nanoradian accuracy including in larger angle test range. A new generation LTP is all-important. The design of nanometer and nanoradian surface profiler (NSP) for NSLS II is presented. In order to reach nanoradian accuracy it is necessary to remove error sources as much as possible or to reduce errors produced by them to the nanoradian level. The following solutions will improve the NSP accuracy by one order of magnitude than recent LTP: optimized optical system design, scan mode selection, non-tilted reference method, quality controlling of optical components, scan air-bearing improvement and temperature control. Nanoradian calibration is the insurance of the nanometer and nanoradian accuracy, so a precise calibration device is absolutely necessary.

  395. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Nucleation during large-scale epitaxy"

    Presented by Slowa Solovyov, CMPMSD, BNL

    Friday, July 10, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  396. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Magnetic domain will transport in nanowires induced by alternating spin-polarized currents"

    Presented by Peter Warnicke, Uppsala University

    Friday, July 10, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  397. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Sub-microradian Surface Slope Metrology at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory"

    Presented by Valeriy Yashchuk

    Tuesday, July 7, 2009, 3 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron laser facilities requires x-ray optical systems with extremely high performance, generally of diffraction limited quality. Fabrication and use of such optics requires adequate, highly accurate metrology and dedicated instrumentation. I will concentrate on the R&D work at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory (OML) aimed to bring the performance of Long Trace Profilers (LTP), slope measuring instruments widely used to characterize x-ray optics at low-spatial-wavelengths, to the 0.1 µrad level of performance. A comprehensive analysis of the major sources of random noise, systematic errors, and errors due to the instrumental and set-up drifts, limiting the performance of the slope measuring instruments will be given. The original ways to solve the problems suggested and successfully implemented at the ALS OML are discussed. A plan for further work is also presented. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under contract number DE- AC02-05CH11231.

  398. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Patterning at the Nanoscale: From Silicon to DNA and Back"

    Presented by Franco Cerrina, University of Wisconsin, Madison & Boston University

    Monday, June 29, 2009, 2:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Steve Hulbert

    In this talk I will present our research activity in the area of nanofabrication, extending from semiconductor technology to DNA-based fabrication.

  399. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Thin Film Thermoelectric devices"

    Presented by Zhigang Xiao, Alamaba A&M University

    Friday, June 26, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  400. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Phase change materials and their applications"

    Presented by Simone Raoux, IBM

    Friday, June 26, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  401. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Moving Nanodroplets with Sound: Acoustic Drop Ejection"

    Presented by Joseph Olechno, Labcyte Inc.

    Wednesday, June 24, 2009, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Marc Allaire

    How the new technology of ADE affects sample handling, particle formation, surface coating, sample monitoring and more.

  402. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The nature of low valency nitridometalates"

    Presented by Joanna Bendyna, Max-Planck-Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids

    Friday, June 19, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  403. NSLS-II Seminar

    "A Mathematica Package for the Storage Ring Lattice Analysis"

    Presented by Jinhyuk Choi

    Thursday, June 18, 2009, 2:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky

    Mathematica is a high-level program tool with unique capabilities, including symbolic calculation, dynamic evaluation, various integrators, and others. These capabilites can be also very useful in accelerator beam dynamics study. I've developed a package which can be used for analyzing a lattice to confirm the aimed operation. In this talk, taking the PLSII lattice as an example, I will show how I analyze and simulate the lattice and also how I optimize the sextupole strengths by directly running the package.

  404. NSLS-II Seminar

    "New Materials at High-Pressure"

    Presented by Dr.Andrea Prodi, Center for Materials Science and Engineering and Dept. of Physics, MIT (US)

    Thursday, June 18, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    The synthesis of new materials under conditions of high pressure and temperature has led to important advances in many fields such as superhard materials, conducting glasses, materials for hydrogen storage and high-temperature superconductors, to name a few. High-pressure modifications of solid-state chemistry often involve the increase of cation coordination number and stabilization of higher valence states of transition metals; in favourable cases compounds can be recovered metastably to ambient conditions. In this talk I will illustrate the structural and magnetic properties of the family of high-pressure compounds AMn7O12 (A=Na+,RE3+) with quadruple perovskite structure that have been proposed as a disorder-free model system to explore collective electronic phenomena like charge, spin and orbital ordering and multiferroic behaviour. These phenomena have been intensely investigated in RE3+1-xD2+xMnO3 doped manganites with simple perovskite structure, where the role of quenched disorder associated with chemical doping is difficult to establish

  405. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Application of X-ray Diffraction Techniques to materials under various environmental conditions"

    Presented by Dr. Sanjit Ghose, Stony Brook University

    Tuesday, June 16, 2009, 2:30 pm
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Understanding the behavior of novel materials and minerals at various environmental conditions requires the understanding of its atomic and molecular structure on long-range, intermediate-range and short-range scale. Information on all these length scales could be possible with the application of state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction techniques. In this presentation I will be talking on Crystal Truncation ROD (CTR) a surface sensitive diffraction technique and its application in determining the structure of geochemical interfaces. I will also be discussing on some of the results of the application of Angle and Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (ADXD & EDXD) and Total X-ray Scattering (PDF analysis) techniques in geosciences and materials science.

  406. NSLS-II Seminar

    "JJ X-Ray Visit to NSLS"

    Presented by Scott Barton

    Tuesday, June 16, 2009, 10 am
    703 Large Conference room

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    JJ X-Ray are manufacturers of a range of beamline components including a range of slits with a newly developed compact high precision UHV slit. They also supply Compound Refractive beryllium Lenses (CRLs) both as a cooled front-end focusing/collimating device and as a monochromatic downstream focusing device. They will present a case story of the LS-CAT beamline station F and G at APS which are two identical beamlines based on single bounce flat diamond crystal monochromators and downstream focusing beryllium lenses. This beamline was installed in 2007.

  407. Celebration Marking Construction Start of NSLS-II

    Monday, June 15, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Construction Site

    This celebration marks the start of construction of the National Synchrotron Light Source II. This $912-million facility will provide extremely bright beams of x-ray, ultraviolet, and infrared light to probe the structures and properties of a variety of materials and biological samples, yielding advances in energy, environmental science, and medicine. When operational in 2015, NSLS-II will be the world's brightest synchrotron light source.

  408. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Alterations in the Mineral and Collagen Matrix of Bisphosphonate-treated bone and osteoblasts"

    Presented by Meghan Ruppel, BNL, NSLS

    Friday, June 12, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  409. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Cardiac Risk Assessment Using Intravascular Spectroscopic Analysis"

    Presented by David Wetzel, Kansas State University

    Friday, June 5, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  410. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Spectromicroscopic Investigation of Nickel and Cobalt in a Hyperaccumulator Plant used for Phytoremediation and Phytomining"

    Presented by Ryan Tappero, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, June 5, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  411. Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI) Seminar

    "Ultrafast optical control in complex materials"

    Presented by Raanan (Ron) Tobey, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

    Tuesday, June 2, 2009, 1:30 pm
    NSLS Seminar Room, Bldg. 725, Room 2-125

    Hosted by: John P. Hill

    The macroscopic electronic phases of strongly correlated materials are known to be extremely susceptible to external stimuli. Early studies explored the effects of magnetic field, chemical and externally applied pressure on the emergent properties. Likewise, exposure of these materials to radiation has shown to be an effective method of controlling their properties. In this talk I will discuss the application of ultrafast optical techniques to study the non-equilibrium dynamics during laser-induced phase transitions. I will highlight methods which allow us to excite specific internal degrees of freedom and monitor the sample evolution along multiple reaction coordinates.

  412. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Diffuse Scattering and Phonons from K0.98Li0.02TaO3"

    Presented by Jinsheng Wen, Stony Brook University and CMPMSD, BNL

    Friday, May 29, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  413. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Designing the Soft X-ray Project Beamline for NSLS-II"

    Presented by Cecilia Sanchez-Hanke, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, May 29, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  414. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Investigation of Intermolecular Forces by Terahertz Spectroscopy and Theoretical Methods"

    Presented by Tanieka Motley, Syracuse University

    Tuesday, May 26, 2009, 4 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lisa Miller & Larry Carr

  415. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Touschek Lifetime and Higher order Multipole Errors for NSLS-II"

    Presented by Boaz Nash

    Thursday, May 21, 2009, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky

    Touschek scattering is the limiting lifetime mechanism for beam loss in medium energy high brightness synchrotron light sources. The lifetime depends on a number of factors including the beam sizes that are determined by the linear optics, and the momentum acceptance which is determined by either the non-linear dynamics (off-momentum dynamic aperture) or the RF acceptance. One issue which we have found to impact the momentum acceptance is higher order multipole errors in the quadrupoles and sextupoles. I review the sources and expected magnitude of these errors and discuss their impact on Touschek Lifetime for NSLS-II.

  416. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Toyama NSLS II Presentation Synopsis"

    Presented by Joe Endo, CEO, Toyama Company, Japan

    Friday, May 15, 2009, 10 am
    Building 703-Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    Toyama was established in 1956 and has a proven record of supplying precision instrumentation and equipment which pioneer new horizons in science. Toyama's foremost strength is its comprehensive organization which handles every element of system creation, from design and production to installation and maintenance. The company's dedication to excellence during the production process of each and every item builds in high performance and outstanding reliability. In Japan, Toyama has supplied KEK/PF, Spring-8 and many other research institutions with products which are known for their dependability. Toyama components and systems are used at all the Japanese synchrotrons and high energy physics institutions; in addition the company has supplied equipment to many major Japanese firms (eg, Toshiba, Sony, Canon, Mitsubishi and Hitachi). In recent years the company has developed its export markets. Toyama has delivered instrumentation to the Canadian Light Source (complete VESPERS beamline), SOLEIL (soft x-ray monochromators, reflectometers), NSRC in Thailand (VLSPGM soft x-ray monochromator), NSRRC in Taiwan (mirror systems) and to other synchrotrons outside Japan, and is currently working on projects with Diamond (in-vacuum diffractometer), Soleil (VLSPGM), Indus-2 (mirror system etc.) and ALBA (complete XMCD beamline). This talk will present an overview of Toyamas capabilities from design through to installation, and then focus principally on soft x-ray beamline systems and components. This will include recently designed and installed instrumentation such as complete beamlines and grating monochromators, and will touch on in-vacuum diffractometer, ellipsometer and reflectometer systems. The final part of the talk will describe experience with accelerator & front end components including undulators, high heat load components (masks, fixed apertures and slits), safety shutters, filters & beam position monitors, and specialist accelerator vacuum

  417. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The Diamond Light Source, its status and prospects for the future"

    Presented by Colin Norris, UK

    Wednesday, May 13, 2009, 11 am
    Bldg 703 - Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    The Diamond Light Source, near Oxford, is the biggest scientific project in the UK for 40 years. It is a third generation machine operating at 3.0 GeV, 300 mA (rising to 500 mA) and with an emittance of 2.7nm-rad. It competes well with other light sources in terms of the number and the brilliance of its undulator sources from 20ev to 25keV. Multipole wigglers extend the energy range to beyond 100keV. Bunch lengths of less than 20 psec have been obtained. Phase I of the construction programme, including the building the machine and 7 beamlines, was completed in 2007. A further 15 beamlines will come into operation by July 2011, and more are proposed for the future. Diamond will be the main SR source to support the UK scientific community in a wide programme of research covering the life, physical and environmental sciences. Macromolecular crystallography is a major area of activity supported by on-site crystal preparation facilities. The high brightness of the insertion device sources will be exploited for high resolution diffraction, coherence studies and imaging. Advanced detectors will enable rapid and reliable data collection, and permit fast temporal monitoring of stress-induced changes and other processes. To maximise the output of the facility, the beamline construction is underpinned by an instrumentation development programme taking advantage of the expertise elsewhere on the Harwell campus. The progress of the project, the planned scientific programme and the opportunities for the future will be described.

  418. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Some Aspects of Polarized Proton Beam Acceleration in the AGS --- Simulation, Experiment and Analysis"

    Presented by Fanglei Lin

    Tuesday, May 12, 2009, 9 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky

    Two partial helical dipole snakes have been commissioned to maintain the polarization of proton beam in the AGS. However, the two partial snakes also introduce a new type of horizontal intrinsic spin resonance. Simulations and experiments have shown an agreement that the horizontal intrinsic resonances cause ~10% polarization loss. A potential solution, horizontal tune jump mechanism, is proposed to overcome this kind of spin resonance. Some aspects about the horizontal intrinsic resonance will be presented in this talk.

  419. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Combined X-ray Absorption and Diffraction Studies of Molecules Hosted in Micro-Porous Crystals and their Reactivity"

    Presented by Carlo Lamberti, University of Turin, Torino, Italy

    Friday, May 8, 2009, 10:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Anatoly Frenkel

    Zeolites are three-dimensional organized microporous systems hosting positively charged cations that balance the negative charge of the framework and act as strong Lewis acid sites. Such materials play a great role in industrial chemistry, as they are very efficient catalysts exhibiting remarkable shape selectivity. The pore dimension and topology select the reactant molecules able to penetrate the framework and to reach the internal active sites. The same holds for the intermediate molecules formed on the catalytic sites and for the final products able to leave the zeolite framework, that actually acts as a nanoreactor of molecular dimension. The understanding of the site reactivity can be achieved by comparing the cations position in the activated catalyst (zeolites subjected to thermal treatments in vacuo conditions, exhibiting no molecules in the channels) with that occupied upon interaction with selected molecules dosed in situ either from the gas or from the liquid phases. The combination of XAFS spectra (collected in situ at ESRF BM8 GILDA or BM29) with high resolution XRPD data (colleted in situ at ESRF ID31) with conventional IR, Raman, UV-Vis, and EPR data is a complete approach to face this complex problem. More recently our group has extended this approach to a novel class of microporous materials: metallorganic frameworks.

  420. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Synchrotron Mirror Fabrication and Metrology at Carl Zeiss Laser Optics"

    Presented by Helge Thiess

    Thursday, May 7, 2009, 11 am
    Building 703 Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    Carl Zeiss has a long-lasting expertise in the field of optical manufacturing and material processing for reflecting and refracting optical systems. In particular optical mirrors of various geometries ranging from small flats to large freeform mirrors are subject to the extensive research and development activities. Exceedingly stringent specifications are placed on the optical components used in these newly designed systems. Extremely high heat loads demand cooling of these optics and thus material with high heat conductivity and low thermal expansion. The increased quality of radiation sources calls for higher-quality optics: Typical requirements are slope errors significantly below 1 arcsec for aspheric elements and below 0.1 arcsec for flats or spheres. Carl Zeiss uses state-of-the-art tooling and metrology devices in order to serve his customers with highest quality optical devices made from a wide range of substrate and coating materials. In order to achieve the desired surface quality, a very close interaction between metrology and polishing is mandatory.

  421. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Enjoy the Challenges in Nanotechnology"

    Presented by Lin Wang

    Monday, May 4, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    The rapid development of nanotechnology has brought us tremendous challenges. For example, nanoscale fabrication and metrology are the two key challenges in nanotechnology. Synchrotron radiation is able to provide enriched spectrum and is a very powerful tool for nanotechnology research. This presentation covers three main topics. First of all, x-ray interferometry (XRI) was applied for subnanometer measurement using Si(220) (lattice space 0.192nm) as a basic ruler, and nanostructure dimension was measured precisely by combining XRI and STM (Scanning Tunneling Microscope). Next topic is about nanofabrication using synchrotron radiation, including EUV interference lithography for high resolution patterning and x-ray lithography for high aspect ratio pattern fabrication as well as the applications in MEMS and BioMEMS. Finally, I will give a brief discussion about the current challenges in the development for 45nm/32nm node technology in semiconductor industry.

  422. Joint NSLS-Biology Seminar

    "Adaptive High-Throughput Peptide Screening and Analysis via Active Learning"

    Presented by Burr Settles, Department of Computer Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Monday, May 4, 2009, 10 am
    John Dunn Seminar Room, Bldg. 463

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi and Sean McCorkle

  423. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Enjoy the Challenges in Nanotechnology"

    Presented by Dr. Lin Wang

    Monday, May 4, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    The rapid development of nanotechnology has brought us tremendous challenges. For example, nanoscale fabrication and metrology are the two key challenges in nanotechnology. Synchrotron radiation is able to provide enriched spectrum and is a very powerful tool for nanotechnology research. This presentation covers three main topics. First of all, x-ray interferometry (XRI) was applied for subnanometer measurement using Si(220) (lattice space 0.192nm) as a basic ruler, and nanostructure dimension was measured precisely by combining XRI and STM (Scanning Tunneling Microscope). Next topic is about nanofabrication using synchrotron radiation, including EUV interference lithography for high resolution patterning and x-ray lithography for high aspect ratio pattern fabrication as well as the applications in MEMS and BioMEMS. Finally, I will give a brief discussion about the current challenges in the development for 45nm/32nm node technology in semiconductor industry.

