BNL Home
June 2021
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

1

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3

  1. CFN Virtual Colloquium

    4 pm, ZoomGov Meeting - see below for link

    Hosted by: Deyu Lu

    While machine learning holds promise in materials research it is currently limited to problems for which large datasets exist. I will discuss two applications where we have successfully used machine learning (ML). Phase identification in X-ray diffraction is particularly well suited for ML as simulated diffraction patterns can be used to generate training data, providing essentially infinite training data. I will show that convolutional neural networks, combined with statistical probability trees, can outperform traditional commercial software in identifying phases in single-phase and multi-phase diffraction patterns. In a second application, I will show how ML can be used to extract data and its associated meaning from millions of research papers in an automated way. Using this approach, we have generated the largest dataset on the synthesis of inorganic materials. Such datasets are critically needed to start using ML on difficult problems in materials science.

4

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9

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, Videoconference / Virtual Event

    Hosted by: Gregory Doerk

    The recent research trends on the advanced display and smart lighting system are focused on the wide colour gamut, high colour purity, higher brightness, stability and flexibility with respect to the performance and form factors. Considering the above factors on the basis of the self-emitting light source candidates, a quantum dot light-emitting device (QD-LED) is strongly recommended for the next-generation display and lighting application. And the presentation will cover the studies on the science and technologies of QD-LEDs and metal-oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) from the material, the process technology, the device design and architecture to the system integration and its characterization for the specified applications, particularly for full-color display and smart lighting.

10

  1. No events scheduled

11

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    1 pm, Videoconference / Virtual Event

    Hosted by: Gregory Doerk

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides, exhibit great potential as functional materials for numerous novel applications due to their excellent properties. The grafting of conventional micropatterning techniques such as MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) on new types of electronics based on 2D materials is required to fully utilize the unique nature of 2D materials in practical applications. However, the conventional lithography and polymer-supported wet transfer methods often induce contamination and damage on micropatterned 2D materials due to polymer residues and harsh wet-transfer conditions. Furthermore, the dangling bonds and defects on basal planes and edge sites of 2D materials provide opportunities to modify surface chemistry. Thus, the surface modification employing noble metal nanoparticles and functionalization is considered as a key strategy to achieve superior electronic properties since it enables to modulate the chemical and electrical properties of 2D materials for target applications. Here, my research on the synthesis, materials design, and microfabrication techniques for advanced electronic materials is presented. I devised a novel strategy to fabricate large-scale flexible electronics based on graphene micropatterns by using a direct polymer curing method. Four graphene micropatterns with self-heating effect and catalytic noble metal decoration are utilized as a sensor array to discriminate gas species. In addition, modified surface chemistry of 2D materials using catalytic nanoparticles (e.g., Au, Pt, Ag, Pd) and functional groups improves sensitivity and selectivity of sensor devices.

12

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16

  1. JUN

    16

    Wednesday

    Center for Biomolecular Structure Lecture Series

    1:30 pm, Videoconference / Virtual Event

    Wednesday, June 16, 2021, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    An odyssey in drug delivery study via X-ray microscopy approach We've used X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XRF) as a powerful chemical nano-imaging tool to study a few examples of anti-cancer drug with transition metal complexes (Os, Ir) and locate their target sites within human cancer cells. Throughout these studies, despite its high sensitivity, semi-quantitative, and versatility, XRF has also complemented other techniques such as soft X-ray microscopy, TEM, cryo light confocal microscopy, and hard X-ray phase contrast imaging to provide more complete pictures to uncover the potential delivery mechanisms. In addition, sample preparations including cryogenic preparation, as well as the transfer compatibility between various techniques, as a critical aspect, will also be discussed.

