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February 2021
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  1. CFN Virtual Colloquium

    4 pm, Videoconference / Virtual Event

    Hosted by: Qin Wu

    Abstract: rationally and precisely controlling the size, dimension, and morphology of nanostructures allows us to tune the electronic structures and quantum states of matter, discover new physical properties, thus enable applications in electronics, photonics, and renewable energy. i will first discuss how to directly synthesize twisted 2d quantum materials with a rational control of interlayer twist angle by combining screw dislocation-driven crystal growth with non-euclidean (curved) substrates. by controlling the phase of 2d materials, the catalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (her) by exfoliated nanosheets of mos2 is significantly enhanced. earth-abundant but highly active and selective electrocatalysts, such as mos2 and cops, are needed to enable efficient and sustainable electrocatalytic and photoelectrochemical (pec) production of energy and chemicals using increasingly affordable renewable electricity. these efficient electrocatalysts have been integrated with efficient semiconductor materials to demonstrate efficient pec hydrogen generation systems. finally, i will highlight our recent work on combining computations and experiments to show cos2 and cose2 as selective and efficient catalysts for two-electron oxygen reduction reaction (2e- orr) to produce h2o2. Biography: prof. song jin received his b.s. in chemistry from peking university in 1997, ph.d. in 2002 from cornell university under the direction of prof. francis j. disalvo and carried out his postdoctoral research under the direction of prof. charles m. lieber at harvard university. dr. jin is interested in the chemistry, physics and technological applications of nanoscale and solid-state materials. dr. jin developed innovative synthesis of a variety of nanomaterials including metal chalcogenides, silicides, and halide perovskites, and discovered and developed the screw dislocation-driven growth of nanomaterials. building on the fundamental understanding of novel physical properties, jin advances the exploitation of (nano)materials for electrocatalysis, solar energy conversion, energy storage, optoelectronics, nanospintronics, and biotechnology. a unifying theme of jin's energy research is the focus on earth-abundant materials. dr. jin has authored or co-authored over 220 publications and 8 patents. he has been recognized with a nsf career award, a research corporation cottrell scholar award and as one of world's top 35 innovators under the age of 35 (tr35 award) by the mit technology review magazine, the acs exxonmobil solid state chemistry fellowship, and the alfred p. sloan research fellowship, u. of wisconsin-madison vilas associate award and h. i. romnes faculty fellowship, and the acs inorganic nanoscience award. he also serves as a senior editor for acs energy letters.

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  1. MAR

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    Thursday

    CFN Virtual Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Prof. Andrea Cavalleri, Condensed Matter Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Germany

    11 am, Videoconference / Virtual Event

    Thursday, March 4, 2021, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Mingzhao Liu

    TBD

  2. APR

    1

    Thursday

    CFN Virtual Colloquium

    "Minimalist cell-free biosynthesis exploiting nanoparticle scaffolds and enzymatic channeling"

    Presented by Igor L. Medintz Ph.D, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering

    4 pm, Videoconference / Virtual Event

    Thursday, April 1, 2021, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Dr. Oleg Gang

    Amongst the suite of technologies being developed for synthetic biology, cell-free approaches are becoming ever more prominent as they offer many advantages to address confounding issues associated with cellular systems including especially toxicity and off-pathway affects. Making these systems as simple and efficient as possible will be key to their success. From a purely minimalist perspective, multistep biosynthetic systems (i.e. enzymatic cascades) only require enzymes, their cofactors, and the substrate, however, such approaches typically suffers from reaction diffusion limitations and long-term enzyme instability. We are attempting to address these latter issues in pursuit of efficient minimalist synthetic systems by using nanoparticles (NPs) to both stabilize the enzymes and allow them to form nanoclusters that access channeled catalysis. Using semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and the enzymes from saccharification and oxidative glycolysis as a prototypical system, we have developed methods that allow the enzymes to self-assemble with the QDs into catalytic nanoclusters. Within these systems, catalytic flux is improved by several orders of magnitude and detailed analysis along with numerical simulations show that this arises from both enzymatic stabilization and channeling phenomena. Incorporation of non-spherical QDs and optimization of relative enzymatic ratios (and catalytic rates) have also boosted efficiency dramatically. Examples of systems utilizing 10-14 enzymatic steps will be presented along with analysis of cluster formation and their channeling processes. The potential of this approach will be discussed in comparison to other scaffolded-type reconstituted enzymatic cascades including those assembled on DNA nanostructures along with how they can be further improved.