  424. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Quick EXAFS provides new insight of structural reorganization during glass transition in selenide glasses"

    Presented by Roman Holovchak, Lehigh University

    Friday, May 1, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  425. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Application of the Synchrotron White Beam to Structural Defect Characterization and Stress Mapping of Single Crystal Materials"

    Presented by Balaji Raghothamachar, Stony Brook University

    Friday, May 1, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  426. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Introduction to the NY Photonics Network and the local Manufacture of High Quality Optical Components"

    Presented by Tom Battley, NY Photonics Network

    Friday, May 1, 2009, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    New York Photonics and the Rochester Regional Photonics Cluster (RRPC) are not-for-profit organizations founded to promote and enhance the New York State photonics, optics and imaging industry by fostering the cooperation of business, academia and government. The Rochester cluster has more than 60 leading optics, imaging and photonics companies, world renown university programs and research centers. With over 100 years of collaboration, Rochester develops breakthrough technologies and products at the forefront of industry applications and solutions. Rochester is recognized as one of the most capable and innovative optics and photonics destinations in the world. This talk will explain how New York's rich Optics, Photonics and Imaging infrastructure and extensive network of resources can help to meet a wide variety of component or integrated system needs for applications such as adaptive optics, geospatial imaging, laser optics, and nanolithography.

  427. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Beam Dynamics and Lattice Design for More Compact XFEL Facilities"

    Presented by Yujong Kim, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Switzerland, Switzerland

    Thursday, April 30, 2009, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky

    Recently, long and high-energy linear accelerator based X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) projects were launched at DESY, SLAC, and SPring-8 to supply coherent, ultra-bright, and ultra-fast hard X-rays. We expect that those XFEL facilities can open various new research fields in biology, chemistry, physics, and material science where femtosecond (or sub-femtosecond) temporal resolution and atomic-scale spatial resolution are required. Even though future of XFEL projects is very bright, many laboratories failed to get their construction budgets due to huge size and long length of the XFEL facilities. From various experiences of accelerator designs, start-to-end simulations, and commissioning works at several FEL projects and facilities (FLASH and European XFEL of DESY, SCSS and XFEL/SPring-8, PAL-XFEL of PAL, Sapphire Project of Diamond Light Source, Mark-III and OK-5 FEL of Duke University, 250 MeV Injector and PSI-XFEL projects of PSI), recently, speaker found a good way to build a more compact and stable XFEL facility with a lower energy linear accelerator. During this talk, speaker will talk about important beam dynamics and lattice design concepts from the gun to the end of linear accelerator to realize such a more compact XFEL facility with higher performance. Then he will present lattice design works and start-to-end simulation results of one compact XFEL facility, which were mainly done with ASTRA and ELEGANT codes.

  428. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The THz dynamics of water probed by extremely high resolution Inelastic X Ray Scattering"

    Presented by Alessandro Cunsolo

    Thursday, April 30, 2009, 9 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    One of the most ambitious dreams of modern spectroscopy is the setup of next generation X Ray spectrometers with an unprecedentedly narrow (sub-meV bandwidth) and sharp instrumental resolution function. Such upgrade would provide answers to a host of hot and unsolved topics concerning the dynamics response of liquids in the Q= 0.1-1 nm-1 and E =0.1-1 meV dynamic range, i.e. inside a no-mans land for existing instrumentation. As an example, I will show how such spectrometer could considerably improve our knowledge of the rather anomalous high frequency behavior of liquid water. In particular it would help to shed a deeper insight onto the rich phenomenology associated to structural relaxations as well as on the onset of transverse modes at low temperatures.

  429. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Short Working Distance X-ray Spectrometers: A Cheaper, Faster, and Sometimes Better Approach to XES, RIXS, and Fluorescence-mode XAFS"

    Presented by Prof. Jerry Seidler, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

    Monday, April 27, 2009, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Anatoly Frenkel

    There are numerous important scientific applications of core-level emission-mode x-ray spectroscopies. These are generally based on the direct determination of the valence, spin state, and local electronic structure of the target species, and often make use of the suppression of spectral broadening from the short core-hole lifetimes. However, traditional hard x-ray emission spectrometers based on spherically-bent crystal analyzers (SBCAs) pose some practical difficulties. These include their engineering complexity and expense, the low collection solid angles of SBCAs, and also the difficulties coordinating such major instrumentation with other apparatus required for the preparation of extreme sample conditions. It is important to recognize that the use of SBCAs as the dispersing optic originates with some of the earliest work in high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy from the 1930s, which was itself inspired by curved optical gratings originating in the 1890s work of Henry Rowland. In other words, there is no particular reason to think that SBCAs are the only, or the optimal, general purpose approach for modern synchrotron-based studies of x-ray emission. In two recent papers my group has demonstrated that an appropriate collection of small, flat crystals placed quite near to the sample can be a useful dispersive optic for XES and related emission-mode x-ray spectroscopies. The resulting short-working distance (SWD) x-ray spectrometers are compact, portable, easy to use, and typically cost only a few thousand dollars to fabricate. They also often equal or outperform traditional large-scale XES/IXS instruments based on SBCAs. Less than a year after the first development of SWD x-ray optics, it is reasonable to project that this technology will have interesting applications in high-pressure science, actinide chemistry, catalyst chemistry, battery electrode research, and ultrafast time-resolved studies of photochemistry.

  430. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "LEEM study of Ge nanoisland growth on Si(112)"

    Presented by Moritz Speckmann, University of Bremen

    Friday, April 24, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  431. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Anhydromuramic Acid Kinase: Significance, Substrate and Structure"

    Presented by Catherine Leigh Allen, Duke University

    Friday, April 24, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  432. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Principles and Applications of Scanned Probe MRFM for Spatially Resolved Studies in Ferromagnets"

    Presented by Dr. Evgueni Nazaretski

    Monday, April 20, 2009, 10 am
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) offers a very high sensitivity approach to detection of magnetic resonance. Proposed by J.A. Sidles in 1991 [1], it has been used for the detection of both electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance. Recently, Rugar and co-workers reported detection of a force signal originating from a single electron spin [2], emphatically demonstrating unprecedented MRFM sensitivity. Incorporating basic elements of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), MRFM can provide much higher spatial resolution than conventional MRI. Recently, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) has been detected by MRFM [3-6]. In general, ferromagnetically coupled systems pose a challenge for spatially resolved FMR due to a strong exchange interaction between the spins. The observed resonance modes involve precession of spins in an entire sample. In our work we argue that the micromagnetic probe locally stabilizes magnetostatic modes detected in FMR thus indicating the potential for scanned probe imaging of magnetic properties in extended ferromagnetic films. We report MRFM spectra from various ferromagnetic samples and demonstrate the capability of MRFM to perform highly localized spectroscopic studies in ferromagnets. We discuss the model which accounts for the presence of a non-uniform tip field and compare numerical simulations to experimental data.

  433. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Phase stability of zirconium hydrides"

    Presented by Matthew Kerr, Queens University

    Friday, April 17, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  434. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Calibration of a time projection chamber polarimeter"

    Presented by Joe Hill, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    Friday, April 17, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  435. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Nanopositioning by PI (Physik Instrumente)"

    Presented by Mark Wood, Physik Instrument

    Friday, April 17, 2009, 10 am
    Bldg 703 Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Yong Chu

    * Nanopositioning and Micropositioning products * Piezo Technology and how to achieve longer lifetime * Reliability of PZT materials * Creating Multi-Axis Motion with PZT actuators * Serial Kinematics vrs. Parallel Kinematics * Measuring Nanometers - Parallel Metrology * Ultrasonic Motors solutions * Piezo walk solutions - Nexline and NexAct * Hexapod solutions

  436. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Presentation by InSync Optics"

    Presented by Tom Tonnessen, InSync Optics

    Thursday, April 16, 2009, 9 am
    Building 703 - Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    Tom will present his companies facilities and describe their mirror products. He will also discuss what InSync can currently achieve with regard to advanced x-ray mirror polishing specifications and possible collaborative routes to improving the technology of both manufacturing and measuring x-ray mirrors. He will also have a small ~200mm long internally cooled silicon mirror for "show and tell".

  437. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Fundamentals of Dry Etching and Its Applications for Si Etch"

    Presented by Jason (Sungjin) Cho

    Wednesday, April 15, 2009, 9 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Yong Cai

    This presentation is to provide a sound foundation in the fundamentals of process of etching thin films in semiconductor application. A fundamental overview of etching, especially dry etching and its application on silicon will be presented. An overview of plasma principles and interaction will be presented, followed by discussion of dry etch process issues and etch chemistry on Si process. A through review of etching methodology for Si application and its analysis will be provided.

  438. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Structural Trends in oxygen vacancy ordered perovskite La1 - xSrxMnOy compounds"

    Presented by Leopoldo Suescun, University of Uruguay, school of Chemistry, Crystallography, Sokid State and Materials Laboratory, Uruguay

    Tuesday, April 14, 2009, 2 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Jun Wang

    Manganites are among the most frequently studied materials nowadays. In these compounds coupling between structural, orbital and magnetic degrees of freedom can be fully appreciated. When an extra degree of freedom, the chemical composition, is added additional complexities arises in the system. Oxygen vacancy formation may lead to different structures, either by an average distortion of the perovskite network for disordered vacancies or a complete structural rearrangement with ordered vacancies. We have performed a structural and magnetic characterization of manganites of general formula La1-xSrxMnOy (0≤x≤0.5, 2.5

  439. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Nanopatterned Surfaces and their Wetting Behavior: Experiment and Theory"

    Presented by Tommy Hofmann, BNL CMP Dept.

    Friday, April 10, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  440. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Synchrotron based X-ray studies on electrode materials for Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors"

    Presented by Kyung-Wan Nam, BNL Chemistry Dept.

    Friday, April 10, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  441. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Presentation by Advanced Design Consulting (ADC)"

    Presented by Alex Deyhim, ADC

    Thursday, April 9, 2009, 2 pm
    703 Large conference room

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    ADC will present capabilities in insertion devices including recent EPU and Wiggler projects, as well as a complete insertion device measurement system. Other recent projects to be shown include a 5 axis high precision system for NASA, a one meter long mirror system to APS, many beamline components to SSRF and DLS, two high heat load water cooled slits to MAX Lab. Projects currently in manufacturing include; an Octopole End Station for APS, six very complex translation systems for Diamond Light Source, a large order of custom beam pipes and enclosures for Canadian Light Source, a four axis Goniometer for Korea, two custom slits for Australia, and more. They will also talk about their quality control system, workload and staffing, project tracking, design and engineering capabilities, UHV cleaning, testing, RGA, assembly and testing, customer monthly report, machining, fabrication, etc.

  442. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Global Optimization of a Magnetic Lattice Using Genetic Algorithms"

    Presented by Dr. Lingyun Yang

    Thursday, April 9, 2009, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky

    Genetic Algorithms have been used in real-life scientific and engineering problems including accelerator physics. We explore the use of the Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA) to locate globally optimized lattice settings. This enhances our ability to design or optimize several quantities simultaneously, e.g. emittance, brightness, twiss parameters in specific location, and in a robust way. We will introduce the MOGA algorithm and show its capabilities for optimization of the ALS lattice.

  443. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Dynamics on the Nanoscale: Imaging with Nanometer Spatial and Femtosecond Temporal Resolution"

    Presented by Prof. Markus Raschke, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

    Thursday, April 9, 2009, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Dario Arena

    The natural time- and length-scales of the elementary excitations in matter define a new regime of ultrafast vibrational and electron dynamics as the dimensions of the medium shrink into the 1 to 100 nm range. To achieve the required femtosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution we take advantage of the optical antenna properties of nanoscopic metal tips. They provide the necessary local field enhancement and spatial confinement for scattering-type near-field optical microscopy. Here, I will discuss our recent results on the vibrational dynamics of block-copolymer nanostructures, nano-Raman spectroscopy of molecules and solids, and the spatially resolved optical response of plasmonic nanocrystals.

  444. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Liquid unmixing at white heat - the detection of first order liquid-liquid phase transitions"

    Presented by Prof. Neville Greaves, Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, UK

    Wednesday, April 8, 2009, 2:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: David P. Siddons

    Combining small angle and wide angle x-ray scattering with aerodynamic levitation techniques has enabled in situ detection of phase transitions in the liquid state under contactless conditions1. At very high temperatures yttria-alumina melts show a first order transition, previously inferred from phase separation in quenched glasses. We show how the transition coincides with a narrow and reversible maximum in SAXS indicative of liquid unmixing on the nanoscale combined with an abrupt realignment in WAXS features related to reversible shifts in polyhedral packing on the atomic scale. We also observed a rotary action in the suspended supercooled drop driven by repetitive transitions a polyamorphic rotor from which the reversible changes in molar volume and entropy can be estimated. These results have important implications for the nature of phase transitions in other liquids and glasses.

  445. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Photoemission, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and LEEM imaging studies of ferroics: Ho1-xYxMnO3"

    Presented by Relja Vasic, North Carolina State University

    Friday, April 3, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  446. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Development of magnetic measurement with nanofabricated pick-up coil for high pressure study with diamond anvil cell"

    Presented by Dr. Melike Abliz

    Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 3:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Toshi Tanabe

    new research area which is important in the materials science and medical science which is related to cancer treatment that has been recently recognized in the nano material science. In this talk we introduce a new type of magnetic measurement method that we can apply to pick-up a nano volt order magnetic signal from a 100 micron sample for high pressure study. Recently, we succeeded in nano fabricating a pick-up coil on 300 micron culet of diamond. High pressure can induce not only structural phase transition but also electrical phase transition such as superconductor, magnetic ordering, and volume collapse etc. Recently, we found a pressure induced volume collapse occurred in a heavy fermion compound YbIr2Co20 by a synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiment with high pressure up to 60 GPa. The result is presented in addition to development of magnetic measurement.

  447. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Combined High-Pressure and Heavy-Ion Irradiation: A Novel Approach"

    Presented by Maik Lang, University of Michigan

    Friday, March 27, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  448. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Investigation on the early stages of biomineralization using synchrotron X-ray scattering and microscopy"

    Presented by Xiaolan Ba, Stony Brook University

    Friday, March 27, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  449. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Absence of Superconductivity in the Hole Doped Li0.38BC"

    Presented by Engin Ozdas, Hacettepe University, Physics Department,, Ankara, Turkey

    Tuesday, March 24, 2009, 3 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Chi-Chang Kao

    The existence of several borocarbides with crystal structures highly related to MgB2, in which one of these, the layered LiBC has been predicted based on the electronic structure calculations that this compound should become superconducting on doping with holes. However, the superconducting features for Li off-stoichiometric borocarbide compounds have not been observed in any experimental studies, because of the difficulties in the sample preparation. In this work, the effects of synthesis conditions on the structure of LixBC samples with the different Li content and the phase stability were investigated. The structural studies showed that the intercalation process has a staging behavior as Li intercalated graphite and a novel Li vacancy ordered structure for off-stoichiometric stage-2 Li0.38BC phase. The temperature dependence of the conductivity shows semiconducting behavior over the whole temperature range and the hopping type conduction improved by the hole doping.

  450. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Three Dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy"

    Presented by Dr. Lawrence Margulies, Risoe National Laboratory

    Monday, March 23, 2009, 10 am
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    The three dimensional x-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope is a unique instrument which combines the use of high energy x-rays generated at a synchrotron source with a "tomographic" approach to acquisition of diffraction data, enabling a fast 3D structural characterization of mm-cm sized samples. The position, volume, orientation, grain boundary morphology, elastic and plastic strain can be derived for hundreds of grains simultaneously. The spatial resolution is on the order of 5 microns, while diffracting units of sizes down to 25 nm can be observed. 3DXRD microscopy for the first time enables dynamic studies of the individual grains and sub-grains in polycrystals. Hence, it is possible to observe how the structural elements nucleate, grow, deform or transform and in general how they interact with their local environment. The methodology will be presented and the potential applications illustrated by examples ranging from in-situ deformation and recrystallization to phase transformations

  451. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Towards In-Situ Soft X-ray Measurements in Working Li-ion Batteries"

    Presented by Faisal Alamgir, Georgia Institute of Technology

    Friday, March 20, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  452. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Report from the 2009 Workshop on The Future of High Performance Magnets in the USA"

    Presented by George Rakowsky, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, March 20, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  453. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Fast switching polarized soft x-rays at X13A"

    Presented by Cecilia Sanchez-Hanke

    Monday, March 16, 2009, 10 am
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    X13A at NSLS is a beamline dedicated to the generation and uses of fast-switching elliptically-polarized soft x-rays in the energy range from 250 eV to ~1600 eV. The source for this beamline is an elliptically polarized wiggler (EPW) that delivers linearly and elliptically-polarized soft x-rays. EPW is a unique hybrid (permanent magnets and electromagnets) insertion device that delivers elliptically polarized soft x-rays switching between left and right handeness at 22Hz. In the last 10 years polarization-sensitive X-ray absorption spectroscopies, MCD and MLD, are some of the most demanded soft x-ray techniques at synchrotron radiation facilities. In many cases experiments in this field are count rate limited, so any efforts to speed up the data acquisition time and increase the sensitivity in the detection of small signals are important. In the presentation I will show the results of experiments performed at the X13A that needed EPWs fast switching capability to be successful. I also will show the upgrades plans for X13A to expand its capabilities as instrument to measure polarization sensitive phenomena and to improve the data collection in the next future.

