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February 2016
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  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    11 am, Conference Room A, Bldg. 735

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    The progress in colloidal synthesis allowed reaching a high degree of controls in synthesis of nanoparticles. As a result, nanoparticles come in many different shapes, sizes and compositions. Combining multiple components within individual nanoparticles or doping of nanoparticles are simple ways to control chemical and physical properties at nanoscale to obtain efficient catalysts and advanced energy conversion and storage systems. However the successful synthetic protocols are based on empirical rules based on numerous trials and errors and often the mechanism of nucleation and growth of nanoparticles remains unclear. I will present in situ study on the nucleation and growth kinetics and the temporal changes in the crystal structure of the metal dumbbell NPs (e.g. CoPt3/Au, Pt/Au and PtFe/Au). Using synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques we were able to catch the transient stages of structural and volumetric changes of NPs. We found that in the early stage of the reaction intermediate core/shell heterostructure is formed prior to dumbbells. The transition of the core/shell into the dumbbell occurs via strain relaxation of the pseudomorphic Au shell resulting in the nucleation of a strain-free Au domain. I will discuss the formation and doping process of iron and iron oxide NPs in real time by in situ synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In our study we revealed that the mass flow of the metal triggered by oxidation is responsible for the internalization of the dopant (molybdenum) adsorbed at the surface of the host iron NPs. The new oxidation induced doping mechanism allows control over the doping levels by varying the amount of dopant precursor. Our in situ studies also showed that the dopant precursor substantially changes the reaction kinetics of formation of iron and iron oxide NPs.

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  1. FEB

    18

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    11 am, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, February 18, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Dmytro Nykypanchuk

    The fabrication of nanofibers (diameter from 1- 100 nm) can be accomplished by using a variety of methods, including electro-spinning and a combination of chemical/mechanical processes, especially for cellulose, as a form of green sustainable resource material. Non-woven nanofiber mats have unique properties, such as interconnected pores, a very large surface-to-volume ratio, and a high capacity for surface modifications, making such scaffolds useful for fabrication of high throughput separation membranes. Directed water channels in the barrier layer are formed through the formation of interface between the cross-linked nanofibers and the polymer matrix, while the gap thickness (less than 1 nm) may be regulated by physical interactions or chemical bonding. In the present context, advances in electro-spinning and fundamental studies on cellulose microfibrils (or nanocelluloses) by means of synchrotron x-ray scattering have provided us with new insight to use the fibrous format with varying pore sizes for applications from micro-filtration via ultra-filtration to nano-filtration and reverse osmosis. We have taken advantage of unique breakthroughs in chemical modifications and physical scale-up transformations to drastically improve filtration membrane development with predesigned properties. This technology has led to a revolutionary design of highly permeable filtration membranes with significantly higher flux (or lower energy) than commercial membranes. Biography: Prof. Hsiao served as Chair of the Chemistry Department and held Vice President for Research and Chief Research Officer positions at Stony Brook. His research is focused on the development of new nanostructured polymers for energy, environmental and health applications. Recently, Hsiao and his research team have demonstrated a breakthrough technology using nanofibrous materials, such as natural cellulose nanofibers, for water purification. This technology has led to a

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  1. FEB

    18

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "Breakthrough water filtration membrane technology based on nanofibers"

    Presented by Ben Hsiao, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, Co-founding Director, Innovative Global Energy Solutions Center, Director, Center for Advanced Technology in Integrated Electric Energy Systems, Stony Brook University

    11 am, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, February 18, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Dmytro Nykypanchuk

    The fabrication of nanofibers (diameter from 1- 100 nm) can be accomplished by using a variety of methods, including electro-spinning and a combination of chemical/mechanical processes, especially for cellulose, as a form of green sustainable resource material. Non-woven nanofiber mats have unique properties, such as interconnected pores, a very large surface-to-volume ratio, and a high capacity for surface modifications, making such scaffolds useful for fabrication of high throughput separation membranes. Directed water channels in the barrier layer are formed through the formation of interface between the cross-linked nanofibers and the polymer matrix, while the gap thickness (less than 1 nm) may be regulated by physical interactions or chemical bonding. In the present context, advances in electro-spinning and fundamental studies on cellulose microfibrils (or nanocelluloses) by means of synchrotron x-ray scattering have provided us with new insight to use the fibrous format with varying pore sizes for applications from micro-filtration via ultra-filtration to nano-filtration and reverse osmosis. We have taken advantage of unique breakthroughs in chemical modifications and physical scale-up transformations to drastically improve filtration membrane development with predesigned properties. This technology has led to a revolutionary design of highly permeable filtration membranes with significantly higher flux (or lower energy) than commercial membranes. Biography: Prof. Hsiao served as Chair of the Chemistry Department and held Vice President for Research and Chief Research Officer positions at Stony Brook. His research is focused on the development of new nanostructured polymers for energy, environmental and health applications. Recently, Hsiao and his research team have demonstrated a breakthrough technology using nanofibrous materials, such as natural cellulose nanofibers, for water purification. This technology has led to a

  2. MAR

    11

    Friday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Michael Tsapatsis, University of Minnesota

    11 am, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Friday, March 11, 2016, 11:00 am

    Hosted by: Anibal Boscoboinik

    TBD

  3. APR

    7

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Matthew Sfeir, Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    11 am, Bldg 735, Seminar Room, 2nd Floor

    Thursday, April 7, 2016, 11:00 am

    TBD