BNL Home
March 2019
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

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  1. CFN Colloquium

    4 pm, Bldg 735, CFN, Seminar Room 2nd Floor

    Hosted by: Kevin Yager

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD), typically utilized for coating ultrathin conformal inorganic films for semiconductor device processing, is fundamentally enabled by the reaction specificity between vapor-phase organometallic precursors and chemical groups available on the substrate surface. The infiltration synthesis (IS), a recently developed ALD-derived method, expands the concept by driving precursors into the matrix of organic polymer substrates to form embedded inorganic molecules. This not only generates organic-inorganic hybrids with new materials functionalities but also provides non-conventional nanopatterning routes for inorganic nanostructures that can be directly integrated into electronic devices. In this talk, I will discuss our recent efforts of applying IS for developing organic-inorganic hybrids and semiconductor nanostructures with unique properties and enhanced device functionalities, such as hybrid nanopillars with the highest capacity to store/release elastic mechanical energy among engineering materials and wafer-scale-integrated, in-plane-aligned ZnO nanowire array phototransistors with ultrahigh UV sensitivity and usual superlinear photoconductivity. Also highlighted is the generation of metal oxide nanopatterns by combining IS with self-assembled block copolymer and lithographically patterned polymer templates, revealing important roles of selective interaction of organometallic precursors and chemical groups in the organic matrix on enabling IS. I will conclude the talk by briefly mentioning other potential applications of IS on improving energy and nanotechnologies, such as gas separation membranes, hybrid gravimetric vapor sensors, and next-generation lithography.

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11

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    3:30 pm, CFN Building 735 first floor conference room

    Hosted by: Qin Wu

    The use and development of novel materials are considered to be sufficiently important indicators of progress that labels such as the "Stone Age", "Bronze Age" and "Iron Age" are used to indicate progress in human development. However, through much of history, novel materials have been discovered either by accident or through a process of trial and error. Worldwide, efforts are now underway to replace this by a program of rational materials design. In this endeavor, considerable time and effort can be saved by developing "descriptors" that, though possibly approximate, are quick to compute. Using descriptors, one can rapidly identify candidate materials that are likely to possess a target property, saving time when compared to experiments or first principles calculations. I will briefly review the field, and present work in my group on formulating descriptors for the structure of self assembled monolayers, for catalytic activity, and for charge transfer. Shobhana Narasimhan is a theoretical physicist working in the area of computational nanoscience. Her group uses the techniques of quantum mechanical density functional theory to design novel nanomaterials. Shobhana grew up in Bombay, India, where she went to school and college. After obtaining a PhD in physics at Harvard University, she was a postdoc at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Fritz Haber Institute, Berlin, Germany. Since 1996 she has been on the faculty of the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore, India, where she has also been Chair of the Theoretical Sciences Unit and Dean of Academic Affairs. She has an active interest in women in science: she has conducted several workshops for women in physics, was a member of the Working Group on Women in Physics of IUPAP, and is currently a member of the Standing Committee on Women in Science of the Government of India. She has also taught physics in many developing coun

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  1. MAR

    20

    Wednesday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Wednesday, March 20, 2019, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    Functional materials with exciting novel properties are often disordered, posing challenges to structural characterization. The conventional laboratory X-ray powder diffraction breaks down when the material is nanocrystalline or amorphous. Atomic pair distribution function (PDF) calculated from synchrotron X-ray total scattering, on the other hand, is the tool of choice for studying local structure of disordered materials. In the beginning part of my talk, I will introduce PDF technique, and its applications on extracting structural details of emerging two-dimensional nanomaterials. Despite the ubiquitous importance of nanoparticles in the modern scientific and technological materials landscape, it is notoriously difficult to find an experimental answer to questions as simple as "do bonds get weaker or stronger in a nanocluster compared to the bulk", yet the answer to these questions is critical to understanding properties such as catalytic activity or optical response. I will present our recent work on examining size dependence of lattice dynamics of cadmium selenide quantum dot nanoparticles via high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (HERIX). Finally, I will summarize my research progress in applying synchrotron X-ray techniques in studying pharmaceutical soft materials [6-8] and conclude the talk with future plans.