  454. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Phase diagrams of electrostatically self-assembled amphiplexes using combinatorial X-ray scattering setup"

    Presented by Helmut Strey, Stony Brook University

    Friday, March 13, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  455. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "XANES studies of sulfur poisoning in steam reforming catalysts"

    Presented by Yongsheng Chen, Pennsylvania State University

    Friday, March 13, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  456. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Exploring Nano‐scale Magnetism with Soft X‐ray Synchrotron Radiation"

    Presented by Dr. Jyoti Mohanty

    Tuesday, March 10, 2009, 11 am
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: QunShen

    Magnetism at nano‐scale is at present in the heart of magnetic data storage, recording media, and also spin based electronics devices, spintronics exploiting the spin nature of the electron. In order to see these nano‐scale properties of the magnetic material one need the appropriate wavelength where x‐rays comes into the play. X‐ray has various advantages over the other local probe techniques being element specific, chemical sensitive, high penetration depth, application of magnetic field and temperature (photon‐in and photo out process), utilization of coherence properties to study dynamics. In this talk I will present magnetic domain, magnetization reversal and domain dynamics in various interesting magnetic material system e.g. ferromagnet‐semiconductor hybrid for spintronics application, ferromagnet‐antiferromagnet exchange bias system and magnetic multilayer utilizing magnetic perpendicular anisotropy. Magnetic domain imaging using MFM, XMCD and coherent soft x‐ray resonant scattering will be presented.

  457. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Static magnetic field undulators are capable of producing quasi-monochromatic synchrotron radiation of very high brightness."

    Presented by Murali Yeddulla

    Monday, March 9, 2009, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Jim Rose

    However, it is not possible to quickly change the properties such as polarization of the radiation in a static undulator. It is possible to construct an undulator using microwaves instead of static magnets where the electron beam is undulated by both electric and magnetic fields of an rf wave. A major advantage with a microwave undulator is that the radiation properties can be changed very quickly. The biggest challenge in developing a microwave undulator is in keeping the rf losses low. We are designing a microwave undulator with the aim of achieving at least a tenth of the flux obtained by the BL13 static magnetic field Elliptical Polarized Undulator in the SPEAR ring. We have considered circular waveguide modes and hybrid HE11 mode in a corrugated waveguide as possible candidates for the microwave undulator. It is found that a corrugated waveguide has the lowest rf losses with a very desirable field profile. The design issues of the corrugated waveguide and the ends of the cavity for the microwave undulator will be presented.

  458. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The use of a hexapod in X-ray diffraction measurements of substrate-supported crystals of organic semiconductors"

    Presented by Lin Yang, BNL, NSLS

    Friday, March 6, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  459. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Structure and Order in Coherent Diffractive Imaging"

    Presented by Mark Pfeifer

    Wednesday, March 4, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Yong Chu

  460. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Study of the Two-Stream Instabilities: Fast-Ion and Electron Cloud"

    Presented by Lanfa Wang, SLAC

    Tuesday, March 3, 2009, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

  461. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Recent progress of the soft X-ray generation system and the new RF Gun with high quantum efficiency at Waseda University"

    Presented by Masakazu Washio, Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Japan

    Monday, March 2, 2009, 2 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: X.J. Wang

  462. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Observation of density-driven crystallization of proteins in 2D"

    Presented by Masafumi Fukuto, Condensed Matter Physics

    Friday, February 27, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  463. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Giant flexoelectric effect in bent-core liquid crystals"

    Presented by Samuel Sprunt, Kent State University

    Friday, February 27, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  464. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Soft X-ray Scattering at Beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source: probing structure from microns to nanometers"

    Presented by Dr. David Shapiro

    Monday, February 23, 2009, 2:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Beamline 9.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory provides an intense beam of soft x-rays with energies ranging from 500 to 1500 eV. This source, with a photon flux as high as 1012 photons/second in a 50 micron spot and a coherence length as large as 10 microns, is well suited for soft x-ray scattering from few-micron sized particles. This talk serves as an overview of the tools available at beamline 9.0.1. In particular, we have optimized diffraction based imaging experiments where the x-ray phase information is provided either by proper frequency space sampling followed by iterative phase retrieval or through convolution of the sample with a complicated reference source. Using these techniques we can image both biological and material sciences samples at 10 nm resolution in two or three dimensions. In addition to imaging, we are developing techniques that utilize the scattering strength of soft x-rays to study protein crystals that are too small for traditional crystallographic methods. Using an aerodynamically focused micro-jet particle injector for sample delivery we have recorded a powder diffraction pattern from the smallest crystals (500 nm) of the largest protein (72000 atoms) ever used in powder diffraction analysis. The use of new ab initio phasing algorithms, such as compressive phase retrieval which doesn't require atomic resolution, may provide molecular envelopes from low resolution diffraction patterns.

  465. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Investigating Complex Liquid Crystal Phases Through Doping"

    Presented by Jennifer Kirchhoff, Florida State University

    Friday, February 20, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  466. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Advanced In-Situ Characterization of Thin Films"

    Presented by Eric Friedman, k-Space Associates, Inc.

    Thursday, February 19, 2009, 2 pm
    NSLS-II Large Conference Room, Bldg. 703

    Hosted by: Ray Conley

    k-Space Associates, Inc., specializes in advanced thin-film characterization tools and software for MOCVD, MBE, Sputtering, CVD, and related thin film applications. All k-Space products provide true real-time acquisition, processing, and analysis. Our kSA BandiT directly measures the temperature of semiconductor wafers and thin films via band-gap absorption thermometry: it's non-contact, non-invasive, and real-time measurement down to room temperature with better than 1 degrees C repeatability without in-situ calibrations. Multi-beam Optical Sensor (MOS) and MOS Ultra-Scan provide 2D laser-based curvature and stress measurement of practically any polished surface with >100km radius-of-curvature detection. kSA RateRat Pro uses laser reflectivity to provide deposition rate, film thickness, and optical constants (n,k) of today's most advanced thin films with unmatched signal to noise. kSA 400 Analytical RHEED system yields powerful surface analysis during thin-film deposition via sputtering, PLD, and MBE processes.

  467. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Pro-Dex Oregon Micro Systems Motion Control Presentation"

    Presented by Scott Fredericks, Oregon Micro Systems

    Thursday, February 19, 2009, 9 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent/Scott Coburn

  468. NSLS Town Meeting

    Wednesday, February 18, 2009, 1 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  469. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Two-dimensional projection X-ray diffraction microscopy with Ewald sphere curvature considerations"

    Presented by Ning Lei

    Wednesday, February 18, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    An approach is proposed to determine the structure of a three-dimensional noncrystalline object from a single two-dimensional X-ray scattering image. If X-ray absorption is ignored, this method always generates a structure of real electron density, even in the case that the Ewald sphere curvature is large. More importantly, the approach relaxes the requirement of a thin sample by about a factor of two. The reconstructed 2-d projection electron density is the integrated electron density of the sample along a path which makes an angle with the incoming X-rays (z-axis) in proportion to the maximum scattering wavevector transfer magnitude along the axis, revealing the objects depth information.

  470. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Recent Imaging Technology and Application Development at Xradia"

    Presented by Webing Yun, XRADIA

    Wednesday, February 18, 2009, 9 am
    Bldg. 703 Large Conference Room

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbents

  471. NSLS-II Seminar

    "X-ray Scattering Studies of the Structure and Dynamics of Thin Polymer Molten Films"

    Presented by Mrinmay Mukhopadhyay

    Tuesday, February 17, 2009, 11 am
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Grazing incidence small angle scattering (GISAXS) and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies from silicon supported polystyrene (PS) molten films having different thickness and different molecular weights of PS will be presented. GISAXS measurements were made in x-ray standing wave geometry designed to enhance the scattering from the interior of the film compared to surface and substrate scattering. Melt films thicker than 4Rg show bulk like density fluctuations. The thinner films exhibit a peak in structure factor S(q) near q = 0 which grows with decreasing thickness. This peak is attributed to a decreased interpenetration of chains resulting in an enhanced compressibility [1]. The effect of confinement is also evident from the wide angle measurements where a liquid scattering ring corresponding to the side chains of the polymers is observed in thick films. In thinner films the intensity in the scattering ring is strongly concentrated along the surface normal direction indicating alignment of the side chains parallel to the surface. XPCS studies on polymer molten films reveal a transition from single through a stretched to another single exponential regime as the temperature is decreased from well above to near the bulk glass transition temperature. A universal scaling of the dynamics was discovered over a wide range of film thicknesses, temperatures, and molecular weights (except in the multiple relaxation regime). The observation is understood in a manner in which the capillary wave relaxation behavior progresses through a reptation dominated regime at high temperature (in the so-called terminal zone), followed by an intermediate or rubbery regime and then a regime dominated by Rouse-like modes of the nonentangled chain segments just above the bulk Tg. In the latter regime (known as the transition zone), the relaxation of capillary waves becomes independent of the molecular weight for above the critical value for entanglement

  472. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Synchrotron-based Research at General Motors Corporation"

    Presented by Dr. Joseph M. Ziegelbauer, General Motors R&D Center

    Friday, February 13, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  473. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Feed Barley Structure & Nutrient Availability Research"

    Presented by Professor Peiqiang Yu, University of Saskatchewan

    Friday, February 13, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  474. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Structure and Dynamics of Soft-Condensed Matter Systems"

    Presented by Lutz Wiegart, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France

    Thursday, February 12, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Soft condensed matter comprises systems such as liquid crystals, colloids, polymers, surfactant monolayer and gels. A common feature of such systems is the ease by which they can be deformed –for instance by thermal fluctuations- and their tendency for self-organization on a mesoscopic scale. The organization process is often driven by relatively weak interactions such as van der Waals forces, which compete with the thermal fluctuations. Therefore, changes of the dynamics of the sample are often mirrored by conformal changes in the self-assembled structures. It is shown how the viscoelastic properties of model membranes, consisting of surfactant monolayers at the liquid/air interface, can be probed by X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) under grazing incidence conditions. In combination with grazing incidence diffraction measurements (GIXD) the transitions in the dynamic response of the membranes to surface capillary waves can be related to conformal changes within the monolayers. Systems studied comprise phospholipids monolayers in interaction with charged crystallites and sugars as well as fatty acids at the rotator-crystalline phase transition. Future developments for the characterization of soft condensed matter systems by XPCS and in-situ x-ray diffraction and scattering methods will be discussed.

  475. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Benchmarking Radiation Transport Computer Codes"

    Presented by Albert Hanson

    Monday, February 9, 2009, 10 am
    Large Conference Room, Building 703

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Radiation transport computer codes have been developed as sophisticated tools for the analyses of nuclear reactors, accelerator systems, HEP and NP experiments, astrophysics, radiation dose planning, radio-isotope production, radiation damage of materials, radiation detector response, national security and more. One of the codes, MCNPX, has been developed at LANL and the author will discuss some medium energy accelerator experiments which have been performed to test specific routines of this computer code. The insights from this work will be useful in designing experiments to benchmark this and other similar computer codes for work with synchrotron radiation.

  476. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Structure-Function Relationships in Biomineralized Composites"

    Presented by David Kisailus, University of California, Riverside

    Friday, February 6, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  477. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "IR Reflectivity of Sodium"

    Presented by Amy Lazicki, Carnegie Institute of Washington

    Friday, February 6, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elaine DiMasi

  478. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Capability and Experience in the Manufacture of Synchrotron Radiation Hutches"

    Presented by Global Shielding, Global Partners in Shielding, INC.

    Friday, February 6, 2009, 10 am
    Bldg. 817, Room 36

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

  479. Employee Lunchtime Tour to NSLS II prototype magnets

    John Skaritka

    Friday, January 30, 2009, 12 pm
    Berkner Hall Upper Lobby

    Hosted by: Elaine Lowenstein

    Visit the first protype magnets built in industry. The group will see and hear about a prototype magnet girder populated with magnets from the ALBA light source in Barcelona. Ole! Sample sections of the vacuum system components can be seen as well as the state of the art alignment system to position and alight the magnets' invisible fields to microscopic tolerances.

  480. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Improved transverse hole conductivity in organic semiconducting polythiophene by thermal crosslinking"

    Presented by Raluca Gearba, CFN and NSLS, BNL

    Friday, January 30, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  481. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Optical evidence of mixed-phase behavior in manganite films"

    Presented by Peng Gao, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Friday, January 30, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  482. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The beam line design and beam physics study of energy recovery Linac free electron laser at Peking University"

    Presented by Guimei Wang

    Tuesday, January 27, 2009, 9 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Richard Heese

  483. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Amyloid Plaques in PSAPP Mice Bind Less Metal than Plaques in Human Alzheimer's Disease"

    Presented by Andreana Leskovjan, Stony Brook University and NSLS, BNL

    Friday, January 23, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  484. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Factors Controlling the Reactivity of H2S with Hemeproteins"

    Presented by Ruth Pietri, University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez Campus

    Friday, January 23, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  485. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Progress of the XAFS beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility"

    Presented by Yuying Huang, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, China

    Tuesday, January 20, 2009, 2 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Jun Wang

    In this presentation a general introduction to the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) will be presented. The main talk will focus on the design, installation, and preliminary commissioning results of XAFS beamline. The near term applications will be described.

  486. NSLS-II Seminar

    "A Tool to Study Energy Conversion in Molecular System - Building a Laser Initiated Time Resolved User Program at the APS"

    Presented by Klaus Attenkofer, ANL

    Tuesday, January 20, 2009, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Structural changes of molecular systems triggered by electronic excitations play an important role for the functionality of biological systems, light-harvesting chemical systems and, last but not least, in the rational design of synthetic structures mimicking biological systems which convert chemical energy to motion. Pulsed X-ray sources such as storage rings provide a new stroboscopic tool, often complementary to laser-based techniques, to probe not only the electronic excitations but also the structural response of molecules. Some examples of laser-initiated X-ray spectroscopy and wide angle x-ray scattering will demonstrate the strength of these techniques which presently find its limitations due to limited photon flux and time-resolution. Alternative detection mechanisms, including optoelectronic techniques, and improved beamline concepts will be presented which have the potential to overcome these obstacles resulting in time resolution of about 1ps. The talk will show how the objectives of the user community and the mandate of the funding agencies are correlated with these technical and programmatic developments.

  487. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Diamond Amplifier to Detector: A Trip around the Ring"

    Presented by John Smedley, Instrumentation Division, BNL

    Friday, January 16, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  488. NSLS-II Talk/Presentation

    "Surface and Interface Roughness Evolution in Sputtered WSi2 and WSi2/Si Films"

    Presented by Yiping Wang, University of Vermont

    Wednesday, January 14, 2009, 3 pm
    NSLS-II, Lg. Conf. Room (Bldg. 703)

    Hosted by: Nathalie Bouet

    Surface and interface roughness evolution in sputtered WSi2 films and WSi2/Si multilayers has been investigated by real-time GISAXS, X-ray scattering and X-ray reflection. The characterizations confirm that the surface and interface structures of sputtered films are strongly dependent on Ar sputtering gas pressure. The WSi2 surface can be changed from rough to ultra-smooth by reducing the Ar pressure. And alternately smooth and rough interface structures have been found to be formed in WSi2/Si multilayers. The enhanced energetic particles bombardment on the growing surface at low Ar sputtering pressure may be responsible for the observed structures.

