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Macromolecular Crystallography

X-ray Crystallography allows for the three-dimensional structure determination of macromolecules proteins, DNA, RNA or assemblies such as viruses and ribosomes. The Life Science MX beam lines will enable research on molecular interactions, on enzyme catalysis reactions, on the action of drugs and disease mechanisms.

AMX and FMX are two beamlines with overlapping capabilities. While the AMX ‘mini’ beam supports efficient structure determination and high-density throughput for chemical library or mutation activity screening, the FMX ‘micro beam’ enables the study of macromolecular complexes, weakly diffracting samples and radiation-sensitive crystals.

The New York Structural Biology Center beamline, NYX, will provide the highest energy resolution of the macromolecular crystallography beam lines enabling multiwavelength and single wavelength anomalous diffraction.

The core facilities are supported by a structural biology Laboratory that enables high throughput crystallization and screening. A UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopy Laboratory enables the study of metalloprotein in solution or crystals. More…

Highly Automated Macromolecular Crystallography (AMX)

AMX
AMX
AMX

Scientific Scope

AMX was developed to address those problems in need of efficient data collection on a vast number of samples. The beam line is well suited for biomedical structure determination of complexes in large unit cells, drug discovery explorations and the survey by diffraction of specimen at room temperature.

Description

The automated MX beamline, AMX, will deliver a flux of ~1013 ph/s at 1 Å into a 4 – 100 μm spot, with its maximum flux density surpassing current MX beamlines by up to two orders of magnitude. It covers an energy range from 5 – 18 keV. High flux and short data collection times will make it possible to collect on every specimen, assisted by crystallographic decision making software. The beam line will allow remote operation and fast automated crystal screening followed by a user choice for automated data collection. The level of automation enables “interleaved” data collection and Rapid Feedback service to users that have few samples and wish to characterize them.

Frontier Microfocusing Macromolecular Crystallography (FMX)

FMX
FMX
FMX

Scientific Scope

FMX will support a broad range of structural determination methods from serial crystallography on micron-sized crystals, to resolving macromolecular complexes in large unit cells, to rapid sample screening and data collection of crystals in crystallization trays. The high brightness and micro-focusing capability of FMX will be ideal for difficult crystallography problems.

Description

The micro-focusing Frontier MX beamline, FMX, will deliver a flux of ~5x1012 ph/s at 1 Å into a 1 – 50 μm spot, with its maximum flux density surpassing current MX beamlines by up to two orders of magnitude. It covers a wide energy range from 5 – 30 keV. Central components of the experimental station include a horizontal axis goniometer with a 100 nm target sphere of confusion, multi-axis goniometry, and an Eiger16M pixel array detector with a 133Hz framing rate. A dedicated secondary goniometer will be optimized in the future for data collection from crystallization plates, and will support the development of novel sample delivery methods such as microcrystal jets.

The Life Science Biomedical Technology Research resource is primarily supported by the National Institute of Health, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) through a Biomedical Technology Research Resource P41 grant (P41GM111244), and by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (KP1605010). As a National Synchrotron Light Source II facility resource at Brookhaven National Laboratory, work performed at the LSBR is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences Program under contract number and DE-SC0012704 (KC0401040).

NIH and DOE logos