BNL Home
January 2020
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  1. CFN Colloquium

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Hosted by: Deyu Lu

    We discuss computational strategies to predict materials with desired characteristics for quantum sensing and quantum computations, and the impact that quantum computers may have in revolutionizing materials simulations and hence materials design and innovation.

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  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10:30 am, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    Cells are capable of orchestrating complex behaviors such as differentiation and stress response using genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) comprising interconnected genes that regulate one another. Many of the key dynamics identified in cellular GRNs have been recapitulated using synthetic chemistries in vitro with an emerging application of autonomous control and dynamic regulation of downstream materials. In this context, in vitro GRN analogs could imbue synthetic materials with the sophisticated behaviors of living systems. In vitro transcriptional circuits, composed of short synthetic genelets, have emerged as a simple yet powerful tool for assembling synthetic GRNs. These circuits utilize only a few inexpensive enzymes and nucleic acids to regulate genelet expression, making them straightforward to program and implement. Yet only small genelet modules that exhibit a single function have been developed. Given cellular GRNs build complexity by integrating many functional modules together, the ability to integrate multiple genelet modules together into larger networks could make it possible to build sophisticated multifunctional GRN analogs. Here we report an updated genelet toolbox that enables the construction of large multifunctional regulatory networks. We develop the toolbox by identifying sources of undesired interactions between network components and designing strategies to mitigate these effects which enables the creation >10 orthogonal genelet node sequences. We assemble these nodes into integrated genelet networks that exhibit either (1) switchable multi-stability inspired by cellular decision making, (2) temporal programs inspired by cellular differentiation pathways, or (3) orchestrate state-specific temporal expression programs. These demonstrations introduce a new class of mesoscale synthetic networks that can orchestrate increasingly complex regulatory processes by design. The genelet regulatory netw

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  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    1 pm, Bldg. 735 (CFN) - 1st florr conference room

    Hosted by: Deyu Lu

    The ability to predict the structure, transport and reaction kinetics in porous media is critical to a number of applications, ranging from catalysis to energy storage. While experimental methods to probe the details of the kinetics and structure in such systems has enabled us to follow in-situ reaction and transport processes, theory and modeling play a critical part in developing a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that control these processes. Here, we present mesoscale modeling approaches based on Lattice Boltzmann and Molecular Dynamics methods that are used to model two material systems: transport and reactions in nanostructured catalysts and electrochemical transport in batteries. Our models are designed to compare directly with experimental data and thus can be validated and used for rational materials design.

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  1. FEB

    6

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Progress in Trapped Ion Quantum Computing"

    Presented by Prof. Jungsang Kim, Duke University

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, February 6, 2020, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chang-Yong Nam

    Trapped ions are one of the leading candidates for realizing practically useful quantum computers. Introduction of advanced integration technologies to this traditional atomic physics research has provided an opportunity to convert a complex atomic physics experiment into a stand-alone programmable quantum computer. In this presentation, I will discuss the new enabling technologies that changes the perception of a trapped ion system as a scalable quantum computer, and the concrete progress made to date in this endeavor. Short Biography: Prof. Jungsang Kim's current research focus is practical realization of quantum computers. He received his B.S. degree from Seoul National University (1992) and his Ph.D. from Stanford University (1999), both in Physics. He worked at Bell Laboratories for five years, working on developing cutting-edge optical and wireless communication systems. He joined the Electrical and Computer Engineering department at Duke University in 2004, where he has worked on trapped ion quantum computing, high pixel-count imaging systems, and novel quantum device research. He has been serving as a principal investigator for many collaborative research projects on quantum computing and communications. In 2015, he co-founded IonQ, focusing on commercial development of ion trap based quantum computer.