  489. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Application of nano-positioners for X-ray characterization of flexible coated webbing and tape"

    Presented by Vyacheslav Solovyov

    Monday, January 12, 2009, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Large scale epitaxy is becoming more common for industrial production of energy-related materials and consumer products, such us superconducting tapes, solar panels, and adaptive architectural coatings. An increasingly important aspect, especially for power-oriented products, is reduction of manufacturing costs. This requires better understanding of epi film growth on long-length, flexible and inexpensive substrates. A rich array of structural information about the substrate surface can be derived from a well resolved X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence measurements. However, the high resolution reflectivity trace can only be obtained with a very flat sample surface profile. Flexible substrates are usually smooth on a micron-scale but microscopically warped by residual stress. A solution is to adaptively deform the substrate by an array of nano-positioners. This requires development of a compact closed-loop linear drive with good environmental stability. The second half of the talk starts with a brief historic perspective of nano-positioning system development since the inception of nanotechnology in 80s. The following overview will outline state-of the art industrial nano-positioning solutions, such as linear encoders for production of optical gratings, lithographic equipment and other positioning products. The latest trends in the field will be analyzed based on issued patents and patent applications from leading manufacturers of nano-positioning systems and accessories (Physik Instrumente, Heidenhain-Certo, Newfocus, Optodyne, Freescale Semiconductors, KLA-Tencor) and publications of academic R&D groups (D. Shu APS, Y. Dabin ESRF). Discussion of modern nano-positioning solutions include applications of complex composite piezodrives, fast-responsive feedback controls with feedforward corrections, novel position-sensitive sensors for closed-loop operation. Special attention will be given to displacement sensing and readout solutions, such as laser Doppler e

  490. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "High-resolution solution X-ray scattering and its application to crystallographic phasing"

    Presented by Xinguo Hong, MacChess, Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University

    Friday, January 9, 2009, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lin Yang

    X-ray scattering from biological macromolecules in solution is an increasingly important technique that yields low-resolution structural information on the molecules, and can be used to monitor their shape and conformational changes, including molecular associations 1 ,2, 3. However, in contrast to numerous successful applications of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), e.g. ref. 4-6, practical use of wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) data has been limited due to the weak protein scattering despite of the higher-resolution structural information of disordered and partially ordered systems. Recently, we have succeeded in developing an effective method to overcome the long-standing issue of radiation damage in the field of solution scattering 7. Precise solution SAXS and WAXS data of X-ray sensitive protein solutions can be obtained with small stationary cell7. High resolution pair-distance distribution function, P(r), of protein molecules has been obtained in terms of the complete solution scattering curve by combining accurate SAXS and WAXS data out to crystallographic resolution. X-ray crystallographic data demonstrate that in terms of the complete solution scattering profile, some high resolution aspects of the structural hierarchy and function of a protein may be investigated in solution8. In addition, we have applied the high resolution scattering curve to solve the phase problem, which remains central to crystallographic structure determination. The high-resolution solution models (envelope/bead) were constructed based on the complete SAXS/WAXS data up to 5 resolution, and a 6-dimensional search method of molecular replacement (FSEARCH) was used to locate a low-resolution molecular envelope determined from small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) within the crystallographic unit cell. The inclusion of high resolution WAXS data is essential for correctly locating the molecular envelope in the crystal unit cell, as well as for locating heavy atom sites 9. The in

  491. NSLS-II Seminar

    "A Polarized Soft X-ray Beamline Optimized for Studies of Magnetism at Diamond"

    Presented by Paul Steadman, Diamond Light Source, LTD, United Kingdom

    Wednesday, January 7, 2009, 10 am
    Bldg 817, Room 4

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

  492. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Synchrotron-based absolute calibration of x-ray sensors and optics for energetic plasma science and related fields"

    Presented by Jeff Keister

    Friday, December 19, 2008, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Understanding of complex astronomical and laboratory-based x-ray light sources hinges critically upon accurate measurement of radiation intensity. Today, the state-of-the art for such measurement involves the use of robust sensors and optics of various types, calibrated to percent-level accuracy using synchrotron radiation. Salient features and validation of beamlines for performing such work will be described, as will efforts in x-ray metrology and radiometry relevant to specific scientific applications.

  493. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Unstructural Biology: Characterizing Disorder in Synaptic Signaling Proteins"

    Presented by Mark Bowen, Stony Brook University, Department of Physiology and Biophysics

    Tuesday, December 16, 2008, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Marc Allaire

    The synapse is a signal processing machine composed of thousands of proteins that detects and responds to neurotransmitter signals. Many of the critical protein interactions at the synapse are mediated by intrinsically‐disordered polypeptides. Disorder is a common feature of signaling proteins. More than one third of eukaryotic proteins are predicted to be completely or partially disordered. Understanding the role of disordered polypeptides is one of the remaining challenges for structural biology. As with membrane proteins, disordered protein samples are challenging to produce and characterize. Because disordered proteins lack a unique structure, ensemble sampling methods cannot describe their behavior. Our work measures single molecule fluorescence as a means of probing intrinsic dynamics and monitoring interactions between disordered proteins. This methodology has shed light on the protein interactions involved in synaptic vesicle fusion and we are now trying to describe the structure of the partially‐disordered, scaffold protein, PSD‐95.

  494. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Research Experiences on Accelerator Physics and Technology"

    Presented by Shilun Pei

    Tuesday, December 16, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: James Rose

    In this talk, I will first introduce the 3 main parts of my work in SLAC from 2007.7 till now, which focues on experimental data analysis, high gradient structure design and beam dynamics simulation studies, etc. For the experimental data analysis part, I use a new curve fitting method instead of SVD (Singular Value Decomposition) to analyze the TTF dipole mode signal to extract the mode's modal and cavity tilt information. For the structure design studies part, I will show the damping effect studies for two kinds of X-band high gradient structures with cylindrical damping slots and choke, respectively. For the beam dynamics part, I'd like to show the longitudinal bunch lengthening effect compensation studies of a high charge S-band photo-injector. Finally, I will conclude my talk with a brief introduction of the Sub Harmonic Bunching (SHB) system for BEPCII injector Linac, this system has been pre-assembled and will be moved to the tunnel and conditioned in the near future.

  495. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Solving a picture puzzle using Advanced Detectors"

    Presented by D. Peter Siddons, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, December 12, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  496. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Self-assembled 2D TMV arrays on fluid lipid membranes"

    Presented by Suntao Wang, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, December 12, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  497. NSLS-II Talk/Presentation

    "Nanopositioning by PI (Physik Instrumente)"

    Presented by Mark Woods, PI (Physik Instrumente)

    Wednesday, December 10, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Ray Conley

    Mark Woods of PI(Physik Instrumente) will give a talk on: * Nanopositioning and Micropositioning products * Piezo Technology and how to achieve longer lifetime * Reliability of PZT materials * Creating Multi-Axis Motion with PZT actuators * Serial Kinematics vrs. Parallel Kinematics * Measuring Nanometers - Parallel Metrology * Ultrasonic Motors solutions * Piezo walk solutions - Nexline and NexAct * Hexapod solutions

  498. NSLS-II SEMINAR

    "XRD Structural Analysis of Epitaxial NiAl Thin Films"

    Presented by Noureddine Anibou, XStream Systems Inc.

    Monday, December 8, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Epitaxial growth of metals on semiconductors is of significant interest for both fundamental and technological reasons. Recently, nickel-rich NiAl alloys have been employed as model materials for high-temperature shape-memory alloys. Additionally, NiAl films have been extensively used as under-layers for Co longitudinal recording media. In this talk, the sputter deposition at ambient temperature of epitaxial NiAl thin films and their x-ray study using Buerger precession camera and conventional XRD will be discussed. Furthermore, grazing incidence diffraction (GID) experiments using bright synchrotron radiation which allowed a depth characterization of the different crystalline structures of the Ni63.2Al 36.8/Cu/Si system will be presented. Also to be explained, the substrate influence on the film crystallinity and on the martensitic transformation in Ni63.2Al 36.8 film. Finally, structural models of the growth of NiAl films will be introduced.

  499. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "To Be Announced"

    Presented by Rebecca Page, Brown University

    Friday, December 5, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  500. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Mesoparticles"

    Presented by Anatoly Frenkel, Yeshiva University

    Friday, December 5, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  501. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Artificial Electromagnetic Materials and their Application to Accelerator Physics"

    Presented by Sergey Antipov, Argonne National Laboratory

    Thursday, December 4, 2008, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Boris Podobedov

    Material properties are central to the field of accelerator physics. One new area of research is being investigated are "unconventional" materials for accelerator applications. Two types of such materials will be discussed: artificially constructed electromagnetic structures(metamaterials) and active medium based on Zeeman effect. Metamaterials are considered for novel types of detection schemes, for example in a non-invasive energy measurement method for ultra-relativistic charged particles. Active medium can be produced by Zeeman splitting of energy levels for some chemical systems in kG-level magnetic fields. This mechanism is proposed for X-band PASER (Particle Acceleration by Stimulated Emission of Radiation).

  502. NSLS-II SEMINAR

    "Localization of RF Breakdowns in a Standing Wave Cavity"

    Presented by Faya Wang, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Thursday, December 4, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: James Rose

    Although the ILC uses predominately superconducting cavities, the positron capture cavity location in both a high radiation environment and a solenoidal magnetic field requires it to be normal conducting. A 5-cell, normal-conducting, 1.3 GHz, standing-wave (SW) cavity was built as a prototype capture accelerator for the ILC positron source. During the high power test of the cavity, two type of breakdown events (hard event and soft event) have been found. In order to understand the two type of breakdown and locate the breakdown position, an equivalent circuit model is established. The result is that the breakdowns are isolating various numbers of cavity cells, thus the stored energy in the isolated cavity will decay in some of the natural modes of this part, which will have behavior as modes beating, and is efficiently confirmed with the circuit model.

  503. NSLS-II Presentation/Talk

    "Nanopositioning for Synchrotron Facility Applications"

    Presented by Martin Davies, Attocube Systems, United Kingdom

    Wednesday, December 3, 2008, 10 am
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

    Overcoming the challenges behind precise sample positioning, crystal alignment, and alignment of optical components in extreme environments can be difficult, unreliable and time consuming. Attocube's range of nanopositioning devices and scanners provide robustness and the ease of use necessary in user facilities. Examples of the principle of operation and solutions that have been provided for a variety of synchrotron facility applications will be discussed.

  504. NSLS-II Presentation/Talk

    "Phase Retrieval for X-ray Image Reconstruction and Beam Characterization"

    Presented by James R. Fienup and Manuel Guizar-Sicairos, University of Rochester, Institute of Optics

    Tuesday, November 25, 2008, 2 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Evans-Lutterodt, Kenneth

    A broad spectrum of applications has emerged for phase retrieval, including image reconstruction from stellar interferometer data, coherent lensless imaging, wavefront sensing for adaptive optics and aligning telescopes, and optical metrology. In this talk, we will focus on the application of these algorithms to the x-ray regime. We will describe a new coherent lensless imaging approach which allows a direct image reconstruction using the boundary-wave diffracted from a sharp feature as a holographic-like reference wave. We will also discuss the application of phase retrieval with transverse translation diversity as an image reconstruction technique and a novel approach for x-ray beam measurement.

  505. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Structural Analyses on durum Wheat Metallothionein (SAXS with Small Proteins!)"

    Presented by Zehra Sayers, Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey

    Monday, November 24, 2008, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Chi-Chang Kao

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight proteins with high binding capacity for essential metals including Zn and Cu but they also tenaciously bind toxic metals such as Cd and Hg. Metal ions in the protein are coordinated by the cysteine sequence motifs (cys-motifs) which have been used as a basis for classification of MTs as a superfamily. Recent studies indicate that all members of this family may not have a single unifying function; some MTs may participate in metal homeostasis, others may play a role in heavy metal detoxification and some others may be involved in metal ion transport. Lack of direct biochemical and biophysical data on purified proteins hinders establishment of sequence-structure-metal-binding and function relationships in MTs from different sources. We identified an MT from a Cd tolerant strain of Triticum durum wheat and cloned and expressed this protein (dMT) in E. coli for structural investigations. dMT was shown to be a type I plant MT with two terminal metal-binding clusters separated by a hinge region significantly longer than that observed in its mammalian counterparts (40 residues vs. 2-8 residues). Metal to protein ratio was found to be 5±1 Cd/dMT molecule. dMT structure was predicted by homology modeling and ab initio calculations which yielded a dumbbell shape with Cd-binding clusters at N- and C-termini separated by the hinge region with secondary structure elements. In parallel small angle X-ray solution scattering (SAXS) data form dMT and its mutants were used for modeling the molecular shape by ab initio calculations and simulated annealing methods. Results confirmed the extended shape and the structural parameters were found to be consistent with a folded hinge region. Monitoring Cd-binding and release by circular dichroism indicated non-cooperative metal-binding and that dMT retained a residual fold even in the apo-form. These findings point to a functional role where dMT may be involved in metal transport. A folded

  506. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Using synchrotron x-ray radiation to trace the source of iron to the open ocean"

    Presented by Phoebe Lam, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute Clark Laboratory

    Friday, November 21, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  507. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "XAS and EPR Investigations of Laccase as a Potential Electrocatalyst for Biological Fuel Cells"

    Presented by Thomas Arruda, Northeastern University, Department of Chemistry

    Friday, November 21, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  508. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Patterned Nanomagnetic Bits and Spin Torque Devices"

    Presented by Bruce D. Terris, Hitachi Global Storage Technologies, San Jose, CA

    Friday, November 21, 2008, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Dario Arena

    As conventional magnetic recording technology extends to ever higher areal density, it is possible the often predicted, and constantly increasing, density limit will be reached. This limit will likely be in the range of 750 1000 Gb/in2. The use of nanofabrication to create patterned magnetic elements, or patterned media, is one of the proposed approaches with the promise of delaying the onset of superparamagnetism and thus enabling higher areal density. I will discuss many of the challenges that must be overcome for patterned media to be successful, including fundamental physics and material science issues, new fabrication technologies, nm-scale manufacturing tolerances, and low cost budgets. One of these challenges is to controllably reverse one magnetic element, or bit, without affecting the neighboring elements. A narrow anisotropy distribution will be required, yet data suggest that as the element size shrinks, the distribution widens. This distribution arises from a number of sources, including shape and size distributions, edge effects, variations in the full film anisotropy and magnetostatic fields from neighboring elements. In the second part of the talk, I will discuss recent work on spin torque devices, and in particular on the influence of injected rf currents on the magnetization reversal dynamics. We find that the pre-switching free layer precessional orbits can be frequency locked to the injected rf currents, and in this manner the critical dc switching currents can be either increased or decreased. Speculation on the application of such effects for high density solid state storage will be discussed.

  509. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The pressure dependence of the structure of amorphous red phosphorus and the origin of the FSDP"

    Presented by Simon Clark, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Friday, November 21, 2008, 9 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    The accurate determination of the structure of amorphous materials is far from routine with intense debate over irreconcilable discrepancies between the interpretation of X-ray and neutron diffraction results and theoretical calculations. There even exists a lack of consensus within the literature concerning the origin of the first strong diffraction peak (FSDP) which exists for most amorphous and liquid materials. Here we present a computational determination of the average atomic structure of amorphous red phosphorus (a-rP) from 0 to 6.3 GPa. These computations were constrained by pair correlation functions determined from high-quality x-ray diffraction data. We will show that the average structure of a-rP consists of P3 triangles, and P4 pyramids linked by chains of P atoms. We will also demonstrate a direct and positive correlation between the a-rP FSDP scattering intensity and the fraction of atomic scale void-space. Additionally the pressure dependence of the FSDP position will be shown to be directly attributable to the nominal void spacing and void periodicity. The result of the analysis of additional disordered materials, ranging from weak to strong liquids and glasses, will be shown to reproduce the same positive correlations.

  510. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Utility Systems for Synchrotron Projects, Merit Merrells Experience at Diamond and at the Australian Synchrotron"

    Presented by Anthony Wells and Chris Berriman, Merit Merrill Technology Limited, United Kingdom

    Thursday, November 20, 2008, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

  511. NSLS-II SEMINAR

    "New trends in Powder Diffraction"

    Presented by Dr. Eric Dooryhee, Neel Institute, CNRS Grenole, France, France

    Thursday, November 20, 2008, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Powder Diffraction (PD) is usually believed to be a relatively straightforward method, but continuous progress in X-ray sources and instrumentation (including optics, detectors,) as well as progress in data analysis and modeling have tremendously broadened the power and the scope of the technique. PD covers a wide range of topics: structural chemistry, physics, earth science, pharmaceutics, metallurgy, cultural heritage Materials science is becoming a major area, pushing PD into the study of the structure of (functional, heterogeneous) materials and their defects at the atomic-scale, preferably under their real conditions of synthesis or operation. Using high energy photons, PD can examine the materials in situ or in operando inside a large range of environmental cells, under (extreme) conditions of temperature, pressure, stress, radiation, pH, corrosion, magnetic and electrical fields (parametric experiments). Using intense beams, PD can explore structural transformations, reaction pathways and kinetics in real time (down to the msec scale). Higher momentum transfers in PD open the way to the study of amorphous, partly crystalline or nanocrystalline materials using the direct, model-free Fourier transform of the diffraction data. In the high resolution mode, PD looks at materials of increasing crystallographic complexity (low symmetry, large unit cell), including organics and proteins. Based on my experience on several SR PD beamlines, and in particular BM16 (now ID31) at the ESRF, I shall show some examples and discuss some possible options for the PD beamline project at NSLS II.

  512. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Micro-spectroscopic approach to catalyst in action"

    Presented by Ilya Stavitski, University of Utrecht

    Friday, November 14, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  513. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "X-ray Studies of Spintronic Devices"

    Presented by Thomas Hase, University of Warwick

    Friday, November 14, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  514. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The structure of HgSe nanoclusters in zeolitic materials"

    Presented by Miguel Castro-Colin, Unversity of Texas at El Paso

    Friday, November 14, 2008, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Zeolites present a robust template for nanomaterials synthesis, and in the work presented, nanoclusters of Mercury-Selenium were produced through chemical vapor deposition using as a template two different zeolitic frameworks, tubular as well as spherical. The nanometer size character of the zeolitic pores enabled spectroscopic response changes in the nanoclusters which are highlighted here. Structural models corresponding to each pore type were extracted through powder X-ray diffraction, off-edge and anomalous, using Rietveld refinement of data collected at synchrotron sources. It will also be discussed the relevance of the distinctive diffuse scattering signal that accompanies the diffraction patterns of the samples analyzed.