17

  1. No events scheduled

18

  1. JUN

    18

    Friday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, Videoconference / Virtual Event

    Friday, June 18, 2021, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Gregory Doerk

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted great attention during the last decade, benefitting from their rich variety of chemical and crystal structures defining unique physical and chemical properties overall outperforming traditional nanomaterials. More specifically, the electronic and optical properties could either be tuned by varying the atomic combinations and structural motif, or by varying the number of layers in the same type of material. The ultra-flat surface makes it facile for 2D materials to stack up with each other, forming Van der Waals heterostructures which could serve as active materials of elementary unit in electronic devices such as FETs and p-n junctions. Apart from the intrinsic high-performances of 2D materials as semiconductors, their large surface-to-volume ratio and flat surfaces enables them to interact actively with the local environment, including neighbouring organic molecules. These molecules, either physisorbed or chemisorbed on the surface of 2D semiconductors, are able to markedly influence the properties of the latter component. This talk will introduce the interactions between organic species and 2D semiconducting materials (transition metal dichalcogenides, black phosphorus, indium selenide) in the following aspects: i) fundamental physico-chemical properties of the organic-2D material heterostructure. ii) fabrication and characterizations of molecular functionalized electronic devices and potential applications.

19

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21

  1. JUN

    21

    Monday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    1 pm, Videoconference / Virtual Event

    Monday, June 21, 2021, 1:00 pm

    Hosted by: Gregory Doerk

    Semiconducting carbon nanomaterials have attracted significant attention in recent decades due to their unique electronic, mechanical, optical, thermal, and chemical properties. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is a 1D nanomaterial that has found versatile applications in material research and device fabrication for sensing, transistors, photovoltaics, and other electronics. Biosensors are the critical element in diagnostic devices for many diseases. Field-effect transistor (FET) biosensor utilizing SWNTs as the transducing element shows high sensitivity and specificity compared to optical and electrochemical biosensors. However, the major challenge is the high cost and complicated procedures of the traditional fabrication of FET biosensors on silicon wafers, which can be unaffordable in low-resource settings. To overcome the challenge, I utilized the inkjet printing technology to pattern the SWNTs-based FET sensor arrays on paper-based microfluidics. This approach has improved both the sensing performance and the affordability of FET biosensors. In this presentation, I will present my recent research advances on inkjet-printing patterned paper-based FET biosensors. Firstly, to maximize the semiconductor with higher aqueous solubility and higher bioconjugation capacity, a zero-length linker 1-pyrene carboxylic acid (PCA) was used for the non-covalent functionalization of SWNTs. The synthesis of PCA/SWNTs resulted in a high solubility of the semiconductors in a water-based solution up to 4 mg/mL. Material characterizations were conducted for the PCA/SWNTs complex. Secondly, the water-based semiconductor solution was formulated as inkjet-printable inks for precise deposition on the paper substrate to pattern the FET sensor arrays. Various ink formulations were developed for different functional nanomaterials that retained the bioactivity of the bioreceptor and met the rheological requirements for stable inkjet printing. The SWNTs percolation profile was characterized to identify the optimum network density and provide the highest biosensing sensitivity. Thirdly, the cost-effective paper-based microfluidics was programmed and optimized with fluid delay and acceleration functions to automate the solution delivery. The paper-based FET biosensor arrays patterned by the inkjet-printed SWNTs were optimized, quantified, and assembled to detect multiple disease biomarker molecules at ultralow concentrations, including proteins and micro RNAs, fitting the needs for affordable point-of-care use for disease diagnosis.

22

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23

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24

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25

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26

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27

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30

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  1. JUN

    16

    Wednesday

    Center for Biomolecular Structure Lecture Series

    "CBMS Lecture Series"

    Presented by Yang Yang, Brookhaven National Laboratory - NSLS II

    1:30 pm, Videoconference / Virtual Event

    Wednesday, June 16, 2021, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Vivian Stojanoff

    An odyssey in drug delivery study via X-ray microscopy approach We've used X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XRF) as a powerful chemical nano-imaging tool to study a few examples of anti-cancer drug with transition metal complexes (Os, Ir) and locate their target sites within human cancer cells. Throughout these studies, despite its high sensitivity, semi-quantitative, and versatility, XRF has also complemented other techniques such as soft X-ray microscopy, TEM, cryo light confocal microscopy, and hard X-ray phase contrast imaging to provide more complete pictures to uncover the potential delivery mechanisms. In addition, sample preparations including cryogenic preparation, as well as the transfer compatibility between various techniques, as a critical aspect, will also be discussed.