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28

  1. MAR

    28

    Thursday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    10 am, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Thursday, March 28, 2019, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    Organic semiconductors have been studied extensively in recent decades due to their potential to reduce both the material and production costs of electronic devices. Materials developed for applications such as organic photovoltaics (OPVs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and organic field effect transistors (OFETs) often have similar chemical structures and functionality, and thus can be expected to share similar structure-property relationships. In this talk, I highlight a series of studies where I use and develop synchrotron X-ray techniques to elucidate the morphology of organic semiconducting materials in order to advance our understanding of how nanostructure impacts performance. In the first half of my talk, I will show how wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) can be used to monitor the crystal structure of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), in situ, during electrochemical doping. By simultaneously probing crystal structure and electrochemical performance, a clear picture of the electrochemical doping process in P3HT emerges. The results found for this model P3HT system have been shown to be consistent with several other studies of OFET devices, demonstrating the generalized nature of the doping process. The second half of my talk is focused on developing resonant soft X-ray reflectivity (RSoXR) as technique to probe the through-film structure of organic thin films. I begin by demonstrating how resonant-enhanced X-ray contrast can be utilized to detect phase segregation in thin films of small-molecule/polymer semiconductor blends, which enables their remarkable performance in OFET devices. Next, I discuss how polarized soft X-rays can enable the study of molecular orientation in thin films. Finally, using a small-molecule model system, I demonstrate how polarized-RSoXR can be used to depth-profile molecular orientation, even in amorphous single-component films. Although these studies are focused on organic electronic

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  1. MAR

    20

    Wednesday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "How do your materials work? —- Gaining insights into atomic structure and lattice dynamics of functional materials via synchrotron X-ray techniques"

    Presented by Chenyang Shi, AbbVie Inc

    10 am, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Wednesday, March 20, 2019, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    Functional materials with exciting novel properties are often disordered, posing challenges to structural characterization. The conventional laboratory X-ray powder diffraction breaks down when the material is nanocrystalline or amorphous. Atomic pair distribution function (PDF) calculated from synchrotron X-ray total scattering, on the other hand, is the tool of choice for studying local structure of disordered materials. In the beginning part of my talk, I will introduce PDF technique, and its applications on extracting structural details of emerging two-dimensional nanomaterials. Despite the ubiquitous importance of nanoparticles in the modern scientific and technological materials landscape, it is notoriously difficult to find an experimental answer to questions as simple as "do bonds get weaker or stronger in a nanocluster compared to the bulk", yet the answer to these questions is critical to understanding properties such as catalytic activity or optical response. I will present our recent work on examining size dependence of lattice dynamics of cadmium selenide quantum dot nanoparticles via high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering (HERIX). Finally, I will summarize my research progress in applying synchrotron X-ray techniques in studying pharmaceutical soft materials [6-8] and conclude the talk with future plans.

  2. MAR

    28

    Thursday

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Seminar

    "Exploring Structure-Property Relationships Using Synchrotron-Based X-ray Techniques: Organic Semiconductor Case Studies"