  515. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Frequency-tunable Microwave Beam Shaping for 1 MW Gyrotron: Design, Simulation and Test"

    Presented by Shaolin Liao, University of Wisconsin, Madison

    Thursday, November 13, 2008, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: James Rose

    State-of-art techniques will be covered in high-power microwave beam shaping and transmission for frequency-tunable (4-frequency/mode), 1 Mega-Watts gyrotron design. Gyrtron is a high-power microwave generator that converts near-relativistic gryrating electron beam energy into microwave, which can produces pulsed or continuous wave power up to Mega-Watts at frequency greater than 100 GHz, with possible applications in plasma heating, material sintering, deep space communication and so on. The demand for frequency-tunable microwave beam-shaping and transmission for gyrotron is of great interest and poses a challenge for high-power microwave scientists and engineers. We have successfully designed such a 4-frequency/mode (TE21,6 at 107.5 GHz, TE22,6 at 110 GHz, TE24,7 at 124.5 GHz, TE25,7 at 127.5 GHz) tunable system for CPI-type 1MW gyrotron, with overall power efficiency greater than 99.4% at the gyrotron output Brewster window. Many of these design techniques will be covered in this talk, which include TE mode converter, Gaussian beam shaping by aluminum/copper mirrors, Brewster diamond window for Gaussian beam transmission, high-order mode effect in resonant microwave cavity, shaping Gaussian beam into flat-top beam and so on. Design result and computer simulation (HFSS, Surf3d, Cascade) will be shown. Cold test facility based on superheterodyne technique will be discussed. Cold test result will be given, along with hot test result carried out by CPI.

  516. NSLS-II SEMINAR

    "Control and Electronics system upgrades for the Pohang Light Source"

    Presented by Kiman Ha, Pohang Light Source, Korea

    Monday, November 10, 2008, 4 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Leo Dalesio

    Pohang light source is third generation 2.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility in the east of Korea. The Linear accelerator and Storage ring were commissioned in the 1994 and continually operation. I was started work from 1991 to present for the Linac and Storage ring control system, power supply, BPM and LLRF control system. I will be introducing about my experience of control and electronics system development and upgrade status and feature planes for the PLS-2 project.

  517. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The Molecular Effects of Radioprotectant Amifostine on Irradiated Rat Brain Tissues"

    Presented by Gulgun Cakmak, Department of Biological Sciences, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey

    Friday, November 7, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  518. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Structural studies on elongated multidomain proteins, when orientation really matters"

    Presented by Enrique Rudino-Pinera, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico

    Friday, November 7, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  519. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Recent Experience in Building Equipment for Synchrotron Projects Around the World"

    Presented by FMB Company, Comprising FMB Berlin, and FMB Oxford (formerly Oxford Danfysik), Germany, United Kingdom

    Thursday, November 6, 2008, 3:30 pm
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Daniel Fischer

    Recent projects have included: SR vacuum vessels (eg NEG coated extruded Aluminum chambers for Insertion Devices); Front ends; Front End Blade BPMs; Complete beamlines: Infra-red, Soft x-ray, Hard x-ray; Beamline components including x-ray mirror systems and monochromators X-ray detector

  520. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Investigation of multi-scale processes in complex natural systems: behavior of uranium in a wetland over 6500 years"

    Presented by Paul Northrup

    Wednesday, November 5, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    The DOE is steward to a large legacy of subsurface uranium contamination from research and weapons production activities. But despite extensive laboratory studies of the chemical and physical behavior of U, efforts to recover -- or even to contain -- this U have not been very successful. This is largely due to the complexities of often-competing chemical, physical and biological processes, combined with heterogeneities from the meter to the submicron scale as well as seasonal and climatological variations. Understanding this complexity requires, first, identification of a system with sufficient complexity but well-understood boundaries, and second, application of a broad suite of analytical tools. I will describe a natural U-containing sediment/water system that offers insights into long-term U behavior and hope for future remediation and recovery efforts. Examination of this system employs a range of synchrotron imaging and spectroscopic techniques, to explore molecular-scale processes involving U, Fe, Mn, S, P, Th and organic components: microbeam x-ray fluorescence mapping and tomography of elemental distribution and associations, microbeam and bulk x-ray absorption spectroscopy to identify speciation and oxidation state, lower-energy XAS, novel use of M-edge and dual-energy XAS, and IR microspectroscopy. These are combined with isotopic studies (U, Th, S, and C systems), which can be used to track chemical and physical processes back in time.

  521. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Molecular aggregation states and surface mechanical properties of surface-grafted polyperfluoroalkyl acrylate thin film"

    Presented by Hiroki Yamaguchi, Kyushu University, Japan

    Friday, October 31, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  522. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Quantized electron subbands at semiconductor surfaces"

    Presented by Louis Piper, Boston University

    Friday, October 31, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  523. NSLS Workshop

    "Introduction to XAFS: Experiment, Theory, Data Analysis"

    Thursday, October 30, 2008, 8:30 am
    NSLS

    Hosted by: Anatoly Frenkel

  524. NSLS-II SEMINAR

    "Soft x-ray linear dichroism - the route from spectra to images: a STXM liquid crystal study"

    Presented by Konstanine Kaznatcheev

    Wednesday, October 29, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) combines excellent orientation selectivity via linear dichroic Near Edge X-ray Absorption Spectra (NEXAFS), and high spatial resolution, limited at present by x-ray optics manufacturing to ~15 nm. Samples are not limited to highly ordered crystals and films, but can be non-crystalline, inhomogeneous and partially oriented specimens, such as liquid crystals (LC). The presentation will include general introduction to STXM technique, data analysis methods to generate "molecular orientation maps" and results of STXM investigations of (a) binary mixture forming a SmAb phase [1], (b) lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals [2], and (c) the role of surfactant and ion additives on LC texture. These experiments suggest that the LC director can be reconstructed with ~5% (magnitude) and ~5 degrees (orientation) accuracy at 100 nm scale in 3-D and position STXM as ultimate technique to probe molecular orientation in soft matter. Future prospects in conjunction with NSLSII construction will be given.

  525. NSLS-II SEMINAR

    "A VIEW TO THE FUTURE: XRPD AT THE NSLS-II"

    Presented by Dr. Martin McMillan

    Tuesday, October 28, 2008, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    In this presentation, I will review my background in x-ray science which includes work in XRPD, EXAFS, surface scattering, small molecule crystallography, protein crystallography - along with molecular modeling and computer programming - and emphasize how my background meshes with the broad scientific objectives of PING and NSLS-II. Further, I will discuss opportunities in nanoscience with a look at the possible funding interactions with the rapidly growing investment community in this area of materials ressearch.

  526. NSLS-II SEMINAR

    "High-Energy X-rays for Structural Study of Advanced Materials in Complex Sample Environments"

    Presented by Yang Ren, Argonne National Laboratory

    Monday, October 27, 2008, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    The availability of synchrotron photons generated in high-flux and with energies greater than 60 keV has significantly advanced the field of materials research because of the great penetration and low absorption of high-energy x-rays. The ability of obtaining high angular resolution for high-energy x-ray scattering provides further research opportunities. Here I will present the development of a high-energy x-ray facility at the APS beamline 11IDC, where we combine a 2D detector and a high-resolution detection system for both rapid and high-resolution x-ray diffraction studies. A large variety of materials in bulk forms as well as in nano-scale phases can be investigated (using both diffraction and total scattering techniques) in confined and complex samples environments (e.g., in combination of temperature, pressure, stress, magnetic field). The technical details and scientific research opportunities at this beamline will be presented, together with some recent results in different research areas, ranging from correlated electron systems to applied materials. Future perspectives for a synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction facility will also be discussed. (Use of the Advanced Photon Source was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.)

  527. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Alterations in the mineral and collagen matrix of bisphosphonate-treated bone and osteoblasts using infrared microspectroscopy and full-field x-ray imaging"

    Presented by Meghan Ruppel, Stony Brook University

    Friday, October 24, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  528. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Pump-probe IR studies of superconductors and semiconductors in a magnetic field: what we have learned from all those timing shifts on the VUV/IR ring"

    Presented by Larry Carr, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, October 24, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  529. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "X-ray spectromicroscopy of soil bacteria"

    Presented by Bjorg Larson, Stony Brook University

    Friday, October 17, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  530. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Diamond kinoform hard X-ray refractive lenses: design, nanofabrication, and testing"

    Presented by Abdel Isakovic, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, October 17, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  531. NSLS-II Seminar

    "What I have been doing at SPring-8"

    Presented by Yoshitaka Kawashima, Spring-8

    Tuesday, October 14, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Jim Rose

    For the first time, electron beam was injected into the SPring-8 storage ring in January 1997, and user operation started in October at designed current of 100 mA without any trouble. I briefly present the accelerator complex of SPring-8 and the performance.

  532. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Naturally Obsessed"

    Presented by Richard and Carole Rifkind, Parnassas Works

    Friday, October 10, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lisa Miller

    This special edition of the Friday Lunchtime Seminar will feature the screening of "Naturally Obsessed," a one-hour documentary, filmed in part at the NSLS. The documentary follows a group of Columbia University crystallographers for three years. The film, featuring the research group of NSLS user Larry Shapiro, was produced and directed by Carole Rifkind, an author and educator, and her husband Richard Rifkind, former head of the Columbia University Cancer Center and Chairman Emeritus of the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research. Specifically, the film chronicles the group's study of a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to reveal a new path toward the treatment of diabetes and obesity.

  533. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Element- and Layer-Resolved Magnetization Dynamics at Picosecond Resolution"

    Presented by Dario Arena

    Monday, October 6, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    We present the combination of two powerful spectroscopic techniques, time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (tr-XMCD) and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), which produces a new and powerful tool for examining the dynamics of heterogeneous magnetic materials. With this technique, the dynamic response of individual layers or precession of individual elements in an alloy can be detected. Extremely accurate measurements of the precession cone angle (to 0.2°) and the phase of oscillation (to 2°, or ~5 ps at 2.3 GHz) are achieved. With this precision, and the ability to detect the dynamics of individual elements, fundamental assumptions in phenomenological theories such as the Landau-Lifschitz-Gilbert formalism can be investigated. The combination of tr-XMCD and FMR can be used to study the origins of intrinsic precession damping by measuring the relative phase lag of dissimilar and precessing spins. We will discuss measurement of the dynamic response of specific elements and separate layers in several alloys and multilayer structures. Recent advances in the measurement of the element-resolved complex susceptibility and prospects for future advances will also be presented.

  534. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Mechanistic investigation of the sulfide layer formed at rubber-tire cord interface"

    Presented by Akshay Ashirgade, University of Cincinnati

    Friday, October 3, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  535. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Direct imaging of interface structures at sub-Angstrom resolution of high-Tc superconducting thin films by COBRA technique"

    Presented by Hua Zhou, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, October 3, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  536. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Photon Beam Stability Requirements for Light Sources and How They Translate to Electron Beam Parameters"

    Presented by Robert Hettel, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), CA

    Thursday, October 2, 2008, 2 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lonny Berman

  537. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Basics of storage ring light sources and NSLS machine introduction"

    Presented by Boris Podobedov, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, September 26, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  538. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Real-time x-ray studies of Ga adsorption/desorption on sapphire surfaces"

    Presented by Nathalie Bouet, Boston University

    Friday, September 26, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  539. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "areaDetectors"

    Presented by Mark Rivers, University of Chicago

    Thursday, September 25, 2008, 3 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Bob Dalesio

  540. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Development of Scanning Tunneling Potentiometry for Measurement of Electronic Transport at Short Length Scales"

    Presented by Michael Rozler

    Monday, September 15, 2008, 9 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    It is clear that complete understanding of macroscopic properties of materials is impossible without a thorough knowledge of behavior at the smallest length scales. While the past 25 years have witnessed major advances in a variety of techniques that probe the nanoscale properties of matter, electrical transport measurements - the heart of condensed matter research - have lagged behind. This talk will describe a scanning tunneling potentiometry (STP) system constructed by us to simultaneously map the transport-related electrochemical potential distribution of a biased sample along with its surface topography. Combining a novel sample biasing technique with a continuous current-nulling feedback scheme pushes the noise performance of the measurement to its fundamental limit - the Johnson noise of the STM tunnel junction. The resulting 130 nV voltage sensitivity allows us to spatially resolve local potentials at scales down to 2 nm, while maintaining atomic scale STM imaging, all at scan sizes of up to 15 microns. A mm-range two-dimensional coarse positioning stage and the ability to operate from liquid helium to room temperature with a fast turn-around time greatly expand the versatility of the instrument. Use of carefully selected model materials, combined with excellent topographic and voltage resolution has allowed us to distinguish measurement artifacts caused by surface roughness from true potentiometric features, a major problem in previous STP studies. The measurements demonstrate that STP can produce physically meaningful results for homogeneous transport as well as non-uni form conduction dominated by material microstructures. The results establish scanning tunneling potentiometry as a useful tool for physics and materials science.

  541. NSLS-II Seminar

    "X-ray Diffraction Metrology in Semiconductor Fabrication"

    Presented by Kris Kozaczek

    Monday, September 8, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Semiconductor fabrication is a challenging filed of the thin film metallurgy due to the nanometer scale of the devise dimensions and the use of complex materials systems. One of the significant trends in the semiconductor metrology has been the incorporation of the sophisticated analytical probes as routine line monitoring tools. X-ray diffraction (XRD) has found its application in testing the quality of single crystal and polycrystalline ultra thin films and patterned structures. This presentation will discuss the unique requirements for the measurement techniques and data analyses necessary for the in-line XRD characterization of microstructure of thin films. The measured microstructure characteristics, such as the phase composition, crystallographic texture, domain size, and microstrains are important factors in process development and control. The microstructure of the stack of thin films may be tailored for the improved reliability and performance of the device. The microstructure may also serve as a internal sensor during the film processing since it is sensitive to variation in processing conditions. The examples of the applications of the XRD metrology in the current semiconductor processing, both in the front-end -of the line and the back-end-of the line will be presented together with the requirements for the future technology nodes.

  542. National Synchrotron Light Source II Seminar

    "Challenges and progress in materials physics and nanopatterning of hard X-ray nanofocusing optics"

    Presented by Abdel Isakovic, BNL

    Tuesday, August 19, 2008, 2 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Ray Conley

    This talk will offer a brief review of some materials and techniques that are considered for hard X-ray nanofocusing optics, and specifically, I will show advantages of diamond over silicon in hard X-ray kinoform refractive optics. The testing of the focal spot size shows the result of 26-29 nm for compound kinoform refractive silicon optics and 1-2 microns spot size for single diamond lens. Local (CFN) capabilities for future nanopatterning of multilayer Laue lenses, zone plates, and kinoform optics will be presented with the focus on plasma processing (ICP RIE) and with some suggestions for future facility upgrades. Lastly, I will briefly present some other X-ray optics elements that, together with our lenses, make a definitive step towards creation of the full X-ray optics bench, specifically, an X-ray prism array and an example of Fabry-Perot X-ray resonator.

  543. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Light Sources Developments at the NSRRC - from 1.5 GeV TLS to 3 GeV TPS"

    Presented by June-Rong Chen, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Taiwan

    Monday, August 18, 2008, 1:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Hsiao-Chaun Hseuh

    The developments of the 1.5 GeV Taiwan Light Source (TLS) at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC) is presented. The TLS has been operating for 15 years and has been highly reliable. A 1.6 nm-rad low-emittance 3 GeV synchrotron light source, the Taiwan Photon Source (TPS, with a circumference of 518.4m), at the NSRRC is proposed to meet the requirements of advanced scientific studies. Given the strictness of these requirements, the TPS must be constructed to perform well in many areas. The TPS has been preliminarily designed based on experience gained at the TLS. This report also presents the technical design of the TPS, the factors that influence beam quality and the reliability of the system.

  544. NSLS-II Seminar

    "X-ray Diffraction Microscopy Toward Nanometers:"

    Presented by Yong Chu, Argonne National Laboratory, USA

    Monday, August 18, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    Proposed source properties at the NSLS II offer an exciting opportunity to develop hard x-ray microscopy tools with an unprecedented spatial resolution. This presentation will give an overview of several different microscopy techniques. It will discuss effective strategies for utilizing available contrast mechanisms to probe the crystalline structure and chemical status of atoms confined or localized within tens of nanometers or less. This talk will also present the results of on-going scientific research using x-ray diffraction microscopy at spatial resolutions of a few microns to tens of nanometers, with the emphasis on how the techniques developed can be used for designing an effective x-ray microscopy instrument at 10 nm or less.

