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September 2019
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  1. CFNS Seminar

    4 pm, Building 510, CFNS Room 2-38

    Hosted by: Abha Rajan

    In this talk I will address how the science of Nuclear Femtography, probed by deeply virtual exclusive electron nucleon scattering, has revolutionized our approach to exploring the internal structure of the nucleon. Current and planned experiments at the future EIC could in principle allow us to use all the information from data and phenomenology, on one side, to form tomographic images of the nucleon's quark and gluon distributions and, on the other, to reveal the nucleon's internal structure by measuring mechanical properties such as the quark angular momentum, energy density and pressure distributions. While this information is critical for ultimately understanding the working of the color forces, it also defines a new area of research where the fundamental gravitational properties of protons, neutrons and nuclei can be tested through recent astronomical observations constraining the equation of state of neutron stars.

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  1. CFN Colloquium

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Hosted by: Chang-Yong Nam

    Strongly confined electrical, optical and thermal excitations drastically modify material's properties and break local symmetries that can enable precisely tunable novel responses and new functionalities. We will discuss the effect of engineered plasmonic lattice on light matter interactions in 2D excitonic crystals to produce novel responses such as enhanced and tunable emission, Fano resonances and strong exciton-plasmon polaritons, which can be precisely controlled by geometry and applied fields to produce new device concepts. Our recent work on collective polaritonic modes and the formation of a complete polaritonic bandgap in few-layered excitonic semiconductors coupled to plasmons will also be presented along with our ability to control them via externally applied electric fields. We will also discuss our efforts to explore the optoelectronic properties of MoxW1-xTe2, which are type-II Weyl semimetals, i.e., gapless topological states of matter with broken inversion and/or time reversal symmetry, which exhibit unconventional responses to externally applied fields. We have observed spatially dispersive circular photogalvanic effect (s-CPGE) over a wide spectral region (0.2 - 2.0 eV range) in these materials. This effect shows exclusively in the Weyl phase and vanishes upon temperature induced topological phase change. Since the photon energy leads to interband transitions between different electronic bands, we use the density matrix formalism to describe the photocurrent response under chiral optical excitation with a spatially inhomogeneous beam. We will discuss how spatially inhomogeneous optical excitation and unique symmetry and band structure of Weyl semimetals produces CPGE in these systems. The effect of band inversion, Berry curvature and asymmetric carrier relaxation in this material system on the s-CPGE signal will also be discussed along with the implications for designing new optoelectronic devices. Short B

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  1. SEP

    23

    Monday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Monday, September 23, 2019, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Mircea Cotlet

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles or nanoceria have a unique structure and interesting physicochemical properties and reactivity that vary with the size, shape and surface coating. These particles have been traditionally used in catalytic applications in automotive combustion engines, and solid oxide fuel cells, and more recently have been proposed as therapeutic agents in biomedicine. This presentation will discuss properties, characterization and novel applications of a new type of biomimetic cerium oxide nanostructures with regenerative properties and illustrate their potential as active materials for sensing and environmental remediation applications. These materials have tunable redox activity, optical and catalytic properties and can be used to replace enzymes in biological sensing mechanisms, or amplify chemical and biological detection schemes when used in combination with biomolecules. The resulting nanostructures integrate biorecognition, signal amplification and detection capabilities and can function as all-in-one biosensing devices. Design and performance characteristics of several types of ceria-based sensing platforms developed in our lab for point-of-care diagnosis, food quality control and environmental monitoring will be described. The presentation will also show the capability of these materials to function as biomimetic degradation catalysts enabling their use in separation membranes and flow through reactors for environmental remediation. Within this framework, recent work focusing on the development of a mesoporous framework containing highly active ultrasmall cerium oxide nanoparticles will be discussed with an example of application for the degradation of organophosphate agents. These materials have high stability, can be produced in large quantities at a low cost and have demonstrated excellent performance when used in field-deployable devices. Due to their high stability, activity and reusability, the application of these materials can be extend

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  1. SEP

    23

    Monday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Ceria-based nanostructured biomimetic materials and interfaces for sensing and environmental remediation"

    Presented by Silvana Andreescu, Clarkson University

    1:30 pm, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Monday, September 23, 2019, 1:30 pm

    Hosted by: Mircea Cotlet

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles or nanoceria have a unique structure and interesting physicochemical properties and reactivity that vary with the size, shape and surface coating. These particles have been traditionally used in catalytic applications in automotive combustion engines, and solid oxide fuel cells, and more recently have been proposed as therapeutic agents in biomedicine. This presentation will discuss properties, characterization and novel applications of a new type of biomimetic cerium oxide nanostructures with regenerative properties and illustrate their potential as active materials for sensing and environmental remediation applications. These materials have tunable redox activity, optical and catalytic properties and can be used to replace enzymes in biological sensing mechanisms, or amplify chemical and biological detection schemes when used in combination with biomolecules. The resulting nanostructures integrate biorecognition, signal amplification and detection capabilities and can function as all-in-one biosensing devices. Design and performance characteristics of several types of ceria-based sensing platforms developed in our lab for point-of-care diagnosis, food quality control and environmental monitoring will be described. The presentation will also show the capability of these materials to function as biomimetic degradation catalysts enabling their use in separation membranes and flow through reactors for environmental remediation. Within this framework, recent work focusing on the development of a mesoporous framework containing highly active ultrasmall cerium oxide nanoparticles will be discussed with an example of application for the degradation of organophosphate agents. These materials have high stability, can be produced in large quantities at a low cost and have demonstrated excellent performance when used in field-deployable devices. Due to their high stability, activity and reusability, the application of these materials can be extend