BNL Home
November 2019
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14

  1. CFNS Seminar

    4 pm, Large Seminar Room, Bldg. 510

    Hosted by: Abha Rajan

    The planned EIC will provide three-dimensional precision snapshots of the quark gluon structure of protons and nuclei. While twist-2 Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) allow for a determination of partons in the transverse plane, twist-3 GPDs contain quark-gluon correlations that provide information about the transverse color Lorentz force acting on quarks in a DIS experiments. The example the nonforward generalization of the polarized PDF $g_T(x)$ is used to illustrate how twist-3 GPDs can provide transverse position information about that force.

15

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    1:30 pm, CFN, Bldg. 735 1st floor conference room

    Hosted by: Jurek Sadowski

    Chiral magnets are a series of magnets with broken inversion symmetry. A new type of spin interaction therein, the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, stimulates the formation of many novel topological spin textures. One typical example is the emergence of magnetic skyrmion, whose nontrivial topology enables unique dynamical property and thermal stability and gives out promise on future spintronic devices A key transport signature of the skyrmion is the topological Hall effect, that is, the electron moves in sideway under the effect of real space Berry phase induced by spin chirality. In the first part of the talk, after a comprehensive introduction of the skyrmion physics, I will argue that the presence of topological Hall in many experiments is not enough to identify skyrmions. It could originate from atomic scale chirality from thermal fluctuations. In the second part of the talk, I will generalize the skyrmion texture from two dimensions (2D) to three dimensions (3D), and discuss two relevant 3D spin textures in chiral magnets. One is the target skyrmion we recently observed, both theoretically and experimentally, in ultra-small nanodisks of chiral magnets. A target skyrmion consists of concentric helical rings and can be stabilized in the absence of external magnetic field. Switch between two types of target skyrmions can be enabled by a field loop. The other texture to be discussed is the magnetic hopfion. We propose the presence of zero-field hopfion in synthetic chiral magnetic multilayers. The transition from hopfion to the ground state, a monopole-antimonopole pair, can be fully understood as the topological transition between torus and sphere. These works could stimulate the development of 3D spintronics.

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  1. NOV

    22

    Friday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Friday, November 22, 2019, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Chuck Black

    While lithography was a key technology for making transistors into complex integrated circuits, micro-assembly is potentially a key technology for making nanotechnology into large, complex, heterogeneous, custom systems. The vast majority of semiconductor and materials research will never be integrated into mainstream clean room fabs – assembly is the general solution for heterogeneous integration. We aim to build a new tool for integrating millions of pre-fabricated chiplets or micro-objects into systems, based on deterministic micro-assembly and transfer. The process uses chips initially in solution, and then sorts, transports, and orients chips with directed electrostatic assembly and parallel control. Assemblies are then transferred to final substrates with a stamp or continuous feed roll-based methods, and then electrically interconnected. The current laboratory systems have handled small chips (10 um – 500 um), demonstrated fine registration (

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  1. NOV

    22

    Friday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Chiplet Micro-Assembly Printer – A New Nano Integration Tool"

    Presented by Eugene Chow, Electronic Materials and Devices Laboratory at PARC (a Xerox Company)

    10 am, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Friday, November 22, 2019, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Chuck Black

    While lithography was a key technology for making transistors into complex integrated circuits, micro-assembly is potentially a key technology for making nanotechnology into large, complex, heterogeneous, custom systems. The vast majority of semiconductor and materials research will never be integrated into mainstream clean room fabs – assembly is the general solution for heterogeneous integration. We aim to build a new tool for integrating millions of pre-fabricated chiplets or micro-objects into systems, based on deterministic micro-assembly and transfer. The process uses chips initially in solution, and then sorts, transports, and orients chips with directed electrostatic assembly and parallel control. Assemblies are then transferred to final substrates with a stamp or continuous feed roll-based methods, and then electrically interconnected. The current laboratory systems have handled small chips (10 um – 500 um), demonstrated fine registration (

  2. DEC

    5

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Looking at Silicates Through the Eyes of Surface Science: A Story of Struggle, Incompatibility, Compromise, Hope, ... and Curiosities"

    Presented by Dr. J. Anibal Boscoboinik, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, December 5, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Deyu Lu

    Silicates are the most abundant materials in the earth's crust and are tremendously important in numerous applications. In catalysis, for example, they can be used as supports for active species, or as catalysts themselves in the case of their crystalline nanoporous Al-doped versions (a.k.a.: zeolites). While surface science techniques provide exquisite levels of chemical and electronic detail, this approach struggles with non-conductive materials like silicates due to their incompatibility with methods that require electron conductivity. A way to reach a compromise between the world of silicates and the world of surface science is to use ultra-thin films supported on conductive supports, which gives us hope to truly reach a detailed understanding of these materials. In this talk, I will discuss the work we are doing at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials in trying to understand silicates and zeolites, and I will often diverge into "curiosities" we found along the way. Most notably, confinement effects at the silicate/metal interface have resulted in fascinating properties far beyond our expectations.