BNL Home
June 2016
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  1. CFN Colloquium

    11 am, CFN, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Hosted by: 'Dmitri Zakharov'

    An in-depth look at numerous methods to make graphene, ranging from single-crystal sheets that grown in precise hexagonal arrays to growth of graphene in air at room temperature using lasers, and 2- and 3-D hybrid graphene nanotube structures. Use of the graphene materials in composites will be discussed. Many of the devices made and their transitions to industry will be shown. These devices include fuel cells, water splitting systems, batteries, supercapacitors and more.

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  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN, Bldg 735 Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: '''Pawel Majewski'''

    My research is focused on rational design of materials for efficient electrocatalysis and electrochemical energy conversion and storage. In particular, I am interested in electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide, a potent greenhouse gas and a contributor to global warming. Given the fact that the CO2 molecule is very stable, its electroreduction processes are characterized by large overpotentials. To optimize the hydrogenation-type electrocatalytic approach, we have utilized nanostructured metallic centers (e.g. Pd, Pt or Ru) in a form of highly dispersed nanoparticles generated within a supramolecular network of distinct N-, S- or oxygen-coordination complexes. Another possibility to enhance electroreduction of carbon dioxide is to explore direct transformation of solar-to-chemical energy using transition metal oxide semiconductors. We showed that, by controlled combination of semiconducting oxides (TiO2 and Cu2O), we were able to drive photoelectrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide mostly to methanol. Application of mixed-metal oxides as active matrices is important in electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules in low-temperature fuel cells. The oxide's chemical properties and morphology, which favor hydrous proton mobility affect the overall reactivity during oxidation of ethanol (e.g. at PtRu). When metal nanoparticles were dispersed between WO3 and ZrO2 layers, significant current enhancements were observed. The result can be rationalized by the mechanism in which Rh induces splitting of C-C bonds in C2H5OH molecules before the actual electrooxidation. We also consider nanoelectrocatalytic systems permitting effective operation of the iodine-based dye sensitized solar cells. The ability of Pd or Pt nanostructures to induce splitting of I-I bonds in the triiodide molecules is explored here to enhance electron transfers in the triiodide/iodide-containing 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ionic liquids.

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  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    1:30 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: ''''Matthew Sfeir''''

    Traditional solid-state compounds are infinite crystalline arrays of densely packed atoms. The emergence of collective properties in structured clusters of atoms, which we term "superatoms", offers a new class of fundamental building blocks for assembling materials. The superatom concept has the potential to usher in a new era where materials are designed to have a specific function, rather than discovered by trial and error. To realize this concept, we are exploring the use of molecular clusters as superatomic building blocks, designing and synthesizing not only the molecular clusters but also the means by which they interact. In this presentation, I will show how the atomic control and the diversity afforded by our superatoms allows us to dictate the structure of the solids and control the interactions between the building blocks. I will discuss how collective properties emerge from these interactions by providing examples of magnetic phase transition, electrical transport and thermal energy transport.

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  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, CFN, Bldg 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Hosted by: 'Mingzhao Liu'

    Catalysis research is essential to addressing the energy and environmental challenges we face today. In this talk, I will present an overview of catalysis research being performed at National Energy Technology Laboratory. I will first discuss the utilization of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and plasmonic nanoparticles for photocatalysis applications. These heterostructured catalysts combine the interesting optical properties of QDs and plasmonic nanoparticles with the catalytically active metal oxides to drive photocatalytic reduction of CO2 under visible light illumination. Preliminary effort on the demonstration of a continuous flow plasmonic reactor will be described. A second class of electrocatalysts using atomically precise metal clusters for electrocatalytic CO2 reduction and oxygen evolution reaction will be presented. These catalysts not only display excellent catalytic activity but also facilitate joint experimental and computational studies. Finally, I will briefly discuss our recent effort on the synthesis of nanocatalyts for Fischer-Tropsch catalysis.

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  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    3 pm, CFN, Bldg. 735,Conf. Rm. A

    Hosted by: ''Qin Wu''

    Abstract Hybrid quantum mechanical molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations are widely used to investigate condensed-phase phenomena, such as chemical/enzymatic reactions, molecular solvation, ligand-receptor binding, and various photochemical/photobiological processes. In QM/MM calculations, the electronic structure of the QM region gets polarized by the MM environment (as represented by MM electrostatic potential). In order to understand such polarization effects, we will employ exact (and approximate) response kernels for the QM region, and show that this leads to more efficient QM/MM calculations as well as to a new theoretical framework for approaching polarizable force fields.

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  1. JUL

    17

    Sunday

    Summer Sunday

    "Exploring the Ultra Small: The Center for Functional Nanomaterials"

    10 am, Berkner Hall for Information

    Sunday, July 17, 2016, 10:00 am

    Tour the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, where Brookhaven scientists study structures as tiny as a billionth of a meter.