  545. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Looking Deep into Materials with High Energy X-rays"

    Presented by Harald Reichert, Max Planck Institut fur Metallforshung, Stuttgart

    Friday, August 15, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  546. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Elastic properties and acoustic velocities of e-FeSi at high pressure and temperature: a synchrotron x-radiation and ultrasonic interferometry study"

    Presented by Matthew Whitaker, Stony Brook University

    Friday, August 8, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  547. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "A surface driven route to magnetic doping - surface nanostructures and quantum dots"

    Presented by Petra Reinke, University of Virginia

    Friday, August 8, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  548. NSLS-II Seminar

    "KLA-Tencor Optical Surface Profilometers"

    Presented by Brian Crawfrord, KLA-Tencor

    Wednesday, August 6, 2008, 3 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Raymond Conley

  549. National Synchrotron Light Source Symposium

    "Spin Transfer in Magnetic Nanopillars"

    Presented by Prof. Andy Kent, New York University, Manhattan, NY

    Wednesday, August 6, 2008, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Elio Vescovo

  550. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Understanding phase transformations in yttria-stabilized zirconia for thermal barrier coatings"

    Presented by Yan Gao, GE

    Friday, August 1, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  551. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Flow properties of bent-core materials in their isotropic fluid phase"

    Presented by Antal Jakli, Kent State University

    Friday, August 1, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  552. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Biological coherent diffraction imaging: progress, challenges and the future"

    Presented by Enju Lima, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France

    Monday, July 28, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Hanfei Yan

    Imaging of biological material, such as a whole cell, in three dimensions will deepen our insight into cellular biology. This requires high-resolution imaging of samples as close as possible to their natural state without introducing structural artifacts by staining or sectioning, or by radiation damage. Currently, x-ray microscopy based on a zone plate (scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) and transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM)) provides high-resolution imaging that benefits from the short wave length and high penetration length of x-rays. Due to this direct imaging using a lens, x-ray microscopy yields high throughput as well as spectroscopy and elemental mapping of the sample. However, as higher resolution lenses are sought in the future, the intrinsic limitations of optical lenses, such as short depth of field, will become problematic with biological samples of a-few-micron thickness. Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI), where image reconstruction is done through a computational lens (reconstruction algorithm), can be complementary to current x-ray microscopy. The resolution of the microscope is determined not by a lens, but by the largest angles at which scattered radiation from the sample can be detected and the convergence of the reconstruction algorithm. Currently the CDI method in biological imaging is still under development since obtaining highquality data for reconstruction is hindered by the fact that biological samples are weak scattering. In this talk, I will present the progress of biological CDI using soft and hard xrays with challenges and possible solutions. The future of x-ray biological imaging might be found in the combination of two methods, for example, STXM and CDI, to provide direct imaging and improved resolution.

  553. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Structural plasticity of the P22 tail needle probed with xenon gas"

    Presented by Adam Olia, SUNY Upstate Medical School

    Friday, July 25, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  554. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Refraction based X-Ray imaging for medicine"

    Presented by Masami Ando, Tokio University of Science and Technology

    Friday, July 25, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  555. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "MAX 4 Project"

    Presented by Prof. Nils Martensson, Lund University, MAX-Lab, Sweden

    Wednesday, July 23, 2008, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: ChiChang Kao

  556. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Beam Monitor and Bunch-by-Bunch Feedback Control"

    Presented by Weixing Cheng, SLAC

    Monday, July 21, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

    In this talk, I will introduce two main parts of my recent research. The first part is about the synchrotron light monitor systems at SLAC storage rings. Streak camera bunch length and synchronous phase measurement has been carried out at varies conditions. The machine impedance has been analyzed from the measured data. Second part I will introduce the transverse and longitudinal bunch by bunch feedback activities at KEK photon factory, both systems are now working well.

  557. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Interaction between the General Anesthetic Halothane and Model Ion Channel Peptides in Langmuir Monolayers: An X-ray Reflectivity Study"

    Presented by Joseph Strzalka, University of Pennsylvania

    Friday, July 18, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  558. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Scope into Earth's Interior through a Diamond Window"

    Presented by Sean Shieh, University of Western Ontario

    Friday, July 18, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  559. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Dynamic Effects of Elliptically Polarized Undulators"

    Presented by Christoph Steier, ALS/LBL

    Wednesday, July 16, 2008, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

    Insertion devices can have a major effect on the beam dynamics and therefore the injection efficiency and beam lifetime in synchrotron light sources. This is especially true for low and intermediate energy storage rings. Particularly Elliptically Polarizing Undulators (EPUs) which in the last years have been very popular because they provide full photon polarization control to users can have big detrimental effects on the nonlinear single particle dynamics. This is due to the fast, intrinsic transverse roll-off of the magnetic field. The roll-off is especially fast for vertical polarization settings, and particularly low and medium energy light sources and long period EPUs are prone to those effects. The talk will describe different simulation methods to evaluate the effects, several experimental techniques to characterize them and correction methods now routinely used at several like sources (BESSY, ALS, SPEAR)

  560. NSLS-II Seminar

    "VG Scienta"

    Presented by Carl Richardson, VG Scienta Inc

    Monday, July 14, 2008, 10 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Konstantine Kaznacheev

    VG Scienta is uniquely positioned to support UHV engineering projects for scientific research. Our company provides standard components, specialized vacuum systems and surface analytical systems. Our standard catalogue offers a wide range of products (over 2000 items) including linear and rotary drives, manipulators, cryostats, UHV chambers, vacuum gauging, and RGA systems. Our specialized vacuum systems historically have included the booster, and a large part of the main storage ring, at Diamond, modular / user proof end stations, together with surface analysis, MBE deposition, and UHV depositions systems. Our surface analytical components include electron analyzers, hemispherical, time of flight and x-ray emission spectrometers for applications such as ARPES, XPS, UPS, high pressure XPS, high energy XPS. VG Scienta is well positioned to support NSLS II in a number of applications, and a brief presentation of our historical experiences and current capabilities is offered.

  561. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Multiferroic Ising Chains"

    Presented by Valery Kiryukhin, Rutgers University, Physics Department

    Friday, July 11, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  562. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Elusive iceX novel aspects on the structure of water ice at ultrahigh pressures"

    Presented by Oliver Tschauner, University Nevada Las Vegas, Physics Department

    Friday, July 11, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  563. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Implementation and evolution of the top-up operation and filling pattern controls at the Swiss Light Source"

    Presented by Timo Korhonen, Swiss Light Source, Switzerland

    Wednesday, July 9, 2008, 2 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Leo Dalesio

    The Swiss Light Source has been operated in top-up mode for practically its whole life time. The talk explains the necessary features of the timing and control system to achieve this. The operating modes and associated applications are outlined. The applications have evolved from a simple open-loop filling to a sophisticated system that can handle different operating conditions and filling modes with a great degree of automation. During this evolution we have encountered a number of phenomena that we did not expect. Those phenomena are outlined and their causes and implications to for example beam stability are discussed. The latest addition to the system is the recently upgraded filling pattern feedback system. The technical implementation and the main advantages of this system are explained.

  564. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Three Dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy"

    Presented by Lawrence Margulies, Risoe National Laboratory, Denmark

    Tuesday, July 8, 2008, 9 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Qun Shen

    The three dimensional x-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope is a unique instrument which combines the use of high energy x-rays generated at a synchrotron source with a "tomographic" approach to acquisition of diffraction data, enabling a fast 3D structural characterization of mm-cm sized samples. The position, volume, orientation, grain boundary morphology, elastic and plastic strain can be derived for hundreds of grains simultaneously. The spatial resolution is on the order of 5 microns, while diffracting units of sizes down to 25 nm can be observed. 3DXRD microscopy for the first time enables dynamic studies of the individual grains and sub-grains in polycrystals. Hence, it is possible to observe how the structural elements nucleate, grow, deform or transform and in general how they interact with their local environment. The methodology will be presented and the potential applications illustrated by examples ranging from in-situ deformation and recrystallization to phase transformations.

  565. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Experience at Caratelli in the construction of x-ray beamline hutches at synchrotrons around the world"

    Presented by Thierry Gardon, Caratelli, France

    Monday, June 30, 2008, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

  566. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Microstructure foundations of high performance in organic semiconductors"

    Presented by Dean DeLongchamp, NIST

    Friday, June 27, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  567. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The role of synchrotron radiation in elucidating arsenic speciation and cycling in poultry production systems"

    Presented by Jen Seiter, University of Delaware

    Friday, June 20, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  568. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "EXAFS of enzymes involved in bacterial proliferation"

    Presented by David Tierney, University of New Mexico

    Friday, June 20, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  569. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Transverse to Longitudinal Emittance Exchange and Investigations of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector"

    Presented by Raymond Fliller, FNAL

    Friday, June 20, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

    The A0 Photoinjector is a 16MeV electron linac at Fermilab which is used for Accelerator R&D. Most experiments to date have involved interesting and unique beam manipulations and development of the relevant diagnostics to measure these beams. Most recently a transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange beamline has been installed. This beamline uses a copper 3.9 GHz deflecting mode or crab cavity between two doglegs to affect the exchange. Data taking for this experiment is underway. Various mechanisms may dilute this exchange or effect the emittance measurements, such as Coherent Synchrotron Radiation. In this talk we will discuss the progress of the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange experiment at Fermilab. We will also discuss measurements of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, its effect on the electron beam and consequences for the emittance exchange.

  570. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Transverse to Longitudinal Emittance Exchange and Investigations of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector"

    Presented by Raymond Fliller, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    Friday, June 20, 2008, 10 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky

    The A0 Photoinjector is a 16MeV electron linac at Fermilab which is used for Accelerator R&D. Most experiments to date have involved interesting and unique beam manipulations and development of the relevant diagnostics to measure these beams. Most recently a transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange beamline has been installed. This beamline uses a copper 3.9 GHz deflecting mode or crab cavity between two doglegs to affect the exchange. Data taking for this experiment is underway. Various mechanisms may dilute this exchange or effect the emittance measurements, such as Coherent Synchrotron Radiation. In this talk we will discuss the progress of the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange experiment at Fermilab. We will also discuss measurements of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, its effect on the electron beam and consequences for the emittance exchange.

  571. NSLS-II Project Seminar

    "Multilayer Laue Lenses for Nanofocusing of Hard X-rays: Status and Prospects"

    Presented by Dr. Al Macrander, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory

    Thursday, June 19, 2008, 10:30 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room 4, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Andy Broadbent

  572. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Interfacial uncompensated spins in buried exchange bias system: study on resonant soft x-ray reflectivity"

    Presented by Jun-Sik Lee, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, June 13, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  573. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "XPCS studies of phase transition kinetics in metallic alloys"

    Presented by Karl Ludwig, Boston University

    Friday, June 13, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  574. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "DNA Cutting Molecular Scissors: From the Bench to the Bedside"

    Presented by Eva Scheuring-Vanamee, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York

    Friday, June 6, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    Restriction endonucleases that are part of the restriction-modification system of bacteria serve as a paradigm for the site-specific cleavage of DNA. Since their discovery of more than three decades ago, they have become ubiquitous tools in molecular biology. Recent developments in creating artificial nucleases with tailored specificities have opened the door for new applications, including therapeutic gene targeting. The talk will focus on discussing the remarkable diversity and possible evolution of restriction enzymes, the structural factors that are responsible for their tight specificity, and possible ways to design enzymes with new specificities.

  575. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "The ESRF Upgrade: Bigger, Better, Smaller, Faster, Higher"

    Presented by Edward Mitchell, ESRF, France

    Thursday, June 5, 2008, 2 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Bob Sweet

    The ESRF is the first third-generation storage ring light source; it will celebrate the 20th anniversary of the signature of the Convention between the twelve original Member countries later this year. In these 20 years synchrotron science has changed enormously, and the use of synchrotron light has become knitted firmly into many types of science, the number of which continues to grow with new user communities arriving on the synchrotron scene. With this progression, and unprecedented demand on its facilities, the ESRF has now reached the limits of its current infrastructure and requires a step increase in its capacity and resources. As a result, an ambitious upgrade programme of the ESRF is under development: a ten-year plan to greatly enhance the ESRF and to maintain its beamlines at state-of-the-art, and to be able to respond to the requirements of new science in the coming ten to twenty years.

  576. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Introduction to Accelerator Tool Box"

    Presented by Andrei Terebilo, SLAC

    Thursday, June 5, 2008, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

  577. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "X-ray magnetic scattering study of field-induced multiferroic GdFe3(BO3)4"

    Presented by Haiding Mo, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, May 30, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  578. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Room temperature surface ferromagnetism and phase coexistence in epitaxial FeRh thin films"

    Presented by Yi Ding, CMPMSD, BNL

    Friday, May 30, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  579. Brookhaven Accelerator Forum

    "Concept of Ultra High Spectral Flux Light Source"

    Presented by Timur Shaftan, et al, NSLS II

    Wednesday, May 21, 2008, 3:30 pm
    Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Satoshi Ozaki

  580. Users' Meeting

    "2008 NSLS and CFN Joint Users' Meeting"

    Monday, May 19, 2008, 8:30 am
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

  581. NSLS-II Seminar

    "A Very Simple Method of Effectively Detecting All the Magnet Misalignments Almost at Once."

    Presented by Hiroshi Nishimura, Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley Naitonal Lab.

    Monday, May 12, 2008, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Sam Krinsky

    By using a linear model, one can calculate the response matrix of magnet misalignments. Therefore, one can "correct" the closed orbit displacements on a computer. Although the number of beam position monitors is usually much less than the number of magnets, it is possible to solve for the magnet displacements by changing the optics while maintaining the magnet misalignments constant.

  582. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Gas Breakdown Study with a 110-GHz Gaussian Pulsed Beam Generated from a 1.5-MW gyrotron"

    Presented by Yoshiteru Hidaka, MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, USA

    Friday, May 9, 2008, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Xijie Wang

  583. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Insertion Device and Permanent Magnet Technology at STI Optronics"

    Presented by Steve Gottschalk, STI Optronics, Inc.

    Thursday, May 8, 2008, 1:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Toshi Tanabe

    A review of insertion device and permanent magnet technology at STI Optronics will be presented. STI Optronics has been building ID's since 1979. We have completely manufactured over 65 ID's with wavelengths from 18mm to 200mm for use in FEL's and SR sources. All devices have met all specifications without cost increases. Recent work on pole shaping, magnet/pole sorting, application specific FEA based electromagnetic design optimization; multi-harmonic undulators, ILC Damping Ring Wiggler prototype, micro-bunching undulator design, PM optics design/build and turn-key ID magnetic measurement systems will be described. Specific examples relevant to the NLSL II Damping Ring Wiggler (DRW) and three pole wiggler (3PW) will be presented.

  584. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Carbon Nanobiomaterials: Prospects for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Bone Tissue Engineering"

    Presented by Balaji . Sitharaman, Ph.D, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University

    Monday, May 5, 2008, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lisa Miller

    The introduction of carbon nanotechnology into biomedical sciences has created a great deal of opportunity for improving diagnostic methods, enhancing scaffold properties, and enriching biological interactions. But to take advantage of the potential benefits of carbon nanobiomaterials, many challenges need to be overcome. In our lab, we have capitalized on their unique properties as advanced contrast agents (CAs) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to improve the physical properties of polymer scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. We have exploited the potential of Gd-based carbon nanostructures: Gd@C60 metallofullerenes (gadofullerenes) and Gd@Ultrashort-tubes (gadonanotubes) as a new generation of advanced CAs for MRI and shown them to have efficacies up to 100 times greater than current clinical CAs. Our recent studies show that they are particularly well suited for passive (magnetic labels for cells) and Active (pH sensitive probes) MRI-based Molecular Imaging. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been proposed as the ideal foundation for the next generation of materials due to their excellent mechanical properties. We have dispersed SWNTs and ultra short SWNTs into fumarate-based polymers to form nanocomposite scaffolds with mechanical properties far superior to the polymers alone. In this presentation, the fabrication, unique physical properties, and biocompatibility of carbon nanobiomaterials will be discussed especially in regard to the unique benefits of this novel class of materials for MRI and bone tissue engineering.

  585. NSLS-II Project Seminar

    "Global Search for Stable Lattice Tunes"

    Presented by David Robin, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Tuesday, April 29, 2008, 1:30 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinksy

    The traditional process of designing and tuning the magnetic lattice of a particle storage ring lattice to produce certain desired properties is not straight forward. Often solutions are found through trial and error and it is not clear that the solutions are close to optimal. This can be a very unsatisfying process. In this paper we take a step back and look at the general stability limits of the lattice. We employ a technique we call GLASS (GLobal scan of All Stable Settings) that allows us to rapidly scan and find all possible stable modes and then characterize their associated properties. In this paper we illustrate how the GLASS technique gives a global and comprehensive vision of the capabilities of the lattice. In a sense, GLASS functions as a lattice observatory clearly displaying all possibilities. The power of the GLASS technique is that it is very fast and comprehensive. There is no fitting involved. It gives the lattice designer clear guidance as to where to look for interesting operational points. We demonstrate the technique by applying it to two existing storage ring lattices - the triple bend achromat of the ALS and the double bend achromat of CAMD. We show that using GLASS, we have uncovered many interesting and in some cases previously unknown stability regions.