    Presented by Jacob Thelen, National Institute of Standards & Technology

    10 am, Bldg. 735, Conference Room A, 1st Floor

    Thursday, March 28, 2019, 10:00 am

    Hosted by: Oleg Gang

    Organic semiconductors have been studied extensively in recent decades due to their potential to reduce both the material and production costs of electronic devices. Materials developed for applications such as organic photovoltaics (OPVs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and organic field effect transistors (OFETs) often have similar chemical structures and functionality, and thus can be expected to share similar structure-property relationships. In this talk, I highlight a series of studies where I use and develop synchrotron X-ray techniques to elucidate the morphology of organic semiconducting materials in order to advance our understanding of how nanostructure impacts performance. In the first half of my talk, I will show how wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) can be used to monitor the crystal structure of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), in situ, during electrochemical doping. By simultaneously probing crystal structure and electrochemical performance, a clear picture of the electrochemical doping process in P3HT emerges. The results found for this model P3HT system have been shown to be consistent with several other studies of OFET devices, demonstrating the generalized nature of the doping process. The second half of my talk is focused on developing resonant soft X-ray reflectivity (RSoXR) as technique to probe the through-film structure of organic thin films. I begin by demonstrating how resonant-enhanced X-ray contrast can be utilized to detect phase segregation in thin films of small-molecule/polymer semiconductor blends, which enables their remarkable performance in OFET devices. Next, I discuss how polarized soft X-rays can enable the study of molecular orientation in thin films. Finally, using a small-molecule model system, I demonstrate how polarized-RSoXR can be used to depth-profile molecular orientation, even in amorphous single-component films. Although these studies are focused on organic electronic

  3. APR

    17

    Wednesday

    CFNS Workshop on Lattice Parton Distribution Functions

    8 am, Building 510, Room 2-38 CFNS Seminar Room

    Wednesday, April 17, 2019, 8:00 am

  4. APR

    18

    Thursday

    CFNS Workshop on Lattice Parton Distribution Functions

    8 am, Building 510, Room 2-38 CFNS Seminar Room

    Thursday, April 18, 2019, 8:00 am

  5. APR

    19

    Friday

    CFNS Workshop on Lattice Parton Distribution Functions

    8 am, Building 510, Room 2-38 CFNS Seminar Room

    Friday, April 19, 2019, 8:00 am

  6. APR

    26

    Friday

    CFN Special Colloquium

    "Magnet-free non-reciprocal and topological metamaterials"

    Presented by Andrea Alù, Photonics Initiative, Advanced Science Research Center, City University of New York

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor Seminar Room

    Friday, April 26, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Donald DiMarzio

    In this talk, I discuss our recent research activity in electromagnetics, nano-optics, quantum optics, acoustics and mechanics, showing how suitably tailored meta-atoms and suitable arrangements of them open exciting venues to realize non-reciprocal devices for light, radio-waves and sound, largely breaking Lorentz reciprocity and realize isolation without the need of magnetic bias. Our approaches are based on using suitably tailored mechanical motion, spatio-temporal modulation, and large nonlinearities in coupled resonator systems, and have enabled magnetic-free circulators and isolators for sound, microwaves, THz and optical frequencies, non-reciprocal antennas, emitters and absorbers breaking Kirchhoff's law, self-induced isolation for high-intensities triggered by nonlinearities, and a new generation of topological insulators for light, sound, and static systems in mechanics. In the talk, I will also discuss the impact of these concepts from basic science to practical technology from classical light to quantum optics and computing. Andrea Alù is the Founding Director and Einstein Professor at the Photonics Initiative, CUNY Advanced Science Research Center. He received his Laurea (2001) and PhD (2007) from the University of Roma Tre, Italy, and, after a postdoc at the University of Pennsylvania, he joined the faculty of the University of Texas at Austin in 2009, where he was the Temple Foundation Endowed Professor until Jan. 2018. Dr. Alù is a Fellow of IEEE, OSA, SPIE and APS, and has received several scientific awards, including the ICO Prize in Optics (2016), the NSF Alan T. Waterman award (2015), the OSA Adolph Lomb Medal (2013), and the URSI Issac Koga Gold Medal (2011).

  7. MAY

    2

    Thursday

    CFNS Seminar

    "TBA"

    Presented by Ulf Meissner, University of Bonn

    4 pm, Building 510, 2-38 CFNS Seminar Room

    Thursday, May 2, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Andrey Tarasov

  8. JUN

    6

    Thursday

    CFN Colloquium

    "TBD"

    Presented by Caroline Ross, MIT

    4 pm, CFN, Bldg 735, 2nd Floor, Seminar Room

    Thursday, June 6, 2019, 4:00 pm

    Hosted by: Chang-Yong Nam