  2. JUN

    18

    Friday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Molecular Science and Two-dimensional Materials: Hybrid Systems for Optoelectronics"

    Presented by Ye Wang, Institute of Supramolecular Science and Engineering University of Strasbourg, France

    10 am, Videoconference / Virtual Event

    Friday, June 18, 2021, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Gregory Doerk

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted great attention during the last decade, benefitting from their rich variety of chemical and crystal structures defining unique physical and chemical properties overall outperforming traditional nanomaterials. More specifically, the electronic and optical properties could either be tuned by varying the atomic combinations and structural motif, or by varying the number of layers in the same type of material. The ultra-flat surface makes it facile for 2D materials to stack up with each other, forming Van der Waals heterostructures which could serve as active materials of elementary unit in electronic devices such as FETs and p-n junctions. Apart from the intrinsic high-performances of 2D materials as semiconductors, their large surface-to-volume ratio and flat surfaces enables them to interact actively with the local environment, including neighbouring organic molecules. These molecules, either physisorbed or chemisorbed on the surface of 2D semiconductors, are able to markedly influence the properties of the latter component. This talk will introduce the interactions between organic species and 2D semiconducting materials (transition metal dichalcogenides, black phosphorus, indium selenide) in the following aspects: i) fundamental physico-chemical properties of the organic-2D material heterostructure. ii) fabrication and characterizations of molecular functionalized electronic devices and potential applications.

  3. JUN

    21

    Monday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Inkjet Printing Patterned Functional SWNTs Network and Its Applications in Paper-based FET Biosensors"

    Presented by Yu Shen, University of California, Riverside

    1 pm, Videoconference / Virtual Event

    Monday, June 21, 2021, 1:00 pm

    Hosted by: Gregory Doerk

    Semiconducting carbon nanomaterials have attracted significant attention in recent decades due to their unique electronic, mechanical, optical, thermal, and chemical properties. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is a 1D nanomaterial that has found versatile applications in material research and device fabrication for sensing, transistors, photovoltaics, and other electronics. Biosensors are the critical element in diagnostic devices for many diseases. Field-effect transistor (FET) biosensor utilizing SWNTs as the transducing element shows high sensitivity and specificity compared to optical and electrochemical biosensors. However, the major challenge is the high cost and complicated procedures of the traditional fabrication of FET biosensors on silicon wafers, which can be unaffordable in low-resource settings. To overcome the challenge, I utilized the inkjet printing technology to pattern the SWNTs-based FET sensor arrays on paper-based microfluidics. This approach has improved both the sensing performance and the affordability of FET biosensors. In this presentation, I will present my recent research advances on inkjet-printing patterned paper-based FET biosensors. Firstly, to maximize the semiconductor with higher aqueous solubility and higher bioconjugation capacity, a zero-length linker 1-pyrene carboxylic acid (PCA) was used for the non-covalent functionalization of SWNTs. The synthesis of PCA/SWNTs resulted in a high solubility of the semiconductors in a water-based solution up to 4 mg/mL. Material characterizations were conducted for the PCA/SWNTs complex. Secondly, the water-based semiconductor solution was formulated as inkjet-printable inks for precise deposition on the paper substrate to pattern the FET sensor arrays. Various ink formulations were developed for different functional nanomaterials that retained the bioactivity of the bioreceptor and met the rheological requirements for stable inkjet printing. The SWNTs percolation profile was characterized to identify the optimum network density and provide the highest biosensing sensitivity. Thirdly, the cost-effective paper-based microfluidics was programmed and optimized with fluid delay and acceleration functions to automate the solution delivery. The paper-based FET biosensor arrays patterned by the inkjet-printed SWNTs were optimized, quantified, and assembled to detect multiple disease biomarker molecules at ultralow concentrations, including proteins and micro RNAs, fitting the needs for affordable point-of-care use for disease diagnosis.