  586. NSLS-II Project Seminar

    "Low Emittance Tuning and Electron Cloud Measurements with CesrTA"

    Presented by David Rubin, Cornell University

    Tuesday, April 29, 2008, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Samuel Krinsky

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring is being reconfigured to operate as a damping ring test accelerator. At a beam energy of 2GeV in the 768m circumference ring, superconducting wigglers reduce the radiation damping time by nearly an order of magnitude. With the wigglers deployed in regions of zero horizontal dispersion, the equilibrium emittance will be 2.5nm. Our target vertical emittance is 5 pm. I will report on the result of a paper study of sensitivities of emittance to optical errors and magnet misalignments in CesrTA. We use simulations to determine the efficacy of beam based emittance tuning algorithms, and the implications for survey tolerances, and beam position monitor resolution. I will also describe a technique for extracting dispersion based on a measurement at each BPM of the amplitude and phase of driven synchrotron oscillations. I will show CESR measurements of the evolution and decay of the electron cloud with trains of positron bunches and a low current witness bunch. I will also describe instrumentation that we are installing in CESR for measuring electron cloud density and energy spectrum and our experimental program to investigate the dependence of electron cloud on beam configuration, magnetic field, and chamber chemistry.

  587. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Searching for other worlds: high contrast imaging with astronomical adaptive optics"

    Presented by Anand Sivaramakrishnan, American Museum of Natural History and Stony Brook University

    Friday, April 25, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  588. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The phase behavior of thaumatin"

    Presented by Neer Asherie, Yeshiva University

    Friday, April 25, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  589. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Optical Properties Across the Whole Spectrum"

    Presented by Dr. Eric L. Shirley, National Institute of Standards and Technology

    Tuesday, April 22, 2008, 1:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Chi-Chang Kao

    First-principles calculations of optical properties across the electromagnetic spectrum can involve vibrational excitation in the terahertz region, valence excitations in the near-ir/visible/near-uv and core excitations in the soft x-ray and hard x-ray regions. In this talk, we will survey some of the results obtained at NIST use Bethe-Salpeter calculations for core and valence excitations, as well as modern perturbation theory calculations that predict vibration spectra in the one- and two-phonon region in semiconductors. Finally, we will look briefly at heuristic orbital-less methods to predict complicated screening effects in materials that may help calculations be more feasible in complex systems such as materials with large unit cells or aperiodic structures of interest in nanoscience. The screening effects are relevant to stopping powers for charged particles and screening of the electron-electron interactions in polyatomic systems in general.

  590. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Structural study of the orbital ordering in manganite thin films"

    Presented by Yusuke Wakabayashi, Photon Factory

    Friday, April 18, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  591. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "EXAFS studies of catalytic DNA sensors for metallic water contaminants"

    Presented by Bruce Ravel, NIST

    Friday, April 18, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  592. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Probing Diesel and Biodiesel Sprays with Ultrafast X-ray Microimaging"

    Presented by Dr. Jin Wang, Argonne National Laboratory

    Friday, April 18, 2008, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Chi-Chang Kao / William Horak

  593. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "High yield sythesis of single walled carbon nanotube and its catalytic applications"

    Presented by Xiaoming Wang, Yale University

    Friday, April 11, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  594. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Microfluidic devices for protein crystallization"

    Presented by Sarah Perry, University of Illinois

    Friday, April 11, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  595. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Impact of Electric Current Fluctuations arising from Power Supplies on a Charged-Particle Beam"

    Presented by Phil Yoon, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    Tuesday, April 8, 2008, 10 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: John Hill

    Electric current fluctuations are one type of unavoidable machine imperfections and induce magnetic-field perturbation as a source of instabilities in accelerators. This paper presents the measurement-based modeling methodology of fluctuating electric current arising from the power system of Fermilab's Booster synchrotron to discuss the ramifications of the presence of ripple current and space-charge defocusing effects. We also present the method of generating stochastic noise and the measurement and analysis methods of ripple current and offending electromagnetic interferences residing in the Booster power system. This stochastic noise model, accompanied by a suite of beam diagnostic calculations, manifests that the fluctuating power-supply current, when coupled to space charge and impinging upon a beam, can substantially enhance beam degradation phenomena---such as emittance growth and halo formation---during the Booster injection period.

  596. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Structural investigation of bent-core liquid crystals by reasonant scattering of x-rays"

    Presented by Dr. Philippe Barois, Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal

    Friday, April 4, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  597. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Frustrated Interactions in arrays of nanomagnets"

    Presented by Dr. Christopher Marrows, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds

    Friday, April 4, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  598. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "The study of interfacial effects in magnetic nanostructures by photon and neutron techniques"

    Presented by Dr. Sean Langridge, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, United Kingdom

    Monday, March 31, 2008, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Dario Arena

  599. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Study of reversed phase sequence in a three component liquid crystal system"

    Presented by LiDong Pan, University of Minnesota

    Friday, March 28, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  600. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Pressure-induced phase transition of solvated C60"

    Presented by Lin Wang, Carnegie Institution of Washington

    Friday, March 28, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  601. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Why polymer crystals melt over a broad temperature range"

    Presented by Dimitri Ivanov, Institut de Chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces

    Friday, March 21, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  602. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Structure solution of para-methylchalcone from high resolution powder diffraction"

    Presented by Kevin Stone, Stony Brook University

    Friday, March 21, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Christie Nelson

  603. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "High Energy X-ray Diffraction from surfaces and interfaces"

    Presented by Viejo Honkimaki, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    Friday, March 14, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  604. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "The HIgh Energy X-ray Radiation Applications at ESRF"

    Presented by Veijo Honkimaki, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France

    Thursday, March 13, 2008, 1:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    The beamlines ID15A and ID15B at ESRF are devoted for very high energy x-ray radiation up to several hundred keV. At present the main research areas at these beamlines are engineering materials research and studies of surfaces and buried interfaces. However, the concept of the beamlines is to keep scientific options open and retain flexibility to exploit the unique properties of hard x-rays: large penetration depth, large Ewald spheres, very high momentum transfer, large extinction lengths and small radiation doses. These properties are discussed and many examples are given using the core techniques at the beamlines: energy dispersive diffraction, micro-tomography, surface/interface micro-diffraction, high resolution inelastic scattering and diffraction with area detectors.

  605. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "High pressure x-ray diffraction study of tungsten disulfide with different pressure media"

    Presented by Emre Selvi, Texas Tech University

    Friday, March 7, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  606. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Pair distribution function analysis of metakaolin-based geopolymers"

    Presented by Jonathan Bell, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Friday, March 7, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  607. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Hard X-ray Imaging with Full and Partial Coherence"

    Presented by Xianghui Xiao, Argonne

    Tuesday, March 4, 2008, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Hanfei Yan

    X-ray imaging techniques play important roles in modern science for which can provide high-resolution, element-sensitive structure information with long penetration length, in a non-destructive manner. X-ray coherent diffraction imaging technique (XCDI), taking advantage of coherence illumination delivered from 3rd generation synchrotron sources, has been growing rapidly in the recent years. XCDI is a lensless imaging technique and has potential to achieve atomic resolution, therefore it attracts more and more attentions from many different communities, from biology to material science. However, there are some difficulties in XCDI in both experimental and data-processing stages, for examples, avoiding parasitic scattering in the collected data and solving structure from the incomplete data. In the first part of this presentation, the developments made at APS that aim to solve these problems will be presented and discussed. Grating-based x-ray interferometer (XGI) is another recently developed imaging technique that allows the specimens' phase map to be retrieved from the interferogram in a straightforward way. Typically, the spatial resolution of XGI is limited by the grating period that is at best 1 micron level to-date. To improve the achievable spatial resolution with XGI, we can combine XGI with a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM). In the second half of this talk, the discussion on the optimal combination conditions of a XGI and a TXM based on coherence theory will be presented. The theoretical results of this work can be used to guide a successful combination setup in practice.

  608. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The huge isotope effect in Strntium Titanate"

    Presented by Yizhak Yacoby, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Friday, February 29, 2008, 12 pm
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

  609. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "On the growth of hydrates in porous media"

    Presented by Prasad KerKar, Stony Brook University

    Friday, February 29, 2008, 12 pm
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

  610. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Synchrotron Emission and Wavefront Propagation Calculations Using the Methods of Physical Optics"

    Presented by Oleg Tchoubar, Synchrotron SOLEIL (France), France

    Thursday, February 28, 2008, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: John Hill

    Efficient computation methods and multiple calculation examples dedicated to spontaneous emission and wavefront propagation in the 3rd generation synchrotron radiation sources will be presented. With the approach to be described, the electric field emitted by a relativistic electron is calculated in the frequency domain by accurate expressions derived from Linard-Wiechert potentials, without the standard separation on the "velocity" and "acceleration" parts. This approach provides an efficient numerical method, which is valid in near- and far-field zones, and is applicable to almost arbitrary magnetic field: e.g. field of an undulator or wiggler, central or edge part of a bending magnet or a short magnet. Once calculated in a transverse plane at some distance from the source, the electric field can be numerically propagated, using the methods of Fourier optics (and, were necessary, asymptotic expansions) through an optical beamline, to an "observation plane" of interest, were intensities at different polarizations can be considered. Effects related to finite electron beam emittance (e.g. partial coherence) can be taken into account by summing-up intensities of radiation from different (macro-) electrons at the end of the propagation. These methods are implemented in the "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) computer code. The results of all calculations to be presented were obtained using this code. Many of these results will illustrate performance of real insertion devices and beamlines on existing 3rd generation sources. Some examples of wavefront propagation calculations for the 4th generation sources will also be given.

  611. NSLS-II Seminar

    "An Update from the Australian Synchrotron Small and Wide Angle Scattering Beamline"

    Presented by Dr. Nigel Kirby, Australian Synchrotron, Australia

    Wednesday, February 27, 2008, 3:30 pm
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Andrew Broadbent

    A dedicated new SAXS/WAXS beamline is being constructed at the Australian Synchrotron, a 216m circumference, 3GeV, ring located in Melbourne. The beamline consists of an in-vacuum undulator source, optics optimized for performance and flexibility, and an endstation designed to exploit all the capabilities of the beamline. The beamline will support transmission and grazing incidence SAXS and WAXS, either separately or simultaneously. The beamline has the capacity to analyze liquid surfaces, and has the flexibility to readily implement other scattering techniques such as reflectometry and in-plane diffraction in the future. Pilatus detectors, developed by the SLS, will be the main systems for both SAXS and WAXS analysis. These new detectors will provide vastly improved dynamic range over conventional area detectors, are ideal for analyzing very weak scatterers such as dilute protein solutions, have very fast time resolution for dynamical studies, and will support anomalous scattering analysis. This presentation will outline some interesting points in the design and development of this new facility, describe its capabilities, and present some examples of applications that explore some of its possibilities. It will also include a discussion on our new steel experiment hutches which have been designed and built locally.

  612. NSLS / NSLS-II Seminar

    "X-ray Beamline Developments at ACCEL Instruments"

    Presented by Wolfgang Diete, ACCEL

    Wednesday, February 27, 2008, 9 am
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

    ACCEL Instruments staff, Wolfgang Diete and Riccardo Signorato will give a presentation at 9:00am on Wednesday morning in conference room A at the NSLS. They will describe their recent experience of building beamlines for a number different scientific applications at various facilities around the world, and describe developments in beamline instrumentation including x-ray mirror systems and monochromators. The talk, with questions will last approximately 45 minutes. All staff involved with beamline upgrades, or new beamlines, are encouraged to attend.

  613. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Texture measurement with an area detector: the Ni-Si reaction"

    Presented by Simon Gaudet, University of Montreal

    Friday, February 22, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  614. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "On the growth of hydrates in porous media"

    Presented by Prasad KerKar, Stony Brook University

    Friday, February 22, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  615. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Exploring the Origin of Thermoelectricity in Cobalt Oxides"

    Presented by Trevor Tyson, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Friday, February 15, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  616. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "LEEM/PEEM study of the nucleation and growth of thin organic films"

    Presented by Jurek Sadowski, Center for Functional Nanomaterials, CFN Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, February 15, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  617. NSLS Town Meeting

    Thursday, February 14, 2008, 1 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  618. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Electronic order in strongly correlated oxides"

    Presented by Stuart Wilkins, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, February 1, 2008, 12 pm
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

  619. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Fabrication of nanoscale multilayer thin film cooling devices"

    Presented by Zhigang Xiao, Alabama A&M University

    Friday, February 1, 2008, 12 pm
    Conference Room A, Bldg. 725

  620. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Enhanced uranium sorption through surface modification"

    Presented by Yuanzhi Tang, Stony Brook University

    Friday, January 25, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  621. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Probing the band structure of mono-, bi- and tri-layer graphene by infrared absorption spectroscopy"

    Presented by Kin Fai Mak, Columbia University

    Friday, January 25, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  622. Brookhaven Lecture

    "432nd Brookhaven Lecture: 'At the Cutting Edge of Bright Beams: The NSLS Source Development Lab'"

    Presented by James B. Murphy, Ph.D., National Synchrotron Light Source Department

    Thursday, January 24, 2008, 4 pm
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Brant Johnson and Fulvia Pilat

    <p>Inspired by the discoveries with synchrotron light at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and similar facilities around the world, researchers are looking for more brilliant beams of light. To develop this next-generation of light sources, accelerator physicists at the NSLS Source Development Laboratory (SDL) make use of a magnesium photocathode irradiated by ultraviolet laser light to produce electron beams of unprecedented brightness.</p> <p>To learn more about this forefront research, join Dr. James B. Murphy, NSLS Deputy Chairman for Accelerators & Operations, at 4 p.m. on Thursday, January 24, in Berkner Hall, as he gives the 432nd Brookhaven Lecture, entitled At the Cutting Edge of Bright Beams: The NSLS Source Development Laboratory. All are welcome to this free, open-to-the public lecture, which is, please note, on a Thursday, not the usual Wednesday.</p> <p>As Murphy will describe in his talk, he and fellow researchers have developed various techniques to catch molecules and atoms in action. In one recent study, the researchers used a laser to control the pulse duration of light from a free-electron laser (FEL), a type of light source with a potential peak brightness up to one billion times higher than that of ordinary synchrotron light. In another technique, Murphy and his colleagues generated extremely short pulses of terahertz radiation that are the highest intensity of their type ever produced.</p> <p>James B. Murphy earned his Ph.D. in physics from Dartmouth College in 1982. He joined the Accelerator Physics Group at the NSLS in August 1983, as a post-doc to work on free electron lasers (FELs) and laser acceleration, and is now a tenured member of the NSLS staff.</p> <p>To lunch with the lecturer at an off-site restaurant on Friday, January 25, please make reservations with Kathleen Loverro, Ext. 7188.</p>

  623. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "In-situ x-ray reflectivity studies on the formation of substrate-supported phospholipid bilayers and monolayers"

    Presented by Suntao Wang, NSLS, BNL

    Friday, January 18, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  624. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Infrared photoconductivity of individual carbon nanotubes using Fourier-transform spectroscopy"

    Presented by Matt Sfeir, CMPMS, BNL

    Friday, January 18, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  625. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy at the ESRF"

    Presented by Enju Lima, ESRF, France

    Monday, January 14, 2008, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    X-ray diffraction microscopy offers an approach to 3D imaging at minimal radiation dose and with no lens limits to resolution. Recent experiments on test specimens and cryo specimens at ESRF will be described.

  626. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Optical and transport studies of NaxCoO2"

    Presented by Hsiang-Lin Liu, National Taiwan Normal University

    Friday, January 11, 2008, 12 pm
    NSLS Library, Room 1-111

  627. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Negative thermal expansion and other anomalies in supported metal nanoparticles"

    Presented by Anatoly Frenkel, Yeshiva University

    Friday, January 11, 2008, 12 pm
    NSLS Library, Room 1-111

  628. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Potential Cancer Therapeutic Development from a Crystal Structure"

    Presented by Kelly Jameison, New York University Medical Center

    Tuesday, January 8, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  629. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Nanoscale patterning from block copolymer thin films"

    Presented by Soojin Park, University of Massashussets, Amherst

    Tuesday, January 8, 2008, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

  630. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Development of a Dedicated Pair-Distribution-Function Beamline at the Advance Photon Source: Scientific Drivers and Opportunities"

    Presented by Peter Chupas, Argonne National Laboratory

    Thursday, December 20, 2007, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: John Hill

    There is growing recognition in the materials community of the need to study disorder in materials at both the sub-nanometer and nanometer lengths scales with atomic resolution. The Pair-Distribution-Function (PDF) technique recovers structural information, in the form of a radial distribution of atom-atom distances without the assumptions of symmetry constraints that crystallographic approaches rely on. Information on both the local and intermediate range length scales is probed, and therefore PDF is an ideal match for probing atomic scale disorder. Recent advances in PDF measurements combining area detectors and high-energy X-rays have dramatically decreased measurement times for high resolution PDF (Pair-Distribution-Function) measurements to times as fast as 30 milliseconds, and have therefore opened up the potential scientific applications of the technique. Specifically this talk will cover both the development and operation of a dedicated PDF beamline at the APS and emerging scientific opportunities applying the PDF technique, including, (1) time-resolved PDF measurements, (2) the use of the technique to probe the structure of reactive sites at surfaces, (3) PDF measurements at high pressures, and (4) spatially resolved PDF measurements.

  631. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Application of Phase Retrieval to Optical Surface and Wavefront Metrology"

    Presented by Gregory Brady, University of Rochester

    Friday, December 7, 2007, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Hanfei Yan

    Phase retrieval is a method of determining the phase of an optical field employing only simple measurements of the near-focus intensity patterns produced by the field. Phase retrieval is distinguished by the simplicity of the experimental arrangements required and the flexibility of the method. The simplicity of the apparatus allows for its use in wavelength regimes where more complex arrangements are not possible. It is also capable of measuring non-spherical surfaces and wavefronts without a null optic or retrace and imaging errors. We will describe and contrast the two different classes of algorithm, known as Iterative Transform Algorithms and Nonlinear Optimization Algorithms. We then describe the simulation and experimental results measuring optical surfaces and wavefronts using a Nonlinear Optimization algorithm, demonstrating that the method is capable of measurements with accuracies on the order of a thousandth of a wavelength RMS. We also will discuss the practical limitations of the method and approaches to mitigate these.

  632. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Ready or not: the transition to the mail-in synchrotron powder diffraction"

    Presented by Brian Toby, Argonne National Laboratory

    Friday, November 30, 2007, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: John Hill

    A mail-in facility for powder diffraction has significant implications for how structural sciences are taught and conducted. Support for a high-throughput instrument also affects the synchrotron operations paradigm, since staffing levels cannot scale with numbers of samples. Design of instrument automation and metadata tracking determines staffing requirements and user effectiveness. This talk will describe key concepts for implementation of mail-in support at 11-BM, the high resolution and high-throughput powder diffractometer at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source. Also to be discussed are educational programs being developed for novice and experienced users at the APS and our goals for a new generation of data analysis software. Selected examples of how synchrotron powder diffraction studies are impacting research fields will be presented. Finally, the current commissioning status of 11-BM will be reviewed.

  633. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Imaging thin films with subatomic resolution"

    Presented by Yizhak Yacoby, Hebrew University

    Tuesday, November 20, 2007, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Ron Pindak

    Abstract: A recently developed method to determine the atomic structure of thin films and their interface with the substrate will be discussed. The method known as Coherent Bragg Rod Analysis (COBRA) consists of measuring the diffraction intensities along the system Bragg rods, analyzing the results to determine the complex scattering factors which are then Fourier transformed into real space to determine the system electron density. The principles underlying the method will be briefly discussed and the method will be illustrated with three examples. 1. Ferroelectric thin films and the problem of depolarizing electric fields. 2. The effect of electrodes on the structure of thin films. 3. The formation of 2D electron gas at the interface of LaAlO3/SrTiO3

  634. National Synchrotron Light Source Town Meeting

    Friday, November 16, 2007, 1 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  635. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Very-High-Energy-Resolution X-ray Detectors for Synchrotrons"

    Presented by W. Bertrand (Randy) Doriese, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO

    Tuesday, November 13, 2007, 11 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Daniel A. Fischer

    The quantum sensors group at NIST Boulder has demonstrated cryogenic photon detectors with energy resolutions of 2 eV (FWHM) up to 1.5 keV, 2.4 eV up to 6 keV, and 22 eV up to 100 keV. These detectors, transition-edge-sensor (TES) microcalorimeters, have the potential to become powerful new detectors at synchrotron light sources. A TES microcalorimeter is a thin superconducting film, electrically biased in its resistive transition. Heat deposited by an incident photon increases the temperature and resistance of the TES. The resulting pulsed decrease in the device current, amplified by a SQUID ammeter, is used to measure the energy of the photon. TESs combine the high energy resolution associated with wavelength dispersive instruments with the broadband response of energy-dispersive detectors. In addition, although most development has focused on photon detection, TESs are also inherent energy-dispersive detectors of any other particle type, including electrons, atoms, and alpha particles. Recent advancements in arraying TESs into two-dimensional cameras have removed the historical drawbacks to deploying TES detectors at synchrotrons. These drawbacks included small collecting area (pixels can range from a few hundred um to 1.5 mm on a side), and slow response (maximum count rates per pixel can range from a few hundred Hz to a few kHz). In this talk, Ill discuss an instrument under development at NIST that is to be tested at the NSLS. The rough specifications of this 128-pixel instrument are 1 eV resolution over the 200 eV 2 keV spectral band, 5.1 mm2 total collecting area, and ~100 kHz maximum total count rate. Ill pay special attention to trade-offs that can be made among count rate, collecting area, and energy resolution as this and future instruments are designed. I will also discuss applications of TESs at synchrotrons and elsewhere.

  636. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Local atomic structure of Ti and Ni species in complex metal hydrides for reversible hydrogen storage."

    Presented by Alexander Ignatov, LA State University

    Friday, November 2, 2007, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Lonny Berman

  637. NSLS-II Project Seminar

    "APS Upgrade Plans"

    Presented by Murray Gibson, Director APS, APS/ANL

    Monday, October 29, 2007, 1:15 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Steve Dierker, ALD Light Sources

  638. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Atomistic observation of photoexpansion and photocontraction in amorphous chalcogenide films by insitu EXAFS"

    Presented by Ashtosh Ganjoo, Lehigh University

    Friday, October 26, 2007, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  639. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Inelastic x-ray scattering studies of phonons in superconducting CaC6"

    Presented by Mary Upton, CMPMS, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Friday, October 26, 2007, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  640. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Fully Epitaxial Oxides on Silicon (001)"

    Presented by James Reiner, Yale University

    Thursday, October 25, 2007, 12 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: John Hill

    Crystalline oxides exhibit a range of interesting and useful phenomena, including magnetism, ferroelectricity, superconductivity, and colossal magnetoresistance. In the last decade, it has become possible to integrate these materials onto a silicon platform in a fully epitaxial structure. This development brings the promise of integrating the rich functionality present in crystalline oxides with the advanced capabilities of modern silicon device technology. To date, the most successful fully epitaxial oxide-silicon (001) heterostructures have been achieved through a single deposition recipe which involves manipulating temperature and oxygen pressure on a layer by layer basis during the deposition of alkaline earth metal. Of these epitaxial oxides, SrTiO3 has received the most experimental and theoretical attention. We have grown 5 unit cell thick epitaxial SrTiO3 films directly on silicon (001) wafers and measured anomalous x-ray scattering in order to determine the atomic structure of the films. In particular, we examine the possibility of strain-induced ferroelectric polarization by measuring the relative displacements of planes of atoms from the ideal perovskite structure. We have also deposited epitaxial LaAlO3 on silicon by using a 2 unit cell SrTiO3 buffer layer. In situ reflection high energy electron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy indicate a highly crystalline, epitaxial structure with no SiO2 at the oxide-silicon interface. Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors have been fabricated and measured (I-V and C-V characteristics). Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy carried out on the LaAlO3 structures indicates a low trap density and the absence of SiO2 at the interface. Finally, recent work on sub-monolayer strontium deposition on the silicon surface suggests the conventional picture of this structure, upon which the entire crystalline oxides on silicon framework is built, is only a low-temperature pha

  641. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Longitudinal shaping of relativistic electron beams and measurement using a deflecting mode cavity"

    Presented by Joel England, UCLA

    Thursday, October 25, 2007, 10:30 am
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: X.J. Wang

  642. Brookhaven Lecture

    "428th Brookhaven Lecture: 'Lighthouses, Light Sources and Kinoform Hard X-Ray Optics'"

    Presented by Kenneth Evans-Lutterodt, Ph.D., National Synchrotron Light Source Department

    Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 4 pm
    Berkner Hall Auditorium

    Hosted by: Brant Johnson and Fulvia Pilat

    <p>BNL's planned National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is designed to be a world-leading light source facility, promising advances in nanoscience, energy, biology, and materials research. In designing and developing this new facility, breakthrough research is a must to ensure that appropriate tools are available for the new science that will be studied.</p> <p>At BNL, a team of researchers has overcome a major x-ray focusing obstacle to allow the study of molecules, atoms, and advanced materials at the nanoscale, which is on the order of billionths of a meter. Their innovative method uses a type of refractive lens called a kinoform lens —similar to the kind found in lighthouses — in order to focus the x-rays down to the extremely small spots needed for a sharp image at small dimensions.</p> <p>To learn about this research, join NSLS Physicist Kenneth Evans-Lutterodt in Berkner Hall, at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, October 24, as he gives the 428th Brookhaven Lecture entitled "Lighthouses, Light Sources and Kinoform Hard X-Ray Optics."</p> <p>The goal for Evans-Lutterodt and his colleagues is to enable the probing of materials and molecules with just one-nanometer resolution, which is a capability needed to study the intricate mechanisms of chemical and biological systems. However, to do that, they need to exceed a limit known as the critical angle on the ability to focus high-energy, or hard, x-rays. Evans-Lutterodt will explain how this limit was exceeded at the NSLS and how the breakthrough could benefit future science at NSLS-II.</p> <p>Evans-Lutterodt received his Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After working at Bell Laboratories, he joined BNL in 2003.</p>

  643. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "Strongly Correlated Systems: Measurements of Magnesium"

    Presented by Samaresh Guchhait, Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin

    Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 1:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: David P. Siddons

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (NMRFM) is a unique quantum microscopy technique, which combines the three- dimensional imaging capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with high sensitivity and resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM). It has potential applications in many di erent elds. This novel scanned probe instrument holds potential for atomic-scale resolution. MgB2 is a classic example of two-band superconductor. However the behavior of these two bands below the superconducting transition temperature is not well understood yet. Also the relaxation times of single crystal MgB2 cannot be measured because it is not yet possible to grow large enough MgB2 single crystals for conventional NMR. Using our homemade NMRFM probe, we have set out to measure the relaxation times of micron size MgB2 single crystals to answer several questions relating to the anisotropy, multiband behavior, and coherence e ects in this unusual superconductor. The main goal of the second project, the study of magnetic semi- conductors, is to investigate magnetic properties of Mn-implanted GeC thin lms. 20 keV energy Mn ions were implanted in two samples: 1) bulk Ge (100) and 2) a 250 nm thick epitaxial GeC lm, grown on a Si (100) wafer by UHV chemical vapor deposition using a mixture of germane (GeH4) and methylgermane (CH3GeH3) gases. A SQUID magnetometer study shows ferromagnetism in both samples. While the Curie temperature for both samples is about 180 K, the in-plane saturated magnetic moment per unit area for the rst sample is about 2:210��5 emu/cm2 and that for the second sample is about 3:010��5 emu/cm2. These results show clear enhancement of magnetic proper- ties of the Mn-implanted GeC thin lm over the identically implanted Ge layer due to the presence of a small amount of carbon.

  644. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Enhancing Ferroelectrics Using Strain"

    Presented by Michael Biegalski, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Tuesday, October 23, 2007, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: John Hill

    Under biaxial strain the ferroelectric properties of many ferroelectric materials have been predicted to be enhanced. Using reactive MBE, strained epitaxial films of BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 were grown on rare earth scandate substrates. Under these conditions strain levels of ~1% are obtained. At these strain levels bulk oxide materials would typically fracture, but not films thinner than the Griffith crack criterion. Prior researchers have grown epitaxial films of these materials to thicknesses greatly exceeding their critical thicknesses (~4 nm for BaTiO3 growth on SrTiO3). This results in a high dislocation density and an inhomogeneous strain that can smear out the ferroelectric phase transition and reduce the ferroelectric properties of the material. Our approach limits this by developing new substrates, DyScO3 and GdScO3, that allow for the growth of uniformly strained films below or near the critical thickness. This technique allows our strained SrTiO3 and BaTiO3 films to have even better structural perfection (narrower rocking curve widths) than bulk single crystals of these materials. Modeling of ferroelectrics under these strain levels predicts dramatic shifts in the transition temperature and enhancement of the polarization. Indeed, in our strained SrTiO3, a material that is normally not ferroelectric at any temperature, a ferroelectric state was induced with a transition near room temperature. These films also exhibit the large dielectric constant (~20,000) normally seen at very low temperature (<4K) in bulk SrTiO3 at room temperature. An unexpected surprise is that the strained SrTiO3 films exhibit a frequency dependence of their dielectric constant consistent with relaxor ferroelectricity. Our strained BaTiO3 not only shows the largest strain induced shift of the ferroelectric transition ever reported, but also a two to three fold increase of the remanent polarization. The strained BaTiO3 films offer a lead-free ferroelectric alternative to Pb(Zr,Ti)O3, w

  645. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Soft X- Ray Linear Dichrosim"

    Presented by Kostantine Kaznatcheev, Canadian Light Source, Canada

    Monday, October 22, 2007, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: John Hill

    Soft X-Ray Linear Dichroism: The Route from Spectra to Images K. Kaznatcheev, CLSI, Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) combines excellent orientation selectivity via linear dichroic Near Edge X-ray Absorption Spectra (NEXAFS), and high spatial resolution, limited at present by x-ray optics manufacturing to ~15 nm. STXM is an ideal tool to probe molecular order and to build molecular orientation map at spatial resolution 1-2 orders of magnitude better than optical. Samples are not limited to highly ordered crystals and films, but can be non-crystalline, inhomogeneous and partially oriented specimens, such as liquid crystals (LC). Recently commissioned soft X-ray spectromicroscopy beamline at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) has been optimized for such studies [1]. I will present experimental study of LC thin film texture in (a) binary mixture forming a SmAb phase [2], (b) lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals, and (c) discuss the role of surfactant and ion additives on LC texture. These experiments suggest that the in-plane LC director can be reconstructed with ~5% (magnitude) and ~5 degrees

  646. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "The atomic phase shift versus Z: Why NEXAFS can differentiate atoms across the periodic table and EXAFS cannot."

    Presented by Joseph Woicik, National Institute of Standards and Technology

    Friday, October 19, 2007, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  647. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Towards ferromagnetic Co-doped ZnO films by solution based synthesis."

    Presented by Victoria Coleman, Uppsala University

    Friday, October 19, 2007, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  648. NSLS-II Seminar

    "The Australian Synchrotron"

    Presented by Alan Jackson, LBNL; Former Technical Director of the Australian Synchrotron

    Tuesday, October 16, 2007, 11 am
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Dr. Ferdinand Willeke

    The Australian Synchrotron is a light source facility based on a 3-GeV electron storage ring. The injector for the storage ring comprises a 100-MeV linac and a 3-GeV, 1 Hz booster synchrotron. The facility was built on a green-field site adjacent to Monash University in the south-eastern suburbs of Melbourne. Starting in February 2003 with full funding (AUD 157.2M for the building and accelerator systems), and one technical team member (me) the accelerators achieved stored beam just 3 years later. The average size of the technical team during this period was 25 people, and the total Synchrotron Delivery Team never exceeded 55. By March 2007, the accelerator systems were operating to their full specifications, 5 beamlines had achieved beam on sample, and a further 4 beamlines were in production. In this talk I will discuss the procurement strategy that realized the remarkably fast construction and commissioning of the facility.

  649. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Emerging electronic ground states near the quantum critical point in a model itinerant metal"

    Presented by Dmitry Sokolov, CMPMS, Brookhaven National Lab

    Friday, October 12, 2007, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  650. National Synchrotron Light Source Lunch Time Seminar

    "Unraveling the mysteries of bone formation"

    Presented by Yizhi Meng, Stony Brook University

    Friday, October 12, 2007, 12 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

  651. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "RADIA and SRW - 3D Magnetostatics and Physical Optics Simulation Software for Synchrotron Radiation Sources: How it Worked for SOLEIL"

    Presented by Oleg Chubar, Synchrotron SOLEIL, France

    Thursday, October 11, 2007, 1:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Boris Podobedov

  652. National Synchrotron Light Source Seminar

    "RADIA and SRW - 3D Magnetostatics and Physical Optics Simulation Software for Synchrotron Radiation Sources: How it Worked for SOLEIL"

    Presented by Oleg Chubar, Synchrotron SOLEIL, France

    Thursday, October 11, 2007, 1:30 pm
    Seminar Room, Bldg. 725

    Hosted by: Boris Podobedov

  653. NSLS-II Seminar

    "Research Experiences on an Accelerator and its Control System"

    Presented by Guobao Shen

    Thursday, October 11, 2007, 1 pm
    NSLS-II Seminar Room, Bldg. 817

    Hosted by: Bob Dalesio

    I worked for 2 accelerators in past years: one is SSRF, a 3rd generation light source; another is J-PARC, a high intensity proton machine. The experiences on the accelerator and its control system are presented based on the research activities. In SSRF, my research activities covered the implementation of device controller prototype, and the control system R&D. An AFG(Arbitrary Waveform Generator), which was realized utilizing EPICS software, is presented in detail. The activities in J-PARC project covered 2 parts. One was in KEK. Development of a Linux-based IOC is presented in detail, which is for the control of MR BPM system. Another is in JAEA. A detail realization is presented for the control of beam monitor system of J-PARC LINAC. A procedure for the LINAC RF tuning is also presented, which is performed using a phase scan method with the aid of an automated application developed using the XAL framework.